Departmental Results Report

For the period ending
March 31, 2019

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

ISSN 2561-1984

Table of contents

Minister’s message

As the new Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, I am pleased to present the Departmental Results Report for 2018–2019.

Immigration is an important part of Canada’s history and identity, and continues to contribute to our economic prosperity. Canada’s immigration system is recognized globally for its innovative selection tools and support for integrating newcomers. Our approach ensures the economic, social, and cultural benefits of immigration are enjoyed by communities across the country, while continuing to protect the health and safety of Canadians.

An important feature of Canada’s immigration system is our multi-year immigration levels plan and in 2019, we released the government’s second multi-year plan, covering 2019 to 2021. Multi-year planning allows us to take a measured approach to increasing the number of permanent resident admissions. This means that we can responsibly and incrementally increase Canada’s workforce, reunite family members and continue our country’s strong tradition in welcoming those in need of protection, all while investing in Canada’s future prosperity.

The successful settlement and integration of newcomers is another important goal of Canada’s immigration system and in 2018–2019, we launched an annual Newcomer Survey in order to gather information and feedback directly from more than 50,000 newcomers. This information will provide our government with a clearer understanding of how settlement services currently benefit newcomers to Canada and how best to tailor these services in the future. In 2019, we also introduced Canada’s Francophone Immigration Strategy aimed at supporting the integration and retention of French-speaking newcomers settling outside of Quebec. By engaging with Francophone communities across the country, we are working to improve their capacity to welcome French-speaking newcomers and to facilitate their integration.

Canada continues to be a safe haven for the world’s most vulnerable people. In 2018, we formally resettled more refugees than any other country, with a focus on helping vulnerable women and children. This humanitarian support demonstrates to the world that we have a shared responsibility to help those who are displaced, persecuted and most in need of protection.

Irregular migration and keeping our borders secure have also been significant priorities in recent years and will continue to be so. In March 2019, the government announced $1.18 billion over five years, and $55 million ongoing, to enhance the integrity of Canada’s borders and to increase the capacity of the asylum system. In addition to this funding, up to $474 million has been set aside to provide financial support to affected provinces and municipalities for interim housing costs incurred. Through collaboration with provinces and other federal departments, we continue to work to protect the most vulnerable while maintaining the integrity of our borders.

Canada continued to be a destination of choice for temporary residents over the past year. In 2018, Canada issued nearly 1.9 million temporary resident visas and over 4 million electronic Travel Authorizations, surpassing figures for the previous year. Interest in working in Canada temporarily continued to grow, with nearly 339,000 temporary workers admitted to Canada. We also welcomed over 356,000 international students in 2018, roughly 40,000 more than in 2017, and we continued to improve the way we manage study permit applications. In addition, more partner countries joined International Experience Canada, which supports work and travel opportunities for young people across the globe and for Canadians to gain international exposure through work and travel.

Canada’s economic prosperity and rich cultural diversity is due in large part to the contributions of immigrants. By growing the Canadian population and labour force, immigration plays an integral part in building a strong economy and ensuring that Canada remains globally competitive.

As the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, I am proud of this department’s role in contributing to Canada’s prosperity. I invite you to read about the outcomes that we achieved over the past year.

_____________________________________

The Honourable Marco E.L. Mendicino, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship

Results at a glance

1. Strengthening Canada’s economy and diversity through permanent resident admissions

Numbers at a glance

  • In 2018, a total of 6,024,233 visas and electronic travel authorizations were issued to visitors, international students and temporary workers, an increase of 5.2% from 2017.
  • 321,035 permanent residents were admitted to Canada in 2018, an increase of 12.1% from 2017 and the highest level in recent history.
  • Temporary and permanent immigration, settlement, citizenship and passport programming results were achieved in 2018-2019 with the support of $2,403,858,757 in funding and 7,414 full-time equivalents.

In 2018-2019, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) released a new multi-year plan for 2019-2021, responsibly increasing permanent resident admission levels. The majority of these increases are devoted to economic immigrants, contributing to Canada’s economic growth and encouraging innovation domestically. The plan also increases levels under the Family Class and the number of protected persons and refugee settlement spaces, providing more opportunities for families to be reunited and recognizing Canada’s humanitarian leadershipFootnote 1. In addition, IRCC continued to deliver high-quality pre-arrival, settlement and resettlement services for newcomers. These included pre-arrival services to French-speaking newcomers and adapted settlement services for visible minority newcomer women. Lastly, the Department emphasized improvements to service delivery based on documented outcomes.

2. Addressing labour market needs of smaller communities

In the past fiscal year, IRCC built on the success of targeted and innovative programming. For example, the Department launched the Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot with a focus on spreading economic immigration benefits to smaller communities across Canada. This pilot complements existing economic initiatives such as the Atlantic Immigration Pilot in targeting immigration to underserved regions of the country to fill labour market gaps and encourage the retention of newcomers in these regions. Furthermore, in March 2019, IRCC expanded pathways to permanent residency for workers already in Canada under temporary permits and who have intermediate skill levels, by allocating an additional 2,000 nominations under the Provincial Nominee Program.

3. Facilitating temporary resident admissions to Canada

The Department continued to facilitate temporary admission to Canada by visitors, business travellers, international students and temporary foreign workers throughout 2018-2019, while ensuring the safety and security of Canadians. For example, IRCC expanded its biometrics program, which facilitates the entry of legitimate travellers, and formalized the Student Direct Stream to expedite study permit processing for certain applicants. The Department also strengthened Canada’s temporary foreign worker programs by reinforcing temporary worker protection and signed new agreements with partner countries to encourage international work and travel experience for young adults through the International Experience Canada program.

4. Managing asylum claims and irregular migration

In 2018-2019, IRCC continued to respect Canada’s international legal obligations to people fleeing persecution. Recognizing the challenges posed by the large number of regular and irregular migrants, IRCC invested to ensure security at the border and speed up processing of asylum claims. In Budget 2019, the government announced $1.18 billion over five years, and $55 million ongoing, to enhance the integrity of Canada’s borders and to temporarily increase the capacity of the asylum system. The Department also worked with national and international partners to discourage irregular migration, notably by reinforcing mutual cooperation with the United States on border issues.

For more information on the Department’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core Responsibilities

Core Responsibility 1: Visitors, International Students and Temporary Workers

Description

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) facilitates the entry of migrants who wish to come to Canada temporarily, while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians. The Department works with partners to verify that individuals meet admissibility requirements. IRCC processes visas, electronic travel authorizations, and work and study permits for tourists, business travellers, international students and temporary workers, whose spending and presence in Canada benefit the economy.

Results

Departmental Result 1: Entry to Canada of eligible visitors, international students and temporary workers is facilitated

International students, workers and visitors enrich Canada’s cultural and social life and support Canada’s economic well-being in many ways. IRCC plays a central role in managing this flow of people to Canada by facilitating the timely entry of genuine visitors while ensuring that those who pose potential threats to Canada do not gain entry.

In 2018, temporary resident visas (TRV) issued to visitors reached 1,898,324, a 71.5% increase over volumes attained in 2014. This unprecedented growth is likely due to a number of factors, including Canada’s reputation as a safe and stable country with natural attractions, world-class cities and a diverse economy. In addition, efforts to promote tourism overseas, proximity to the United States and an expanding global middle class mean that more and more visitors want to come to Canada each year.

The number of electronic travel authorizations (eTAs) issued to visitors reached 4,125,909 in 2018, a 0.4% increase since 2017. While this represents a lower percentage increase than in previous years, it is plausible that the number of eTA applications stabilized in 2018 due to the eTA program entering its second year of mandatory enforcement.

The Department continues to face the challenges presented by increasing volumes in the processing of eTAs and visas for temporary residents. In 2018, eTAs and visas issued to visitors, international students and temporary workers reached 6,024,233, a 5.2% increase from 2017. To address high volumes, Budget 2019 included an investment of $78.6 million over two years to ensure that resources are in place to process the high demand for Canadian visitor visas, work and study permits.

IRCC continued to implement strategies that have proven effective in managing application volumes, such as expanding the use of biometrics and visa application centres (VAC). At the same time, the Department recognizes that it needs to explore new ways of doing business, and therefore began experimenting with the use of data analytics and other methods aimed at streamlining low-risk applications.

Facilitating the entry of travellers and international students

Increased number of temporary admissions to Canada in 2018

  • Canada issued 1,898,324 TRVs and 4,125,909 eTAs to visitors, reflecting a 17% increase for TRVs and less than 1% increase for eTAs from 2017;
  • Canada welcomed 356,876 international student study permit holders, representing an increase from 316,376 in 2017;
  • 338,769 temporary work permit holders entered Canada, up from 301,421 in 2017.

In order to facilitate the entry of temporary residents, the Department has opened 26 new VACs in Asia-Pacific, the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Canada has one of the most extensive VAC networks in the world, with 160 VACs in 108 countries.

In 2018, the Department also formalized the Student Direct Stream (SDS), an expedited study permit processing stream open to applicants living in India, China, the Philippines and VietnamFootnote 2. The program is open to legal residents from these countries applying for a study permit, destined to a post-secondary designated learning institution, and who provide upfront proof they meet specific language, medical and financial requirements. Eligible applicants benefit from processing within 20 days, rather than the standard 60 days for study permits processed through the regular study permit application process.

The Department also advanced program integrity for the study permit issuance process through a centralized verification project for letters of acceptance issued to students by educational institutions. This has contributed to more timely and efficient verification of acceptance letters. To date, the project has yielded valuable data for trends analysis and business intelligence that helps study permit officers better understand the risks related to processing and approving study permits.

In the past fiscal year, traveller convenience was also enhanced by providing two new online payment options for travellers and international students from Asia who apply for a Canadian temporary resident visa.

Expanding the biometrics program

In 2018-2019, IRCC expanded its biometrics program to better facilitate immigration and border services by preventing individuals who pose a risk to the safety and security of Canadians from entering Canada. The program helps officials verify travellers’ identities, improves processing efficiency by establishing a confirmed travel history both to Canada and to our Migration Five partner countries, and simplifies entry for legitimate travellers by allowing their identity to be rapidly established and confirmedFootnote 3.

Reducing threats to Canadian safety and security

Last year, IRCC launched two pilot projects using computer analytics to help officers triage online TRV applications from China and India. The goal of the pilot projects is to identify applications that are routine and straightforward by analyzing data and recognizing patterns in applications; complex files are triaged for a more thorough review. With a significant volume of routine cases facilitated by computer analytics, officers now have more time to scrutinize complex applications and better detect fraud and security threats that may present risks to Canadian safety and security. The pilots’ expected results are to facilitate the reduction of application processing times, which improves service and supports Canada’s tourism industry; and to enhance system efficiency, which contributes to the efficient use of public funds.

Results achieved

Departmental result: Entry to Canada of eligible visitors, international students and temporary workers is facilitated
Departmental Result Indicators TargetsFootnote 4 Date to achieve targetsFootnote 5 Actual results
1. Total number of visas and electronic travel authorizations issued to visitors, international students and temporary workers ≥ 6 million End of each Calendar year (CY) 2016: 3,952,975
2017: 5,727,140
2018: 6,024,233
2. Percentage of visitor, international student and temporary worker applicants found inadmissible on health grounds and those who are authorized to enter with a condition on their visa related to health surveillance ≤ 3% End of each CY 2016: 1.3%
2017: 1.6%
2018: 1.7%
3. Percentage of visitor, international student and temporary worker applicants found inadmissible on safety and security groundsFootnote 6 ≤ 0.06% End of each CY 2016: 0.05%
2017: 0.04%
2018: 0.03%
4. Percentage of temporary resident business lines that adhere to service standardsFootnote 7 100% End of each Fiscal Year (FY) 2016-17: 89%
2017-18: 80%
2018-19: 78%
5. Percentage of visitor, international student and temporary worker applicants who report they were satisfied overall with the services they received ≥ 90% End of each FY 2016-17: 86%
2017-18: 83%
2018-19: 91%

Performance indicator analysis

Indicator 1: The number of visas and eTAs issued to eligible visitors, international students and temporary workers has continued to increase on an annual basis. In 2018, the number of visas, and eTAs issued to visitors, international students and temporary workers rose to 6,024,233, a 5.2% increase from the previous year. Overall, this was in line with the expected volume of 6 million or more.

Indicator 2: Even with the increase in overall immigration levels, the percentage of applicants found inadmissible on health grounds or authorized to enter with a health surveillance-related condition remained consistent with previous years’ results.

Indicator 3: The percentage of visitor, international student and temporary worker applicants found inadmissible on safety and security grounds has remained consistently low, decreasing to 0.03% in 2018. This decrease could be due to a variety of reasons including global circumstances outside of the Department’s control. Over the last several years, IRCC has implemented measures to strengthen program integrity including enhancing integrity risk management controls, thereby supporting officers in detecting inadmissibility on safety and security grounds.

Indicator 4: In the past fiscal year, the Department met targeted service standards for seven out of nine (78%) temporary resident business lines. Service standards were not met for temporary resident visas and for work permit applications for International Experience Canada (IEC), which were processed slightly below the 100% target (94%)Footnote 8. The Department continues to implement and explore measures to respond to higher volumes, improve services and maintain processing times.

In 2017-2018, the result for this indicator was 80%, based on 8 out of 10 business lines. In 2018-2019, work permit applications under the Live-in Caregiver program (submitted outside of Canada) were removed from measuring this indicator because that line of business is no longer offered by the Department.

Indicator 5: In the past fiscal year, 91% of visitor, international student and temporary worker applicants reported that they were satisfied overall with the services they received. This represents an increase from the 83% reported in 2017-2018 and exceeds the target. The increase may be attributable in part to the influence of the eTA program, which was introduced in late 2016 and now accounts for half of temporary resident applications.

Results

Departmental Result 2: Facilitation of temporary entry helps to generate economic benefits

Temporary migration contributes to Canada’s economic prosperity. In 2016, the total monetary contribution of visitors and international students to Canada’s economy was $31.8 billion.

Another significant class of temporary entrants are the temporary workers who come to Canada to address labour market shortages, filling positions for which Canadian workers are unavailable. Since its launch in 2017, Canada’s Global Skills Strategy (GSS) has provided Canadian employers with fast and reliable access to nearly 17,000 highly skilled workers to fill critical positions, helping 1,100 Canadian companies grow and creating 60,000 new jobs in the process. Overall, 338,769 temporary work permit holders entered Canada in 2018.

Encouraging international experience for young adults

The IEC program contributes to the Canadian economy with the issuance of work permits for youth. Through the program, each year roughly 20,000 Canadian youth aged 18 to 35 take advantage of work and travel experiences provided by youth mobility arrangements between Canada and more than 30 partner countries. These work permit holders often work in regions with low unemployment rates and in jobs that are temporary, shorter in duration and sometimes hard for Canadian employers to fill.

In 2018-2019, IRCC signed a new agreement with Portugal and amended an existing agreement with Australia to increase the eligible upper age limit from 30 to 35.

Participants spend money in Canada and contribute to tourism, either as former participants come back to Canada to visit, or families and friends come to visit Canada. In addition, people-to-people ties and bilateral relations are created, which can lead to economic spin-offs by building trade and economic bridges in the future.

Findings from the recently completed Evaluation of the IEC Program demonstrated that many of the participants find the program to be valuable to both their personal and professional lives.

Giving Canadian employers access to top talent

Access to highly skilled talent continues to be important for Canadian firms to grow and remain competitive. Launched in 2017, the GSS gives Canadian employers fast and reliable access to top talent from around the world, by quickly issuing work permits in just two weeks. After two years, 21,000 people have come to Canada under the strategy, including nearly 17,000 highly skilled workers.

Promoting temporary foreign worker protection

In order for temporary workers to contribute their skills to the Canadian economy, they need to know that their rights will be protected and that their workplaces will be respectful. In 2018-2019, IRCC strengthened Canada’s temporary foreign worker programs by reinforcing temporary worker protection.

Last year, $194.1 million in new funding was committed over five years, and $33 million ongoing, to ensure the continued protection and enforcement of temporary foreign worker rights. Funding will enhance employer compliance regimes by increasing the number of onsite inspections and providing a workplace that is free of abuse.

The Department also committed to implementing a risk-based inspection model, whereby risk factors would inform how employers are selected for inspections. In addition, the Department worked toward the creation of open work permits for vulnerable workers for those who have employer-specific permits and find themselves in abusive job situations in Canada or are at risk of experiencing abuse. As of June 4, 2019, workers are now able to apply for an open work permit which will help them leave their employer, find another job and maintain their status.

Results achieved

Departmental result: Facilitation of temporary entry helps to generate economic benefits
Departmental Result Indicators Targets Date to achieve targets Actual results
1. Total monetary contribution of visitors and international students to Canada’s economy ≥ $31 billion End of each CY 2016: $31.8 billion (2016)
2017: $31.8 billion (2016)
2018: $31.8 billion (2016)
2. Number of temporary workers who fill labour market needs for which Canadians are unavailable 70,000 - 85,000Footnote 9 End of each CY 2016: 78,425
2017: 78,661
2018: 84,229

Performance indicator analysis

Indicator 1: Due to a change in methodology and the availability of data provided by Global Affairs Canada and Statistics Canada, the next reported result will be available only in the 2019-2020 Departmental Results Report. In 2016, international students and visitors injected $31.8 billion to Canada’s economy. The amount added by international students generated significant revenue, innovation and growth in the education sector.

Indicator 2: In 2018, the total number of work permits issued under the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) was 84,229. This increase from previous years reflects the increase in labour market needs for which Canadians are unavailable.

Visitors, International Students and Temporary Workers

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned spending
2018-19
Total authorities
available for use
2018-19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018-19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned
spending)
179,940,020 179,940,020 239,371,328 211,390,880 31,450,860
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018-19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time
equivalents)
1,210 1,438 228

Spending for this core responsibility is used to facilitate the entry of migrants who wish to come to Canada temporarily, while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians.

To do this, IRCC works with federal government partners to verify that applicants meet admissibility requirements. The Department also processes visas, eTAs, work and study permits for tourists, business travellers, international students and temporary workers, whose spending and presence in Canada benefit the economy.

The difference between planned and actual spending is mainly due to funding received for the protection of temporary foreign workers under the TFWP and the International Mobility Program to ensure employer compliance regimes as well as reallocation of resources to the temporary resident program to address increased application volumes.

These additional resources were not included at the planning stage as financial authorities were granted and made available to the Department through Budget 2018 during fiscal year 2018-2019.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Core Responsibility 2: Immigrant and Refugee Selection and Integration

Description

IRCC facilitates the admission and economic and social integration of immigrants and refugees who intend to stay in Canada permanently, while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians. The Department selects economic immigrant applicants to contribute to the Canadian economy, processes family member applicants to reunite families, and processes refugee and protected person applicants to provide a safe haven for those facing persecution. IRCC works with partners to verify that individuals meet admissibility requirements before they enter Canada. In order to support immigrants and refugees in integrating into Canadian society, IRCC offers a variety of settlement support services through a network of service providers.

Results

Departmental Result 3: Potential permanent residents are selected for immigration to Canada

Canada’s ability to balance demographic and economic objectives with family and humanitarian migration is recognized as a global model by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). IRCC’s immigration policy aims to select permanent residents who meet the economic and social needs of Canadian communities while remaining committed to Canada’s international humanitarian commitments.

IRCC achieves this balance through effective planning and responsive policies. Contributing to the success of Canada’s migration system, multi-year levels planning, first established in the 2018-2019 Levels Plan, enables IRCC, its federal and provincial and territorial partners, and stakeholders such as settlement service providers, to better plan.

In 2018, a total of 321,035 permanent residents were admitted to Canada, exceeding the admission target of 310,000 while remaining within the planned range. Of this number, approximately 186,000 (58%) were economic permanent residents, and approximately 49,000 (15.4%) were refugees and protected persons. Also in 2018-2019, initiatives such as the Francophone Immigration Strategy, and Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot (RNIP) were put in place to meet regional economic needs, complementing other initiatives such as the Atlantic Immigration Pilot (AIP). Since the AIP’s launch in March 2017, over 2,535 approved permanent residents have been destined for or have already arrived in the Atlantic Canada region.

Increasing immigration levels in the future

In November 2018, IRCC released the multi-year immigration levels plan for 2019-2021, increasing the number of potential permanent residents selected to immigrate to Canada. The 2019-2021 Levels Plan announced targets of 330,800 new permanent residents for 2019, 341,000 for 2020 and 350,000 for 2021. It includes slight adjustments to previously announced targets for 2019 and 2020 and a new third year (2021).

In recognizing Canada’s humanitarian leadership, the plan increased the number of protected persons and refugee resettlement spaces, including additional admissions to meet Canada’s commitment to resettle an additional 1,000 vulnerable women and girls over two years.

Permanent immigration to Canada contributes to economic growth and encourages innovation. Under this plan, Canada will welcome more talented workers with the skills and expertise our economy needs, reunite more family members and accommodate more refugees looking to start new lives. In addition, multi-year levels planning is contributing to the success of Canada’s immigration program by enabling the Department, its federal and provincial and territorial partners, and other key partners such as settlement service providers, to better plan for projected permanent resident admissions.

Exceeding the 2018 immigration levels target

With 321,035 admissions in 2018, IRCC remained within the planned range of 290,000 to 330,000 admissions.

Furthermore, 186,352 permanent economic class residents were also admitted to Canada, representing 58% of all permanent resident admissions, in comparison with 55.6% in 2017. The majority of the increase is attributed to economic immigrants through federal economic programming and the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP). With 62,427 admissions under the PNP in 2018, which is the highest number of admissions under this program, IRCC continues to share the benefits of immigration across all regions of Canada by filling regional labour market needs.

Reuniting families

In 2018, a total of 85,179 individuals were admitted to Canada as Family Class immigrants. This number is within the planned range of 81,000 to 89,000 individuals and represents an increase of 3.3% from 2017.

In 2018, Canada increased the annual cap on applications for parents and grandparents to 17,000, up from 10,000 in 2017. Moreover, Canada further increased the annual cap on applications in 2019 to 20,000, representing four times the number of applications accepted in 2015. Increased immigration levels under the Family Class allow more families to be reunited. Family reunification plays an essential role in attracting, retaining and integrating newcomers so that they are able to build successful lives in Canada and contribute to the economic, social and cultural prosperity of all Canadians.

Last year, 45,758 resettled refugees and protected persons were admitted to Canada. While this number exceeded the target of 43,000, it remained within the planned range of 36,500 to 48,000 admissions. In addition, IRCC continues efforts to resettle 10,000 refugees from the Middle East and 10,000 from Africa over three years as part of the multi-year regional government-supported refugee commitment. The Department is also on track to meet Canada’s commitment to resettle an additional 1,000 vulnerable women and girls by the end of 2019.

In response to the high level of interest and demand in the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program, and to reduce inventories and processing times, considerable levels space has been added in recent years for the private sponsorship of refugees, which, in addition to operational improvements, has resulted in a significant reduction of processing times. Processing times decreased from over four years (80% of applications were processed within this period) in 2014 to approximately two years in 2018.

Managing higher asylum claim volumes and irregular migration

The Department continues to ensure Canada meets its international legal obligations to people fleeing persecution and to receive asylum claimants respectfully and humanely.

With the growth of global migration in 2018, Canada received over 55,000 asylum claims from migrants entering at official ports of entry and those crossing between official ports of entry at the land border (irregular migrants). This represented a 9% increase from 2017. Of the total claims, approximately 35% were made by irregular migrants, the number of claims by irregular migrants being similar to levels in 2017.

IRCC recognizes the challenges posed by these volumes, and continues to work with asylum delivery organizations to address the situation. To this end, in Budget 2018, the government invested $173.2 million over two years toward managing irregular migration by ensuring security at the border, and faster processing of asylum claims. Subsequently, in March 2019, the government announced $1.18 billion over five years, and $55 million ongoing, to enhance the integrity of Canada’s borders and to temporarily increase the capacity of the asylum system. These investments will build on the work already done to manage Canada’s borders and improve the efficiency of Canada’s asylum system, without compromising its fairness or its compassion.

The government also recognizes that interim housing pressures are being felt in a number of provincial and municipal jurisdictions as a result of increased asylum claims. Therefore up to $474 million has been set aside to provide financial support to affected provinces and municipalities for interim housing costs incurred.

IRCC continues to work with international and domestic partners to manage and discourage irregular migration as well as accelerate the processing of asylum claims, provide timely protection to refugees and remove failed claimants.

Improving the productivity and efficiency of Canada’s asylum system

In June 2018, IRCC published the Report of the Independent Review of the Immigration and Refugee Board: A Systems Management Approach to Asylum. This report assessed and provided recommendations to improve the productivity and efficiency of asylum decision making at the Refugee Protection Division of the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB) as well as across the asylum system overall.

Taken together, the report’s recommendations underscored that the organizations involved in delivering the asylum system needed to better coordinate their activities. Improvements were recommended across the entire asylum process. One key recommendation was to establish a systems management approach for the asylum system to improve overall coordination between partner organizations. The report also recommended significant transformations with respect to planning and budgeting, how activities were reported, how technology was leveraged, and how cases move through the asylum continuum. Additionally, there was recognition that the capacity of the organizations delivering the asylum system needed to be increased.

Since the report’s release, IRCC and the other federal organizations responsible for delivering the asylum system have introduced measures that are in line with the report’s recommendations. This includes the creation of a deputy-head-level Asylum System Management Board, and the piloting of an Integrated Claim Analysis Centre to eliminate duplication and prepare cases for hearings at the IRB more quickly.

Protecting new immigrants and applicants

Individuals seeking to immigrate to Canada or become citizens often rely on the advice and expertise of immigration consultants to help them navigate immigration processes. However, these individuals can be the victims of fraudulent or unethical consultants. Budget 2019 announced $51.9 million over five years, starting in 2019-2020, and $10.1 million per year ongoing to help protect new immigrants and applicants wishing to obtain services from legitimate service providers. Funding will improve oversight of immigration consultants (including through new legislation), strengthen compliance and enforcement measures and support public awareness activities. In addition, the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants Act was introduced as part of the 2019 Budget Implementation Act, which received Royal Assent in June 2019. The legislation proposes the establishment of the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants, which will serve as a statutory self-regulatory body for consultants across the country. The work of the College will be coupled with strong government oversight. Ultimately, the new legislation and Budget 2019 measures will help to ensure that applicants have access to quality immigration and citizenship advice and that they are better protected from unethical consultants. It will also help to maintain the integrity of Canada’s immigration system.

Adjusting policies and increasing awareness

Support for LGBTQ2 refugees

IRCC provides funding to 10 service provider organizations that offer support for LGBTQ2 refugees. For example, the Positive Spaces Initiative has produced several tools and resources that have formed the basis of training sessions conducted among settlement service agencies.

In the last fiscal year, the Government of Canada adjusted the policies on the selection and sponsorship of newcomers. For example, IRCC updated the Medical Inadmissibility Policy of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act to ensure that our immigration policies better align with Canadian values and reflect the importance that Canada places on the inclusion of persons with disabilities. The changes include removing references to special education, social and vocational rehabilitation services and personal support services. Under the newly updated policy, fewer applicants with disabilities will be deemed inadmissible on health grounds. Also, IRCC announced that the Government of Canada has renewed the cost-sharing agreement with the Rainbow Refugee Society until March 2020. This agreement is aimed at increasing awareness of the unique needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and two-spirit (LGBTQ2) refugees among Canadian sponsors and at strengthening overall sponsorship of this vulnerable group. Additional funding of $100,000 was also made available to support refugees sponsored under this initiative.

Strengthening the vitality of Canada through Francophone immigration

In 2018-2019, IRCC introduced additional efforts to better support Francophone immigration outside of Quebec. For example, IRCC announced the creation of a new Francophone Immigration Policy Hub, supported by the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023: Investing in Our Future, to ensure a more coordinated approach to Francophone immigration policy development. The Meeting Our Objectives: Francophone Immigration Strategy was also announced and lays out a plan to achieve a target of 4.4% of French-speaking immigrants outside Quebec by 2023. It will support the successful integration and retention of French-speaking newcomers and strengthen the capacity of Francophone communities.

This strategy includes a broad range of initiatives, such as: a targeted expansion of promotion and recruitment support in Canada and abroad; ongoing collaboration with provinces and territories to advance the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Action Plan for Increasing Francophone Immigration Outside of Quebec; strengthening the Francophone Integration Pathway; and, the implementation of a new measure to count French-speaking immigrants, developed in consultation with Francophone minority communities.

Furthermore, the government began accepting the results of a second French language test to increase the accessibility and affordability of French language testing in Canada for potential economic immigrants. Since the Department began accepting this test, there has been an increase in the number of French-language testing locations available in Canada and the cost of French language testing in Canada has decreased.

Addressing common challenges through international cooperation

In the last fiscal year, IRCC continued to collaborate with international partners to promote the global expansion of regular migration pathways and resettlement spaces, put in place measures to deter irregular migration, build cooperation with source countries on removals, and share Canada’s experience on settlement and integration.

IRCC advanced existing bilateral relationships with key countries. Canada has engaged with counterparts in the U.S. to discuss how to enhance cooperation for effective border management and deter irregular migration, and has advanced key files and strengthened collaboration in this regard. As well, IRCC actively engaged with Mexico at the High Level Dialogues on Mobility with Central American countries.

In continued support of the United Nations (UN) General Assembly New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, in December 2018 Canada adopted the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration and the Global Compact on Refugees. The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration is the first global framework to address all dimensions of international migration, while the Global Compact on Refugees calls for improved responses to refugee situations and more predictable support to hosting communities. Both compacts seek to harness the positive contribution of migrants and refugees, bolster and create regular migration pathways, and address challenges faced by states and people on the move.

International migration

  • The number of international migrants worldwide was estimated at 258 million in 2017 - 49% higher than in 2000.
  • International migrants represent 3.3% of the world’s total population.
  • An unprecedented 68.5 million people are forcibly displaced, having fled their homes due to violence, discrimination and war.

IRCC continued to advance Canadian priorities at multilateral fora where Canada demonstrated leadership on migration and refugee issues. IRCC actively engaged with the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the Five Country Ministerial, the Migration Five, the Regional Conference on Migration, the Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees, the United Nations Refugee Agency and the Global Forum on Migration and Development. Engagement with these organizations has allowed Canada to promote the benefits of safe, orderly and regular migration, advance refugee protection, share information with like-minded partners on border management, and invest in innovation and capacity building. Notably, IRCC continued Canada’s leadership role in the Global Refugee Sponsorship Initiative by assisting other countries to open new pathways for refugee protection. In 2018-2019, Germany, Spain and Ireland launched their own community refugee sponsorship pilot programs.

In fiscal year 2018-2019, the Department invested close to $2.5 million for the assessed contribution to the IOM and for memberships to other international organizations. Also, under the Migration Policy Development Program, IRCC invested approximately $700,000 in international capacity building projects to advance Canadian global and domestic priorities by supporting the development of well-managed migration systems internationally. Projects included research, conferences, information sessions, training and technical capacity building. They addressed a variety of priority issues such as deterring irregular migration, encouraging safe, orderly and regular migration pathways, expanding complementary pathways, measuring social inclusion, developing regulation for labour recruiters, and transmitting knowledge on women’s decision making in the migration process.

Results achieved

Departmental result: Potential permanent residents are selected for immigration to Canada
Departmental Result Indicators Targets Date to achieve targets Actual results
1. Total number of permanent resident admissions, against the annual immigration levels plan 290,000 - 330,000 End of each CY 2016: 296,346
2017: 286,489
2018: 321,035
2. Percentage of permanent residents admitted to Canada, outside Quebec, who identify as French-speakingFootnote 10 ≥ 4.4% by 2023 End of CY 2023 2016: 1.61%
2017: 1.77%
2018: 1.83%
3. Percentage of permanent resident applicants found inadmissible on health grounds and those who are permitted admission with a condition on their visa related to health surveillance ≤ 3%Footnote 11 End of each CY 2016: 2.2%
2017: 2.2%
2018: 2.1%
4. Percentage of permanent resident applicants found inadmissible on safety and security grounds ≤ 0.4%Footnote 12 End of each CY 2016: 0.24%
2017: 0.32%
2018: 0.20%
5. Percentage of permanent resident business lines that adhere to service standardsFootnote 13 100% End of each FY 2016-17: 43%
2017-18: 43%
2018-19: 14%
6. Percentage of permanent resident applicants who report they were satisfied overall with the services they received ≥ 90% End of each FY 2016-17: 83%
2017-18: 91%
2018-19: 89%

Performance indicator analysis

Indicator 1: Canada’s immigration levels plan has three broad objectives: first, furthering Canada’s long-term economic interests; second, providing shorter-term support to employers and communities; and third, supporting a well-managed immigration system overall.

Canada welcomed 321,035 permanent residents in 2018, achieving admissions within our target range of 290,000 to 330,000. This increase in immigration contributes to economic growth, family reunification, and the government’s humanitarian commitments. Furthermore, the Department continues to work to reduce application inventories, improve application processing times, and attract highly skilled global talent.

Indicator 2: The percentage of permanent residents outside of Quebec who identify as French-speaking is relatively stable as total admissions increase. The Department’s Francophone Immigration Strategy, announced in 2018-2019, aims to achieve, through a broad range of initiatives, a 4.4% total admissions level of French-speaking immigrants outside of Quebec. Since the implementation of additional points in June 2017 for French-speaking and/or bilingual applicants in the Express Entry system, the Department has observed an increase in the number of French-speaking immigrants who have submitted applications for permanent residence.

Indicator 3: Despite the overall increase in immigration levels, the percentage of applicants found inadmissible on health grounds or authorized to enter with a health surveillance-related condition on their visa remains consistent with previous years.

Indicator 4: In 2018, the percentage of permanent resident applicants were found inadmissible on safety and security grounds was 0.2%, a decrease from 0.32% in 2017. Fluctuation in results can be due to a number of reasons including global circumstances outside the Department’s control, as well as screening processes and other integrity risk management measures that decrease the likelihood of individuals with a security and criminal history applying for permanent resident status.

Adherence for IRCC’s seven lines of business with public service standards

Service standard of 80% met:

  • Canadian Experience Class: 85%

Service standard of 80% nearly attained:

  • Federal Skilled Workers (via Express Entry): 77%
  • Provincial/Territorial Nominees (via Express Entry): 79%
  • Family Class Priority (Overseas - spouses, partners and dependent children): 78%

Service standard of 80% not met:

  • Provincial/Territorial Nominees (paper applications): 5%
  • Quebec Skilled Workers: 2%
  • Skilled Trades (via Express Entry): 38%

Indicator 5: Despite improving processing times for some permanent resident lines of business in 2018, the Department fell short of meeting service standards in six of seven business lines. The Canadian Experience Class line of business met its service standard. While the Express Entry lines of business enable the Department to manage intake—thus providing greater control over meeting service standards—processing times for 77% of federal skilled worker applications and 79% of provincial nominee applications (via Express Entry) fell slightly short of the 80% standard. Although the processing times for these two lines of business almost met the service standard, falling short in these two areas contributed to the 14% (one line of business out of seven) adherence result compared to the 43% (three lines of business out of seven) adherence result from the previous year. Categories with no intake control, such as the Provincial Nominee and Quebec Skilled Workers programs, did not meet service standards.

Indicator 6: The overall client satisfaction rate for the Permanent Resident Program in 2018-2019 is 89%. Although this is below the target of 90%, it is consistent with the previous year’s performance of 91%. The Department will continue to regularly solicit feedback from its clients, including through an annual client satisfaction survey.

Results

Departmental Result 4: Permanent residents are welcomed and benefit from settlement supports

Permanent residents have access to a wide range of settlement services designed to help them establish in Canada. The OECD has linked settlement services to better integration outcomes for migrants in Canada compared with those of most other OECD countries.

IRCC-funded services include needs assessment and referral, information and orientation, language training, employment-related services and community connections. Services are delivered by third-party organizations such as settlement service organizations, community partners, school boards and other non-governmental actors across the country.

In the last fiscal year, IRCC continued efforts to improve settlement service effectiveness. Insights from the first annual Newcomers Survey will help the Department shape future settlement and resettlement policies and improve the delivery of services. Efforts were also made to better address the needs of minority newcomer women as well as to expand clients’ access to language services.

Ensuring the delivery of high-quality pre-arrival services

In 2018-2019, IRCC continued to deliver high-quality pre-arrival, and domestic settlement and resettlement services for newcomers.

As part of this commitment, IRCC launched an expression of interest process in 2018, which led to the signing of 16 pre-arrival contribution agreements in January 2019, based on the renewed pre-arrival services framework. The new framework is focused on collaboration and referral among pre-arrival delivery partners to better serve clients. For example, a partnership led by Collège La Cité (in French only) was selected to deliver pre-arrival services to French-speaking newcomers. It is expected that these pre-arrival services will provide newcomers with information on how to move to, live and work in Canada to ensure successful integration.

Since signature of the new agreements in the last quarter of this fiscal year, services have been provided to slightly over 11,000 immigrants, mostly via the Internet. In-person services are provided mostly to refugees resettling to Canada who receive services from the IOM with IRCC funding support. The three countries where the highest number of services are provided to refugees include Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan, while India, China and the Philippines are where the highest number of services are provided to non-refugees.

Planning in collaboration with provinces and territories

Co-planning and service mapping with provinces and territories has been a priority for the Department. Bilateral yearly work plans with provinces and territories have been established. Comprehensive information sharing has enhanced the ability to identify and reduce gaps and overlaps. As of March 31, 2019, IRCC has completed six bilateral assistant deputy minister-level co-planning stocktakes and signed eight bilateral settlement memoranda of understanding (MOUs) with provinces and territories. This ongoing initiative will lead to improved alignment of federal/provincial/territorial settlement/integration investments.

Strengthening settlement and resettlement services

IRCC launched a National Call for Proposals in early 2019. The Call for Proposals reflects a program design approach that brings together the principles of a shared settlement vision, and strengthens base settlement and resettlement services, while emphasizing priority areas. Investments are targeted to meet the needs of both newcomer clients and the communities in which they settle, and are geared toward the best possible outcomes for clients. Priorities include: demonstrated effectiveness (language/employment combinations); addressing demonstrated need (more focused interventions for vulnerable newcomers); and programming that increases connections between Canadians and newcomers (Canada Connects).

Monitoring newcomer outcomes

A rigorous outcomes measurement approach is being implemented. In 2018, the first annual Newcomers Survey, aimed at Settlement Program clients and non-clients, was launched and received over 50,000 responses. The survey will be administered annually and the findings will be a key source of outcome information that will help IRCC shape future settlement and resettlement policies as well as support effective delivery of services. The Department is committed to examining data collected to support evidence-based management and performance measurement of the Settlement Program. Collecting comprehensive and timely information will allow the Department to more accurately demonstrate how services are affecting client outcomes and helping immigrants to integrate successfully. Survey results show that, of the clients who received settlement services one year prior to the survey, over half reported increased knowledge on several topics related to participation in the labour market. These included looking for/applying for a job; establishing contacts, connections and networks; having educational and/or professional qualifications assessed; starting a business; and using soft skills at work.

Supporting visible minority newcomer women

Addressing employment barriers faced by minority newcomer women

  • Visible minority newcomer women have the lowest median annual income of all newcomer groups at $26,624.
  • The Department has launched the three-year Visible Minority Newcomer Women Pilot with the aim of improving outcomes for these women.

Acknowledging that minority newcomer women may face employment barriers, in December 2018 IRCC launched a three-year Visible Minority Newcomer Women Pilot. The pilot is aimed at improving the employment and career advancement of visible minority newcomer women in Canada (outside Quebec) by addressing gender- and race-based discrimination, precarious employment, as well as the lack of affordable childcare and social supports.

Settlement for Syrian Refugees

The Syrian Outcomes Report shows how Syrian refugee integration outcomes have been improving since arrival in Canada. For example, settlement outcomes such as sense of belonging, labour market participation and language usage are showing a positive trend. Also, data indicate that average Syrian employment earnings increase with time spent living in Canada, much like the case for other refugee cohorts.

Syrian refugees have lower initial rates of employment compared to other resettled populations. However, after two to three years of living in Canada, approximately 57% of adult Syrian refugee respondents reported they were currently working, and of those not working, 23% reported that they were currently looking for work. Therefore, Syrian refugees appear to be on similar trajectories as other refugees.

The Department has made significant progress in improving the management of language training. Actions include targeted funding for additional training seats for literacy and basic language levels, and enhanced information for officials who monitor language training activities. The goal to reduce language training waitlists for priority clients by 50% from December 2017 levels was achieved in January 2019. As of the end of March 2019, waitlists had been reduced by 56%.

Experimentation for service delivery

In the last fiscal year, approximately $23 million was spent on service delivery improvement initiatives (SDI). Over 100 SDI agreements have been put in place with more than 40 addressing key ministerial initiatives.

The Department continues to implement SDI projects to test the effectiveness and feasibility of various practices, and identify those that could improve the efficiency of settlement service delivery. IRCC has set a target to commit approximately 20% of the annual service delivery initiative funding (grants and contributions) to experimentation in the areas of settlement and integration service delivery. For example, IRCC is testing the effectiveness of incentive-based funding models for improving the performance of service provider organizations (SPOs) through three testing projects and one research project. Results of the Department’s experimentation in settlement service delivery will be reported in future parliamentary reports.

A project-level reporting process to gather information from SDI recipients on what is and is not working was launched in spring 2019. This process will occur every six months to provide IRCC with an evidence base on the emerging results of interventions being tested under SDI.

Results achieved

Departmental result: Permanent residents are welcomed and benefit from settlement supports
Departmental Result Indicators Targets Date to achieve targets Actual results
1. Percentage of Canadians who support the current level of immigration ≥ 65% End of each FY 2016-17: 62%
2017-18: 66%
2018-19: 57%
2. Percentage of settlement clients who improved their official language skills ≥ 60% End of each FY 2016-17: 59.9%
2017-18: 50.5%
2018-19: 42.2%
3. Percentage of settlement clients who acquired knowledge and skills to integrate into the Canadian labour marketFootnote 14 ≥ 50% End of each FY 2016-17: 52%
2017-18: N/AFootnote 15
2018-19: 60%

Performance indicator analysis

Indicator 1: Results from IRCC’s 2018-2019 Annual Tracking Study of 2,800 Canadians show that 57% of Canadians feel that the target of 300,000 immigrants per year is either about right or too few. While this result is lower than the target of 65%, it is not uncommon for this figure to fluctuate, and in recent years it has ranged from 57% in 2013-2014 to 66% in 2017-2018. Despite these fluctuations, current support for the number of immigrants coming to Canada is significantly higher than it was in the mid-1990s, as measured in public opinion research conducted separately by IRCC and Environics Institute. It has remained generally consistent for the past 15 years, following a significant increase between 1996 and 2004.

Indicator 2: The percentage of settlement clients who improved their official language proficiency in at least one of the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) has declined in the last few years and did not meet the established target. The admission of vulnerable populations with lower language levels has resulted in a greater number of clients who have complex needs and require additional support. Many factors affect learning a new language, such as demographic characteristics, human capital, learner motivation and the degree of differences between languages. The Department remains committed to supporting newcomers in improving their official language skills. The anticipated findings of the Department’s language training evaluation currently under way will provide further insights into the effectiveness of language training.

Indicator 3: Of the clients who received settlement services one year prior to the survey, over half reported increased knowledge on several topics related to participation in the labour market, such as: looking for/applying for a job; establishing contacts, connections and networks; having educational and/or professional qualifications assessed; starting a business; and using soft skills at work. This is higher than the expected target.

Results

Departmental Result 5: Immigrants and refugees achieve economic independence and contribute to labour force growth

Immigration plays an important role in strengthening Canada’s economy, particularly in contributing to labour force growth. In 2017, landed immigrants accounted for 26.9% of the Canadian labour force. According to demographic projections, immigrants will make up 32.6% of the working age population by 2036Footnote 16.

Immigrants in Canada not only contribute to labour force growth, they also achieve economic independence. Immigrants’ earnings increase with the number of years spent in Canada across all admission categories and approach the Canadian average after 15 years. Moreover, immigrants as a group have had a positive net direct fiscal impact, paying more income tax than government transfers received.

In order to support continued success and improvements of immigrant economic outcomes, the Department advanced several initiatives in the last fiscal year.

Improved economic outcomes for immigrants

Narrowing the gap between immigrants and Canadian-born workers

According to a research from Statistics Canada released in 2018, the unemployment rate for core-aged immigrants (25 to 54 years) was 6.4% in 2017, the lowest rate since 2006 when Statistics Canada began measuring this indicator, and their employment rate rose to 78.9%, the highest rate recorded in the 12-year period. In comparison, the Canadian-born employment rate was 84% in 2017 with an unemployment rate of 5%. In addition, the employment-rate gap narrowed for three consecutive years, after increasing in 2014.

IRCC began using the Express Entry system in 2015 to better manage the intake of applications from qualified applicants in some economic classes. Preliminary findings from a 2019 evaluation of the program demonstrate that the Express Entry system has had a positive impact. The evaluation assessed the early economic outcomes of economic immigrants admitted between 2015 and 2018. Initial findings indicate that candidates screened through Express Entry have a higher incidence of employment and earnings than non-Express Entry economic immigrants admitted during the same time period. Express Entry economic immigrants also secured employment twice as fast as their non-Express Entry counterparts and a greater proportion reported working in their primary occupation.

In 2017, IRCC also made changes to enhance the Express Entry application management system to improve the economic outcomes of immigrants invited to apply to one of IRCC’s three federal high-skilled programs. These changes included awarding additional points to international students who have studied in Canada, to French-language speakers and to immigrants having a sibling in Canada. The early results of these changes are positive. In 2018, for example, 5% of invitations to apply were issued to French-speaking candidates, compared to 2.9% in 2017. This measure will contribute to the vitality of Francophone minority communities across Canada.

Addressing labour market needs of smaller communities

Launched in 2017 as part of the Atlantic Growth Strategy, the Atlantic Immigration Pilot (AIP) continues to help employers fill job vacancies by supporting them in attracting skilled workers and international graduates. IRCC announced an extension to the pilot by two years, to December 2021, to continue allowing businesses to fill labour shortages in key sectors of Atlantic Canada. As of March 2019, over 2,000 Atlantic employers have opted to participate in the pilot and have made over 4,000 job offers to skilled workers and international graduates in sectors including accommodations and food services, manufacturing and health care.

In January 2019, IRCC announced the Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot (RNIP), a federal immigration pilot aimed at testing a new community-driven model to address the diverse economic development and labour needs of smaller communities in northern and rural areasFootnote 17. The RNIP will open to permanent resident applications in 2019-2020.

With their shared focus on spreading the economic benefits of immigration across Canada, the RNIP and the AIP complement other regional economic immigration initiatives, including the PNP.

Results achieved

Departmental result: Immigrants and refugees achieve economic independence and contribute to labour force growth
Departmental Result Indicators Targets Date to achieve targets Actual results
1. Percentage of newcomers who are employedFootnote 18 ≥ 65% End of each CY 2016: 68.2%
2017: 69.8%
2018: 71.3%
2. Percentage of immigrants and refugees who are in the middle income range or aboveFootnote 19 ≥ 50% End of each FY 2016-17: 53.7%
2017-18: 54.3%
2018-19: 55.9%
3. Percentage of the Canadian labour force that is made up of immigrants and refugees ≥ 25% End of each CY 2016: 25.7%
2017: 26.1%
2018: 26.9%

Performance indicator analysis

Immigrant earnings in 2018-2019

Five years after landing, the average employment earnings of federal economic principal applicants relative to the Canadian average is 27.8% higher than the Canadian average. For the provincial nominees, this number is 15.1% higher than the Canadian average.

These figures demonstrate the ability of these immigrants to integrate the Canadian economy.

Indicator 1: In 2018, a total of 71.3% of newcomers, aged 25 to 54 and who landed within the last one to five years, were employed. This high percentage demonstrates the success of economic immigration programs in selecting newcomers based on human capital characteristics such as education, work experience and language that facilitate integration into the Canadian economy and labour force.

Indicator 2: In 2018-2019, 55.9% of immigrants and refugees were in the middle income range or above. This percentage has increased incrementally over the past three years. As with the previous indicator, this demonstrates that IRCC’s economic programs are selecting newcomers with characteristics that facilitate their integration into the labour force and enable them to achieve earnings in the middle income range.

Indicator 3: In 2018, immigrants represented 26.9% of the Canadian labour force. Over the past few years, changes to federal and regional economic immigration programming have placed greater importance on human capital characteristics such as education, work experience and language and has had a positive impact on immigrants’ share in the labour force.

Gradually increasing permanent resident immigration levels to 1% of the Canadian population is an effective strategy to counter the slowing of labour force growth over the next decade. In 2017 and 2018, IRCC laid out two consecutive three-year immigration levels plans. One of the objectives of this approach is to support Canada’s long-term economic interests, including the growth of the labour force.

Results

Departmental Result 6: Immigrants and refugees feel part of and participate in Canadian society

In the last fiscal year, over 71% of newcomer survey respondents agreed that their community was welcoming to newcomers. The government recognizes that it is important for immigrants and refugees to feel a sense of belonging and connection to Canada in order for them to be active participants in Canadian society. To this end, IRCC funds programming such as Canada Connects aimed at helping immigrants build connections within their local communities. The government also recognizes the importance of supporting French-speaking newcomers. In addition, IRCC launched the new Welcoming Francophone Communities Initiative and provided funding for the delivery of innovative initiatives.

Building connections between newcomers and welcoming communities

In 2018-2019, IRCC engaged with SPOs to ensure that services to support social integration and participation in Canadian society, such as connecting with local communities, services, culture or history, are available to newcomers. The National Call for Proposals for the Settlement and Resettlement Assistance Programs, launched in February 2019, includes proposals for building community connections aimed at creating a welcoming environment, enhancing a sense of belonging, building social cohesion, and supporting employment readiness and language learning.

Newcomer integration into Canadian society

A recent survey of newcomers to Canada indicates that:

  • Over 90% described having a strong sense of belonging to Canada
  • Over 71% agreed that their community is welcoming for newcomers

The Canada Connects initiative has been implemented by over 30 SPOs since 2017-2018 and was rolled out to an additional 100 throughout 2018-2019 to increase connections between newcomers, Indigenous communities, long-time Canadians and established immigrants. It will become a permanent part of the Settlement Program through the 2019 National Settlement Call for Proposals. During the last fiscal year, almost 20,000 clients were connected with Canadians or established immigrants.

IRCC continues to work with municipalities, communities, Francophone associations and employers to ensure that newcomers are welcomed and feel part of Canadian society.

Increasing opportunities for French-speaking newcomers

The Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023: Investing in Our Future provides funding for the delivery of innovative initiatives to consolidate the Francophone Integration Pathway. This will be achieved in part through the new Welcoming Francophone Communities Initiative, a community-based pilot project aimed at ensuring lasting ties are created between French-speaking newcomers and Francophone minority communities.

This initiative, co-led by IRCC and Francophone communities, including the 13 Réseaux en immigration francophone, the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada (in French only) and the Comité atlantique sur l’immigration francophone (in French only). The selection process for the communities to be included in this initiative involved all partners who developed and assessed proposed communities on a set of criteria. These criteria included presence of French-speaking immigrants in the community, willingness of the community to attract and retain French-speaking newcomers, services already available in French with a potential for increase, involvement of community in the activities and targeting a specific local geographic area. Fourteen communities across Canada (excluding Quebec) were selected to take part in the initiative and will receive a total of $12.6 million over three years to increase their capacity to welcome French-speaking newcomers and to facilitate these newcomers’ integration.

In 2019, IRCC took additional steps to support the settlement outcomes of French-speaking newcomers, which included adding new Francophone reception services at Pearson International Airport and offering newly adapted language training services for French-speaking newcomers. The Department selected seven organizations from across the country to provide official language training services adapted to the needs of French-speaking immigrants and allophone newcomers who declare French as their official language of preference.

Results achieved

Departmental result: Immigrants and refugees feel part of and participate in Canadian society
Departmental Result indicatorsFootnote 20 Targets Date to achieve targets Actual results
1. Percentage of immigrants and refugees that have a strong sense of belonging ≥ 85% End of each FY 2016-17: 88.7%
2017-18: N/AFootnote 21
2018-19: 90.6%
2. Percentage of immigrants and refugees who volunteer in Canada ≥ 30% End of each FY 2016-17: 34%
2017-18: N/AFootnote 22
2018-19: 30.1%

Performance indicator analysis

Indicator 1: Results from the 2018 Newcomers Survey suggest that the majority of the approximately 50,000 survey respondents have a strong sense of belonging to Canada, and the actual achievements extend beyond the expected target. Through the Settlement Program, IRCC-funded services are offered to help newcomers develop their social networks and communication skills, and to support their integration journey, which may ultimately impact their sense of belonging.

Indicator 2: Results from the 2018 Newcomers Survey suggest that about a third of the approximately 50,000 survey respondents reported volunteering in the last 12 months. Through the Settlement Program, IRCC-funded information and orientation services are offered to eligible newcomers to provide them with information on community engagement, which includes connecting with others and volunteering in their community.

Immigrant and Refugee Selection and Integration

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned spending
2018-19
Total authorities available for use
2018-19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018-19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned spending)
1,799,102,591 1,799,102,591 2,019,741,913 1,855,642,404 56,539,813
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018-19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus
Planned full-time equivalents)
2,701 2,707 6

Operational Requirements

A portion of financial resources for this core responsibility is used for operational purposes in selecting economic immigrant applicants, processing family member applications to reunite families, and processing refugee and protected person applications to provide a safe haven for those facing persecution, while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians. IRCC works with federal government security partners and third-party health professionals to verify that individuals meet admissibility requirements. These financial resources also include a special purpose allotment to fund temporary and limited health coverage for eligible beneficiaries, including resettled refugees and asylum claimants.

Grants and Contributions

In order to support immigrants and refugees in integrating into Canadian society and the economy, IRCC funds a variety of settlement support services through a network of organizations. Services offered by these organizations aim to improve immigrant and refugee official language abilities and help newcomers acquire knowledge and skills necessary to integrate into Canadian society and the labour market.

The vast majority ($1.4 billion) of actual spending for this core responsibility was for grants and contribution spending which includes an amount of $0.6 billion for the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration.

The difference between planned and actual spending for 2018-2019 is mainly explained by increased payments to the Quebec government for the Canada-Quebec Accord and to support the increase of asylum seekers, including payments to support provinces and municipalities in the provision of temporary housing.

These additional resources were not included at the planning stage as financial authorities were granted and made available to the Department through Budget 2018 and the 2018-2019 Supplementary Estimates process.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Core Responsibility 3: Citizenship and Passports

Description

IRCC promotes the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship, and issues secure and internationally recognized Canadian citizenship and travel documents so that Canadians can participate fully in civic society and so that travel is facilitated across borders while contributing to international and domestic security.

Results

Departmental Result 7: Eligible permanent residents become Canadian citizens

Citizenship is the thread that weaves together the fabric of the pluralistic society and connects all Canadians. In 2018-2019, over 207,000 people were granted Canadian citizenship, an 84% increase over the previous fiscal year. As the Citizenship Program strives to modernize its operations in the face of rising volumes and in line with the Department’s priority to maintain effective client service, IRCC is committed to maintaining program integrity.

The Department’s mandate also encompasses promoting rights, privileges and responsibilities of citizenship through education, partnership and awareness activities for newcomers and Canadians beyond the naturalization objective.

Citizenship appears to lead to better economic outcomes and a greater sense of belonging to Canada. According to a Statistics Canada study, the median wage of male immigrants admitted in 2006 who obtained citizenship by 2016 was $40,500, while it was $31,200 for non-citizens. For female immigrants, the median wage was $28,100 for those who obtained their citizenship, and $21,600 for those who had not. Furthermore, 71% of established immigrants who have taken up citizenship have very strong sense of belonging to Canada compared to 56% for those who are not citizens.

In 2018-2019, over 207,000 people became Canadian citizens, a significant increase over 112,000 new citizens in 2017-2018.

This increase is in part due to the enactment of Bill C-6 which amended the amount of time a permanent resident has to spend in Canada before being eligible to apply for citizenship. These changes include reducing the physical presence in Canada requirement from four out of six years to three out of five years.

Updating the citizenship guide, test and Oath of Citizenship

In anticipation of future versions of the citizenship guide, test and study tools, IRCC collaborated with a wide range of stakeholders, including Indigenous organizations, minority populations, women, Francophones, LGBTQ2 and persons with disabilities.

IRCC is also working with SPOs and pedagogical experts to develop a wide range of study tools such as practice tests, citizenship preparation class curriculum, and mix and match games to support second-language learners with different learning styles, whether at home or in a classroom.

IRCC finalized consultations with Indigenous and citizenship stakeholders to update the Oath of Citizenship to reflect Indigenous treaty rights, responding to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call to Action #94.

Enhancing the integrity of the citizenship program

New document seizure authorities came into force on December 5, 2018, providing clear authority under the Citizenship Act to seize and detain documents believed to be fraudulently or improperly obtained or used. These provisions help to strengthen the government’s ability to protect the integrity of the Citizenship Program and the value of Canadian citizenship.

Improving flexibility for candidates to Canadian citizenship

In 2018-2019, IRCC piloted an electronic tool facilitating the rescheduling of citizenship tests. The Department will apply lessons learned during this pilot for future development of similar tools to ensure an improved client experience.

Results achieved

Departmental result: Eligible permanent residents become Canadian citizens
Departmental Result indicators Targets Date to achieve targets Actual results
1. Percentage of permanent residents who become Canadian citizens ≥ 85% 2021Footnote 23 2016-17: 85.8% (2016)
2017-18: 85.8% (2016)
2018-19: 85.8% (2016)
2. Percentage of citizenship applications that are processed within service standards ≥ 80% End of each FY 2016-17: 90%
2017-18: 92%
2018-19: 81%
3. Percentage of citizenship applicants who report they were satisfied overall with the services they received ≥ 90% End of each FY 2016-17: 94%
2017-18: 94%
2018-19: 93%

Performance indicator analysis

Indicator 1: Because this indicator relies on the Census, new data are available on a five-year cycle. The next Census will be conducted in 2021. According to the 2016 Census, the 85.8% take-up rate for citizenship remained consistent with 85.6% reported in the 2011 Census. The ultimate goal of the Citizenship Program is to support eligible permanent residents to become Canadian citizens. Between 2016 and 2018, over 430,000 individuals who applied met the requirements and were thus granted Canadian citizenship.

Indicator 2: In 2018-2019, a total of 81% of citizenship grant applications were processed within the 12-month service standard. At the same time, the number of citizenship applicants who became Canadian citizens almost doubled, from 112,969 in 2017-2018 to 207,893 in 2018-2019.

Indicator 3: In 2018-2019, a full 93% of the permanent residents who became Canadian citizens were satisfied with the services they received. The rate of client satisfaction has remained steady over the last three consecutive fiscal years.

Results

Departmental Result 8: Canadians’ international travel is facilitated

IRCC’s Passport Program facilitates travel for Canadians, permanent residents and protected persons and ensures that Canadian travel documents remain internationally recognized and respected. To keep pace with the future of international travel documents, in 2018-2019, IRCC continued to advance the ePassport Next Generation Project to supply and design Canada’s future suite of travel documents. IRCC, in partnership with Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), also improved passport services to all Canadians by expanding the service delivery network to over 300 locations. Additionally, IRCC fully implemented Canadian’s ability to choose an “X” as their gender designation across all lines of business, including Passport.

Designing the next generation of travel documents

In 2018-2019, IRCC continued to advance the ePassport Next Generation Project to supply and design Canada’s future suite of travel documents. The next generation of Canadian travel documents will provide an enhanced design and personalization solution to ensure the continued integrity of Canadian travel documents, their interoperability with border systems and their alignment with international standards.

In the last fiscal year, the Department continued to lead the Passport Program Modernization Initiative, a multi-year project focused on modernizing the Passport Program’s current issuance system. This work will ensure readiness for uptake in demand beginning in 2023-2024 when the first wave of 10-year passports will expire.

Providing better passport services to Canadians

Working in partnership with ESDC, IRCC doubled the number of Service Canada locations, from 151 to more than 300, significantly increasing access to passport services across the country, including in rural and remote areas. In fact, 93% of Canadians now have access to passport services within 50 km of their home.

An internal evaluation of the Passport Program was undertaken in 2018-2019, which focused on the program’s effectiveness since its transfer from Global Affairs Canada in 2013. When finalized, results and recommendations will be published in 2020.

Adapting travel documents

The Department continued to work with provinces and territories, airport authorities and other partners to add a gender X designation on its applications for those people who do not identify as male or female. In fact, IRCC fully implemented gender X, not only for passport, but for all lines of businesses, giving Canadian citizens and residents who do not identify exclusively as male or female the opportunity to live according to their own identity.

Results achieved

Departmental result: Canadians’ international travel is facilitated
Departmental Result indicators Targets Date to achieve targets Actual results
1. Percentage compliance of the Canadian passport with international standards 100% End of each FY 2016-17: 100%
2017-18: 100%
2018-19: 100%
2. Percentage of passport applications that are processed within service standardsFootnote 24 ≥ 90% End of each FY 2016-17: 98%
2017-18: 99%
2018-19: 99.2%
3. Percentage of passport applicants who report they were satisfied overall with the services they receivedFootnote 25 ≥ 95% End of each FY 2016-17: 97%
2017-18: 97%
2018-19: 94%

Performance indicator analysis

Indicator 1: In 2018-2019, Canada continued to comply with the international standards related to travel documents set out in Annex 9 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation. Canadian passports continue to be designed with globally interoperable features and are issued using secure and internationally recognized practices.

Indicator 2: In 2018-2019, a total of 99.2% of Canadian passport and other travel document applications were processed within service standards: in Canada, 99.6% of Canadian passports and 89.3% of refugee travel documents and certificate of identity applications were processed within service standards; abroad, 93.1% of Canadian passports were processed within service standards.

Indicator 3: In the 2018-2019 survey, 94% of respondents indicated that they were satisfied with their overall service. Although this is slightly below target, it is considered a positive result. The survey included refinements survey methodology that led to a more representative sample of Passport clients and may have contributed to the reduction. Analysis demonstrates that the satisfaction level of clients aged 18-34 decreased from previous year. Lack of modern and technological options in service that are commonly used in other industries such as banking could be a leading factor in this reduction.

Citizenship and Passports

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned spending
2018-19
Total authorities
available for useFootnote *
2018-19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018-19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned
spending)
153,914,576 153,914,576 1,325,484,225 51,785,702 -102,128,874
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018-19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time
equivalents)
1,621 1,575 -46

Citizenship Program

For the citizenship component, resources are mainly used for assessment activities, administration of tests, checks to confirm applicants do not have a criminal record, activities to detect and prevent fraud, citizenship ceremonies and development of tools such as citizenship tests and guides.

Financial figures associated with the Citizenship program alone include $68 million in planned spending and $66 million in actual spending for a variance of $2 million (or 3%).

Passport Program

IRCC collaborates with Service Canada and Global Affairs Canada to facilitate travel for Canadians and contribute to a safe and secure travel regime by issuing Canadian travel documents that are internationally recognized and respected.

The Passport Program operates on a full cost-recovery basis from fees charged for travel document services.

The difference of $100 million between planned and actual spending is associated with the Passport Program. This variance is explained by a combination of two main factors: less spending materialized than was anticipated for various investment initiatives including the passport modernization initiative and the ePassport; and lower-than-anticipated operating expenses were needed to administer the program.

Fiscal year 2018-2019 marks the sixth year of the 10-year business cycle that began with the launch of the 10-year passport in 2013-2014. The drop in revenues in 2018-2019 was expected and is the result of a reduction in passport demand due to the transition from the 5-year passport to the 10-year passport. As a result, deficits are expected due to declining passport revenues combined with the ongoing fixed costs associated with maintaining the operational infrastructure. However, it is anticipated that adequate revenues have been collected in preceding years to compensate for future deficits.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: 

In addition to reporting on key results for internal services such as human resource management, in this section the Department also reports on key horizontal initiatives that impact all business lines such as those that enhance the client experience and improve operational efficiency.

Results

Improving the client experience

Throughout the last fiscal year, IRCC worked on improving the client service experience in several areas.

In July 2018, IRCC began using an improved method to estimate processing times for some new permanent residence applications. Processing times are now projected and provide applicants with more accurate expectations of how long most applications will take to process under normal circumstancesFootnote 26.

The Department also deployed “Quaid,” a chatbot powered by artificial intelligence. As part of a broader client service pilot for IRCC’s social media channels, Quaid is currently being piloted on Facebook Messenger to respond to general inquiries, in both official languages, without human intervention. Between October 2, 2018 and March 31, 2019, Quaid provided 39,250 responses.

In the last fiscal year, the Department also launched the IRCC Usability Space to observe how clients experience IRCC services and identify where and why issues occur. Using a dedicated space, client-facing tools, forms, letters and messaging were tested by clients to make sure they are easy to use and understand. Testing results are already informing improvements and enhancements to IRCC services.

Furthermore, the Department secured an additional investment of $42.9 million over two years in Budget 2019 to hire more staff at the Client Support Centre to improve accessibility and timeliness of response for enquiries received by telephone and email, as well as to expand the hours of operation at the Client Support Centre and at high volume local offices.

Improving how clients seek information on the status of their applications

Many clients use the access to information and privacy (ATIP) process to seek the status of their applications. As a result, the Department continued to experience a significant increase in volume of ATIP requests. In 2018-2019, the volume increased to 98,041 requests from 77,602 in 2017-2018 (a 26% increase). While this volume exceeded the Department’s capacity to respond to all requests within legislated deadlines, IRCC was still able to process 69,671 requests within legislative requirements compared to 51,528 last year.

IRCC aims to offer more meaningful information to clients in order to reduce their use of the ATIP process to seek their application status. In 2018-2019, IRCC simplified the information provided to clients in their “My immigration or citizenship account” including more meaningful case status text in addition to launching a service standard progress bar for Express Entry applicants.

Several other initiatives are also under way to reduce the volume of ATIP requests, such as engaging stakeholders (the Canadian Bar Association, the Canadian Association of Professional Immigration Consultants and the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council) to raise awareness of ATIP best practices.

Improving efficiencies across all lines of business

During the last fiscal year, the Department continued to implement and build upon various initiatives to help manage increasing workloads and processing pressures. Specifically, IRCC has utilized work-sharing projects to improve efficiencies and decrease processing times for certain lines of business. Having nimble workload management will result in a decrease in application backlogs in certain programs and increased corporate knowledge among processing officers. The Department also continues to enhance the use of artificial intelligence to automate low-risk decision-making processes, which is helping to reduce processing times.

IRCC recognized as a top Canadian employer

In 2018-2019, the Department was named by Forbes one of Canada’s Top 100 Employers within the National Capital Region and as one of Canada’s best employers. IRCC’s selection was based on the provision to employees of retirement planning assistance and health benefits that extend to retirees, as well as the offer of an extensive benefits package for families, including a full year of paid leave for new mothers and generous parental leave. IRCC will continue strengthening areas of excellence and addressing areas for improvement to keep attracting talented employees.

Supporting a diverse work force and promoting a modern, healthy and enabling workplace

In 2018-2019, the Department continued to support a high-performing, adaptable and diverse work force within a modern, healthy and enabling workplace where employees are valued and engaged. For example, the Department advanced its efforts to support mental health and wellness in the workplace by implementing the “Not Myself Today” campaign and “LifeSpeak” as enhancements to the Employee Assistance Program, and by offering related learning events and activities. To address compensation issues, the IRCC Phoenix Task Force implemented many activities, including timely staffing, “Pay Talks” and “Ask me anything” sessions.

IRCC enhanced its recruitment efforts by attending more than 30 career fairs and networking events; shifted to a culture of talent readiness; established a Learning Advisory Board to operationalize the Learning Development and Management Framework; and, continued to support the various employment equity and diversity employee networks.

In the last fiscal year, IRCC developed its first comprehensive five-year Strategic Accommodation Plan, which describes strategies for addressing departmental growth. The plan’s focus is on modernizing work environments that contribute positively to mental health, motivation and productivity, and further enabling a culture of inclusiveness within the Department. Collaborative and progressive change management support has been key to the successful implementation of GCworkplace concepts and designs.

Internal Services

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned spending
2018-19
Total authorities
available for use
2018-19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018-19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned
spending)
222,706,089 222,706,089 300,561,686 285,039,771 62,333,682
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018-19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time
equivalents)
1,607 1,694 87

The variance between planned and actual spending is mainly due to increased efforts from the different service categories under the responsibility of internal services to support operations and projects for the major initiatives that took place in 2018-2019.

IRCC made investments in its Global Case Management System to increase overall capacity and to ensure application processing continues should an information technology disaster occur. In addition, the Department also invested in accommodation projects, such as the Edmonton move from Vegreville and the CPC-Mississauga refit, in order to align the workplace in such way that it meets the organization’s needs and growth. These investments were to support the additional efforts to implement the 2018 Immigration Levels Plan, temporary foreign worker reforms, management of irregular migration at the Canada-U.S. border, and increases in temporary resident applications and citizenship processing. Resources were allocated to program planning and monitoring to ensure that the Department keeps pace with program growth. Additional resources were also required to prepare for IRCC’s transformation agenda.

The Department also continues to dedicate resources to identify, monitor and resolve issues related to the Phoenix pay system.

These additional costs were not included at the planning stage as financial authorities were realigned internally with a portion granted and made available to the Department through Budget 2018 and the 2018-2019 Supplementary Estimates process.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph

Text version: Departmental spending trend graph
Fiscal year Statutory ($ millions) Voted ($ millions) Total ($ millions)
2016-17 -233 1,833 1,600
2017-18 -162 2,079 1,917
2018-19 66 2,338 2,404
2019-20 253 2,595 2,848
2020-21 139 2,290 2,429
2021-22 132 2,333 2,465

In this graph, financial figures from 2016-2017 to 2018-2019 represent actual spending incurred by the Department. Financial figures from 2019-2020 to 2021-2022 represent planned spending.

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core
Responsibilities
and Internal
Services
2018-19
Main
Estimates
2018-19
Planned
spending
2019-20
Planned
spending
2020-21
Planned
spending
2018-19
Total
authorities
available for
useFootnote *
2018-19
Actual
spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Actual
spending
(authorities
used)
2016-17
Actual
spending
(authorities
used)
Visitors, International Students and Temporary Workers 179,940,020 179,940,020 235,424,084 232,784,495 239,371,328 211,390,880 - -
Immigrant and Refugee Selection and Integration 1,799,102,591 1,799,102,591 2,141,873,586 1,849,541,663 2,019,741,913 1,855,642,404 - -
Citizenship and Passports 153,914,576 153,914,576 242,703,748 127,062,661 1,325,484,225 51,785,702 - -
Subtotal 2,132,957,187 2,132,957,187 2,620,001,418 2,209,388,819 3,584,597,466 2,118,818,986    
Internal Services 222,706,089 222,706,089 228,461,460 220,019,376 300,561,686 285,039,771 267,484,298 221,034,966
Funds not allocated to the 2018-19 Departmental Results FrameworkFootnote 27             1,649,764,614 1,379,015,283
Total 2,355,663,276 2,355,663,276 2,848,462,878 2,429,408,195 3,885,159,152 2,403,858,757 1,917,248,912 1,600,050,249

Analysis of trends in spending

Analysis - 2018-2019 Planned spending versus 2018-2019 Available authorities for use

Planned spending for 2018-2019 is based on a set of assumptions made in fall 2017, as well as on the availability of funding at the planning stage. As such, the total variance of $1.5 billion (or 65%) between the 2018-2019 planned spending and total authorities available for use is mainly attributable to the cumulative unused surplus associated with the Passport Program as well as the additional funding received through Budget 2018 and the 2018-2019 Supplementary Estimates.

Budget 2018 announcements included funding to facilitate the entry of temporary foreign workers, and to help address the issue of irregular migrants at the Canada-U.S. border. Through the supplementary estimates, the Department also received funding for various initiatives such as support to provinces and municipalities for temporary housing related to asylum seekers, and the adjustment made to the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration.

Trend analysis - Actual spending from 2016-2017 to 2018-2019

Actual spending increased by $0.8 billion (or 50%) from 2016-2017 to 2018-2019. The increase is mainly due to expenditures associated with the processing of increased levels in permanent resident admissions, the increased volumes in temporary resident applications, as well as the increased number of asylum seekers along with the related support to provinces and municipalities for temporary housing.

Furthermore, investments were made to ensure IRCC’s operations meet all aspects of security, policy and legal requirements, and to uphold commitments made to IRCC’s partner departments and government bodies.

Trend analysis - Planned spending from 2019-2020 to 2020-2021

It is important to note that planned spending for 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 was prepared in fall 2018, and as such, does not include new funding anticipated through future years’ budget announcements (i.e., Budget 2019) or the supplementary estimates process.

The downward fluctuations from $2.8 billion in 2019-2020 to $2.4 billion in 2020-2021 stem from $324 million that was available at the beginning of 2019-2020 for payments to provinces and municipalities for interim housing for asylum seekers, completion of projects related to the Passport Program, and the end of funding for Syrian refugees in 2019-2020. The above-noted spending reduction is partially offset by increased resources for permanent residents’ settlement and integration into Canadian society.

2018-2019 Budgetary actual gross spending summary (dollars)
Core Responsibilities
and Internal Services
2018-19
Actual gross
spending
2018-19
Actual gross
spending for
specified purpose
accounts
2018-19
Actual revenues
netted against
expenditures
2018-19
Actual net
spending
(authorities used)
Visitors, International Students and Temporary Workers 220,776,353 - 9,385,473 211,390,880
Immigrant and Refugee Selection and Integration 1,855,642,404 - - 1,855,642,404
Citizenship and Passports 419,094,293 - 367,308,591 51,785,702
Subtotal 2,495,513,050 - 376,694,064 2,118,818,986
Internal Services 285,039,771 - - 285,039,771
Total 2,780,552,821 - 376,694,064 2,403,858,757

The International Experience Canada Program operates on a vote-netted revenue basis. Its revenues are generated through a participation fee.

The Passport Program operates on a full cost-recovery basis and generates revenue through fees paid for passports and other travel documents.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full‑time equivalents {FTEs})
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2016-17
Actual
FTEs
2017-18
Actual
FTEs
2018-19
Planned
FTEs
2018-19
Actual
FTEs
2019-20
Planned
FTEs
2020-21
Planned
FTEs
Visitors, International Students and Temporary Workers - - 1,210 1,438 1,328 1,315
Immigrant and Refugee Selection and Integration - - 2,701 2,707 2,807 2,782
Citizenship and Passports - - 1,621 1,575 1,592 1,576
Subtotal - - 5,532 5,720 5,727 5,673
Internal Services 1,576 1,654 1,607 1,694 1,651 1,631
FTEs not allocated to the 2018-19 Departmental Results Framework 4,735 5,034 - - - -
Total 6,311 6,688 7,139 7,414 7,378 7,304

Analysis of trends in human resources

Analysis - 2018-2019 Planned versus Actual FTEs

The increase in the number of 2018-2019 Actual FTEs in comparison with the 2018-2019 Planned FTEs is mainly attributable to additional resources received to facilitate the entry of temporary foreign workers and to help address the issues of irregular migrants at the Canada-U.S. border.

Trend analysis - Actual FTEs from 2016-2017 to 2018-2019

The increase in the number of FTEs from 2016-2017 to 2018-2019 is mainly due to the additional resources required to support the processing of increased levels in permanent resident admissions, to address the increased volume in temporary resident applications, and to address irregular migration at the Canada-U.S. border.

Trend analysis - Planned FTEs from 2019-2020 to 2020-2021

It is important to note that planned FTEs for 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 were prepared in fall 2018, and as such, do not include new resources anticipated through future years’ budget announcements (i.e., Budget 2019) or the supplementary estimates process.

From 2019-2020 to 2020-2021, the number of FTEs remains fairly stable despite the downward fluctuation in planned spending. This is due to the fact that the decrease in the funding profile is mainly related to transfer payments (Grants and Contributions).

Expenditures by vote

For information on IRCC’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018-2019.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of IRCC’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

IRCC’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on IRCC’s website.

Financial statements highlights

The financial highlights presented within this Departmental Results Report are intended to serve as a general overview of IRCC’s Consolidated Statement of Operations and Consolidated Statement of Financial Position. These statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles and are therefore different from the information published in the Public Accounts of Canada, which are prepared on a modified cash basis.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018-19
Planned
results
2018-19
Actual
results
2017-18
Actual
results
(restated)
Difference
(2018-19
Actual results
minus
2018-19
Planned results)
Difference
(2018-19
Actual results
minus
2017-18
Actual results)
Total expenses 3,095,966,810 3,112,049,048 2,879,833,745 16,082,238 232,215,303
Total revenues 394,807,268 376,713,690 648,461,819 (18,093,578) (271,748,129)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 2,701,159,542 2,735,335,358 2,231,371,926 34,175,816 503,963,432

Consolidated future-oriented statement of operations can be found on IRCC’s website.

Expenses

Total expenses of $3,112.0 million in 2018-2019 included $1,433.4 million (46.1%) in transfer payments and $782.2 million (25.1%) in salaries and employee benefits.

Total expenses increased by $232.2 million (8.1%) as compared to the previous year. This variance is mainly attributable to the following:

Total expenses for 2018-2019 are comparable to the planned results with a variance of $16.1 million (0.5%).

The chart below outlines IRCC’s expenses by core responsibility:

Expenses by Core Responsibility

Text version: Expenses by Core Responsibility
Expenses by Core Responsibility Percentage
Immigrant and Refugee Selection and Integration ($1,972.2 million) 63%
Citizenship and Passports ($451.0 million) 15%
Visitors, International Students and Temporary Workers ($401.9 million) 13%
Internal Services ($286.9 million) 9%
Total 100%
Revenues

Total revenues amounted to $1,328.6 million in 2018-2019, of which $951.9 million (71.6%) were departmental revenues earned on behalf of government and $376.7 million (28.4%) were departmental respendable revenues, largely composed of Passport Program and International Experience Canada revenues.

Departmental revenues earned on behalf of government rose by $163.9 million (20.8%) as compared to the previous year. This result is mainly attributable to an increase in the volume of temporary resident visas and citizenship applications, as well as an increase in biometrics fees earned as a result of the biometrics expansion that started this fiscal year.

Departmental revenues earned on behalf of government are $21.0 million lower than the planned results. This variance is mainly attributable to an overstatement of the estimated impact of Bill C‑6 on citizenship service fees and right of citizenship revenues.

Departmental respendable revenues decreased by $271.7 million (41.9%) as compared to the previous year, mainly due to a significantly lower volume of passport applications received in the current year.

Departmental respendable revenues are $18.1 million lower than the planned results. This variance is mainly attributable to an unexpected lower volume of passport applications.

The chart below outlines IRCC’s revenues by type:

Revenues by Type

Text version: Revenues by Type
Revenues by Type Percentage
Immigration service fees ($665.3 million) 50%
Passport fees ($367.1 million) 28%
Immigration rights and privileges ($172.2 million) 13%
Citizenship service fees ($97.3 million) 7%
Other revenues* ($26.7 million) 2%
Total 100%

* Revenue types grouped in Other revenues include: Right of citizenship, International Experience Canada, Passport miscellaneous revenues and Other revenues.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018-19 2017-18
(restated)
Difference
(2018-19 minus
2017-18)
Total net liabilities 375,057,465 477,035,451 (101,977,986)
Total net financial assets 362,749,577 457,055,811 (94,306,234)
Departmental net debt (12,307,888) (19,979,640) 7,671,752
Total non‑financial assets 153,067,572 163,303,253 (10,235,681)
Departmental net financial position 140,759,684 143,323,613 (2,563,929)
Liabilities

Total net liabilities decreased by $102.0 million (21.4%) in 2018-2019 as compared to 2017-2018. This variance is mainly attributable to the following:

The chart below outlines IRCC’s net liabilities:

Total Net Liabilities

Text version: Total Net Liabilities
Total Net Liabilities Percentage
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities ($301.1 million) 80%
Vacation pay and compensatory leave ($32.2 million) 9%
Employee future benefits ($22.1 million) 6%
Immigrant Investor Program ($19.6 million) 5%
Total 100%
Assets

Total net financial assets decreased by $94.3 million (20.6%) in 2018-2019 as compared to 2017–2018. This variance is mainly attributable to the following:

The chart below outlines IRCC’s net financial assets:

Total Net Financial Assets

Text version: Total Net Financial Assets
Total Net Financial Assets Percentage
Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund ($298.5 million) 82%
Accounts receivable and advances ($56.2 million) 16%
Inventory held for resale ($8.1 million) 2%
Total 100%

Total non-financial assets decreased by $10.2 million (6.3%) in 2018-2019 as compared to 2017–2018. This variance is mainly attributable to a decrease of $10.9 million in tangible capital assets largely explained by the yearly amortization expense, which was partly offset by the acquisitions of tangible capital assets, mostly comprised of internally developed software.

The chart below outlines IRCC’s non-financial assets:

Total Non-Financial Assets

Text version: Total Non-Financial Assets
Total Non-Financial Assets Percentage
Tangible capital assets ($137.3 million) 90%
Inventory held for consumption ($10.6 million) 7%
Prepaid expenses ($5.1 million) 3%
Total 100%

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: Marco E.L. Mendicino
Institutional head: Catrina Tapley
Ministerial portfolio: Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Department: Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Statutory and Other Agencies: Citizenship Commission, Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Enabling instrument[s]: Section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867, the Citizenship Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, and the Canadian Passport Order.
Year of incorporation / commencement: 1994

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

Canada is a country that has been greatly impacted by immigration, welcoming 15 million people since Confederation and home to over 200 ethnic communities. Immigration has been crucial in shaping Canada into the diverse and prosperous nation it is today and, looking forward, stands to be equally fundamental to Canada's future social cohesion and economic prosperity. To this end, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) facilitates the entry of temporary residents, manages the selection, settlement and integration of newcomers, grants citizenship and issues passports to eligible citizens. The Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship is responsible for this organization.

Note: Until the establishing legislation is amended, the legal name of the department for the purposes of Appropriation Acts remains Department of Citizenship and Immigration.

Mandate and role

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) selects and welcomes, as permanent and temporary residents, foreign nationals whose skills contribute to Canadian prosperity. It also reunites family members.

The Department maintains Canada’s humanitarian tradition by welcoming refugees and other people in need of protection, thereby upholding its international obligations and reputation.

IRCC, in collaboration with its partners, conducts the screening of potential permanent and temporary residents to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. IRCC is also responsible for the issuance and control of Canadian passports and other travel documents that facilitate the travel of Canadian citizens, permanent residents and protected persons.

Lastly, the Department builds a stronger Canada by helping all newcomers settle and integrate into Canadian society and the economy, and by encouraging, granting and providing proof of Canadian citizenship.

IRCC offers its many programs either directly or through contract, grant or contribution agreement, or in partnership with other government departments. Immigration services are offered on the IRCC website, as well as at 25 in-Canada points of service and 61 points of service in 50 countries. As of November 2018, there were 152 visa application centres in 103 countries, 133 application support centresFootnote 28 in the United States, and a panel physicians network operating around the world. Settlement and integration services are offered through a network of over 500 service provider organizations across Canada. The Department also works with Employment and Social Development Canada as its principal domestic passport service delivery partner, leveraging the latter’s extensive network of passport processing centres and walk-in sites (34 passport offices and 315 Service Canada sites). IRCC also partners with Global Affairs Canada, which provides passport services abroad in 206 different locations. For more general information about the department, see the “Supplementary Information” section of this report.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

Annually, through its key lines of business, IRCC interacts with millions of individuals, including those seeking temporary or permanent resident entry into Canada and subsequently settling into Canadian society, and those pursuing Canadian citizenship. The Department is also responsible for passport services in support of individuals seeking to obtain or renew a Canadian passport or other travel document such as a certificate of identity or a refugee travel document.

IRCC works to facilitate the legitimate entry of visitors, economic immigrants, sponsored family members and those seeking protection in Canada, while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians. The Department balances competing pressures, notably: responding to domestic labour market demands and an increasingly mobile work force; contributing to overall economic growth; and addressing efforts to streamline service delivery and enhance the client experience, while responding to increasingly complex safety and security challenges. In addition, to ensure the successful integration of newcomers into the Canadian economy and society, IRCC engages regularly and extensively with federal partners, provinces and territories, as well as other stakeholders on a variety of key immigration-related topics, such as immigration levels planning, economic immigration, and settlement and integration of newcomers, including refugees and protected persons.

IRCC has established a wide-ranging transformation agenda that is based on optimizing current operations and building a foundation that sustains a new culture and way of working. This transformation is aimed at augmenting the client experience by improving processing times, generating simpler and clearer processes and reducing inventories.

In recent years, the Department has experienced significant increases in some of its most important lines of business as many around the world seek to enter Canada temporarily or permanently, and as increasing numbers of eligible permanent residents seek to become Canadian citizens. IRCC’s challenge is to effectively manage these requests to enter and remain in Canada, while working with stakeholders to ensure that newcomers have the best opportunities to succeed and that the Canadian economy and society reap the benefits of newcomer success.

Key risks

IRCC fulfils its mandate within a complex environment influenced by emerging world events, Canadian and global economic, social and political contexts, and shifting migration trends. Active partners in the success of Canada’s immigration and travel continuum include provinces, territories, municipalities, other federal departments, service provider organizations, international organizations, foreign governments, and other third parties. IRCC increasingly relies on these partners to support policy and program development, as well as to deliver services.

To carry out its responsibilities, IRCC holds and manages an extensive inventory of sensitive information. The Department remains vigilant in ensuring the personal information of Canadians and other clients is safeguarded, and that accurate information is available for decision making and information sharing with partners.

In 2018-2019, IRCC continued to balance significant pressures, notably the delivery of the highest levels plan in recent history and ever-increasing application volumes. As a result, the Department faced unprecedented growth in all of its programs and business lines. IRCC has seized the opportunity to implement an ambitious transformation agenda which creates innovative solutions to streamlining service delivery, optimizing resources and enhancing the client experience, while responding to increasingly complex safety and security challenges.

Key Risks
Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to Department’s Core Responsibilities Link to mandate letter commitments and any government-wide or departmental priorities

Reliance on partners and third parties
There is a risk that external partners and third parties may not engage or deliver services in an effective and timely manner, which could affect the achievement of IRCC’s priorities and results

Advanced the two-year strategic plan to deliver high-quality settlement services based on a shared national vision for settlement and integration with provinces and territories to improve consistent settlement services for newcomers.

Continued to engage partners to explore efficiencies in the delivery of the security screening program.

Worked with Employment and Social Development Canada to seek appropriate authorities related to information sharing to produce travel documents for Canadians.

All core responsibilities

Increased annual immigration levels

Delivery of high-quality settlement services

Continuing to welcome refugees and ensuring refugees are integrating successfully into Canada

Reducing application processing times, improving service delivery and client services

Adoption of Bill C-6, An Act to Amend the Citizenship Act (to remove the grounds for revocation of Canadian citizenship from dual nationals)

Improve the Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Management of, and access to, information and data
There is a risk that IRCC may face challenges in accessing accurate data to inform policy development and to measure the success of its programs.

Implemented standardized and ongoing employee training to ensure consistent management of, and access to, data.

Finalized IT Digital Strategy and Roadmap which outlines a path forward for the information management/information technology function in order to align with emerging government policies, such as Digital Government and the Policy on Service.

Persisted in joint planning efforts with provinces and territories to increase information sharing and reduce gaps and overlaps.

All core responsibilities

Increased annual immigration levels

Continuing to welcome refugees and ensuring refugees are integrating successfully into Canada

Reducing application processing times, improving service delivery and client services

Adoption of Bill C-6, An Act to Amend the Citizenship Act (to remove the grounds for revocation of Canadian citizenship from dual nationals)

Improve the Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Sustainable growth
There is a risk across IRCC lines of business that continuous changes and increasing application volumes and demand could hinder IRCC’s capacity to deliver timely and dependable client-centred services.

Launched a new method to provide applicants with more accurate projections for processing times in several permanent resident categories.

Continued to expand advanced analytics data and decisions, and to automate low-risk decision-making processes, which is helping to reduce processing times.

Launched the IRCC service transformation strategy, roadmap and future operating model to improve client service. Client service enhancements include improvements to My Account, the digital intake project for citizenship and the chatbot pilot.

Testing products with clients to ensure that they work as intended.

All core responsibilities

Increased annual immigration levels

Delivery of high-quality settlement services

Continuing to welcome refugees and ensuring refugees are integrating successfully into Canada

Reducing application processing times, improving service delivery and client services

Adoption of Bill C-6, An Act to Amend the Citizenship Act (to remove the grounds for revocation of Canadian citizenship from dual nationals)

Reporting framework

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018-2019 are shown below:

Reporting framework

Text version: Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018-2019
  • Core Responsibility 1: Visitors, International Students and Temporary Workers
    • R1: Entry to Canada of eligible visitors, international students and temporary workers is facilitated
      • I 1. Total number of visas and electronic travel authorizations issued to visitors, international students and temporary workers
      • I 2. Percentage of visitor, international student and temporary worker applicants found inadmissible on health grounds and those who are authorized to enter with a condition on their visa related to health surveillance
      • I 3. Percentage of visitor, international student and temporary worker applicants found inadmissible on safety and security grounds
      • I 4. Percentage of temporary resident business lines that adhere to service standards
      • I 5. Percentage of visitor, international student and temporary worker applicants who report they were satisfied overall with the services they received
    • R2: Facilitation of temporary entry helps to generate economic benefits
      • I 6. Total monetary contribution of visitors and international students to Canada’s economy
      • I 7. Number of temporary workers who fill labour market needs for which Canadians are unavailable
  • Core Responsibility 2: Immigrant and Refugee Selection and Integration
    • R3: Potential permanent residents are selected for immigration to Canada
      • I 8. Total number of permanent resident admissions, against the annual immigration levels plan
      • I 9. Percentage of permanent residents admitted to Canada, outside Quebec, who identify as French-speaking
      • I 10. Percentage of permanent resident applicants found inadmissible on health grounds and those who are permitted admission with a condition on their visa related to health surveillance
      • I 11. Percentage of permanent resident applicants found inadmissible on safety and security grounds
      • I 12. Percentage of permanent resident business lines that adhere to service standards
      • I 13. Percentage of permanent resident applicants who report they were satisfied overall with the services they received
    • R4: Permanent residents are welcomed and benefit from settlement supports
      • I 14. Percentage of Canadians who support the current level of immigration
      • I 15. Percentage of settlement clients who improved their official language skills
      • I 16. Percentage of settlement clients who acquired knowledge and skills to integrate into the Canadian labour market
    • R5: Immigrants and refugees achieve economic independence and contribute to labour force growth
      • I 17. Percentage of newcomers who are employed
      • I 18. Percentage of immigrants and refugees who are in the middle income range or above
      • I 19. Percentage of the Canadian labour force that is made up of immigrants and refugees
    • R6: Immigrants and refugees feel part of and participate in Canadian society
      • I 20. Percentage of immigrants and refugees that have a strong sense of belonging
      • I 21. Percentage of immigrants and refugees who volunteer in Canada
  • Core Responsibility 3: Citizenship and Passports
    • R7: Eligible permanent residents become Canadian citizens
      • I 22. Percentage of permanent residents who become Canadian citizens
      • I 23. Percentage of citizenship applications that are processed within service standards
      • I 24. Percentage of citizenship applicants who report they were satisfied overall with the services they received
    • R8: Canadians’ international travel is facilitated
      • I 25. Percentage compliance of the Canadian passport with international standards
      • I 26. Percentage of passport applications that are processed within service standards
      • I 27. Percentage of passport applicants who report they were satisfied overall with the services they received

Program Inventory

  • Core Responsibility 1: Visitors, International Students and Temporary Workers
    • Visitors
    • International Students
    • Temporary Workers
  • Core Responsibility 2: Immigrant and Refugee Selection and Integration
    • Federal Economic Immigration
    • Provincial Economic Immigration
    • Family Reunification
    • Humanitarian/Compassionate and Discretionary Immigration
    • Refugee Resettlement
    • Asylum
    • Settlement
  • Core Responsibility 3: Citizenship and Passports
    • Citizenship
    • Passport
  • Internal Services

Pursuant to the Treasury Board Policy on Results, the Department has developed its Departmental Results Framework as a replacement for the Program Alignment Architecture and Performance Measurement Framework. The new Results Framework offers a more strategic view that better presents the desired outcomes for Canadians and immigrants of the Department’s work in temporary migration, immigrant and refugee selection and integration, and citizenship and passports.

2018-19 Core Responsibilities and Program Inventory 2017-18 Lowest-level Program of the Program Alignment Architecture Percentage of lowest-level Program Alignment Architecture program (dollars) corresponding to the new Program in the Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Visitors, International Students and Temporary Workers
Visitors 4.1.1 Health Screening 7%
4.1.2 Medical Surveillance and Notifications 7%
4.2.1 Identity Management 72%
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents 67%
International Students 1.2.1 International Students 100%
4.1.1 Health Screening 22%
4.1.2 Medical Surveillance and Notifications 22%
4.2.1 Identity Management 11%
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents 4%
Temporary Workers 1.2.2 Temporary Work Authorization 100%
1.2.3 International Experience Canada 100%
4.1.1 Health Screening 8%
4.1.2 Medical Surveillance and Notifications 8%
4.2.1 Identity Management 7%
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents 5%
Core Responsibility 2: Immigrant and Refugee Selection and Integration
Federal Economic Immigration 1.1.1 Federal Skilled Workers 100%
1.1.2 Federal Skilled Trades 100%
1.1.5 Caregiver 100%
1.1.6 Canadian Experience Class 100%
1.1.7 Federal Business Immigrants 100%
4.1.1 Health Screening 12%
4.1.2 Medical Surveillance and Notifications 12%
4.2.1 Identity Management 3%
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents 5%
Provincial Economic Immigration 1.1.3 Quebec Skilled Workers 100%
1.1.4 Provincial Nominee 100%
1.1.8 Quebec Business Immigrants 100%
4.1.1 Health Screening 16%
4.1.2 Medical Surveillance and Notifications 16%
4.2.1 Identity Management 3%
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents 4%
Family Reunification 2.1.1 Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification 100%
2.1.2 Parents and Grandparents Reunification 100%
4.1.1 Health Screening 19%
4.1.2 Medical Surveillance and Notifications 19%
4.2.1 Identity Management 3%
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents 6%
Humanitarian / Compassionate and Discretionary Immigration 2.1.3 Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Consideration 100%
4.1.1 Health Screening 2%
4.1.2 Medical Surveillance and Notifications 2%
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents 3%
Refugee Resettlement 2.2.1 Government-Assisted Refugees 100%
2.2.2 Privately Sponsored Refugees 100%
2.2.3 Blended Visa Office-Referred Refugees 100%
3.1.3 Immigration Loan 100%
3.1.4 Resettlement Assistance Program 100%
4.1.1 Health Screening 10%
4.1.2 Medical Surveillance and Notifications 10%
4.1.3 Interim Federal Health 52%
4.2.1 Identity Management 1%
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents 3%
Asylum 2.2.4 In-Canada Asylum 100%
2.2.5 Pre-Removal Risk Assessment 100%
4.2.3 Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants 100%
4.1.1 Health Screening 4%
4.1.2 Medical Surveillance and Notifications 4%
4.1.3 Interim Federal Health 48%
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents 3%
Settlement 3.1.1.1 Language Training 100%
3.1.1.2 Community and Labour Market Integration Services 100%
3.1.2 Grant to Quebec 100%
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda 100%
Core Responsibility 3: Citizenship and Passports
Citizenship 3.2.1 Citizenship Awareness 100%
3.2.2 Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation 100%
Passport 4.4 Passport 100%

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s website.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

For any additional information on this report or other parliamentary reports, please contact ParliamentaryReports-RapportsParlementaires@cic.gc.ca.

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision making, by learning what works and what does not.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, Program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance Information Profile (profil de l’information sur le rendement)
The document that identifies the performance information for each Program from the Program Inventory.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.
Program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s Core Responsibilities and Results.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, Program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, Program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time‑limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, Program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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