Renouncing permanent residence

This section contains policy, procedures and guidance used by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada staff. It is posted on the Department’s website as a courtesy to stakeholders.

Background

Prior to November 21, 2014, there was no legislative mechanism under the former Immigration Act or the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) to voluntarily renounce permanent resident status. In order for individuals to have lost permanent resident status under the previous legislative framework, they had to be found not to meet the residency obligation of section A28, be found otherwise inadmissible or lose their protected person status pursuant to paragraph A46(c.1) or (d). If they met the residency obligation and were not otherwise inadmissible, an administrative procedure was followed by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), allowing individuals to relinquish their permanent resident status and be treated as foreign nationals.

Paragraph A46(1)(e) and section 72.6 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR), which came into force November 21, 2014, aimed to close this gap and to provide legislative framework for clients to voluntarily give up their permanent resident status. In some cases, permanent residents know that they failed to meet the residency obligation and have no desire to remain in Canada as permanent residents, but they wish to visit Canada without being reported for non-compliance with respect to their residency requirements. In other cases, individuals may be required to provide proof that they have given up Canadian permanent resident status in order to obtain benefits from their country of origin or a third country, such as accepting a diplomatic posting, renewing civil documents (national identity cards, health or pension coverage, etc.) or entering military service. These are only a few of the most common examples. The legislation does not require officers to assess applicants’ reasoning when accepting renunciations.

Note: Under the previous legal and administrative frameworks, voluntarily giving up permanent resident status was usually referred to as “relinquishment”. In the current regulatory framework, giving up permanent resident status is referred to as “renunciation”, unless it is referring to one of those previous legal and administrative frameworks.

Determining whether the applicant is a permanent resident

Applicant status

Before processing an application for voluntary renunciation, an officer must first determine whether the applicant is a permanent resident. An applicant who has already lost permanent resident status, for example, through a negative residency determination, is a foreign national. If a foreign national applies to voluntarily renounce their permanent resident status, their application should be returned unprocessed along with the letter 3. See Loss of permanent resident status for more information on handling individuals who have lost their permanent resident status.

An individual who has not lost their permanent resident status through one of the mechanisms set out in section A46 is still a permanent resident and must be treated as such until an officer determines otherwise, either by making a negative residency determination or by approving an application to renounce permanent resident status. A permanent resident who would like to be treated as a foreign national but has not lost their permanent resident status under section A46 must complete the Application to Voluntarily Renounce Permanent Resident Status form [IMM 5782 (PDF, 639.41KB)] and provide the required supporting documents (see Assessing an application to voluntarily renounce permanent resident status below).

A permanent resident who renounces their permanent resident status in Canada becomes a temporary resident and is admitted for a period of six months from the day the application is approved. If a permanent resident makes their application to renounce at a port of entry or is not physically present in Canada on the day their application is approved, they lose their permanent resident status immediately and do not have any temporary resident status.

Application intake

For clients outside Canada, the application package should be sent, by regular mail, to the local visa office. For in-Canada clients, the application package should be sent to the Operations Support Centre at the following address:

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Operations Support Centre
Voluntary Renunciation of Permanent Resident Status
365 Laurier Avenue West
Ground Floor Mailroom, South Tower
Ottawa, Ontario  K1A 1L1

The application should then be assessed according to the instructions (see Assessing an application to voluntarily renounce permanent resident status below).

Note: If the applicant was found inadmissible and lost permanent resident status for a reason other than failing to meet the residency obligation, officers should be careful in determining whether the applicant is still inadmissible to Canada when assessing any other applications submitted by the applicant.

Voluntary relinquishment under the former Immigration Act

The Immigration Act was in force until June 27, 2002. If the client voluntarily relinquished their permanent resident status on or before that date by completing an IMM 1342B form, the relinquishment should be accepted as valid and the client treated as a foreign national by IRCC and the CBSA if the following conditions are met:

  • Global Case Management System (GCMS) records show that the relinquishment was properly documented by way of a Field Operations Support System (FOSS) Type 10 non-computer-based (NCB) entry (this can be verified in GCMS under Client UCI, FOSS Record Details); and
  • the client acknowledges in writing that they have renounced their permanent residence.

If these requirements are not met and the client applies to renounce their permanent resident status again, the application should be processed.

Voluntary relinquishment under previous administrative procedures of the IRPA

The IRPA came into force on June 28, 2002. Voluntary relinquishment processed between June 28, 2002, and November 21, 2014, would have taken place under the previous administrative procedures of the IRPA. These relinquishments have no legal effect. Further explanation is provided below.

Clients can only lose permanent resident status pursuant to the provisions of section A46.

Voluntary relinquishment after failing to meet the residency obligation under the IRPA

If, before November 21, 2014, the client was found not to have met the residency obligation, they sometimes waived their appeal rights in writing in order to be treated as a foreign national (e.g., being granted admission to Canada or being granted a temporary resident visa [TRV]). This was sometimes considered voluntary relinquishment of permanent resident status.

Even if the client waived their appeal rights, they would still have had the right to appeal, because waiving the appeal rights has no legal effect. It must therefore be determined whether an appeal was made and whether it was successful or not.

If the client has not yet appealed the negative residency decision to the Immigration Appeal Division (IAD), the officer must determine whether the appeal period has expired. The appeal period of a negative residency determination overseas is 60 days; the appeal period of a removal order issued in Canada is 30 days. If the appeal period has expired without an appeal having been filed, the client is a foreign national. If the client appealed the decision and lost the appeal at the IAD, they are a foreign national. In either case, the application to renounce should be returned unprocessed, along with the letter 3.

If the client appealed the negative residency determination and the appeal was successful at the IAD, the client is a permanent resident, and an application to renounce permanent resident status can be processed.

If the client was found not to meet the residency obligation and the appeal period has not expired, but the client applies to renounce their permanent resident status, an officer can process the application to renounce.

Status of the applicant unclear from the GCMS record

If it cannot be determined from the GCMS record whether the applicant is a permanent resident or a foreign national, they should be treated as a permanent resident if it appears they were ever granted permanent resident status. In this case, an application to renounce permanent resident status can be processed without clarifying further with the applicant. If it does not appear they were ever granted permanent resident status, they should be treated as a foreign national.

Assessing an application to voluntarily renounce permanent resident status

Required proof of citizenship or valid permanent resident status in another country

A copy of a passport or a citizenship certificate from another country is normally provided along with the application to renounce, but officers should be flexible in considering alternate proofs of citizenship. A copy of a permanent resident card (PRC) or another document from another country should also be accepted.

Officers should take exceptional care before accepting travel documents issued by other countries for refugees and stateless individuals because such documents are not always indicative of the individuals’ right to return to and reside in the country of issuance.

In addition, renouncing permanent resident status in Canada is sometimes a condition of obtaining permanent residence in another country. If the applicant has no other citizenship, the officer should request documentary evidence from the applicant indicating they will receive permanent resident status in the other country before approving the application to renounce permanent resident status in Canada.

Requirement for signature of all parents and legal guardians of applicants under 18 years of age

Every person who has the legal authority to act on behalf of a client under 18 years of age must have consented to the applicant renouncing their permanent resident status [R72.6(b)]. They indicate consent by signing the application form.

The officer must ensure that both parents have signed the application form by verifying it against the applicant’s birth certificate.

If the birth certificate provided does not include the names of the parents, additional documentation that carries the names of the child and both parents, such as a copy of the baptismal certificate, a civil registry document, a school transcript or a national identity card, must be provided by the client.

If only one parent has signed the application form, sole custody should be confirmed through

  • the birth certificate, indicating that the father is unknown;
  • the death certificate of one parent; or
  • a court order or a written agreement granting sole custody (see details below).

In the absence of such documentation, the application should be refused.

Even if one parent has a court order granting sole custody, the other non-custodial parent may have the right to be consulted on decisions related to the child. The authorization of the non-custodial parent is required for the applicant to renounce permanent resident status, unless the court order explicitly states that the non-custodial parent has no right to participate in decisions related to the child’s place of residence.

If the individuals signing the application form are not named on the birth certificate and no other evidence of parental relationship or guardianship is provided, the officer should refuse the application. Applicants bear the responsibility of providing adoption orders or other court documents to satisfy officers that the individuals signing the application have the legal right to do so. When provided, adoption documents should also be examined to ensure that all individuals with legal authority over the applicant have signed the application form.

If officers are able to establish through paper or electronic records that the individuals signing the application are the same as the parents or guardians who sponsored the child or with whom the child immigrated to Canada, this should normally be sufficient to meet the requirement of paragraph R72.6(b).

Procedures for approving or refusing the application

If the applicant meets the requirements to renounce permanent resident status, and the application is approved, the officer should send the applicant the letter 1.

If it is determined that an applicant does not meet the requirements to renounce permanent resident status, the application should be refused. The officer’s rationale for the determination must be included in the GCMS notes.

If the application is refused, the officer should send the applicant the letter 2.

Each applicant should receive their own letter.

Procedure for PRC disposal in cases of positive renunciation decisions

Clients are asked to submit their valid PRC with their application to renounce. Expired PRCs do not need to be submitted; if they are submitted, they should be handled as set out below.

At this time, valid PRCs for clients who have successfully renounced permanent resident status are automatically cancelled (invalidated) when the positive decision is recorded in GCMS.

Positive renunciation decisions rendered in Canada

For PRCs where the validity period has expired

  1. There is no need to record anything in GCMS. Package these separately and send them to the PRC processing centre (CPC-PRC) in Sydney to have them destroyed.
  2. Include a cover letter indicating “Permanent resident cards expired – for destruction”, so the CPC-PRC in Sydney knows what to do with the cards without having to check them in GCMS individually.
  3. Label each package clearly “Permanent resident cards expired – for destruction” so they are not put in storage unnecessarily.

For PRCs where the validity period has not expired

  1. Record cards in GCMS as cancelled or inactive with the reason “destroyed”, ensuring that the correct card is being cancelled.
  2. Package cards separately, in batches, and send to the CPC-PRC in Sydney.
  3. Indicate on the cover letter “Permanent resident cards cancelled – for destruction”, so the mailroom staff is aware of the content and appropriate action can be taken.

If a client submitted the Solemn Declaration concerning a permanent resident card that was lost, stolen, destroyed or never received form [IMM 5451]

  1. Officers will verify in GCMS whether the PRC validity has expired.
    1. If PRC validity has not expired, follow the instructions above.
    2. If PRC validity has expired, no action is required.

Positive renunciation decisions rendered in visa offices

For PRCs where the validity period has expired

  1. There is no need to record anything in GCMS.
  2. Collect and shred cards on-site. Do not return expired PRCs to the CPC-PRC in Sydney.

For PRCs where the validity period has not expired

  1. Overseas offices are unable to cancel PRCs in GCMS.
  2. Officers will email the PRC-Sydney-Referral box with the subject line “Renunciation permanent resident card update required”. The email should contain the client’s unique client identifier (UCI) and information pertinent to the card to be cancelled (PRC number, date of renunciation).
  3. To comply with privacy requirements for transmission of client information between the email systems of different departments, the email must not contain the client’s personal information (e.g., name, date of birth). It must contain only information linked to the client’s GCMS record.
  4. Once the CPC-PRC in Sydney is informed, shred the PRC on-site. Do not return the cancelled PRC to the CPC-PRC in Sydney.

If the client has submitted the Solemn Declaration concerning a permanent resident card that was lost, stolen, destroyed or never received form [IMM 5451]

  1. Officers will verify in GCMS whether the PRC validity has expired.
    1. If PRC validity has not expired, follow the instructions above.
    2. If PRC validity has expired, no action is required.

Exceptional circumstances

If the parent meets the requirements to renounce, but the child does not

It is anticipated that most applications involving applicants under 18 years of age will be made along with applications for their parents. In the event that the parents meet the requirements to renounce their permanent resident status, but the child does not, the officer should approve the applications that meet the renunciation requirements and refuse those that do not.

Protected persons wishing to renounce their permanent residence

If a protected person renounces their permanent residence, they maintain their protected person status and thus may remain in Canada. However, if the protected person leaves Canada without a valid refugee travel document, there is no guarantee that they will be able to travel back to Canada or be readmitted.

However, unless there are grounds for cessation of refugee protection [A108] or the person is inadmissible on serious grounds, protected persons who wish to return to Canada should be assisted in returning and generally should be readmitted.

A protected person seeking to renounce their permanent resident status should be counselled by the office processing the application on the impact of renouncing permanent resident status (i.e., the possibility of not being able to return to Canada if they leave).

If the applicant does not meet the requirements to renounce but may be otherwise inadmissible to Canada

If an applicant is ineligible to renounce but also appears to be inadmissible, the officer should complete the processing of the application to renounce and refuse it, based on the applicable ground of ineligibility. The applicant’s possible inadmissibility can then be assessed under normal inadmissibility processing instructions.

If an officer must refuse an application to renounce due to ineligibility, but the applicant still wishes to cease being a permanent resident, the officer can suggest the option of obtaining a residency determination by applying for either a permanent resident travel document (PRTD), if the client is outside Canada, or a PRC, if the client is in Canada.

If a voluntary renunciation is received along with other application types

An application to renounce permanent resident status may be submitted with or without another application type. If an application is received alone, the officer should determine the applicant’s status (see Applicant status above) and assess the application (see Assessing an application to voluntarily renounce permanent resident status above).

If an application to voluntarily renounce permanent resident status is received along with an application for permanent residence (APR) or an application for a TRV, then the officer should follow the specific procedures below.

Permanent residence renunciation received along with an APR

If the applicant is a foreign national, the application to renounce should be returned unprocessed, along with the letter 3. Processing of the APR can then continue.

If the applicant is still a permanent resident, the application to voluntarily renounce should be processed first. Processing of the APR can then continue.

Permanent residence renunciation received along with a TRV application

If the applicant is a foreign national, the application to renounce should be returned unprocessed, along with the letter 3. Processing of the TRV can then continue. If the applicant is still a permanent resident, the application to renounce permanent residence should be processed, followed by the TRV.

If the renunciation is refused and the applicant has a valid PRC, they can travel to Canada with it. If the client does not have a valid PRC, they can apply for a PRTD, which is processed according to existing instructions. If the renunciation is approved, processing of the TRV can continue.

If a client applied for a TRV without an accompanying application to renounce but still appears as a permanent resident in GCMS or FOSS, the officer should send the letter 4 to the client to inform them that they still hold permanent resident status. The letter gives the client two options: withdraw their TRV application and apply for a PRTD or submit a voluntary renunciation application.

If the client opts to withdraw the TRV and apply for a PRTD, their TRV fees must be refunded, and they must pay the PRTD processing fees. The basis for the TRV fee refund is that the client applied for a service that cannot be granted because of their status (a TRV cannot be issued to a permanent resident).

If a voluntary renunciation application is submitted and approved, the officer should continue processing the TRV.

Voluntary renunciation received at the port of entry

Officers should be careful about counselling the client (see Applicant status above). While officers should not actively encourage clients to renounce their permanent resident status, it can be presented as an option. If the client is a foreign national, no application to renounce should be accepted and the client should be assessed as a foreign national. If the client is a permanent resident, the application to renounce permanent resident status should be processed.

If the client chooses to proceed with renunciation, they should complete the application form and provide as many supporting documents as possible. The application must be thoroughly and properly assessed, because the applicant cannot file an appeal of the decision to the IAD. If the applicant cannot provide documentary evidence showing they meet the requirements to renounce permanent resident status, the application should be refused.

Officers should take special care to ensure that any applications involving applicants under 18 years of age meet the appropriate requirements (see Requirement for signature of all parents and legal guardians of applicants under 18 years of age above).

If the renunciation is refused for failure to have the required documentation, the applicant should be allowed to enter Canada as a permanent resident. Officers should consult the section on situations where renunciation is refused, but there are concerns with admissibility to Canada (see If the applicant does not meet the requirements to renounce but may be otherwise inadmissible to Canada above). In particular, a negative residency determination should not be made at the port of entry on clients who cannot renounce, even if the client requests it. Instead, the client should be allowed to enter Canada and told to make another application to renounce their permanent residence from within Canada once they have the required documentation.

If the application to renounce is approved and all other requirements for entry as a temporary resident are met, the applicant can be given an entry stamp and admitted to Canada as a temporary resident for a period of six months.

Applicants must be provided with a photocopy of the signed application as well as a decision letter (see Procedures for approving or refusing the application above). Officers must properly document the decision in GCMS (see GCMS instructions below). The signed application should also be sent for microfilming (see Archiving application forms below).

An officer should approve an application to renounce only if the officer is satisfied that the applicant will

  • respect the conditions of their temporary resident status (including not working or studying without authorization); and
  • leave Canada at the end of the period authorized for their stay.

If the officer is satisfied that the applicant will comply with these conditions, the officer may process the renunciation application in place of the section A44 report.

Outstanding section A44 reports and requests to renounce permanent residence

There may be circumstances in which an individual with a section A44 report written against them indicates they do not want to go through the removal order process and would rather renounce their permanent residence. This could occur in cases where the client has failed to meet the residency obligation (e.g., after making a PRC application) or is inadmissible for another reason.

Officers must exercise care before approving an application to renounce permanent resident status because approving an application inland grants the applicant six months of temporary resident status. As a general rule, an officer should approve an application to renounce from applicants with outstanding section A44 reports only if the officer is satisfied that

  • the only inadmissibility is for failing to meet the residency obligation;
  • the applicant will respect the conditions of their temporary resident status (including not working or studying without authorization); and
  • the applicant will leave Canada at the end of the period authorized for their stay.

If the officer is satisfied the applicant will comply with these conditions, the officer may process the renunciation application in place of the section A44 report. The applicant must complete the IMM 5782 form. The officer may also wish to ensure that the applicant has read the guide thoroughly and understands and consents to the consequences of renouncing permanent resident status. Once the applicant has renounced, the section A44 report can be closed with no further action.

If an officer or a Minister’s delegate is not satisfied of the above facts, the application can be refused, and the section A44 report process can continue.

Applications to renounce permanent residence and other active IRCC applications

Instructions for the office processing permanent residence renunciation

If a client makes an application to renounce their permanent resident status, any sponsorship applications made by them that are in process must be suspended until a decision on the application to renounce is rendered. If the sponsor has renounced their permanent resident status, they are no longer eligible to sponsor their family member, and the family member’s application should be refused on that basis. Any citizenship applications the applicant may have submitted should also be suspended.

When an application to renounce is received, the officer should check GCMS for any active sponsorship, family class, citizenship, PRTD or PRC applications. If it is anticipated that the renunciation application will take more than a day to process, the officer should send an email to the offices responsible for the sponsorship, family class, citizenship, PRTD or PRC application, indicating that they have received the application to renounce permanent residence and that the sponsorship, family class, citizenship, PRTD or PRC application should be suspended. The email subject line should include the sponsorship, family class, citizenship, PRTD or PRC application number and the words “Suspend application – Permanent residence renunciation”.

Once a decision has been made on the renunciation application, the officer should inform the office responsible for the sponsorship, family class, citizenship, PRTD or PRC application of the outcome so that the appropriate action can be taken on the suspended application.

For family class applications, the officer should email the mailbox addresses of the primary and secondary offices in GCMS. For citizenship applications, the officer should email the PRC-Sydney-Referral mailbox address. If it appears the file has been referred inland for testing, a ceremony or other processing, or if in doubt, the officer should email the inland office as well.

For PRTD applications, the officer should notify the visa office processing the application. To contact visa offices for family class or PRTD applications, the officer should type “mission” in the IRCC email directory for the complete list of visa office general mailbox addresses. For PRC applications, the officer should notify the PRC processing centre.

Instructions for offices processing sponsorship or family class applications

If notification of an application to renounce permanent resident status is received, the primary or secondary office that is responsible for the file should put the sponsorship or family class application on hold and set the “Bring Forward” feature to 60 days to follow up on the renunciation of permanent residence if needed. No other action should be taken on the sponsorship or family class application until a decision is made on the renunciation application.

If the application to renounce permanent resident status is refused, processing of the sponsorship or family class application should continue. However, the office processing the sponsorship or family class application may want to take the application to renounce into consideration in assessing whether the sponsor continues to meet the residency obligation related to sponsorship.

If the application to renounce permanent resident status is approved, the Case Processing Centre in Mississauga must refuse the sponsor for not meeting the requirements of subsection R130(1) in that the sponsor is not a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident. The APR for the sponsored family member should be processed according to normal procedures when the sponsor is found not to be an eligible sponsor.

In the event of a refusal, the processing fee (sponsorship and permanent resident application) should not be refunded; if the applicant paid the right of permanent residence fee, it should be refunded. The appeal rights letter should still be sent to the sponsor.

Instructions for the office processing citizenship applications

If notification of a renunciation of permanent resident status is received, the citizenship application should be put on hold, and the “Bring Forward” feature should be set to 60 days to follow up on the renunciation of permanent residence, if needed. No other action should be taken on the citizenship application until a decision is made on the renunciation application.

If the application to renounce permanent resident status is refused, the citizenship application can continue to be processed. Citizenship officers are encouraged to closely assess residence and the applicant’s intent to reside in Canada.

If the application to renounce permanent resident status is approved, the citizenship application can be refused because the applicant no longer meets the requirement of paragraph 5(1)(c) of the Citizenship Act to be a permanent resident. The decision must be made by the judge at a local office. The Case Processing Centre in Sydney should forward the file to the local office, where it will be processed according to instructions for cases in which written confirmation is received that the applicant is no longer a permanent resident of Canada. Processing fees should not be refunded; if the applicant paid the right of citizenship fee, it should be refunded.

Instructions for offices processing PRC or PRTD applications

If notification of an application to renounce permanent resident status is received, the PRC or PRTD application should be put on hold, and a 60-day “Bring Forward” should be set to follow up on the renunciation of permanent residence, if needed. No other action should be taken on the application until a decision is made on the renunciation application.

If the application to renounce permanent resident status is refused, the PRC or PRTD application can continue being processed. Processing agents and officers are encouraged to assess residency closely.

If the application to renounce permanent resident status is approved, the PRC or PRTD application must be refused, because the client is no longer a permanent resident and no longer meets the requirement of subsection A31(1). Processing fees should not be refunded because the application was being processed until notification of the application to renounce was received.

Counselling the client

Clients should not be counselled to renounce their permanent resident status. They can be presented with the various options available to them, but they should not be encouraged to choose one course of action over another.

If a client applies to voluntarily renounce their permanent resident status by submitting an IMM 5782 form, the application should be processed without further counselling the applicant. The legislation does not require that officers assess the applicant’s reasoning when accepting renunciation. It is expected that they have read and understood the application guide and form, and sought additional clarification, if needed.

Administrative instructions

GCMS instructions

In order to process applications received in Canada and overseas, officers should create a new case type in GCMS: “Voluntary Renunciation of PR status”. When a positive decision of the renunciation case is entered, the system amends the client record to indicate that the client is no longer a permanent resident of Canada, and the PRC automatically becomes “inactive” on the Clients screen.

Definition clarification

The “effective date” is the date the decision is made. It should be the same as the date of decision recorded in GCMS.

The “rec’d date” is the date the application was submitted. In instances where the application is mailed to a visa office, this may be a different date from the “effective date”. In instances where the application is submitted in person, this date will be the same as the “effective date”.

To create a renunciation case and render a decision

  1. Navigate to the Search – Person screen.
  2. Click New.
  3. Enter information in the following fields:
    1. Family Name
    2. Given Name
    3. Gender
    4. COB
    5. DOB
  4. Review the results in the Name Hit List, highlight the appropriate record and then click the UCI/Party ID.
  5. Update all appropriate information on the Clients screen.
  6. Scan and upload the application form [IMM 5782].
    1. In the Clients screen, query for the client.
    2. In the Documents view, in the ID Supporting Documents sub-tab, scan the document as per the usual procedures and associate it to GCMS.
    3. In the Type field, select “CDN Immigration Docs”.
    4. In the Sub Type field, select “Relinquishment”. It should be noted that OMC had created a change request to GCMS to change “Relinquishment” to “Renunciation of PR Status”.
    5. Save the information.
  7. Click the Associations view tab. The system defaults to the Applications & Cases sub-view tab.
  8. Click New.
  9. In the Category/Case field, click the MVG button. The system displays the Immigration Category window.
  10. Select “Renunciation of PR Status”.
  11. In the Rec’d Date field, enter the appropriate information. The system creates a prospective application.
  12. Save the information.
  13. In the Applications & Cases field, click on the hyperlink for the appropriate case beginning with the letter “Q”.
  14. In the Effective Date field, enter the appropriate value.
  15. In the FOSS Documents # field, if not populated, enter the permanent resident document number.
  16. In the Decision field, select the appropriate value from the drop-down menu.
  17. Save the information. The decision letter is automatically created in the Correspondence > Outgoing tab; this document is titled “Confirmation of Renunciation of PR Status”. For “approved”, “refused” or “cancelled” decisions, once Correspondence > Status > Sent to Client is set, the application closes automatically. The “approved” decision automatically sets the client’s PRC to “inactive”.

Archiving application forms

Application forms contain a declaration from the applicant confirming their intention to renounce their permanent resident status. Therefore, applications should be kept as a permanent record, especially when they result in a change of status for the applicant.

Visa offices that are able to record renunciation decisions in GCMS should scan and upload documentation to the UCI of the client (see GCMS instructions above).

Port of entry offices without GCMS access should send only approved paper applications and the decision letters for archiving to the Microfilm Unit. Refused applications and applications from individuals found to be foreign nationals should not be sent for microfilming. Officers must use notes to record receiving the voluntary renunciation application and the reasons for which the application was not approved.

Processing fees

In order to encourage clients who do not wish to be permanent residents to renounce their permanent resident status rather than apply for a complex permanent residence redetermination, there is no fee for voluntary renunciation. For applications received in Canada or overseas, officers should use the GCMS fee code “FPN” (Fee Payment Not Required).

Fees for other applications (e.g., TRV, study permit, work permit, permanent residence) must still be taken.

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