Report on Plans and Priorities 2014–2015

ISSN 2292-5929

Table of Contents


2014–2015 Estimates

PART III—Departmental Expenditure Plans: Reports on Plans and Priorities

Purpose

Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP) are individual expenditure plans for each department and agency. These reports provide increased levels of detail over a three-year period on an organization’s main priorities by strategic outcome, program and planned/expected results, including links to related resource requirements presented in the Main Estimates. In conjunction with the Main Estimates, Reports on Plans and Priorities serve to inform members of Parliament on planned expenditures of departments and agencies, and support Parliament’s consideration of supply bills. The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates by the President of the Treasury Board.

Estimates Documents

The Estimates are comprised of three parts:

Part I—Government Expenditure Plan—provides an overview of the Government’s requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

Part II—Main Estimates—supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

In accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Parts I and II must be tabled on or before March 1.

Part III—Departmental Expenditure Plans—consists of two components:

  • Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP)
  • Departmental Performance Report (DPR)

DPRs are individual department and agency accounts of results achieved against planned performance expectations as set out in respective RPPs.

The DPRs for the most recently completed fiscal year are tabled in the fall by the President of the Treasury Board.

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services. Supplementary Estimates also provide information on changes to expenditure forecasts of major statutory items as well as on such items as: transfers of funds between votes; debt deletion; loan guarantees; and new or increased grants.

For more information on the Estimates, please consult the Treasury Board Secretariat Web site.

Links to the Estimates

As shown above, RPPs make up part of the Part III of the Estimates documents. Whereas Part II emphasizes the financial aspect of the Estimates, Part III focuses on financial and non-financial performance information, both from a planning and priorities standpoint (RPP), and an achievements and results perspective (DPR).

The Management, Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) establishes a structure for display of financial information in the Estimates and reporting to Parliament via RPPs and DPRs. When displaying planned spending, RPPs rely on the Estimates as a basic source of financial information.

Main Estimates expenditure figures are based on the Annual Reference Level Update, which is prepared in the fall. In comparison, planned spending found in RPPs includes the Estimates as well as any other amounts that have been approved through a Treasury Board submission up to February 1st (See Definitions section). This readjusting of the financial figures allows for a more up-to-date portrait of planned spending by program.

Changes to the presentation of the Report on Plans and Priorities

Several changes have been made to the presentation of the RPP partially to respond to a number of requests—from the House of Commons Standing Committees on Public Accounts (PAC—Report 15), in 2010; and on Government and Operations Estimates (OGGO—Report 7), in 2012—to provide more detailed financial and non-financial performance information about programs within RPPs and DPRs, thus improving the ease of their study to support appropriations approval.

  • In Section II, financial, human resources and performance information is now presented at the program and sub-program levels for more granularity.
  • The report’s general format and terminology have been reviewed for clarity and consistency purposes.
  • Other efforts aimed at making the report more intuitive and focused on Estimates information were made to strengthen alignment with the Main Estimates.

How to read this document

RPPs are divided into four sections:

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

This section allows the reader to get a general glance at the organization. It provides a description of the organization’s purpose, as well as basic financial and human resources information. This section opens with the new Organizational Profile, which displays general information about the department, including the names of the minister and the deputy head, the ministerial portfolio, the year the department was established, and the main legislative authorities. This subsection is followed by a new subsection entitled Organizational Context, which includes the Raison d’être, the Responsibilities, the Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture, the Organizational Priorities and the Risk Analysis. This section ends with the Planned Expenditures, the Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes, the Estimates by Votes and the Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. It should be noted that this section does not display any non-financial performance information related to programs (please see Section II).

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section provides detailed financial and non-financial performance information for strategic outcomes, programs and sub-programs. This section allows the reader to learn more about programs by reading their respective description and narrative entitled “Planning Highlights.” This narrative speaks to key services or initiatives which support the plans and priorities presented in Section I; it also describes how performance information supports the department’s strategic outcome or parent program.

Section III: Supplementary Information

This section provides supporting information related to departmental plans and priorities. In this section, the reader will find future-oriented statement of operations and a link to supplementary information tables regarding transfer payments, as well as information related to the greening government operations, internal audits and evaluations, horizontal initiatives, user fees, major Crown and transformational projects, and up-front multi-year funding, where applicable to individual organizations. The reader will also find a link to the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report, produced annually by the Minister of Finance, which provides estimates and projections of the revenue impacts of federal tax measures designed to support the economic and social priorities of the Government of Canada.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

In this last section, the reader will have access to organizational contact information.

Definitions

Appropriation

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary Vs. Non-budgetary Expenditures

Budgetary expenditures—operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Non-budgetary expenditures—net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Expected Result

An outcome that a program is designed to achieve.

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. FTEs are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada Outcomes

A set of high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (MRRS)

A common approach and structure to the collection, management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information.

An MRRS provides detailed information on all departmental programs (e.g., program costs, program expected results and their associated targets, how they align to the government’s priorities and intended outcomes, etc.) and establishes the same structure for both internal decision making and external accountability.

Planned Spending

For the purpose of the RPP, planned spending refers to those amounts for which a Treasury Board submission approval has been received by no later than February 1, 2014. This cut-off date differs from the Main Estimates process. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditure levels presented in the 2014–2015 Main Estimates.

Program

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results, and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture

A structured inventory of a department’s programs, where programs are arranged in a hierarchical manner to depict the logical relationship between each program and the Strategic Outcomes to which they contribute.

Spending Areas

Government of Canada categories of expenditures. There are four spending areas (social affairs, economic affairs, international affairs and government affairs) each comprised of three to five Government of Canada outcomes.

Strategic Outcome

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the department’s mandate, vision and core functions.

Sunset Program

A time-limited program that does not have ongoing funding or policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made as to whether to continue the program. (In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration).

Whole-of-Government Framework

A map of the financial and non-financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations that aligns their programs to a set of high level outcome areas defined for the government as a whole.

Minister’s Message

As Canada's Citizenship and Immigration Minister, I am pleased to present the 2014–2015 Report on Plans and Priorities for Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC).

The Government of Canada is focused on creating jobs and opportunities by protecting the economy, keeping taxes low, and ensuring the health, safety and security of Canadians. Immigration remains central to that focus. The plans outlined in this report will ensure the immigration system fuels Canada's future prosperity, as we also maintain our generous family reunification and humanitarian record.

Once again this year, we plan to welcome between 240,000 and 265,000 new permanent residents to Canada, an overall admissions range that has remained consistent since 2006, and represents the highest sustained level of immigration in Canadian history.

To meet the growing needs of Canada's work force in urban and rural communities, we are welcoming more immigrants in the economic category. Our government has stressed the importance of economic immigration in helping Canada recover from the effects of the global economic downturn of 2008–2009, and expects the need for economic immigration to increase for years to come. We plan to welcome 63% of newcomers via our economic immigration programs. This includes record levels for two of our most successful and fastest-growing programs: the Canadian Experience Class and the Provincial Nominee Program.

CIC will continue to pursue transformative changes to our policies and operations, bringing more speed and flexibility to the immigration system and better linking that system with Canada's evolving economic and labour market needs. As reaffirmed in the government's most recent Speech from the Throne, these changes will culminate in the introduction of a new active recruitment model in January 2015 that will support the selection of immigrants based on the skills that Canadian employers need which will lead to economic success.

Building on our National Settlement Conference in the fall of 2013, we are planning improvements to our integration and settlement systems. A particular focus is on finding innovative ways to begin the settlement process overseas, before immigrants arrive in Canada.

We are working toward fulfilling another commitment in the Speech from the Throne: to complete reforms to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. These reforms will ensure Canadians are considered first for available jobs and support Canadian economic interests, including international agreements and partnerships.

We will continue to move forward with our Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification, which will reunite families more quickly while reducing backlogs and improving processing times.

Our refugee program will remain one of the most generous on earth. The new asylum system that came into effect in December 2012 will continue to provide genuine refugees with timelier protection, as it curtails abuse of the system. With a large drop in asylum claims from designated countries of origin that do not normally produce refugees, we will be able to devote more resources to refugee claimants who truly need Canada's protection.

CIC's work with our international partners, particularly the United States, will remain an important focus. We will continue to work with our American partners, in particular, to make biometric information sharing a reality. Also, as part of the Beyond the Border Action Plan, we will be establishing a common Canada-U.S. approach to screening travellers before they reach our shores via the Electronic Travel Authorization program, and recording the entry and exit of travellers crossing the North American borders.

The Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act, tabled in February 2014, represents the first comprehensive reforms to the Citizenship Act in more than a generation. Once implemented, these reforms will strengthen the value of Canadian citizenship, protect against fraud, and increase efficiencies throughout the citizenship Program. They will also support the integration of new citizens and ensure they are better prepared to participate fully in Canadian life.

CIC is dedicated to ensuring our operations and client services are as modern and as efficient as possible, while maintaining program integrity. One highlight is our work to modernize the Passport Program. Following the transfer of responsibility from Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada in July 2013, CIC has been working with Service Canada to modernize the passport program in order to strengthen program security and integrity, improve accessibility, and increase program efficiency.

We also recently assumed operational responsibility for International Experience Canada, a program that allows young Canadians and foreign nationals to gain travel and work experience in each other's countries for up to two years. We will undertake an examination of International Experience Canada in the context of the broader review of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program, and will increase awareness of the program among potential Canadian participants.

CIC will continue to promote an inclusive and multicultural society through public education initiatives and community engagement, and by maintaining the momentum of Canada's successful chairmanship of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance in 2013–2014.

As Canada's Citizenship and Immigration Minister, I am proud of these plans and certain they benefit Canadian society, Canada's economy and newcomers who wish to call Canada home.


The Honourable Chris Alexander, PC , MP
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: Chris Alexander

Deputy head: Anita Biguzs

Ministerial portfolio:

Year established: 1994

Main legislative authorities: Section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867, the Citizenship Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) and the Canadian Multiculturalism Act.

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

In the first years after Confederation, Canada's leaders had a powerful vision: to connect Canada by rail and make the West the world's breadbasket as a foundation for the country's economic prosperity. This vision meant quickly populating the Prairies, leading the Government of Canada to establish its first national immigration policies. Immigrants have been a driving force in Canada's nationhood and its economic prosperity—as farmers settling lands, as workers in factories fuelling industrial growth, as entrepreneurs and as innovators helping Canada to compete in the global, knowledge-based economy.

Responsibilities

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) selects foreign nationals as permanent and temporary residents and offers Canada's protection to refugees. The Department develops Canada's admissibility policy, which sets the conditions for entering and remaining in Canada; it also conducts, in collaboration with its partners, the screening of potential permanent and temporary residents to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. Fundamentally, the Department builds a stronger Canada by helping immigrants and refugees settle and integrate into Canadian society and the economy, and by encouraging and facilitating Canadian citizenship. To achieve this, CIC operates 27 in-Canada points of service and 70 points of service in 63 countries.

CIC's broad mandate is partly derived from the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act. The Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada is responsible for the Citizenship Act of 1977 and shares responsibility with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness for IRPA, which came into force following major legislative reform in 2002. CIC and the Canada Border Services Agency support their respective ministers in the administration and enforcement of IRPA. These organizations work collaboratively to achieve and balance the objectives of the immigration and refugee programs.

In October 2008, responsibility for administration of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act was transferred to CIC from the Department of Canadian Heritage. Under the Act, CIC promotes the integration of individuals and communities into all aspects of Canadian society and helps to build a stronger, more cohesive society. Jurisdiction over immigration is a shared responsibility between the federal and the provincial and territorial governments under section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867.

In July 2013, the primary responsibility for the Passport Program was transferred from Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) to CIC, while passport service delivery will be provided through Service Canada.

In August 2013, CIC assumed the responsibility for International Experience Canada (IEC) – archived from DFATD. This transfer allowed the program to better align with government priorities and labour market demands in Canada by linking IEC to other immigration programs.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

  • Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy
    • Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents
      • Sub-program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers
      • Sub-program 1.1.2: Federal Skilled Tradespersons
      • Sub-program 1.1.3: Quebec Skilled Workers
      • Sub-program 1.1.4: Provincial Nominees
      • Sub-program 1.1.5: Live-in Caregivers
      • Sub-program 1.1.6: Canadian Experience Class
      • Sub-program 1.1.7: Federal Business Immigrants
      • Sub-program 1.1.8: Quebec Business Immigrants
    • Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents
      • Sub-program 1.2.1: International Students
      • Sub-program 1.2.2: Temporary Foreign Workers
  • Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
    • Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration
      • Sub-program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification
      • Sub-program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification
      • Sub-program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations
    • Program 2.2: Refugee Protection
      • Sub-program 2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees
      • Sub-program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees
      • Sub-program 2.2.3: Visa Office Referred Refugees
      • Sub-program 2.2.4: In-Canada Asylum
      • Sub-program 2.2.5: Pre-removal Risk Assessment
  • Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society
    • Program 3.1: Newcomer Settlement and Integration
      • Sub-program 3.1.1: Settlement
      • Sub-sub-program 3.1.1.1: Language Training
      • Sub-sub-program 3.1.1.2: Community and Labour Market Integration Services
      • Sub-program 3.1.2: Grant to Quebec
      • Sub-program 3.1.3: Immigration Loan
      • Sub-program 3.1.4: Resettlement Assistance Program
    • Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians
      • Sub-program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness
      • Sub-program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation
    • Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians
      • Sub-program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness
      • Sub-program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support
  • Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians
    • Program 4.1: Health Protection
      • Sub-program 4.1.1: Health Screening
      • Sub-program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance Notification
      • Sub-program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health
    • Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management
      • Sub-program 4.2.1: Permanent Resident Status Documents
      • Sub-program 4.2.2: Visitors Status
      • Sub-program 4.2.3: Temporary Resident Permits
      • Sub-program 4.2.4: Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection
      • Sub-program 4.2.5: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants
    • Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda
    • Program 4.4: Passport
    • Program 5.1: Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Footnote 1 Strategic Outcomes
Emphasizing people management Ongoing SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling
Description

Why is this a priority?

Effective human resources management in support of service to Canadians continues to be a priority for the Government of Canada. Ensuring that the Public Service maintains a workplace supportive of a work force that is productive, resilient, innovative and adaptable is essential to delivering to Canadians effective programs that fuel economic growth and the well-being of Canadians.

Plans for meeting the priority
CIC will continue to pursue several key strategic initiatives to contribute to this priority, including:

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Improving/modernizing client service Ongoing SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling
Description

Why is this a priority?

It is essential that CIC builds on its progress to advance the modernization agenda and improve the client experience to maximize the performance and competitiveness of Canada’s immigration program. CIC is making progress toward better managing our contact with clients by progressively offering more and more e-services. This will ensure that Canada remains competitive with other countries and attractive to potential applicants. This shift to e-services also can improve service while reducing the costs per transaction through process streamlining and automation. The Department has also continued to respond to various challenges, including large application backlogs, demands for improved efficiency and effectiveness of services, and improved program fraud detection by capitalizing on new technology and work processes.

Plans for meeting the priority

In accordance with the Government of Canada’s strategy to align programs and services, the responsibilities of Passport Program and IEC have been transferred to CIC. The Department is already responsible for determining and verifying Canadian citizenship, which is a requirement to apply for a passport, and integrating the Passport Program into CIC is expected to facilitate the process.

The transition of the Passport Program to CIC was done without any service disruptions to Canadians. Now the focus is to stabilize and formalize the partnership with Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) and DFATD through the completion of the second Order in Council and new memorandums of understanding and service-level agreements. In parallel, significant energy and work to transform and modernize the way passports are delivered to Canadians has begun, and authorities to proceed with the modernization of the Passport Program have been approved.

IEC is intended to give Canadian and non-Canadian participants opportunities to develop a mutual understanding of other cultures through travel, life and work experiences abroad and in Canada. This cultural experience also enhances their personal and professional development, giving them a competitive edge in the job market. With the support of DFATD, CIC will propose a renewed mandate for IEC that would better align the program with government priorities and labour market considerations. The Department will examine how best to integrate IEC within CIC’s program management and delivery, seeking opportunities to streamline operations and eliminate duplication of functions and processes. The move of IEC to CIC is a great opportunity to improve the client experience by taking advantage of the existing expertise within the Department and streamlining the application process for participants.

With all these changes, CIC has been moving toward an increasingly integrated, modernized and centralized working environment. The 2015 modernization goals have been well advanced and have brought about several changes to its programs and service delivery networks both in Canada and abroad. However, the use of new technology and the addition of new programs have exposed gaps in client service. The Department has placed a particular focus on client service improvement to address the issues in service delivery by establishing a client service vision and strategy.

In an effort to determine whether clients are satisfied with CIC’s level of service and to evaluate the impact of efforts to improve and modernize service, CIC will conduct a client service evaluation survey. Furthermore, the Department will examine how to provide clients with a centralized channel to submit complaints, comments and compliments to help identify systemic service issues and areas needing improvement.

Upgraded technology will continue to allow CIC to provide its clients with the ease and convenience of self-service through its website, a suite of e-services and paperless processing. Recent and upcoming initiatives will enable the Department to provide clients new service delivery channels and to ensure their compatibility with different forms of technology, such as smart phones, to make services more accessible. Moreover, new technology will allow the Department to more effectively leverage the global network of expertise and distribute workload based on capacity, risk and complexity.

In particular, the Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) system is an important innovation in the way CIC processes and manages temporary resident immigration applications, as it incorporates automated decision-making for the first time in the immigration context. The eTA program is on track for implementation in April 2015. The eTA is intended, designed and funded to be a system that is ‘light-touch’ and aimed at a low-risk population. It and other new and planned technologies are moving CIC in a direction that could radically shift its future approach to managing migration and screening travellers in a more efficient and client-friendly manner. Ultimately, the objective is to leverage technologies to enable greater bona fide traveller facilitation to Canada.

The need to create a new and innovative immigration system that includes a pool of skilled workers who are ready to begin employment in Canada has been identified in Canada’s Economic Action Plan 2013. A cornerstone of this modernized immigration program is the Expression of Interest (EOI) application management system which will enable active recruitment of highly skilled immigrants based on economic need. EOI will enable the Department to better respond to labour market needs, improve its ability to manage application intake and provide more timely and efficient service to clients.

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Promoting management accountability and excellence Ongoing SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling
Description

Why is this a priority?

Strong management practices, oversight and accountability, strengthened compliance and monitoring, simplified internal rules and procedures, and improved internal services enable the Department to effectively manage its financial, human, information, assets and accommodation resources to achieve its priorities. CIC continues to build a strong, high-performing institution that is nimble, connected, engaged and ready to face new challenges.

Plans for meeting the priority

CIC will continue to focus on strengthening the Department’s management practices and corporate infrastructure through ongoing efforts to:

  • continuously improve oversight of internal services by strengthening governance practices and processes in areas such as investment planning, security, and asset, risk and project management;
  • enhance the delivery of internal client services by continuing to assess service standards and measure client satisfaction;
  •  align CIC’s Greening Government Operations activities to meet the targets in the 2013–2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy;
  • achieve further integration of business and financial planning and reporting to support improved managerial decision making; and
  • build on best practices for project management and outcomes assessment to strengthen the return on investment in projects.

Risk Analysis

CIC has a robust, integrated corporate planning and corporate risk management function. Corporate risks and broad mitigation strategies identified by senior management are used to set CIC’s strategic directions and inform the development of the Integrated Corporate Plan and the Corporate Risk Profile. Risks and mitigation strategies are reviewed quarterly to ensure they remain current and effective. In 2014–2015, CIC’s ongoing efforts to improve the Corporate Risk Profile will include development of key risk indicators to further assess the effectiveness of mitigation strategies in reducing the Department’s risk exposure.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Program Integrity

There is a risk that illegal activities or ineffective business processes could undermine the integrity of CIC’s programs.
  • Eliminate loopholes via new policy and operational measures, as well as shared vision, priorities and protocols with external partners.
  • Strengthen practices and processes to detect, deter and punish fraud.
  • Reduce systemic inefficiencies.
  • Endeavour to attach greater meaning and value to Canadian citizenship.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4

Natural Disasters/
Emerging Events

There is a risk that natural disasters or emerging world events could affect CIC’s operations or infrastructure in ways that could overburden its program delivery system, affect its ability to deliver on commitments, and undermine the Department’s and Canada’s reputations.
  • Maintain and improve security, emergency response, and business continuity plans and procedures to ensure CIC’s ability to respond to unexpected events efficiently and effectively.
  • Review and develop flexible policies and procedures to enable an efficient and effective response.
  • Engage partners to ensure a timely and coordinated emergency response.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services

Program and Service Delivery

There is a risk that CIC will not be able to respond quickly and effectively to rapidly changing socio-economic and policy environments while meeting its long-term strategic and operational objectives.
  • Continue to advance CIC’s strategic agenda with the implementation of a new application management system in January 2015. The EOI system’s innovative approach will make it possible to select the best candidates with the skills to succeed in Canada and create opportunities to increase the employer role in immigration. Its introduction will enable active recruitment, improve application management, prevent future backlogs and accelerate processing times for the economic stream.
  • Make strategic investments in the service delivery network to better serve Canada’s interests, manage growth, uphold program integrity and maintain Canada’s competitive position.
  • Leverage technology to move to a responsive global operational model that enables even workload distribution.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services

Partnership Management

There is a risk that ineffective management of third-party service providers and a lack of effective partner and stakeholder engagement could undermine the achievement of CIC’s strategic outcomes and Government of Canada objectives.
  • Enhance partnerships with the private sector to reduce inconsistency in supports and outcomes across jurisdictions.
  • Establish and maintain strong performance requirements for third-party service providers, and ensure adequate compliance monitoring and quality assurance on agreements to maintain program integrity.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4

In 2014–2015, CIC will continue to advance extensive changes to create a modern and dynamic immigration system. Fast and flexible, it will respond effectively to Canada’s labour market needs, support reunification of families and provide protection to refugees. To deliver on these goals, CIC maintains an Integrated Risk Management Framework that it uses to develop risk management strategies and to continually identify, update and monitor risks that could potentially affect the achievement of the Department’s strategic objectives.

Developing a more demand-driven economic immigration program

CIC’s strategic directions, as well as its policies and operations, are influenced by numerous external factors such as emerging events, the Canadian and global economic, social and political contexts, and shifting migration trends.

The current global economic outlook is stable but weak, and many countries continue to struggle with persistently high levels of youth unemployment. Although population aging may generate significant demand for labour that would result in declining youth unemployment, youth unemployment will persist in developing nations without economic growth. Strong emerging economies, in addition to established immigrant-receiving countries, are beginning to compete with Canada by attracting and retaining talent. These countervailing trends make immigration flows to Canada difficult to predict.

Canada continues to face its own demographic and labour market challenges. Economic recovery has been slow at the national level with significant differences across provinces. There are signs of tightening labour markets in the western provinces now and potential labour shortages in the future. Within this context CIC must pursue policies that support economic recovery while protecting Canadian workers.

CIC will help employers find foreign workers with the appropriate skills and training more quickly. With the introduction of the EOI system in January 2015, Canada will improve application management for the economic stream, avoid future backlogs and accelerate processing times. EOI will help CIC transition from passive processing of applications in the order they are received to a system that selects in-demand people with the skills that more closely match the labour market demand, which in turn will help immigrants succeed in Canada faster than ever before. CIC will continue working with provinces and territories, as well as with employers, to ensure the new system is streamlined and addresses labour market needs. In addition, steps will be taken to ensure immigrants have the opportunity to fully participate in Canada’s labour market by continuing to provide language training and advancing the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications.

As outlined in the October 2013 Speech from the Throne, and the Economic Action Plan 2014, CIC will reform the federal Immigrant Investor Program to better support economic growth. To protect Canadian workers, CIC will also work with ESDC on ongoing changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) Program to ensure that employers consider qualified Canadian citizens and permanent residents first and that the TFW Program continues to support employers in meeting their short-term or acute labour market needs as originally intended.

Program Integrity

Fraud prevention is an ongoing challenge in immigration and citizenship programs. CIC has implemented two acts to protect program integrity in recent years. The Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act has made it easier to prosecute smugglers and deter participation in human smuggling activities. The Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act limits the review mechanisms for foreign nationals and permanent residents who are inadmissible on such grounds as serious criminality. It also provides for the denial of temporary resident status to foreign nationals based on national or public interest or to avoid harming Canada’s international reputation. But as program integrity is strengthened, unscrupulous individuals develop more sophisticated means of gaining illegal entry to Canada. CIC will strengthen program integrity by eliminating loopholes, deterring and punishing fraud, and reducing systemic inefficiencies.

In 2014–2015 specific actions will be taken to attach even greater meaning and value to Canadian citizenship. Citizenship is devalued by those who do not intend to establish in Canada, including citizens of convenience. The Government of Canada introduced comprehensive reforms to the Citizenship Act in Bill C-24, Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act to ensure those who receive citizenship have a genuine attachment to Canada and are prepared to exercise the responsibilities of citizenship.

Natural Disasters/Emerging Events

CIC must be prepared to respond in emergencies, both domestically and abroad. International crises lead to unpredictable migration flows that may require Canada’s intervention and specialized supports for resettlement. Security risks like terrorism constantly threaten Canadians’ health and safety, and the flow of goods and people, public confidence, and international relationships. Therefore, the Department will work to maintain and improve its emergency response plans and procedures to respond efficiently and effectively to reduce the impact on operations when emergencies arise. CIC will continue to review and develop flexible policies and procedures to ensure a timely and coordinated emergency response for unexpected world events that could affect CIC’s program delivery.

Program and Service Delivery

CIC continues to execute a dynamic, evolving strategic agenda. Since 2006, CIC has embarked on one of the most ambitious reform agendas in its history. By leveraging technology, CIC is moving from a paper-based and overseas mission-centric network to a responsive and competitive global operational model that distributes the workload evenly. Many parts of the agenda have already been put in place. For example, Ministerial Instructions have been introduced to better and more quickly align immigration with Canada’s evolving needs; over the past several years the number of avenues for economic immigrants has increased with the introduction of the Canadian Experience Class and the FSTP; and clients are able to access improved self-service options through integrated voice response and CIC’s website. While these efforts have gone a long way toward modernizing and strengthening the immigration system, there is still much to be done in terms of implementing new initiatives, such as the online eTA system, and identifying opportunities to streamline and update current processes. Sound project management practices are in place to manage all of these changes and ensure that clients will continue to benefit from the full suite of CIC’s programs and services, from visitor visas to citizenship renewals, during this transition.

Partnership Management

Provinces, territories, other federal government departments, service provider organizations and other public stakeholders are active participants in the success of Canada’s immigration continuum. Together with provinces and territories, CIC will advance the shared Federal-Provincial-Territorial Vision Action Plan announced in November 2012 to improve outcomes and to share the benefits of immigrations across the country. The complexity of the immigration and settlement systems means that decisions made by CIC or any of its partners or stakeholders can significantly affect relationships, performance results and the ability to meet objectives for all stakeholders. Yet, the private sector (academics, service providers, non-governmental organizations) offers an untapped opportunity to reduce inconsistent supports and outcomes across jurisdictions. Over the coming year, CIC will explore ways to leverage these partnerships, for example, opportunities for collaborative work with employers and community partners to enhance program efficiencies and immigrant outcomes.

In ever-changing external and internal environments with finite resources, rapid technological change and growing public scrutiny, CIC faces an increasing demand to become even better at anticipating and managing risks, both within the Department and for Canadians. CIC must remain diligent in effectively managing its resources to achieve its strategic outcomes and operational objectives, while minimizing exposure to a variety of risks.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending—dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
1,385,441,063 1,385,441,063 1,345,625,313 1,320,501,091
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
5,886 5,599 5,513

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy ($ millions)
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2011–2012 Expenditures 2012–2013 Expenditures 2013–2014 Forecast Spending 2014–2015 Main Estimates 2014–2015 Planned Spending 2015–2016 Planned Spending 2016–2017 Planned Spending
1.1 Permanent Economic Residents 36,541,121 40,200,532 90,013,017 80,799,944 80,799,944 43,027,060 32,305,414
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents 23,659,011 20,617,661 27,139,625 34,918,556 34,918,556 36,687,258 38,482,722
Strategic Outcome 1 Subtotal 60,200,132 60,818,193 117,152,642 115,718,500 115,718,500 79,714,318 70,788,136

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2011–2012 Expenditures 2012–2013 Expenditures 2013–2014 Forecast Spending 2014–2015 Main Estimates 2014–2015 Planned Spending 2015–2016 Planned Spending 2016–2017 Planned Spending
2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration 45,110,237 48,674,101 47,346,082 46,863,229 46,863,229 45,783,649 45,124,845
2.2 Refugee Protection 33,433,739 30,301,402 37,558,237 35,205,049 35,205,049 34,394,036 33,899,124
Strategic Outcome 2 Subtotal 78,543,976 78,975,503 84,904,319 82,068,278 82,068,278 80,177,685 79,023,969

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2011–2012 Expenditures 2012–2013 Expenditures 2013–2014 Forecast Spending 2014–2015 Main Estimates 2014–2015 Planned Spending 2015–2016 Planned Spending 2016–2017 Planned Spending
3.1 Newcomer Settlement and Integration 966,045,346 950,739,681 993,741,894 1,002,954,353 1,002,954,353 1,002,435,931 1,001,875,472
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 49,352,898 46,583,524 57,881,491 109,789,678 109,789,678 96,780,242 93,113,168
3.3 Multicultur-alism for Newcomers and All Canadians 21,051,465 15,120,234 14,625,165 13,208,032 13,208,032 13,100,065 13,034,179
Strategic Outcome 3 Subtotal 1,036,449,709 1,012,443,439 1,066,248,550 1,125,952,063 1,125,952,063 1,112,316,238 1,108,022,819

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2011–2012 Expenditures 2012–2013 Expenditures 2013–2014 Forecast Spending 2014–2015 Main Estimates 2014–2015 Planned Spending 2015–2016 Planned Spending 2016–2017 Planned Spending
4.1 Health Protection 92,337,565 59,616,808 63,826,810 58,356,894 58,356,894 58,325,951 58,218,922
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management 66,771,311 76,410,491 86,991,026 84,966,649 84,966,649 84,402,341 87,100,571
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda 3,101,193 3,282,924 3,207,946 8,156,032 8,156,032 8,010,725 7,922,053
4.4 PassportFootnote A (182,940,185) (254,192,238) (254,192,238) (236,497,778) (247,458,511)
Strategic Outcome 4 Subtotal 162,210,069 139,310,223 (28,914,403) (102,712,663) (102,712,663) (85,758,761) (94,216,965)
Internal Services Subtotal 246,086,861 231,778,110 256,000,758 164,414,885 164,414,885 159,175,833 156,883,132
Total 1,583,490,747 1,523,325,468 1,495,391,866 1,385,441,063 1,385,441,063 1,345,625,313 1,320,501,091

Planned spending decreases by $40 million in 2015–2016, primarily due to reductions in the return of fees for terminated applications. Planned spending for 2016–2017 declines by $25 million, due to further reductions in the return of fees for terminated applications and planned reductions in funding related to the Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games and the eTA system.

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

2014–2015 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Area (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014–2015 Planned Spending
1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy 1.1 Permanent Economic Residents Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 80,799,944
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 34,918,556
2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted 2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 46,863,229
2.2 Refugee Protection International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 35,205,049
3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society 3.1 Newcomer Settlement and Integration Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 1,002,954,353
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 109,789,678
3.3 Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 13,208,032
4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians 4.1 Health Protection Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 58,356,894
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 84,966,649
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 8,156,032
4.4 Passport International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement (254,192,238)

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 115,718,500
Social Affairs 1,316,138,835
International Affairs (210,831,157)
Government Affairs

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend
Text version: Departmental Spending Trend

This graph shows the Department's Spending Trend for grants and contributions and operating expenditures from 2011–2012 to 2016–2017. The data represents actual spending (2011–2012 to 2012–2013), forecast spending (2013–2014) and planned spending (2014–2015 to 2016–2017). The trends are explained in the text that follows the graph.

Overall, the Department's planned spending will decrease from current levels to $1,320.5 million in 2016–2017. This decrease is largely due to declining statutory funding to return fees for terminated applications. During this period, spending also decreases as a result of planned reductions in funding for the Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games and the eTA system.

Estimates by Vote

For information on CIC’s organizational appropriations, please see the 2014–2015 Main Estimates publication.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2013–2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s 2013–2016 sustainable development activities. The FSDS articulates Canada’s federal sustainable development priorities for a period of three years, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act.

CIC contributes to Theme IV—Shrinking the Environmental Footprint—Beginning with Government as denoted by the visual identifier below.

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint—Beginning  with Government

These contributions are components of the following programs and sub-programs and are further explained in Section II under Program 5.1, Internal Services.

CIC also ensures that its decision-making process includes consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through a strategic environmental assessment (SEA), when necessary. CIC has developed a Risk-Based Triage Scan Tool that is used for all new policy and program proposals and, when necessary, an SEA is undertaken. An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

For additional details on CIC’s activities to support sustainable development, please see Section II of this RPP and CIC’s sustainable development page. For complete details on the FSDS, please see the FSDS Web site.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section describes the four strategic outcomes of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), reflecting the long-term results that the programs are designed to achieve. The program descriptions and the information regarding benefits to Canadians outline how respective programs support the strategic outcomes. The section also provides details on each program, such as the expected results, performance indicators, targets, planning highlights, and the related financial and non-financial resources. The systematic collection, interpretation and analysis of performance measurement results is a key annual activity and enables the Department to report on expected results through the Departmental Performance Report and to broadly use performance information across the organization to inform decision making.

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy

CIC plays a significant role in fostering Canada’s economic development. By promoting Canada as a destination of choice for innovation, investment and opportunity, CIC encourages talented individuals to come to Canada and to contribute to our prosperity. Canada’s immigration program is based on non-discriminatory principles—foreign nationals are assessed without regard to race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, religion or gender. Those who are selected to immigrate to Canada have the skills, education, language competencies and work experience to make an immediate economic contribution.

CIC’s efforts, whether through policy and program development or processing applications for the Federal Skilled Workers Program, the Quebec Skilled Workers Program, the Provincial Nominees Program or other programs, attract thousands of qualified permanent residents each year. Under the 2008 amendments to IRPA the Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada has the authority to issue instructions establishing priorities for processing certain categories of applications. In that regard, the Department analyses and monitors its programs to ensure they are responsive to emerging labour market needs.

CIC also facilitates the hiring of foreign nationals by Canadian employers on a temporary basis and implements a number of initiatives to attract and retain international students.

Benefits for Canadians

Immigration continues to have a significant influence on Canadian society and economic development. Permanent residents who arrive in Canada every year enhance Canada’s social fabric, contribute to labour market growth and strengthen the economy. Changes that modernize and improve the immigration system not only strengthen the integrity of the Permanent Economic Residents Program but also benefit Canada by targeting skills Canadian employers need and admitting qualified individuals more quickly.

Temporary foreign workers help generate growth for a number of Canadian industries by meeting short-term and acute needs in the labour market that are not easily filled by the domestic labour force. International students contribute economically as consumers and enrich the fabric of Canadian society through their diverse experiences and talents. Some temporary workers and international students represent a key talent pool to be retained as immigrants.

Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

Rank within the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development of employment rate for all immigrants

≤ 5 End of each Calendar Year

Canada’s Immigration Plan for 2014

The immigration levels set out in Canada’s immigration plan for 2014 reflect the important role of immigration in supporting Canada’s economic growth and prosperity. In addition, the plan fulfils key objectives of IRPA—to reunite families and uphold Canada’s international legal obligations. Further details can be found in the Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration 2013.

Plan Type Low High Target
Economic Federal Skilled Workers (including Federal Skilled Tradespersons) 41,500 47,800 47,300
Canadian Experience Class 14,000 15,000 15,000
Live-in Caregivers 14,400 17,500 17,500
Federal Business Immigrants 6,000 7,400 6,000
Quebec Business Immigrants 5,000 5,500 5,300
Quebec Skilled Workers 26,000 27,000 26,600
Provincial Nominees 44,500 47,000 46,800
Economic Total 151,400 167,200 164,500
Percentage Mix 63.1% 63.1% 63.0%
Family Spouses, Partners and Children (includes Public Policy) 45,000 48,000 48,000
Parents and Grandparents 18,000 20,000 20,000
Family Total 63,000 68,000 68,000
Percentage Mix 26.3% 25.7% 26.1%
Humanitarian Protected Persons in Canada 7,500 8,000 7,500
Dependants Abroad 3,500 4,000 3,500
Government-assisted Refugees 6,900 7,200 7,100
Visa Office Referred Refugees 400 500 500
Privately Sponsored Refugees 4,500 6,500 6,300
Public Policy—Federal Resettlement Assistance 200 300 300
Public Policy—Other 100 200 200
Humanitarian and Compassionate 2,500 3,000 3,000
Humanitarian Total 25,600 29,700 28,400
Percentage Mix 10.7% 11.2% 10.9%
Permit Holders 0 100 100
OVERALL 240,000 265,000 261,000

Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), the focus of this program is on the selection and processing of immigrants who can support the development of a strong and prosperous Canada, in which the benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada. The acceptance of qualified permanent residents helps the government meet its economic objectives, such as building a skilled work force, addressing immediate and longer-term labour market needs, and supporting national and regional labour force growth. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
80,799,944 80,799,944 43,027,060 32,305,414

Planned spending declines in 2015–2016 and future years due to reductions in the estimated return of fees for terminated applications.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
304 293 287
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada

Percentage of new permanent residents who land outside of the Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs)

> 50% End of each Calendar Year
Economic immigrants support the long-term economic goals of Canada Employment earnings relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing 100% Calendar Year 2020
Percentage growth in labour force attributed to economic migration > 42% End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlights
  • Manage application intake, wait times and inventories while improving responsiveness to labour market conditions and attaining targeted economic objectives through the use of Ministerial Instructions, where appropriate.
  • Proceed toward the January 2015, launch of the Expression of Interest (EOI) system, which will contribute to a fast, flexible, labour market-responsive immigration system that meets employer needs: Identified as a priority in the October 2013 Speech from the Throne, EOI is not a new immigration program but enables active recruitment and faster processing in economic immigration categories.
  • Drawing on the example of systems successfully used in Australia and New Zealand, the EOI model prescreens candidates for skilled immigration and invites applications only from top candidates whose skills best meet the country’s economic needs.
  • To strengthen the immigration system’s labour market responsiveness, EOI gives employers a greater role in the recruitment, assessment and selection of skilled immigrants. CIC is partnering with Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) to allow employers—as part of ESDC’s modernization efforts—to effectively source EOI candidates through its Job Bank. Candidates will receive job postings tailored to their skills and employers will receive information regarding the candidates with skills that they need. In addition, CIC will work with the private sector, particularly existing job sites, to facilitate as many opportunities as possible for EOI candidates to be identified by employers.
  • In the coming months, EOI will be the subject of a concerted outreach campaign by CIC and the provinces and territories to gain employer perspectives on system design and implementation and ensure prospective immigrants, employers and other stakeholders are able to make best use of the system at launch. CIC will also work with ESDC on labour market information to inform future sets of Ministerial Instructions and the EOI application management system.
  • As a result, the launch of EOI will move Canada from the passive receipt of skilled immigrant applications to an active approach to recruitment and up-front screening, complemented by faster application processing times to ensure labour market demand is met.
Sub-program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers

The Federal Skilled Workers Program is the Government of Canada’s main selection system for skilled immigration. The goal of the program is to select highly skilled immigrants who will make a long-term contribution to Canada’s national and structural labour market needs, in support of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy. The program uses a points system to identify prospective immigrants with the ability to economically establish in Canada, based on their human capital (education, skilled work experience, language skills, etc.), with a minimum language threshold and a third-party foreign educational credential assessment prior to application. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
61,284,746 23,961,430 13,514,129

Planned spending declines in 2015–2016 and future years due to reductions in the estimated return of fees for terminated applications.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
127 123 120
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federal skilled workers (FSWs) support the long-term economic goals of Canada FSW principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing + 15% Calendar Year 2020
Percentage of FSWs earning at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing ≥ 35% Calendar Year 2020
Rate of social assistance for FSW principal applicants, five years after landing ≤ 15% Calendar Year 2020
Planning Highlight
  • Maintain monitoring and assessment of the Federal Skilled Workers Program to ensure it continues to select the skilled immigrants who are the most likely to succeed and fully realize their potential in the Canadian economy, and to ensure the program’s successful integration into the future EOI application intake system to be launched in 2015.
Sub-program 1.1.2: Federal Skilled Tradespersons

The Federal Skilled Tradespersons Program (FSTP) is intended to attract skilled tradespersons needed to meet labour demands in specific industries across the country and who want to become permanent residents based on being qualified in a skilled trade. In contrast with the Federal Skilled Workers Program’s points-based selection, the FSTP operates on a streamlined pass/fail basis with four mandatory criteria including: a minimum language threshold; a valid offer of employment in Canada or a certificate of qualification from a province or territory in a qualifying skilled trade; at least two years of work experience in the occupation within the last five years; and meeting the employment requirements set out in the National Occupational Classification system. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
212,507 207,611 204,625
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
2 2 2
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federal skilled tradespersons (FSTs) support the long-term economic goals of Canada FST principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing To be determined (TBD)—once data for sufficient years since landing is available TBD—once data for sufficient years since landing is available
Percentage of FSWs earning at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD—once data for sufficient years since landing is available TBD—once data for sufficient years since landing is available
Rate of social assistance for FSW principal applicants, five years after landing TBD—once data for sufficient years since landing is available TBD—once data for sufficient years since landing is available
Planning Highlight
  • Maintain monitoring and assessment of the FSTP to assess whether it attracts and/or helps retain skilled workers to address regional labour shortages and strengthen Canada’s economy, and that the program can successfully integrate into the future EOI application intake system to be launched in 2015.
Sub-program 1.1.3: Quebec Skilled Workers

The Canada-Québec Accord relating to Immigration and Temporary Admission of Aliens specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and to issue permanent resident visas. The Quebec Skilled Workers (QSW) Program uses specific criteria to identify immigrants with the human capital and skills needed to economically establish in Quebec. Similar to the Federal Skilled Workers Program, the QSW program assesses applicants according to their age, education, work experience, language proficiency (in French) and enhanced settlement prospects (previous education or work experience in Canada, or a confirmed job offer). The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
4,342,021 4,241,994 4,180,954
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
39 38 37
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Quebec-selected skilled workers (QSWs) contribute to the growth of the labour force of the province QSW principal applicants’ incidence of employment, in Quebec, relative to the province’s average, five years after landing TBD End of each Calendar Year
Successful QSW applicants are admitted to Quebec Number of admissions to Quebec 26,000–27,000 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to support the Government of Quebec with the processing of skilled workers selected by that province for permanent residence, in support of its economic goals for immigration.
Sub-program 1.1.4: Provincial Nominees

The Provincial Nominees Program supports the Government of Canada’s objective for the benefits of immigration to be shared across all regions of Canada. Bilateral immigration agreements are in place with all provinces and territories except Nunavut and Quebec,Footnote 2 conferring on their governments the authority to identify and nominate for permanent residence immigrants who will meet local economic development and regional labour market needs, and who wish to settle in that specific province or territory. As part of the nomination process, provincial and territorial governments assess the skills, education and work experience of prospective candidates to ensure that nominees can make an immediate economic contribution to the nominating province or territory. CIC retains the final selection authority and verifies that nominees can economically establish in Canada and meet all admissibility requirements before issuing permanent resident visas. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
5,261,536 5,140,327 5,066,360
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
48 46 45
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Provincial nominees (PNs) support the long-term economic goals of Canada Percentage of PN principal applicants earning at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing ≥ 25% Calendar Year 2020
PNs support the long-term economic goals of the province or territory of nomination PN principal applicants’ incidence of employment, in their province or territory of nomination, relative to that province or territory’s incidence of employment earnings, five years after landing ≥ + 10% Calendar Year 2020
PNs contribute to the shared benefits of immigration in regions of Canada Percentage of PNs landing outside of Toronto and Vancouver CMAs (excludes Quebec and QSWs) ≥ 90% Calendar Year 2020
Planning Highlight
  • Continue working with the provinces and territories to ensure that the Provincial Nominees Program is focused on meeting economic and regional labour market needs, and is underpinned by a strong management and accountability framework. The renewal of federal-provincial-territorial agreements will help to further define the roles and responsibilities of federal and provincial/territorial governments in overseeing the program and ensure a strong governance structure.
Sub-program 1.1.5: Live-in Caregivers

The Live-in Caregivers Program (LCP) allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign workers in private residences to provide care for children, elderly persons or persons with a disability. Eligible applicants come to Canada as temporary foreign workers, subject to their employer obtaining a neutral or positive labour market opinion (LMO) from ESDC. The LMO considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available and the wage and working conditions being offered. The critical component of the program distinguishing it from the general pool of temporary foreign workers is the requirement for the caregiver to reside in their place of employment. The program is also unique in that foreign workers arriving in Canada under the program are eligible to apply for permanent residence after two years or 3,900 hours of full-time employment within four years of their arrival in Canada. They are granted permanent residence as part of the live-in caregiver category of the Economic Class, with established room under the annual levels plan. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
5,551,781 5,423,886 5,345,839
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
50 48 47
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Successful live-in caregiver permanent resident applicants and their family members are admitted to Canada Number of admissions 14,400–17,500 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Increased admissions for LCP under the 2014 levels plan will help to mitigate backlog pressures for this program.
Sub-program 1.1.6: Canadian Experience Class

The Canadian Experience Class (CEC) was introduced in 2008 as a path to permanent residence for those with eligible work experience in Canada, usually obtained as a result of temporary residence as a foreign worker or international student. The program is complementary to the Federal Skilled Workers Program but uses simplified criteria, including eligible skilled Canadian work experience and a minimum level of proficiency in English or French. The program provides a streamlined and usually faster route to permanent residence for those who have already established themselves in skilled work in Canada. This allows Canada to retain talented workers who have already contributed to the Canadian economy. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2,429,081 2,373,122 2,338,974
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
22 21 21
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Temporary residents transition to permanent residence in support of the long-term economic goals of Canada CEC principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2015 when baseline is available TBD
Percentage of CEC principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2015 when baseline is available TBD
Rate of social assistance for CEC principal applicants, five years after landing TBD in 2015 when baseline is available TBD
Planning Highlight
  • Ongoing monitoring and assessment of the CEC to improve the program so that it continues to attract top-quality candidates with diverse skill sets, and can successfully integrate into the future EOI application intake system to be launched in 2015. A Management Response and Action Plan will be developed in response to the findings of the CEC evaluation to be completed in 2014–2015.
Sub-program 1.1.7: Federal Business Immigrants

This program admits to Canada those with the experience and skills to support, through their investment, entrepreneurship or self-employment, the development of a strong and prosperous economy. Immigrant investors bring business capital to Canada while entrepreneurs contribute to economic development through enterprise and employment creation. Self-employed persons hold the intention and ability to be self-employed in Canada in such fields as athletics, cultural activities and farming, thereby making a contribution to specified activities in our economy. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
1,154,040 1,127,454 1,111,231
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
11 10 10
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Successful applicants to the Federal Business Immigrants Program are admitted to Canada Number of admissions 6,000–7,400 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Reform Canada’s immigrant investor programs to ensure that immigrant investors contribute more effectively to the Canadian economy in exchange for a pathway to citizenship.
Sub-program 1.1.8: Quebec Business Immigrants

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and issue permanent resident visas. This program seeks to attract experienced investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons to the province of Quebec, to support the development of a strong and prosperous economy in Quebec. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
564,233 551,236 543,303
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
5 5 5
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Successful Quebec-selected Business Immigrant applicants are admitted to Quebec Number of admissions destined to Quebec 5,000–5,500 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to work with the Government of Quebec to promote program development that supports Canada’s economic goals for immigration, and to reduce backlogs of Quebec-approved applications awaiting final approval at CIC, consistent with Quebec’s levels targets.

Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in IRPA, the focus of this program is to establish and apply the rules governing entry into Canada of temporary foreign workers and international students. Temporary economic migration enhances Canada’s trade, commerce, cultural, educational and scientific activities, in support of our overall economic and social prosperity. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas, work permits and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
34,918,556 34,918,556 36,687,258 38,482,722

Planned spending increases over the planning period as resources for volume demands are shifted from other programs.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
320 320 324
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Qualified temporary foreign workers enter Canada Number of temporary foreign worker entries 213,573 End of each Calendar Year
Qualified international students enter Canada in support of Canada’s goals for international education Number of foreign student entries 120,000 (Historical data) End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue preparation for immigration-related matters for the Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games.
Sub-program 1.2.1: International Students

CIC supports a range of goals for immigration by managing the entry of international students to Canada. International students contribute to Canada’s educational and international competitiveness, and strengthen our educational institutions. International students are selected by these institutions according to their criteria, and CIC validates their presence in Canada to work and study by issuing study permits and, where necessary, visas, which allow them to obtain a Canadian education. CIC is responsible for ensuring that the proper documentation, financial and security requirements are met, including the bona fides, or honest intentions, of all applicants. In order to provide the opportunity of the benefit of Canadian work experience, work permits are issued to qualified international students under CIC’s On-Campus, Off-Campus and Co-op/Internship Work Permit components. Students who want to work in Canada after graduation can apply for a work permit under the Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP) component, which allows them to gain up to three years of valuable Canadian work experience. Some PGWP holders of work permits will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the Canadian Experience Class or other programs. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
11,430,323 11,984,008 12,550,871
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
96 96 97
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The skills of selected international students are retained through transition to permanent residence in support of long-term economic goals of Canada Number of study permit holders transitioning to permanent residence under the Economic Class programs 5,000–10,000 (Historical data) End of each Calendar Year
International students have the opportunity to gain valuable Canadian work experience to complement their education Number of work permits issued to international students TBD End of each Calendar Year
Provinces and territories designate educational institutions for the purposes of admitting international students, based on agreed-upon principles Number of memorandums of understanding in place with provinces and territories to govern the quality of their designation of educational institutions for the purposes of admitting international students 12 End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlight
  • Advance Canada’s position as a world-class destination for international students through implementation of new requirements on students and institutions in close consultation with provinces and territories.
Sub-program 1.2.2: Temporary Foreign Workers

The Temporary Foreign Workers (TFW) Program allows employers to hire foreign nationals on a temporary basis. The program contributes to the competitiveness and viability of Canadian businesses, since workers are recruited by employers or agencies to address labour or skill supply shortages. The federal government’s role is to manage the entry of foreign nationals to work, scrutinizing the job offer to ensure it is both consistent with our goals for economic immigration and has a neutral or positive effect on the Canadian labour market. In fulfilling this role, in order to hire a temporary worker some employers may require an LMO from Employment and Social Development Canada, which considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available and the wage and working conditions being offered. Once in possession of the LMO (if required), the applicant may then apply for the work permit at a mission abroad, at the port of entry (if eligible) or inside Canada (if eligible). The foreign national must meet all admissibility and eligibility requirements. There are a number of different streams under the TFW Program. One of these is the LCP, which allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign nationals to live and work in their private residence to provide care for children, the elderly and the disabled. The Seasonal Agricultural Worker component enables the hiring of workers from countries with these agreements with Canada. If an LMO is not required, such as for reciprocal employment exchanges, intra-company transfers, international agreements (including the North American Free Trade Agreement, bilateral youth exchange agreements and other exceptions), the foreign national applies directly to CIC for a work permit and visa, and CIC considers the genuineness of the job offer and ensures the foreign national meets all admissibility and eligibility requirements. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and work permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
23,488,233 24,703,251 25,931,851

Planned spending increases over the planning period as resources from volume demands are shifted from other programs and as new funding is received to address projected growth under this program.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
225 224 227
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The skills of selected TFWs are retained through transition to permanent residence in support of long-term economic goals of Canada Number of work permit holders transitioning to permanent residence under the Economic Class programs 15,000–30,000 (Historical data) End of each Calendar Year
Percentage adherence rate to 14 calendar day service standard for responses to employers on exemptions from labour market opinions ≥ 80% End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue efforts, in collaboration with ESDC, so that the TFW Program better responds to employer needs for workers, while ensuring the program continues to serve Canada’s interests.
  • Examine the International Experience Canada (IEC) – archived program in the context of the broader review of the TFW Program, and increase awareness of the IEC program among Canadian youth.

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted

CIC is committed to upholding Canada’s humanitarian tradition of reuniting families, resettling refugees and providing protection to those in need.

The Family Class, as set forth in IRPA, allows permanent residents and Canadian citizens to sponsor their immediate family members (i.e., their spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, and dependent children), as well as parents and grandparents, for immigration to Canada. The permanent resident or Canadian citizen must undertake to provide for the basic needs of their sponsored relative for a set period of time, depending on the nature of the relationship. This program facilitates family reunification while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public.

As a signatory to the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the 1967 Protocol, and the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, and further to provisions set forth in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Canada has international and domestic legal obligations to provide safe haven to individuals in need of protection. Canada meets these obligations through the in-Canada refugee status determination system. In addition, Canada partners with other countries and with international and civil society organizations to come to the aid of individuals in need of protection through resettlement. Every year, Canada resettles 10,000 to 12,000—or one out of every 10—of the refugees resettled globally. CIC engages both domestic and international stakeholders to develop and implement timely, efficient and effective refugee protection policies and programs.

Benefits for Canadians

CIC plays a significant role in upholding Canada’s international and domestic obligations and reputation with regard to refugees and in promoting the Canadian values of democracy, freedom, human rights and the rule of law. Through family sponsorship, CIC’s efforts enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents to reunite with family members.

Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration

CIC’s family and discretionary programs support the Government of Canada’s family reunification goals for immigration. The program objectives are to reunite family members and to allow for the processing of exceptional cases. Family Class provisions of IRPA enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada to apply to sponsor eligible members of the Family Class, including spouses and partners, dependent children, and parents and grandparents. Discretionary provisions in the legislation are used in cases where there are humanitarian and compassionate considerations or for public policy reasons. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional and deserving cases not anticipated in the legislation and to support the Government of Canada in its humanitarian response to world events and crises. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
46,863,229 46,863,229 45,783,649 45,124,845
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
424 409 401
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canada reunites families and provides residence in Canada for deserving cases in exceptional circumstancesFootnote B Number of admissions for total Family Class, humanitarian and compassionate grounds, and public policy grounds 88,600–97,700 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlights
  • Conduct, taking into consideration recommendations arising from the recent Evaluation of the Family Reunification Program (comprising 2.1.1, Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification, and 2.1.2, Parents and Grandparents Reunification), ongoing monitoring and assessment to ensure those programs continue to align with immigration objectives and goals.
  • Amend the definition of a dependent child in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations in part by lowering the age limit from less than 22 years of age to less than 19 years of age.
Sub-program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification

The objective of this program is to grant permanent resident status to foreign nationals who are the sponsored spouses, partners and dependent children (including adopted children) of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This supports the government’s objective to reunite close family members while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. The sponsor, who is a permanent resident or Canadian citizen, is responsible for providing the basic needs of his or her spouse or partner for three years, and for their dependent children for up to 10 years. Processing involves determining the sponsor’s ability to meet the sponsorship obligations and verifying the bona fides of the relationships. Given the close family relationships involved, these family members are the highest priority for processing. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
27,472,071 26,839,202 26,452,999
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
249 240 235
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Spouses, partners and children are admitted to Canada and reunited with their sponsor Number of admissions 45,000–48,000 End of each Calendar Year
Reunification applications are processed within published service standards Percentage adherence to the 12 month service standard for cases processed overseas TBD End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlight
  • Work toward further strengthening the integrity of spousal sponsorship and protecting victims.
Sub-program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification

The objective of this program is to grant permanent resident status to sponsored foreign nationals who are the parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This program makes it possible for Canadian citizens and permanent residents to be reunited with their extended family members, while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. Sponsors must demonstrate that they can meet their sponsorship obligations, which include providing for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents for 10 years. Particular sponsorship requirements and a lower processing priority distinguish this category from the spouses, partners and dependent children category. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
7,942,856 7,759,878 7,648,217
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
72 69 68
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Parents and grandparents are admitted to Canada and reunited with their sponsor Number of admissions 18,000–20,000 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Manage the intake and processing of applications for sponsored parents and grandparents based on new program changes that took effect earlier in 2014.
Sub-program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations

The humanitarian and compassionate and public policy provisions of IRPA enable the Minister to address exceptional circumstances by granting an exception to certain criteria or obligations of the Act or by granting permanent residence. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional cases that were not envisioned in the legislation. An applicant’s circumstances are assessed on a case-by-case basis. The public policy provision is a discretionary tool designed to grant permanent or temporary resident status to individuals in similar circumstances, all of whom must meet eligibility criteria defined in the public policy. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
11,448,302 11,184,570 11,023,629
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
104 100 98
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
On an exceptional basis, persons are admitted or are allowed to remain in Canada and acquire permanent resident status Number of persons granted permanent resident status on humanitarian and compassionate or public policy grounds due to their exceptional circumstances 2,800–3,500 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Develop, when required, public policies to grant permanent or temporary resident status to individuals whose circumstances are not described by requirements of other programs.

Program 2.2: Refugee Protection

The Refugee Protection Program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted. One arm of the program starts overseas, where refugees and persons in refugee-like situations are selected by Canadian visa officers to be resettled as permanent residents to Canada. Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, the in-Canada asylum system evaluates the claims of individuals seeking asylum in Canada and grants protected person status when a positive decision is rendered by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
35,205,049 35,205,049 34,394,036 33,899,124
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
319 307 301
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canada protects refugees in need of resettlement Percentage of resettled refugees in the world that Canada resettles (dependent on actions of other countries) 8–12%
(Historical data)
End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to strengthen the integrity of Canada’s refugee protection system by collaborating with domestic and international partners to ensure that those who need protection can receive it in a timely fashion and to deter abuse.
Sub-program 2.2.1: Government-assisted Refugees

Working closely with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) or other referral agencies, Canadian visa officers within the Government-assisted Refugees (GAR) Program identify and select as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada when there is no other durable solution available within a reasonable period of time. The primary objective of the program is to affirm Canada’s humanitarian commitment to assist refugees in need of international protection through the provision of government assistance and to assist the countries hosting them through responsibility sharing.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2,711,326 2,648,866 2,610,750
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
25 24 23
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
GARs are granted protection through resettlement in Canada Number of admissions 6,900–7,200 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Oversee the implementation of Canada’s multilateral and multiyear commitments for the resettlement of GARs.
Sub-program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees

The primary objective of the Privately Sponsored Refugees Program is to affirm Canada’s commitment to providing durable solutions to more refugees than would otherwise be admitted under the GAR Program. Canadian visa officers select as permanent residents members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada who are referred by private sponsors. These private sponsors then provide the social, financial and emotional support to the refugees upon their arrival in Canada. The program is unique as it ensures an additional number of refugees are offered protection over and above those sponsored by the government.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
3,793,017 3,705,638 3,652,316
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
34 33 32
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Privately sponsored refugees (PSRs) are granted protection through resettlement in Canada Number of admissions 4,500–6,500 End of each Calendar Year
Number of private sponsors that have submitted an application within the past year TBD 2014 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to work with sponsors to manage the inventory of the privately sponsored refugees to enhance responsiveness to protection needs.
Sub-program 2.2.3: Visa Office Referred Refugees

Working closely with the UNHCR or other referral agencies, Canadian visa officers identify and select as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada when there is no other durable solution available within a reasonable period of time. Refugees referred by the visa office are matched with a private sponsor and, upon arrival in Canada, receive six months of income support from the Government of Canada via the Resettlement Assistance Program and six months of income support from their sponsor. Private sponsors also provide arrival and orientation services, temporary accommodation, and ongoing emotional and social support. The program is a unique public-private partnership that encourages faith-based, ethnocultural and other community organizations in Canada to play a larger role in offering durable solutions to refugees found to be in need of resettlement by the UNHCR or other referral agencies, supporting the objectives of both the GAR and Private Sponsorship of Refugees programs.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
201,868 197,218 194,380
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
2 2 2
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Visa office-referred refugees are granted protection through resettlement in Canada Number of admissions 400–500 End of each Calendar Year
Number of private sponsors that have submitted an application within the past year TBD 2014 as per baseline End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
Sub-program 2.2.4: In-Canada Asylum

Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, Canada’s asylum system provides protection to persons fleeing persecution and risk of torture, risk to life, or risk of cruel treatment or punishment, by way of legislative and regulatory measures that enable Canada to meet those obligations. The program establishes fair and efficient procedures that uphold Canada’s respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all human beings, while maintaining the overall integrity of the Canadian refugee protection system. Canada’s asylum system includes the determination of eligibility for referral to the IRB and the granting of protected person status to those determined by the Board to be Convention refugees or persons in need of protection. When appropriate, the system also provides for a pre-removal risk assessment (PRRA) to failed refugee claimants and others facing removal from Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
20,547,835 20,074,479 19,785,617
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
186 179 176
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Decisions made on eligibility of in Canada refugee claims are rendered within three working days Percentage of decisions made on eligibility of refugee claims rendered within three working days ≥ 97% End of each Fiscal Year
Protected persons in-Canada and their dependants abroad are admitted as permanent residents Number of admissions 11,000–12,000 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to monitor and assess the effectiveness of the new refugee status determination system that was implemented throughout 2012–2013.
  • Continue to coordinate across all partner departments the implementation of reforms brought about by the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act to ensure that the domestic asylum system meets its strategic objectives.
Sub-program 2.2.5: Pre-removal Risk Assessment

In accordance with its commitment to the principle of non-refoulement, CIC offers a risk assessment before removing a person from Canada. Under IRPA, people who have been issued a removal order must formally apply to CIC for a PRRA. When a person has already had a refugee protection claim assessed by the IRB, only new evidence, such as evidence that demonstrates a sudden change in country conditions, is considered. While some persons whose applications are approved may benefit from a stay of removal, others whose applications are approved may become "protected persons" and may apply and be granted permanent resident status.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
7,951,002 7,767,836 7,656,061
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
72 69 68
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
PRRA decisions are made in compliance with IRPA Percentage of PRRA decisions returned to CIC by the Federal Court for redetermination < 1% End of each Fiscal Year
PRAA backlog is reduced Percentage of PRRA backlog eliminated prior to transfer of the program to the IRB 90% End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Complete regulatory amendments for the transfer of the PRRA function from CIC to the IRB.

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society

Through the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, IRPA and the Citizenship Act, as well as a broader constitutional and legislative suite that includes the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian Human Rights Act, the Official Languages Act and the Employment Equity Act among others, the Government of Canada is committed to facilitating the participation of all Canadians in the social, cultural, economic and civic spheres of Canadian society. Accordingly, the focus of this strategic outcome is on a “two-way street” approach that works with communities and Canadian institutions to assist individuals to become active, connected and productive citizens.

Working with a range of social supports, including other levels of government, voluntary sector and community partners, employers, school boards and others, CIC seeks to strengthen social integration by providing newcomers with tools to fully participate in the labour market; promoting social and cultural connections; encouraging active civic participation; and fostering a sense of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

Benefits for Canadians

Canadians enjoy a higher quality of life when citizens and newcomers actively participate in all aspects of society; contribute to a prosperous economy; and have a strong sense of civic pride and attachment.

Program 3.1: Newcomer Settlement and Integration

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Employment Equity Act and IRPA, programming is developed based on policies that support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society. All permanent residents are eligible for settlement and integration programs. Programming is delivered by third parties (including provincial and municipal governments, school boards and post-secondary institutions, settlement service organizations and other non-governmental actors, and the private sector) across the country.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
1,002,954,353 1,002,954,353 1,002,435,931 1,001,875,472
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
361 348 341
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
NewcomersFootnote C contribute to Canada’s economic, social and cultural development Percentage difference of labour market participation of immigrants residing in Canada less than five years in comparison with the Canadian-born > -3% End of each Fiscal Year
Percentage difference of newcomers who performed unpaid volunteer work in comparison with the Canadian-born -10% Every five years
Percentage difference of internationally trained immigrants working at occupational skill levels that match their education levels within the first five years of arrival in Canada in comparison with the Canadian-born educated in Canada 24.5% Every five years
Planning Highlights
  • Strengthen partnerships to facilitate the integration of newcomers, including foreign credential recognition.
  • Further pursue educational credential assessment designations of professional bodies.
Sub-program 3.1.1: Settlement

Settlement refers to a short period (three to five years) of adaptation by newcomers during which the government provides support and services. Ultimately, the goal of integration is to encourage newcomers to be fully engaged in the economic, social, political and cultural life of Canada. CIC’s Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to the newcomer experience, such as a lack of official language skills, limited knowledge of Canada and the recognition of foreign credentials. The program provides language learning services for newcomers, community and employment bridging services, settlement information, and support services that facilitate access to settlement programming. Also, through the Foreign Credentials Referral Office, the program provides information, path-finding and referral services to internationally trained individuals to have their credentials assessed quickly so they can find work in the fields in which they have been trained. Most services are designed and delivered by service provider organizations; however, certain services (such as information provision) are delivered directly by CIC in Canada and overseas.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
621,572,779 621,203,907 620,734,710
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
302 291 285
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Clients make informed decisions about life in CanadaFootnote D Percentage of clients who are able to make informed decisions about life in Canada TBD Fiscal Year 2016–2017
Clients use official languages to function and participate in Canadian society Percentage of clients who use official languages to function and participate in Canadian society TBD Fiscal Year 2016–2017
Clients participate in society Percentage of clients who participate in society TBD Fiscal Year 2016–2017
Planning Highlights
  • Strengthen partnerships with provincial and territorial governments, municipalities, and other federal departments to enhance the coordination of settlement service delivery and services that support immigrant integration.
  • Contribute to the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications for the next set of target occupations.
  • Continue to improve labour market information and linkages to employers for internationally trained individuals, prior to arrival.
  • Continue to explore and support innovative practices to facilitate the successful integration of newcomers into Canada's economy and in communities from coast to coast to coast.
  • Advance work with partners on policies and programs consistent with the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013–2018.
Sub-program 3.1.2: Grant to Quebec

Under the Canada-Quebec Accord, signed in 1991, Canada has devolved settlement and resettlement responsibility to Quebec, with a grant that includes reasonable compensation for costs. The compensation to Quebec covers services for reception services and linguistic, cultural and economic integration services, provided that they are equivalent to similar federal services in other parts of the country. An objective of the Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec's demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants into that province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec. The Accord provides Quebec with exclusive responsibility for the selection of immigrants destined to the province (except for family reunification and asylum seekers in Canada) as well as the reception and linguistic and cultural integration of these immigrants (including resettlement of refugees). Under the Accord, Canada is responsible for defining overall immigration objectives, national levels, admissibility, selecting family category and asylum seekers in Canada, and citizenship. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
320,457,088 320,445,798 320,438,908
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
4 4 4
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Quebec provides settlement and integration services to newcomers in the province that are comparable to services provided across Canada Frequency of Comité MixteFootnote E meetings 1 End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue working with Quebec officials to do a comparative study as per the terms of the Canada-Quebec Accord.
Sub-program 3.1.3: Immigration Loan

The Immigration Loan Program is a statutory program under IRPA. It ensures that some persons, otherwise unable to pay for the costs of transportation to Canada and medical admissibility exams, have access to a funding source. Assistance loans may also be approved for newcomers in need to cover initial settlement expenses such as rental and utilities deposits. The main target groups for the program are GARs and privately sponsored refugees. These individuals have undergone extreme hardship and most often have few personal resources and are therefore unable to access traditional lending institutions. Canadian visa officers authorize the transportation and admissibility loans and the International Organization for Migration arranges travel and medical exams for refugees and pays these costs. CIC reimburses them and the refugee reimburses CIC. Assistance loans are authorized by in-Canada officers. The interest-bearing loans are repayable in full and payment plans vary by the value of the loan and the recipients' ability to repay while integrating.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
1,450,623 1,417,205 1,396,812
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
13 13 12
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Individuals in need receive and repay immigration loans Proportion of resettled refugee principal applicants (landed) that receive immigration loans 100% End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of loan recipients who repay their immigration loans within the original prescribed loan period ≥ (TBD 2014 as per baseline) End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to manage the Immigration Loan Program and provide access to financial support for immigrants who are in dire need.
Sub-program 3.1.4: Resettlement Assistance Program

The Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP) provides direct financial support and immediate and essential services to RAP clients, including GARs, PSRs in blended initiatives under the Visa Office Referred Refugees Program, and persons in refugee-like situations admitted to Canada under a public policy consideration, to meet their resettlement needs. In most cases RAP clients have undergone extreme hardship and may lack the social networks and the financial resources to assist in addressing the needs associated with becoming established in a new country. Income support is administered directly by CIC to RAP clients for up to 12 months if the RAP client's income is insufficient to meet his or her own needs and the needs of any accompanying dependents. In some cases, RAP clients also receive start-up allowances for expenses related to furniture and other household supplies. Immediate and essential services are supported through contributions to SPOs in all provinces in Canada except Quebec, which delivers similar settlement services through the Canada-Quebec Accord. RAP services include, but are not limited to, port of entry services, assistance with temporary accommodations, assistance opening a bank account, life skills training, orientation sessions, and links to settlement programming and mandatory federal and provincial programs. This program uses transfer payment funding from RAP.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
59,473,863 59,369,020 59,305,041
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
41 40 39
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
GARs have access to CIC settlement services Percentage of GARs outside Quebec who access settlement services within six months after arrival, where CIC manages the delivery of settlement services ≥ 85% End of each Fiscal Year
GARs have their immediate and essential needs met Percentage of GARs, outside Quebec, who report that their immediate and essential resettlement needs were met by the RAP services 80% End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlight
  • Harmonize the program's policies and performance measurement tools with those of the Settlement Program.

Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians

The purpose of the Citizenship Program is to administer citizenship legislation and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. CIC administers the acquisition of Canadian citizenship by developing, implementing and applying legislation, regulations and policies that protect the integrity of Canadian citizenship and allow eligible applicants to be granted citizenship or be provided with a proof of citizenship. In addition, the program promotes citizenship, to both newcomers and the Canadian-born, through various events, materials and projects. Promotional activities focus on enhancing knowledge of Canada's history, institutions and values, as well as fostering an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
109,789,678 109,789,678 96,780,242 93,113,168

Planned spending decreases over the planning period as resources for volume demands are shifted to other programs.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
999 862 821
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadian citizenship is a valued status Take-up rates of citizenship among eligible newcomers ≥ 75% Calendar Year 2016
Percentage of applicants referred to a citizenship hearing to protect the integrity of citizenship 5–10%
(Historical data)
End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlights
  • Support passage of legislation to reform the Citizenship Act; continue to review regulations and begin regulatory process to amend regulations; and advance implementation work.
Sub-program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness

The Citizenship Awareness Program aims to enhance the meaning of Canadian citizenship for both newcomers and the Canadian-born and to increase a sense of belonging to Canada. Through knowledge of Canada's history, institutions and values, as well as the rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship, newcomers and the Canadian-born are better equipped for active citizenship and can contribute to the development of an integrated society. The program undertakes various knowledge-building and promotional activities such as: citizenship ceremonies; citizenship reaffirmation ceremonies; Citizenship Week; Citation for Citizenship award; and the distribution of citizenship educational publications (e.g., Discover Canada citizenship study guide, the Welcome to Canada guide). This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant for the Institute for CanadianCitizenship.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
6,083,159 5,947,054 5,863,997
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
53 52 51
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Citizenship responsibilities and privileges are promoted to newcomers and established Canadians Percentage of enhancedFootnote F citizenship ceremonies held in partnership with community or external organizations ≥ 15% End of each Fiscal Year
Percentage of applicants who write and pass the written citizenship knowledge test 80–85%
(Historical data)
End of each Fiscal Year
Number of printed Discover Canada guides distributed ≥ 250,000 End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlight
  • Develop a strategic approach for citizenship awareness activities focusing on ensuring effectiveness and accessibility of promotional activities and material (such as citizenship ceremonies and the citizenship study guide) for newcomers and citizens.
Sub-program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation

Citizenship processing activities include interpreting and administering the Citizenship Act and Regulations, managing the naturalization process (whereby non-citizens become citizens), issuing proof of citizenship to those who are citizens by birth or by naturalization, and maintaining these records. The processing of Canadian citizenship helps newcomers fully participate in Canadian life and contributes to their successful integration into Canadian society. A person's citizenship is revoked if it is found that they have obtained their citizenship fraudulently, by misrepresentation or by knowingly concealing information during the course of their immigration or citizenship application process. CIC reviews files where there are allegations of fraud, and collects and analyses information to determine if a recommendation to initiate revocation proceedings should be made to the Minister.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
103,706,519 90,833,189 87,249,172

Planned spending decreases over the planning period as resources for volume demands are shifted to other programs.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
946 810 770
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Applications for proofs and grants are processed Total number of decisions for grants 144,747–160,531
(Anticipated processing volume)
End of each Fiscal Year
Total number of decisions for proofs ≥ 38,000 End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to modernize the Citizenship Program and align it with the departmental client service vision, to ensure more efficient and effective application processing and stronger program integrity.

Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians

The Multiculturalism Program is the principal means of carrying out the Minister's responsibilities under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act for promoting the full and equitable participation of individuals and communities across Canada. Grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, the private sector, provincial and municipal governments, non-federal public institutions, and individuals seek to advance overarching program objectives. These objectives are to: build an integrated, socially cohesive society (through increasing intercultural and interfaith understanding, civic memory and pride, respect for core democratic values, and equality of opportunity to full participation in society and the economy); improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and actively engage in discussions on multiculturalism, integration and diversity at the international level. Direct public outreach and promotional activities by the program primarily target young people. Further, the program assists federal partners to meet their obligations under the Act through its annual report to Parliament on its operation and the federal Multiculturalism Champions Network. It also engages with non-federal public institutions seeking to respond to diversity through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Officials Responsible for Multiculturalism Issues. The program is the locus for Canada's participation in international agreements and institutions with respect to anti-Semitism and Holocaust remembrance (through the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
13,208,032 13,208,032 13,100,065 13,034,179
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
42 41 40
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Program participants are given information or tools to support an integrated society Annual percentage of program respondents who report that they are more enabled to support an integrated society ≥ 70% End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlights
Sub-program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness

Multiculturalism awareness comprises a suite of policy, operational, public engagement and promotional activities. In addition to developing policies that shape Canada's stance on diversity issues, project funding (grants and contributions) is disbursed to recipients (e.g., not-for-profit organizations, the private sector and individuals) seeking to address the program's overarching objective of building an integrated, socially cohesive society through promotion of intercultural/interfaith understanding, civic memory and pride, respect for core democratic values, and equal opportunity to full participation in society and the economy. Multiculturalism awareness also directs public outreach and promotional activities, primarily targeting young people, designed to engage newcomers and Canadians on multiculturalism, racism and discrimination issues. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant in support of the Multiculturalism Program and contribution in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
12,705,957 12,609,559 12,550,731
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
38 37 36
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Program participants report an increased respect for Canada's core democratic system and values Annual percentage of program participants reporting increased respect for core democratic values ≥ 70% End of each Fiscal Year
Program participants report a better understanding of a religious, ethnic, or cultural group that is different from their own Annual percentage of program participants reporting increased intercultural/interfaith understanding ≥ 70% End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlight
Sub-program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support

Federal and public institutional multiculturalism support efforts are directed toward improving the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population. To assist federal institutions in meeting their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the program leads a Multiculturalism Champions Network that serves as a forum for discussing shared challenges, best practices, lessons learned and increasing awareness of tools available to institutions to help implement the Act. CIC develops the annual report on the operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act for tabling in Parliament, which fulfils the Minister's obligations under the Act, and serves as an informative tool for institutions seeking best practices toward the implementation of the Act. Dialogue with provinces and related non-financial support is also provided through the Secretariat of the Network of Federal-Provincial-Territorial Network of Officials Responsible for Multiculturalism Issues. In addition, through Inter-Action, the program manages and disburses project funding (grants and contributions) to regional and municipal governments and non-federal public institutions. Lastly, the program fosters policy relationships and portfolio management of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation and the Global Centre for Pluralism. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant in support of the Multiculturalism Program and contribution in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
502,075 490,506 483,448
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
4 4 4
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federal institutions report on their responsiveness to a diverse society Percentage of respondents (federal institutions) who report on the operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act ≥ 75% End of each Fiscal Year
Targeted institutions are supported Participation rate of targeted institutions ≥ 85% End of each Fiscal Year
Number of support or outreach activities provided to targeted institutions ≥ 5 End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to lead the Multiculturalism Champions Network (created in 2005), which serves as a forum for discussing shared challenges, best practices, lessons learned, and increasing awareness of tools to help federal institutions in meeting their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act.

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians

Canada welcomes thousands of permanent residents, temporary foreign workers, international students and visitors each year. CIC manages the movement of people within the context of a more responsive immigration system that benefits Canada's economic, social and cultural development while at the same time protecting the health, safety and security of all Canadians. To manage health issues related to immigration, CIC develops and implements risk mitigation strategies in cooperation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, provinces and territories, and partner countries. Any residual public health risks regarding the transmission of infectious diseases are mitigated through medical surveillance of newly arrived permanent and temporary residents as required. To protect Canadians—and to ensure that the benefits of a more responsive immigration system are not undermined—CIC works with the Canada Border Services Agency, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service to conduct appropriate background screening of both immigrants and temporary residents and to identify applicants who could pose a security risk to the country. CIC shares information with these organizations, fostering timely and effective delivery of its program.

Internationally, migration and humanitarian issues continue to gain the attention of governments, bilateral and multilateral forums, non-governmental organizations, and academic and other research institutes. CIC plays an important role in framing and advancing international dialogues on migration and integration policy, refugee protection and governance. These dialogues explore the links between migration policy and development assistance, health, the environment, trade, and the movement of human capital. CIC works to develop and implement a strategic agenda on global migration and refugee protection, and to advance Canada's policy and program priorities.

Benefits for Canadians

Growing international migration has increased the possibility of Canadians being exposed to disease outbreaks and infectious diseases. CIC and its partners in health management work to reduce the impact of identified risks on the Canadian population.

Policies and programs that affect the international movement of people—across Canada's borders and outside them—have a direct bearing on the safety and security of Canada and Canadians at large, whether they are at home or travelling and conducting trade abroad. Strengthening Canada's refugee programs and demonstrating continued leadership in refugee protection, human rights and the promotion of cultural diversity through active participation in various international and regional forums and partnerships support Canada's broader contribution to a safe and secure world. Finally, coordinated and responsible sharing of information supports a fast response to threats to the safety and security of Canadians.

Program 4.1: Health Protection

This program aims to provide effective immigration health services to manage the health aspect of migrant access and settlement to Canada, and facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees to Canada and their integration while contributing to the protection of the health and safety of all Canadians and contributing to the maintenance of sustainable Canadian health and social services. The program aims to evaluate health risks related to immigration and coordinate with international and Canadian health partners to develop risk management strategies and processes to assess the health of applicants wishing to immigrate to Canada. The strategies, processes and interventions are intended to reduce the impact of the risks identified on the health of Canadians and on Canada's health and social services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
58,356,894 58,356,894 58,325,951 58,218,922
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
69 66 65
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Applicants for permanent or temporary residence who pose a risk to public health and/or public safety and/or may be reasonably expected to cause excessive demand on the Canadian social and/or health-care systems are identified Percentage of applications refused for health reasons (public health, public safety or excessive demand) by visa officers over the number of medically inadmissible cases identified in the immigration medical assessment (IMA)Footnote G process 100% End of each Calendar Year
Eligible clients receive coverage for health services under the Interim Federal Health Program Percentage of eligible clients who receive health coverage under the Interim Federal Health Program 100% End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlights
  • Implement a new health admissibility policy to strengthen the health screening process and respond to changing migration patterns and their impacts on public health.
Sub-program 4.1.1: Health Screening

This program aims to manage the health risks related to permanent and temporary residence according to the three grounds for inadmissibility under IRPA, which are (1) danger to public health, (2) danger to public safety, and (3) excessive demand on health or social services. The immigration medical examination (IME)Footnote 3 is a tool used to screen for infectious diseases of public health significance all applicants for permanent and temporary residence. The IME includes x-rays and lab tests that identify applicants who could pose health threats to Canadians or to the Canadian health and social systems. Those who are in good health are cleared for entry into Canada; those who are found with infectious disease are referred for treatment, where relevant, before admittance to Canada; those who are a danger to public health or public safety or are deemed to cause excessive demand on Canada's health and social system are deemed inadmissible.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
4,281,252 4,182,625 4,122,439
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
39 37 36
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Applicants for permanent and temporary residence who pose public health risks or public safety risks or are likely to create excessive demand on the Canadian health-care or social services systems are deemed inadmissible Percentage of applicants identified as medically inadmissible based on health grounds (public health, public safety, or excessive demand) 0.1%–0.2% End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) found during an IMA over total number of IMAs < 0.08% End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of new cases of inactive TB found during an IMA over total number of IMAs 1.88%
(Historical data)
End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to screen applicants for medical conditions that are likely to endanger public health and safety or to cause excessive demand on health and social services.
Sub-program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance Notification

Section 38(1) of IRPA sets danger to public health as one key condition of inadmissibility to Canada. Applicants for temporary or permanent residence in Canada whose IMAs demonstrate that they may pose risks to public health require further health assessment and monitoring following their landing in Canada in order to ensure that they do not represent a danger to public health. The Medical Surveillance Notification Program informs provincial and territorial public health authorities of applicants who require medical surveillance in order to ensure that the terms and conditions of landing are met.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
816,376 797,569 786,093
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
7 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Provincial and territorial public health authorities are notified, for the purposes of medical surveillance, of migrants who pose public health risks Percentage of migrants identified as having inactive TB and/or adequately treated syphilis who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial or territorial health authorities 100% End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of identified cases of human immunodeficiency virus who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial or territorial health authorities (except for Nova Scotia and Nunavut—which elected to not receive the information) 100% End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of clients who comply with the condition of provincial or territorial medical surveillance 100% End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to report to Canadian provincial and territorial public health authorities all admissible applicants with a condition requiring medical surveillance.
Sub-program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health

The Interim Federal Health (IFH) Program provides limited, temporary coverage of health-care costs, under the authority of an Order in Council. The target population includes resettled refugees, protected persons, refugee claimants, and persons detained under IRPA. In general, eligibility and level of coverage under the IFH Program are determined by the beneficiary's status in Canada. The program offers five types of coverage: Expanded Health Coverage, Health-Care Coverage, Public Health or Public Safety Health-Care Coverage, coverage for the Immigration Medical Examination and coverage for detainees. Most beneficiaries receive Health-Care Coverage, which is a level of coverage similar to the coverage Canadians receive through their provincial/territorial health insurance plans. The program helps protect public health and public safety and supports the successful settlement of resettled refugees receiving government support. IFH Program beneficiaries with valid coverage access health services through registered health care providers, who are reimbursed directly by the IFH claims administrator for covered services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
53,259,266 53,345,757 53,310,390
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
23 22 22
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Eligible clients receive health services that reduce risks to the health and safety of Canadians Percentage of refugee claimants who received an immigration medical examination 100% End of each Fiscal Year
Percentage of IFH Program beneficiaries by coverage type who obtain health services that reduce risk to public health and public safety
  • Public Health or Public Safety Health-care Coverage: 100%
  • Expanded Health-care Coverage: TBD
  • Health-care Coverage: TBD
End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to implement the IFH Program in accordance with the Order in Council to provide health-care services to eligible beneficiaries.

Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management

This program aims to ensure the managed migration of foreign nationals and newcomers to Canada. As such, in accordance with IRPA and accompanying regulations, CIC facilitates the travel of bona fide permanent residents, visitors, students and temporary workers while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians by effectively managing migration access and controlling entry. This is accomplished through a variety of policy and operational measures, including visa policy interventions, anti-fraud measures, eligibility and admissibility criteria, negotiations of bilateral and multilateral information-sharing agreements and treaties, security updates to travel and immigration status documents, as well as revisions to identity management practices. Strategic partnership engagements with security and public safety-related departments are another essential component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
84,966,649 84,966,649 84,402,341 87,100,571

Planned spending increases over the planning period as resources for volume demands are shifted from other programs.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
702 693 696
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
A managed migration of people to Canada that facilitates the movement of legitimate travellers, while denying entry to Canada at the earliest point possible to those who pose a safety or security risk, or are otherwise inadmissible under IRPA Number of refused electronic travel authorizations (eTAs) TBD (will be the number that represents a 10% decline in the percentage of non-U.S. visa-exempt foreign nationals that are refused at port of entry) Five years after project implementation
Percentage of temporary resident visa applicants enrolled biometrically 20% Five years after project implementation
Immigration violation rate (based on a three-year average) following a visa policy decision on a country (violations as a percentage of all travellers from that country) ≤ 3% Within three years of exemption
Planning Highlights
  • Implement regulatory amendments to support legislative amendments approved via the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act.
  • Enhance program integrity by developing and improving tools and procedures to facilitate the movement of non-complex citizenship and immigration applications through CIC's processing system without unnecessary delay, while ensuring that complex applications receive the proper level of review.
Sub-program 4.2.1: Permanent Resident Status Documents

In accordance with IRPA, CIC must process and issue to all permanent residents a secure status document for travel purposes. The permanent resident card serves as proof of permanent resident status in Canada and may be easily verified by commercial carriers and border officers. While the permanent resident card also meets international travel document standards, it is not a travel document. The Permanent Resident Status Documents Program makes it difficult to access Canadian territory fraudulently. The program establishes a mechanism to verify compliance with the residency requirement, provides permanent residents with a status document confirming their right to live, work and study in Canada, provides permanent residents with access to government services, and enables them to be recognized and processed quickly at the border, thereby enhancing border security. While not mandatory within Canada, the permanent resident card is required for all permanent residents as proof of their status when seeking to re-enter Canada on a commercial carrier. It contains security features to reduce the risk of fraud. Permanent residents who obtained their status under previous immigration legislation or those who wish to replace an expired, lost or stolen permanent resident card may obtain one upon application. Limited use travel documents are also issued by visa offices overseas to qualified permanent residents outside of Canada who do not have a valid permanent resident card, to facilitate return travel to Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
17,591,861 17,186,600 16,939,293
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
159 154 150
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Permanent residents have required documentation to re-enter Canada Number of phase one (new) permanent resident cards issued ≥ 240,000
(Anticipated processing volume)
End of each Fiscal Year
Number of phase two (existing) permanent resident cards issued ≥ 140,000
(Anticipated processing volume)
End of each Fiscal Year
Number of permanent resident travel documents issued 10,000–20,000
(Anticipated processing volume)
End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlight
  • Redesign the permanent resident card, incorporating updated and enhanced first-, second- and third-level security features.
Sub-program 4.2.2: Visitors Status

Under IRPA, all visitors to Canada require a temporary resident visa (TRV), except citizens of countries for which an exemption has been granted under the Regulations. A foreign national who wishes to come to Canada, and from a country for which a TRV is imposed, needs to apply at a Canadian embassy abroad prior to travelling to Canada. The Visitors Status Program aims to ensure that each applicant is screened to determine whether they meet the entry requirements, including that they will abide by the terms and conditions of entry, and are not inadmissible to Canada. The screening of travellers requiring a TRV is carried out by CIC in cooperation with its federal security partners. Once individuals arrive in Canada, their status needs to be maintained, regardless of whether they needed a visa to enter the country. The TRV is designed to prevent individuals who would abuse temporary entry from coming to Canada, and to facilitate the entry to Canada of genuine temporary residents. The requirement to obtain a TRV limits the number of immigration violations (e.g., refugee claims, no proper travel documents, not leaving Canada once the period of stay has expired, working illegally, etc.) and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
37,408,204 40,870,381 44,195,014

Planned spending increases over the planning period as resources from volume demands are shifted from other programs and new funding is received to address projected growth under this program.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
298 304 315
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Visitors have been screened to ensure they do not pose a risk to the health, safety and security of Canadians Percentage of applicants (overseas and in-Canada) referred to CIC partners for security screening 3.5–4.5%;
0.5–2.5%
(Historical data)
End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of applicants (overseas and in-Canada) refused for being found not to be legitimate visitors or ineligible for approval 16–19%;
8–11%
(Historical data)
End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of applicants (overseas and in-Canada) refused for inadmissibility or non-compliance 1–4%;
1–4%
(Historical data)
End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlights
  • Manage the Visitors Status Program to ensure that those who travel to Canada are approved to enter the country, while denying access to those who pose a threat.
  • Continue to improve TRV services across the network and in key markets.
Sub-program 4.2.3: Temporary Resident Permits

Persons seeking temporary residence in Canada who do not meet IRPA requirements are subject to refusal of a TRV abroad, denial of entry at ports of entry, or refusal of extensions inland. In some cases, however, there may be compelling reasons for an officer to issue a temporary resident permit (TRP) to allow a person who is otherwise inadmissible to enter or remain in Canada. Under the TRP Program, designated officers may issue these permits abroad, at a port of entry or in Canada, depending on the circumstances. Grounds for issuance of a TRP include, among others, inadmissibility due to medical reasons, criminality, reasons of security, infringement of human or international rights, or organized crime. TRPs are issued for a limited, often short, period of time and are subject to cancellation at any time. TRPs provide officers with the flexibility to address exceptional circumstances and, in so doing, maintain the integrity of Canada's immigration program and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
1,878,477 1,835,203 1,808,794
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
17 16 16
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
People seeking to enter or remain in Canada who would otherwise be inadmissible are granted a TRPFootnote H Percentage of TRPs issued for security, organized crime, war crimes and/or crimes against humanity 0.75–1.0%
(Historical data)
End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of TRPs issued for criminality and/or serious criminality 57.5–62.5%
(Historical data)
End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of TRPs issued for other inadmissibilities or non-compliance 38–42%
(Historical data)
End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue the issuance of TRPs on a case–by-case basis to allow persons who are otherwise inadmissible to enter or remain in Canada.
Sub-program 4.2.4: Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection

Under this program, operational policy is developed and procedures are designed in order to maintain confidence in Canada's citizenship and immigration system and to protect the safety and security of Canada while effectively delivering on economic and social objectives by selecting only those applicants that meet program requirements. Program integrity is achieved through case processing procedures that identify and refuse status to applicants who fail to meet eligibility and/or admissibility requirements, including fraud, and through referral of these cases for enforcement action where appropriate. Identity management contributes to strengthened program integrity by ensuring that services are delivered to the correct individual, developing efficiencies across multiple business lines, and allowing CIC to streamline interactions with repeat clientele. Identity management involves the application of procedures to establish, fix and manage client identity across CIC operations and between key partners based on personal identifiers, identity documents and biometrics identifiers.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
24,940,882 24,366,323 24,015,704
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
226 218 213
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The integrity of Canada's citizenship and immigration programs is assured Percentage of applications processed for which risk indicator criteria have been applied in processing (citizenship, permanent resident, and temporary resident applications) over total number of applications processed in these lines of business 50% End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of refused cases over the total number of applications processed for Family Class spouses 8% End of each Calendar Year
Percentage of refused cases over the total number of applications processed for TRVs 16% End of each Calendar Year
Planning Highlights
  • Implement a systematic and automated biographic and biometric information-sharing capability with the United States to reduce identity fraud, enhance screening decisions, and support other administrative and enforcement actions.
  • Complete work to implement the eTA system for 2015–2016 in support of the Beyond the Border Action Plan.
  • Continue implementation and monitoring of biometric screening and other identity management initiatives in the immigration program.
Sub-program 4.2.5: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants

The Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants (GAIM) Program provides transfer payments in the form of contributions to trusted international, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations (such as the International Organization for Migration) to fund activities and support for intercepted irregular migrants, such as meeting basic needs, providing medical care, identifying migrants to be referred to the appropriate authorities for refugee status determination, and facilitating voluntary return and reintegration in the country of origin if determined not to be in need of protection. The GAIM Program responds to the need for Canada to have a permanent program to manage the consequences of disrupting human-smuggling activities believed to be destined for Canada. It is triggered when the Prime Minister's Special Advisor on Human Smuggling identifies an event involving these activities and CIC agrees to implement the program. It also addresses the need for complementary activities that demonstrate Canada's commitment to transit states and international partners that would otherwise be encumbered with the costs of unintended consequences arising from smuggling-prevention activities. Offers of capacity building and support in managing the consequences of successful prevention of human smuggling have been critical in securing bilateral cooperation from transit states. The GAIM Program reflects CIC's role in Canada's whole-of-government strategy to combat human-smuggling activities. The program uses transfer payment funding from the contribution in support of the GAIM Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
3,147,226 143,834 141,765

Planned spending decreases in 2015–2016 due to the ending of temporary contribution funding for the Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants program.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
1 1 1
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Migrants who are determined not to be refugees reintegrate in their countries of origin Percentage of migrants who received assistance to establish a business are “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “moderately satisfied” with the performance of their businessFootnote I 90% End of each Fiscal Year
Percentage of migrants surveyed who received reintegration assistance who are “positive” about their future in their home country 80% End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlight
  • The Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants Program responds to irregular (i.e., unexpected) migration events. As such, is not possible to identify planning highlights for 2014–2015.

Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

As part of its mandate, CIC aims to influence the international migration and integration policy agenda. This is done by developing and promoting, together with other public policy sectors, Canada's position on international migration, integration and refugee protection issues, and through participation in multilateral, regional and bilateral forums. CIC works closely with partner countries to ensure the effective administration of immigration laws through the exchange of information, including biometric data. This international migration policy development helps Canada advance its interests in the context of international migration as well as meet its international obligations and commitments. CIC supports international engagement and partnerships through membership in and contributions to such organizations as the International Organization for Migration, Regional Conference on Migration, the UNHCR Global Forum on Migration and Development, and Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees. The program uses transfer payment funding from the following programs: grant for Migration Policy Development; International Organization for Migration; and International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
8,156,032 8,156,032 8,010,725 7,922,053
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
57 55 54
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadian positions on managed migration, integration, and international protection are advanced in international fora Percentage of decisions/reports from international meetings and fora identified as importantFootnote J that reflect the delivered CIC migration-related position. 60% End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlights

Program 4.4: Passport

CIC is accountable for the Passport Program, and collaborates with Service Canada and Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada for the delivery of passport services. The program is managed through a revolving fund. The program enables the issuance of secure Canadian travel documents through authentication of identity and entitlement, facilitates travel, and contributes to international and domestic security.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 419,548,572 419,548,572 417,971,894 426,344,429
Respendable Revenue (673,740,810) (673,740,810) (654,469,672) (673,802,940)
Net Revenue (254,192,238) (254,192,238) (236,497,778) (247,458,511)
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
802 784 791
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadians have access to secure travel documents Percentage compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization Annex 9 standards and recommended practicesFootnote K 100% End of each Fiscal Year
Percentage of Canadians having access to a passport point of service within 100 kilometres in Canada 90% End of each Fiscal Year
Canadians are satisfied with passport services Percentage of clients who report they have been satisfied with services they have received 90% End of each Fiscal Year
Planning Highlights
  • Advance program modernization in collaboration with Service Canada to enhance passport services and program integrity by strengthening business processes and enabling systems, while ensuring the financial sustainability of the Passport Program.
  • Strengthen the security and integrity of the Passport Program by undertaking security-oriented improvements in alignment with Passport Program modernization, Government of Canada priorities and international standards.
  • Adopt common Government of Canada administrative business processes and optimize synergies with CIC practices and systems.
Icon for Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint

Program 5.1: Internal Services

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: management and oversight, services; communications services; legal services; human resources management services; financial management services; information management services; information technology services; real property services; materiel services; acquisition services; and travel and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–2015
Main Estimates
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
164,414,885 164,414,885 159,175,833 156,883,132
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017
1,487 1,421 1,392
Planning Highlights
  • Launch improvements to the Global Case Management System (GCMS) in summer and fall 2014, to introduce the following modernization elements and to gain overall efficiencies:
    • A new intake method for prospective immigrants to express an interest in coming to Canada;
    • Enable exchange of fingerprints and other biometric data with the United States for security screening of foreign nationals;
    • online applications for Citizenship grants;
    • replacement of aging Field Operations Support System (FOSS); and
    • technological changes to support compliance for the International Students Program and TFW Program.
  • Advance progress on information technology and information management projects undertaken to improve the service delivery network by April 2015 such as completing the passport Administrative Service Fees Project and FOSS replacement for the Canada Border Services Agency.
  • Complete the move of the call centre to a new service provider by December 2014.
  • Continue monitoring of Access to Information program-related internal service delivery to strengthen client service.
  • Complete the close-out review of the Budget 2012 implementation measures; implement and manage small office closure activities; and provide CIC corporate application access to employees in the Passport Program to support the integration of employees and functions into CIC by April 2015.
  • Continue efforts to advance the Management Accountability Framework, Enterprise Project Management, Compliance and Risk Management, client satisfaction measurement, greening government operations and related management files in order to improve management practices, accountability and compliance.
  • Implement the new Directive on Performance Management to ensure that the work of employees aligns with strategic objectives and priorities, and that both managers and employees are accountable for results. Continue to implement key strategic human resources initiatives such as the employment equity and official languages action plans to enable a healthy workplace and a high-performing, innovative and collaborative work force.

As required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act, CIC will update its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy in response to the 2013–2016 FSDS. CIC is a participant in the 2013–2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and contributes to Theme IV (Shrinking the Environmental Footprint—Beginning with Government) targets through the Internal Services Program. The Department plans to:

  • reduce the departmental greenhouse gas emissions from its fleet by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020;
  • take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement;
  • develop an approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of its workplace operations; and
  • establish Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-bound (SMART) targets to reduce the environmental impact of its services to clients.

Additional details on CIC's sustainable development activities can be found in the Greening Government Operations Supplementary Information Table.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statements of Operations

The consolidated future-oriented financial highlights presented in this subsection are intended to serve as a general overview of the financial operations of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC). These consolidated future-oriented financial highlights are prepared on an accrual basis and contribute to strengthening accountability and improving transparency and financial management.

Because the future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ.

Consolidated Future-oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ending March 31 (dollars)
  $ Change Estimated Results
2013–2014
Planned results
2014–2015
Total expenses 68,505,375 2,294,237,028  2,362,742,403
Total revenues 179,179,919 504,509,703 683,689,622
Net cost of operations >(110,674,544) >1,789,727,325 >1,679,052,781

The total departmental expenses are expected to increase by $68 million or 3.0 percent from $2.29 billion in 2013–2014 to $2.36 billion in 2014–2015. This increase is attributable to the fact that CIC assumed responsibility for Passport Canada as of July 2, 2013. Only nine months of the Passport Program's expenses are included in CIC's estimated expenses for 2013–2014 versus a full 12 months in the 2014–2015 planned expenses. Transfer payments comprise the majority of planned expenses (41.2% or $973 million in 2014–2015).

The increase of $179 million in revenues from 2013–2014 to 2014–2015 is due to the fact that only nine months of the Passport Program's revenues are included in CIC's estimated revenues for 2013–2014 versus a full 12 months in the 2014–2015 planned revenues.

The chart below outlines CIC's planned expenses by program for 2014–2015:

Chart described below
Text version: Planned Expenses by Program

The pie chart shows a breakdown of the Future-Oriented Expenses by Program for 2014–2015. The table below provides the expenses expressed in percentage for each program as indicated in the pie chart.

Future-Oriented Expenses by Program Percentage
Settlement and Integration of Newcomers 42%
Passport 17%
Migration Control and Security Management 8%
Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 6%
Permanent Economic Residents 5%
Temporary Economic Residents 4%
Family and Discretionary Immigration 4%
Internal Services 8%
OtherFootnote L 6%
TOTAL 100%

Consolidated Future-oriented Statement of Operations

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the CIC's Web site.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables found in the 2014–2015 Reports on Plans and Priorities can be found on the CIC Web site:

  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs;
  • Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs under $5 Million;
  • Up-Front Multi-Year Funding;
  • Greening Government Operations;
  • Upcoming Internal Audits Over the Next Three Fiscal Years;
  • Upcoming Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years; and
  • Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

For any additional information, on this report or other parliamentary reports for Citizenship and Immigration Canada, please contact ParliamentaryReports-RapportsParlementaires@cic.gc.ca.

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