2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities – Supplementary Information Tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Overview of the Federal Government’s Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–16 guides the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities reported in this supplementary information table.

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy presents the planned contributions and expected results for Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government.

Themes I to III: Department and Agency-Led Targets

IRCC is not responsible for any targets under Themes I-III of the FSDS.

Themes I to III: Implementation Strategies

IRCC is not responsible for any targets under Themes I-III of the FSDS.

Theme IV: Targets and Implementation Strategies

Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Energy

Target 6.1: GHG Emissions Reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleet by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

Departmental Target

17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

Scope and Context

Departmental GHG emissions in 2005–06 = 90 tonnes (0.09 kilotonnes (kt))

The target is to reduce GHG emissions by 1.7% (1.53 tonnes – 0.00153 kt) per fiscal year, beginning in 2010–11, to achieve the target of 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture

5.1.9. Materiel Services

Financial Performance Expectations

Reducing IRCC’s fleet lessens the environmental footprint of federal operations and contributes to reduced fuel consumption as well as a reduction in the number of kilometres driven. This results in overall cost savings for IRCC, although the exact amount is difficult to quantify.

Performance Measurement

Expected result: Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Updated GHG reduction implementation plan in place by March 31, 2017. Target is to reduce GHG emissions by 1.7% (1.53 tonnes – 0.0153 kt) per fiscal year, beginning in 2010–11.
This will lead to the achievement of the total target of 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2006–07. 0.09 kt
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2016–17. 0.08082 kt
Renewable power emission credits applied in current fiscal year (kt CO2 equivalent). N/A
Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2006–07 to fiscal year 2016–17, inclusive of renewable power emission credits, if applicable. 10.2% decrease (Formula: 0.090 kt – 0.08082 kt /0.09x100).
Adjustments made to base year GHG emissions. N/A

Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Scope and Context

Procurement and materiel management specialists will complete the Green Procurement course (C215) offered by the Canada School of Public Service. Environmental considerations will be incorporated into the performance evaluations of all functional heads of procurement and materiel management.

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture

5.1.10. Acquisition Services

Financial Performance Expectations

N/A

Performance Measurement

Expected result: Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place as of April 1, 2014. Target will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
Number and percentage of procurement and/or materiel management specialists who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in the given fiscal year. A total of 21 procurement and materiel management specialists (100%) will complete the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215) by March 31, 2017.
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year. For 2016–17: Four managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management (100%) will have performance evaluations that include support and contribution toward green procurement.
Departmental green procurement target Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Overall fleet fuel efficiency By March 31, 2017, percentage of vehicles purchased that are right-sized for operational needs and are the most fuel-efficient vehicle in their class available at the time of purchase or are an alternative fuel vehicle. Target will be 100% achieved by March 2017.
IRCC is projecting to replace two cars (100%) for fiscal year 2016–17 that are right-sized for operational needs and the most fuel-efficient vehicle in their class as identified by Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) in its Vehicle Standing Offer.
Light-duty fleet fuel efficiency Percentage of all new light-duty vehicles purchased between April 1, 2014 and March 31, 2017 that have an average rated fuel efficiency of 10 litres per 100 kilometres or less. Will be 100% achieved by March 2017.
(In fiscal year 2014–15: two vehicles were purchased with an average rated fuel efficiency of 10 litres per 100 kilometres or less.)
N.B.: Vehicles are determined by PSPC in its Vehicle Standing Offer.
IRCC plans to replace two cars per fiscal year.
Use of recycled paper products Percentage of copy paper, commercial printing and/or envelope purchases that contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and are certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of its production. 100% of paper purchased will meet these standards by March 31, 2017, as determined by PSPC’s procurement tools.
Implementation strategy element or best practice Targeted performance level
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
Best Practice
7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.
Will be achieved by March 31, 2017, through procurement training sessions.
Best Practice
7.2.4. Increase awareness of the Policy on Green Procurement among managers.
Will be achieved by March 31, 2017, through inclusion of green procurement in performance management agreements.
Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Scope and Context

By March 31, 2017, IRCC will continue to improve or maintain the sustainability of the departmental workplace. Key elements of the approach will continue to address the scope of application and commitment to green meetings, printing unit reduction, paper consumption and electronic and electrical equipment surpluses.

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture

5.1.1 Management and Oversight Services

Financial Performance Expectations

N/A

Performance Measurement

Expected result: Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
An approach to maintain or improve
the sustainability of the departmental workplace in place by March 31, 2017.
Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
Implementation strategy element or best practice Targeted performance level
7.3.1.1. Engage employees in greening government operations practices. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
Employees will be engaged in greening government operations practices.
7.3.1.2. Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
In procurement, environmental considerations will continue to be included in bid documents (printing, publications, etc.) where applicable.
7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (i.e., printer ratios, paper usage and green meetings). Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
Green meeting achievements will be maintained. Project has commenced to achieve printing unit and paper consumption reductions.
7.3.1.4. Minimize the ratio of information technology (IT) assets per employee. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
Project has commenced to reduce ratio of IT assets per employee.
7.3.1.5. Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and materiel usage. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
All IT and office equipment is energy efficient (as per PSPC’s procurement tool) and reduces materiel usage where feasible.
All desktop and notebook systems as well as monitors will continue to be procured from PSPC’s National Master Standing Offers (which are certified through the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool global rating system for greener electronics).
7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
Surplus items are disposed of according to the PSPC Electronic and Electrical Equipment protocol. Currently, there is no count of electronic and electrical equipment disposed of under the protocol. Processes and tools are in development to address this deficiency.
7.3.1.7. Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
Employees will continue to use the paper recycling program in the workplace.
Use of GCSurplus ensures that all assets are reused or recycled where appropriate, including the reuse and recycling of furniture when feasible.
In addition, all assets will continue to be sold (through GCSurplus), donated (computers are sent to Computers for Schools) or disposed of in an environmentally responsible manner (shredded or sold to recycling agencies).
7.3.1.8. Minimize all non-hazardous solid waste generated and leverage service offerings to maximize the diversion of waste. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
See 7.3.1.7.
In addition, the PaperSave program is in place and a waste recycling system is in use in the majority of IRCC buildings.
7.3.1.9. Increase the population density in office buildings and space utilization in special purpose buildings. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
IRCC will continue to maintain or exceed the population density in office buildings. In addition, Workplace 2.0 is being implemented in some of IRCC’s buildings.
7.3.1.10. Maintain or improve sustainable fleet management. Will be achieved by March 31, 2017.
IRCC will review and dispose of or replace vehicles as required.
In 2015–16:
Two vehicles were procured.
Three vehicles were sold.
One vehicle was transferred within an IRCC region.

Additional Departmental Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

No additional activities or initiatives.

Sustainable Development Management System

IRCC examines the social and economic impacts and principles of equity in each Memorandum to Cabinet and Treasury Board Submission, in addition to environmental impacts as required by the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals (Cabinet Directive). The objective of this broader view of sustainability is to arrive at integrated decision making that maximizes the potential for departmental policies and programs. This additional analysis is integral to the IRCC Sustainable Development Policy Framework, which brings together the principles of sustainable development as stated in the Federal Sustainable Development Act. This Framework effectively links the goals and targets of the FSDS to the Directive.

IRCC’s framework for managing sustainable development facilitates the integration of sustainable development into daily activities. IRCC will continue to implement an approach to manage sustainable development based on three pillars:

  • Sustainable Development Policy Framework: As mentioned above, the Policy Framework brings together the full suite of relevant sustainable development policy instruments to strengthen the clarity of requirements and to enhance effective monitoring and support so that IRCC can better fulfill its sustainable development commitments.
  • Policy on Sustainable Development Assessments: This policy clarifies the requirements, roles and responsibilities within IRCC to fulfill its obligations under the Federal Sustainable Development Act and the Cabinet Directive.
  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy: The Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy is used to identify and communicate departmental commitments expressed in terms of goals, targets and implementation strategies, which determine the sustainable development direction at IRCC for a three-year cycle.

Strategic Environmental Assessment

IRCC will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment process. A strategic environmental assessment of policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of IRCC’s detailed assessment are made public when an initiative is announced. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been appropriately considered during proposal development and decision making.

For further information on IRCC’s activities to support sustainable development and strategic environmental assessments, please visit the departmental Sustainable Development Web page. For complete information on the FSDS, please visit the Environment Canada Web site.

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Canada-Quebec Accord Grant (payments are voted)

Start date: Financial compensation to the province (in the form of a grant) is based on the Canada-Quebec Accord relating to Immigration and Temporary Admission of Aliens, which came into force on April 1, 1991.

End date: The Accord does not have an expiry date

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: Ongoing

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Newcomer Settlement and Integration: Grant to Quebec

Description: The Canada-Quebec Accord relating to immigration gives Quebec the responsibility for providing reception and integration services to all immigrants in Quebec, including all refugees. Quebec receives an annual grant from the federal government to support these reception and integration services.

Objective/anticipated outcomes: An objective of the Canada-Quebec Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants into the province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec.

Activities: Quebec has responsibility for the selection of immigrants and their reception to and integration into the province. In accordance with section 26 and Annex B of the Canada-Quebec Accord, Canada is required to pay compensation to Quebec for reception and integration services, where it is established that:

  • the reception and integration services (referred to in sections 24 and 25 of the Accord) offered by Quebec correspond, when considered in their entirety, with those offered by Canada in the rest of the country; and
  • those services are offered without discrimination to any permanent resident in the province, whether or not that permanent resident has been selected by Quebec.

Expected results: The Government of Quebec is responsible for developing and publishing its own expected results related to immigration.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2011–12

Decision following the results of last evaluation: N/A

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: 2016–17

General targeted recipient groups: Other levels of government (Quebec)

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: N/A

Total Forecast Spending
2015–16 ($)
Planned Spending ($)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
Total grants 345,059,000 345,059,000 345,059,000 345,059,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 345,059,000 345,059,000 345,059,000 345,059,000

Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP)Footnote 1 (Payments are voted)

Start date: 1970s (under another name; RAP in its current form was implemented in 1998)

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2015–16

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Newcomer Settlement and Integration: Resettlement Assistance Program

Description: RAP provides direct financial support and immediate and essential services to RAP clients, including government-assisted refugees, visa office-referred refugees under blended initiatives, and persons in refugee-like situations admitted to Canada under a public policy consideration, to meet their resettlement needs.

Expected results: The expected outcomes for RAP include meeting the immediate and essential needs of RAP clients and ensuring that RAP services are timely, useful and accessible, while contributing to Strategic Outcome 3, Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2010–11

Decision following the results of last evaluation: Continuation

The Government-Assisted Refugee-RAP evaluation was completed in March 2011 and found that RAP remains relevant and services provided to government-assisted refugees remain necessary. The next evaluation of RAP will be completed by March 2016.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: 2015–16

General targeted recipient groups: RAP targets two types of recipients: refugee clients and service providers, who provide immediate and essential services to eligible clients, which include:

  • not-for-profit organizations and associations (including non-governmental organizations), community groups and umbrella organizations;
  • intergovernmental and international organizations;
  • businesses;
  • Canadian educational institutions (including boards, districts and divisions);
  • provincial, territorial or municipal governments; and
  • individual Canadian citizens (e.g., consultants, facilitators).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: IRCC uses calls for proposals to award contribution agreements to service providers. Refugee recipients undergo an intake assessment on arrival to Canada to determine the level of support they need and what types of services they require.

Total Forecast Spending
2015–16 ($)
Planned Spending ($)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 152,890,255 162,869,437 54,922,768 54,922,768
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 152,890,255 162,869,437 54,922,768 54,922,768

Settlement ProgramFootnote 2 (Payments are voted)

Start date: May 15, 2008

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2015–16

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Newcomer Settlement and Integration: Settlement: Language Training; Community and Labour Market Integration Services

Description: The Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees in overcoming barriers specific to the newcomer experience, such as a lack of official language skills, limited knowledge of Canada and the recognition of foreign credentials. The program provides language learning services for newcomers, community and employment bridging services, settlement information, and support services that facilitate access to settlement programming. The program also provides information, path-finding and referral services to internationally trained individuals to have their credentials assessed as quickly as possible so they can find work faster in the fields for which they have been trained. Most services are designed and delivered by service provider organizations; however, certain services (such as information provision) are delivered directly by IRCC in Canada and overseas.

Expected results: The program’s ultimate outcomes are that:

  • newcomers contribute to the economic, social and cultural development needs of Canada; and
  • newcomer settlement and integration is supported in Canadian society.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation:

Completed 2009–10: Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada

Completed 2010–11: Host Program, Welcoming Communities Initiative, Immigration Settlement and Adaptation Program, Going to Canada Immigration Portal Initiative

Completed 2012–13: Overseas Orientation Initiatives, Recruitment and Integration of French-speaking Immigrants to Francophone Minority Communities Initiative, Foreign Credentials Referral Office

Decision following the results of last evaluation: Not applicable (N/A)

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: 2016–17: Settlement Program

General targeted recipient groups: The terms and conditions for the Settlement Program describe both eligible recipients of contribution funding and eligible clients. Eligible recipients (often referred to as service providers) for settlement services include:

  • provincial, territorial or municipal governments;
  • international organizations;
  • not-for-profit organizations including non-governmental organizations, non-profit corporations, community groups and umbrella organizations, and regulatory and apprenticeship authorities;
  • businesses (e.g., employers hiring newcomers, private language schools, conference organizers, Web or production firms for tool development);
  • educational institutions (including school boards, districts and divisions); and
  • individuals.

Eligible clients: Only the following persons are eligible to receive settlement services:

  • permanent residents of Canada;
  • protected persons as defined in section 95 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act;
  • individuals who have been selected, inside or outside Canada, to become permanent residents (pending verifications) and who have been informed by a letter from IRCC;
  • Convention refugees and protected persons outside Canada whom IRCC has selected for resettlement in Canada; and
  • temporary foreign workers who hold or received approval of a work permit under section 112 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations or received initial approval for permanent residence under section 113 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations.

Notes: Eligible persons include both the principal applicant and eligible dependants (spouse and children).

Restrictions:

  • To access language training, persons must be of legal school-leaving age within their applicable province or territory.
  • Canadian citizens and non-permanent residents are not eligible persons. However, the Settlement Program provides opportunities for citizens and other residents of Canada to participate in providing settlement services to clients as volunteers.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: An open and fair call for proposals process is the principal approach the Department uses to engage applicants.

Total Forecast Spending
2015–16 ($)
Planned Spending ($)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 590,568,669 631,057,002 631,057,002 629,641,669
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 590,568,669 631,057,002 631,057,002 629,641,669

Multiculturalism ProgramFootnote 3 (Payments are voted)

Start date: 1982–83

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2014–15

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians: Multiculturalism Awareness; Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support

Description: The program objectives are to:

  • build an integrated, socially cohesive society;
  • improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and
  • engage in discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at an international level.

The Multiculturalism Program works to build an integrated, socially cohesive society by fostering intercultural understanding, civic memory and pride, and respect for core democratic values grounded in our history, and by promoting equal opportunity for individuals of all origins.

Expected results: The expected results are:

  • program participants have increased awareness of ethnocultural and religious diversity, core democratic values, and Canadian history and institutions;
  • program participants have increased civic memory and pride, respect for core democratic values, and intercultural/interfaith understanding;
  • federal and public institutions are aware of how to meet the needs of a diverse society;
  • federal and public institutions’ programs, policies and services are responsive to the needs of a diverse society; and
  • best practices on approaches to diversity are shared.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2011–12

Decision following the results of last evaluation: Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: 2017–18

General targeted recipient groups: Eligible recipients include:

  • Canadian not-for-profit organizations or associations;
  • non-federal public institutions, such as boards of education, schools, colleges, universities, chambers of commerce, law enforcement and police agencies, hospitals and other health-care institutions;
  • provincial, regional and municipal governments and their agencies;
  • First Nations and Inuit governments, band councils, and Aboriginal organizations;
  • the private sector—private sector recipients are eligible for contributions only, and applications from the private sector must include at least one not-for-profit partner providing financial or in-kind support;
  • Canadian citizens and permanent residents;
  • the Canadian Race Relations Foundation; and
  • international organizations that foster discussion on multiculturalism and diversity at the international level.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: The call for proposals process is the preferred mechanism for allocation of funding and will continue to have priority; however, due consideration may be given to funding of unsolicited proposals if they align with departmental priorities, the terms and conditions, and if sufficient funding is available.

The Department accepts applications for Inter-Action Events on a continuous intake basis.

Total Forecast Spending
2015–16 ($)
Planned Spending ($)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
Total grants 3,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000
Total contributions 4,593,166 5,521,316 5,521,316 5,521,316
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 7,593,166 8,521,316 8,521,316 8,521,316

Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs Under $5 Million

Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants

End date: March 31, 2018

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Migration Control and Security Management: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants

Main objective: Contribute to the overall discouragement of human smuggling and illegal migration while ensuring migrants intercepted as part of Canada’s anti-smuggling activities:

  • have basic needs met, including shelter, water, food and emergency medical care;
  • are treated in accordance with international principles of protection, including protection against refoulement; and
  • are assisted in returning to their countries of origin if determined not to be in need of protection.

Planned spending for 2016–17: $3,000,000

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2015–16

General targeted recipient groups: International organizations

Annual Assessed Contribution to the International Organization for Migration

End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

Main objective: Membership in the International Organization for Migration, which allows Canada to participate in the organization’s governance and decision making mechanisms. This is linked to the Department’s capacity to meet its objectives, in particular:

  • managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians; and
  • international recognition and acceptance of the principles of managed migration consistent with Canada’s broader foreign policy agenda.

Planned spending for 2016–17: $1,454,000

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2014–15

General targeted recipient groups: International organizations

Migration Policy Development Program

End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payment: Grant

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

Main objective: Objectives of the program are to:

  • provide funding to organizations active in international migration policy development and research;
  • promote research and exchange of information among states on migration issues;
  • gain access to forums, organizations, projects and activities, and be able to influence them;
  • inform development of Canadian policy and programs relating to international migration, including refugees, immigrants and visitors, thus maximizing the economic and social benefits of international migration; and
  • support the Department’s expected result of advancing in international forums Canadian positions on managed migration and international protection.

Planned spending for 2016–17: $350,000

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2012–13

General targeted recipient groups: Multilateral forums and organizations active in international migration policy development, research and exchange of information.

Annual Assessed Contribution to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA, formerly the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance, and Research)

End date: N/A

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

Main objective: Membership in the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance supports the multiculturalismFootnote 3 objective of actively engaging in discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at the international level.

Planned spending for 2016–17: $44,450

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2015–16

General targeted recipient groups: The International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance is a coalition of governmental and non-governmental organizations that promotes Holocaust remembrance both nationally and internationally. In 2009, Canada became the organization’s 27th member.

Horizontal Initiatives

Syrian Refugee Crisis: Resettlement of 25,000 Syrians by February 29, 2016 and an additional 10,000 Government-assisted refugees by December 31, 2016

Name of lead department: Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

Federal partner organizations:

  • Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
  • Global Affairs Canada (GAC)
  • Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
  • Shared Services Canada (SSC)

Non-federal and non-governmental partners:

  • United Nations Refugee Agency
  • International Organization for Migration
  • Various settlement/resettlement service provider organizations
  • Private sponsors
  • Provinces/territories
  • Municipalities

Start date of the horizontal initiative: November 2015

End date of the horizontal initiative: March 2019

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date): $698,476,945

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners: Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative: The ongoing conflict in Syria has triggered the worst humanitarian crisis in the world today Footnote 4 . As millions of Syrians continue to be displaced due to conflict in their home country, the Government of Canada has committed to welcoming 25,000 Syrian refugees by the end of February 2016, as well as an additional 10,000 Government-assisted refugees by December 31, 2016. To fulfill this commitment, several government departments, led by IRCC, are working together with international partners, provinces/territories, sponsorship agreement holders and community organizations. Once Syrian refugees have landed in Canada, the Government of Canada works with governmental/non-governmental partners to facilitate their successful settlement and integration and eventual contribution to Canada’s economic, social and cultural development.

Shared outcomes: This initiative has four shared outcomes:

  • Syrian refugees are granted protection in Canada and become permanent residents.
  • Syrian refugees benefit from Canada’s social, health and economic systems and integrate into Canadian society.
  • Canada’s international humanitarian reputation is upheld by demonstrating to the world that we have a shared responsibility to help people who are displaced and persecuted.
  • The health, safety and security of Canadians are protected through rigorous screening of refugees overseas and upon arrival.

Governance structures: The oversight, execution, monitoring and reporting of this horizontal initiative is undertaken under the direction of various committees, subcommittees, working groups, councils and operations centres.

As the lead federal department, IRCC is responsible for the following work: deploying staff overseas; working with international organizations to identify Syrian refugees overseas; processing refugees to permanent residency; performing biometrics screening; conducting and assessing immigration medical exams as well as performing visual health checks prior to departure; conducting immigration interviews; reimbursing expenses related to medical care through the Interim Federal Health Program; and coordinating the settlement and integration of individuals in cooperation with provinces/territories, municipalities and other partners.

Federal partners play a critical role in providing support to IRCC in the following capacities:

  • CBSA: Works with airline officials to conduct passenger assessments and document verification; liaises with foreign border authorities and transporters to ensure compliance with foreign exit requirements; confirms identity and travel documents of migrants at Canadian ports of entry; investigates, seeks admissibility determination; detains and removes refugees who are deemed inadmissible; and undertakes the necessary arrangements to enforce removal orders.
  • GAC: Supports the roll-out of operations through its network of missions; coordinates the deployment of all Government of Canada personnel; manages bilateral implications of operations and diplomatic engagement of partners globally; and facilitates liaison with international organizations.
  • PHAC: Provides advice on pre-departure health screening at point of origin prior to flight to Canada; conducts health screening in partnership with CBSA at the points of entry, as per the Quarantine Act; facilitates identification and provision of health human resources and physical assets for on-site medical care at interim lodging sites; provides public health surveillance and response at interim lodging sites; and supports capacity to provide Emergency Social Services supplies.
  • SSC: Provides information technology infrastructure support, including datacentre, telecommunications, network and information technology security services; provides 24/7 technical support to facilitate expedited processing of applications and temporary visa processes; and provides adequate bandwidth for in-Canada processing.

Planning highlights: This initiative is comprised of five phases:

  1. Identifying Syrian Refugees to Come to Canada
  2. Processing Syrian Refugees Overseas
  3. Transportation to Canada
  4. Welcoming Syrian Refugees to Canada
  5. Settlement and Community Integration

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners: The Government of Canada has made a $100 million contribution to the United Nations Refugees Agency to help the agency select eligible Syrians for resettlement in Canada by February 2016. The United Nations Refugees Agency is responsible for identifying and prioritizing vulnerable refugees who are a low security risk and for contacting them to determine if they are interested in being resettled in Canada.

Non-federal and non-governmental partners also provide information and referral services to ongoing community supports such as language classes, translators, community-based mental health care, medical services and long-term accommodations.

Contact information:

Dawn Edlund
Associate Assistant Deputy Minister
Operations
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Dawn.Edlund@cic.gc.ca
Telephone: 613-437-9176

David Manicom
Associate Assistant Deputy Minister
Strategic and Program Policy
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
David.Manicom@cic.gc.ca
Telephone: 613-437-9152

Planning information

IRCC
Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Expected results 5Footnote 5 2016–17 Performance indicators 6Footnote 6 2016–17 Targets 7Footnote 7
Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displace and persecuted Refugee Protection $153,500,163 $2,017,764 Effective and efficient selection, matching, processing and transportation of Syrian refugees to Canada. TBD TBD
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society Newcomer Settlement and Integration $343,428,683 $153,949,135 Immediate and essential needs of resettled Syrian refugees are met. TBD TBD
Resettled Syrian refugees are linked to IRCC’s and other government settlement and social services that can respond to their needs. TBD TBD
Settled Syrian refugees are equipped with the knowledge and information needed to contribute to Canadian society. TBD TBD
Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians Health Protection $33,714,614 $14,536,015 TBD TBD TBD
Internal Services   $20,150,396 $9,796,566      
CBSA
Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Expected results 5Footnote 5 2016–17 Performance indicators 6Footnote 6 2016–17 Targets 7Footnote 7
Admissibility Determination Air Mode $6,333,131 0 Safe and Secure integration of 25,000 Syrian refugees into Canadian society The number of refugees landed TBD
Risk Assessment Intelligence $7,423,426 $213,865

The number of Syrian refugee applications processed

The number of visas issued

TBD
Targeting 0 0
Security Screening $1,504,707 0
Immigration Enforcement Immigration Investigations $2,113,307 $314,632   To measure the sustainability of the Syrian refugee program, the Department will continue to collect data enforcement performance indicators (i.e. investigations, hearings, detentions, removals) TBD
Immigration Hearing $1,612,445 $380,034 TBD
Detention $2,205,811 $220,694 TBD
Removals $2,424,530 0 TBD
Internal Services   $2,803,342 $18,144      
GAC
Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Expected results 5Footnote 5 2016–17 Performance indicators 6Footnote 6 2016–17 Targets 7Footnote 7
Canada’s International Agenda Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements $112,282,350 $3,070,587 Increased capacity of Canada’s missions to undertake outreach and liaison activities necessary for the smooth implementation of the initiative. TBD TBD
Improved bilateral and regional diplomacy with Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan as their refugee influx burden is alleviated. TBD TBD
International Commercial and Consular Services for Canadians Consular Services and Emergency Management     Effective coordination of Government of Canada staff and efficient management of human resources being deployed to source countries in support of Operation Syrian Refugees. TBD TBD
International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation Humanitarian Assistance     Improved access to protection services, improved access to lifesaving relief supplies and shelter assistance, and improved access to essential services, particularly education and health care for people affected by the conflict in Syria. TBD TBD
Canada’s Network Abroad Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services     Better situational awareness of security and health environment and legal obligations/status for all Government of Canada staff deployed as well as those to whom the Government of Canada owes a duty of care. TBD TBD
PHAC
Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Expected results Footnote 5 2016–17 Performance indicators Footnote 6 2016–17 Targets Footnote 7
Public Health Infrastructure Implementing the Quarantine Act; $2,180,040 0 N/A N/A N/A
Health Security Supporting health infrastructure at interim lodging sites; and Facilitating national coordination and public health support to provinces          
SSC
Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Expected results Footnote 5 2016–17 Performance indicators Footnote 6 2016–17 Targets Footnote 7
IT Infrastructure Program Distributed Computing Services
Production and Operations Computing Services (Data Centres)
Telecommunications Services (Data, Voice and Video)
Cyber and IT Security
$6,800,000 $5,400,000 Modern, reliable, secure and cost-effective IT infrastructure services are provided to support the resettlement of Syrian Refugees. TBD TBD

Total for all federal organizations:

  • Total allocation (from start to end date): $698,476,945
  • 2016–17 Planned spending: $189,917,436

Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects

Passport Program Modernization Initiative

The Treasury Board initially approved the Passport Program Modernization Initiative at an estimated cost of $101 million.

In May 2015, the Treasury Board granted additional authorities to the Passport Program Modernization Initiative to amend project approval at a revised total indicative cost estimate of $176 million, to amend expenditure authority to complete and extend Phase I, and expenditure authority for Phase II. The total cost is now estimated at $176 million.

The Passport Program Modernization Initiative is expected to achieve defined performance objectives. The overall project implementation plans are under review, with course corrections expected once key business issues are resolved (and decisions are made on the implementation plans).

The Passport Program Modernization Initiative is running on budget. However, course corrections are expected due to key business issues (per above note); the impacts on project budget will be assessed once implementation plans are confirmed.

The Passport Program Modernization Initiative is slated to be completed by June 2018.

Description: The Passport Program Modernization Initiative will:

  1. Implement the transition of accountability for the Passport Program to IRCC and Employment and Social Development Canada;
  2. Modernize business processes including the development and implementation of a new business model, online application and passport issuance system; and,
  3. Optimize the Passport Program service delivery network.

Project outcomes: The Passport Program Modernization Initiative will:

  1. Improve program service delivery and accessibility;
  2. Strengthen program security and integrity of passport entitlement and issuance processes;
  3. Increase program efficiencies; and,
  4. Strengthen organizational and workforce excellence.

Industrial benefits: N/A

Sponsoring department: IRCC

Contracting authority: IRCC

Participating departments:

  • Employment and Social Development Canada
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Shared Services Canada

Prime contractors:

  • Oracle Canada
  • Microsoft
  • Adobe Systems
  • BMC Software
  • CA Technologies
  • Dynamsoft Corporation
  • Entrust
  • F5 Networks
  • Fujitsu Consulting Canada
  • Hewlett-Packard
  • IBM
  • Freedom Scientific
  • Informatica Corporation
  • Symantec
  • Telerik
  • Altova
  • Atalasoft
  • Compugen
  • TRM Technologies
  • CDW Canada
  • Emtec
  • TechXtend
  • Softchoice
  • Embarcadero
  • OpenText
  • Scalar
  • Frontier Computing
  • Redgate

Major subcontractors: N/A

Project phase: Gate 5 – Detailed Project Plans and Functional Specifications 

Major milestones:

  • December 2013: Obtained project approval and expenditure authority for Phase I (TB Submission #1)
  • March 2014: Approval of Order in Council
  • September 2014: Approval of modifications to entitlement policy instruments for Global Case Management System, Passport Release 8
  • May 2015: Obtained amended project approval; amended expenditure authority for Phase I, and expenditure authority for Phase II (TB Submission #2)
  • May 2015: Global Case Management System, Passport Testing Phase Go-live – May 2015 (Release 8)
  • November 2015: Global Case Management System, Release 9 (QAP, Supplementary Services) completed

Progress report and explanation of variances: While the Passport Program Modernization Initiative is still working within the approved project scope, TB authorities and key Phase II commitments, including Phase III planning activities, it is expected that there will be delays to Phase II time lines (i.e., June 2016).

While current plans seek Phase III expenditure authority in spring 2016, it is now expected that more time will be required to complete Phase II activities. Strategies are being investigated to optimize current authorities and available financial and schedule contingencies, with a view to identifying a new date to return for Treasury Board consideration of Phase III authorities.  

Expanding Biometric Screening in Canada’s Immigration System (Biometrics Expansion Project)

Description: Between 2013 and 2015, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) introduced biometric technology to enhance the screening of temporary resident applicants through the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project.

This project expands biometric collection, screening and verification to all temporary resident visa, work permit, study permit, and temporary resident permit applications (excluding U.S. citizens) and permanent resident applicants. It also includes systematic verification of fingerprints through self-service kiosks of these travellers upon arrival at Canada’s major airports, in-Canada biometrics enrolment services, increased biometric information sharing with the U.S. and implementation of automated biometric information sharing with the other Five Country Conference (FCC) partners (the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand) to inform visa decision-making.

The costs of expanding biometric screening are expected to be fully recovered through the existing biometrics fee.

Project outcomes: Building on the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project and the Beyond the Border Action Plan, funding for this initiative was announced in Budget 2015, with the Government’s proposal to expand the use of biometric screening to all visa-required travellers seeking entry to Canada. The initiative falls within the Government’s ongoing efforts to improve the security and integrity of the immigration system.

The use of biometrics as an identity management tool helps supplement existing biographic checks and significantly reduces the chance that one individual could pose or be mistaken for another individual. Immigration officers will know with greater certainty if an immigration applicant undergoing biometric screening has a Canadian criminal record, made an asylum claim in Canada, was previously deported from Canada, submitted an immigration application in the past or has used a different biographic identity.

Biometrics will also provide border services officers with greater certainty that an individual who was granted authorization to enter Canada is the one actually seeking entry. Over time, biometrics will also facilitate legitimate travel by:

  • Strengthening identity management: The expanded collection and screening of biometrics information will add a more secure and reliable identity element to a r range of applicants. Immigration information sharing with FCC partners will further enhance identity management by providing officers with more information to confirm an applicant’s identity and detect cases of identity fraud or inadmissibility.
  • Inadmissible individuals are not allowed entry into Canada: Broader fingerprint collection at the application stage will allow for more applicants to be screened against records of known criminals, past refugee claimants, persons previously deported and previous immigration applicants, to assist officers in the admissibility decision-making process at the application stage. Immigration information sharing will also contribute further to admissibility screening by providing officers with access to a r range of immigration data.
  • Facilitated movement of admissible individuals into Canada: The expanded collection, screening, verification and sharing of biometrics will simplify confirmation of a traveller’s identity, reduce the need for more in-depth questioning at the application and arrival stages and facilitate the processing of low-risk returning applicants both overseas and upon arrival in Canada. More efficient and effective identity management is one of a number of key enablers in support of ongoing processing improvements that will allow IRCC to increasingly automate service delivery.

Industrial benefits: The Biometrics Expansion Project will improve the safety and security of Canadian citizens. Facilitating entry to legitimate travellers while deterring and detecting individuals who pose a risk is central to Canada’s security and economic and social prosperity. The immigration system also helps to uphold Canada’s proud tradition of providing humanitarian assistance to refugees while protecting Canadians from threats to their health, safety and security. To support the Government of Canada outcomes of strong economic growth and a safe and secure world, the Department must maintain a balance between the desire to welcome newcomers to Canada and the obligation to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. Criminals, terrorists and other known inadmissible persons must not be allowed to enter or stay in Canada.

Sponsoring department: IRCC

Contracting authority: Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

Participating departments: The Canada Border Services Agency, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Shared Services Canada.

Prime contractor:

  1. Fujitsu Consulting (Canada) Inc., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada—Technical Solution
  2. VF World Holdings Ltd, Port Louis, Mauritius—Service Delivery
  3. Computer Sciences Canada Inc., Kanata, Ontario, Canada—Service Delivery
  4. 3M Cogent Inc., Pasadena, California, U.S.A. – Technical Solution

Major subcontractors: To be specified by IRCC’s project lead, if applicable.

Aware Inc., Bedford, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Project phase: The Biometrics Expansion Project is currently in Phase 1 (Planning) which involves the development of strategies and plans for defining, building and deploying an expanded biometric solution and enhanced information sharing. Phase 1 commenced in June 2015.

Major milestones: The project will be implemented in three phases before transitioning to steady state operations upon project close in March 2019.

  • Phase 1 (Planning): In this phase, the project will develop preliminary strategies and plans for defining, building and deploying the expanded biometrics solution and enhanced information sharing.
  • Phase 2 (Development): In this phase, requirements for the project will be detailed, and plans for defining, building and deploying the expanded biometrics solution and information sharing will be finalized.
  • Phase 3 (Deployment): In this phase, the biometrics solution and supporting infrastructure will be finalized. Implementation of the communications plan will prepare clients, partners and other stakeholders for the expansion of biometric screening and information sharing.

Major milestones

  • June 2015: Receive project approval and commence project
  • June 2015: Receive Royal Assent of legislative amendments to expand authority for biometric information collection
  • March 2016: Complete updated project management documentation and receive approval to begin Phase 2
  • June 2016: Complete the procurement process and award the contract for the enhanced fingerprint identification system
  • March 2017: Complete procurement process and award contract(s) for visa application centres
  • March 2017: Complete and publish the necessary regulatory changes for:
    • information sharing with FCC partners
  • March 2018: Complete and publish the necessary regulatory changes for:
    • sharing exchange of information on criminal removals with FCC partners
  • May 2018: Complete and publish the necessary regulatory changes for:
    • expanded authority to collect biometric information from additional nationalities and business lines
  • April 2017: Deploy equipment, undertake training and commence biometric enrolment at in-Canada service points
  • October 2017: Finalize project privacy impact assessments
  • April to November 2017: Begin biometric-based information sharing with FCC partners (actual start dates to be negotiated for each country)
  • March 2018: Begin sharing of information on criminal removals with FCC partners
  • July 2018: Begin increased biometric-based information sharing with the U.S.
  • July 2018: Commence biometric enrolment at all service points and expanded verification at certain points of entry into Canada for the expanded nationalities and business lines
  • March 2019: Begin systematic fingerprint verification at major airports

Ongoing operations: Once elements of the Biometrics Expansion Project are implemented, ongoing activities will be required for business and technology support, as well as service delivery. It is anticipated that operations will reach a steady state in 2020–21. 

Progress report and explanation of variances: Initial funding for the Biometrics Expansion Project was announced in Budget 2015. In June 2015, the Treasury Board approved new funding of $312.6 million over five years, and $103.2 million ongoing. An amount of $146.7 million was to implement the Biometrics Expansion Project for which $143.6 million is from the approved new funding and $3.1 million comes from existing reference levels.

Significant progress has been made to achieve the planning objectives set out in Phase 1, and the project remains on track to commence Phase 2 in April 2016. 

However, in developing the detailed project schedule, it became apparent that some activities would need to be deferred into 2016–17 in order to better align deliverables and dependencies. The deferral of Phase 1 activities will not impact the subsequent phases of the project or planned go-live dates.

While project costs are increasing due to revised assumptions and further substantiation of costs, ongoing costs are decreasing, thus allowing the total cost to remain within the five-year funding announced in Budget 2015. Amended project approval will be sought as appropriate for revised cost estimates.

Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years

Internal audits

The mission, vision and values described in the Internal Audit Charter of IRCC, together with the Treasury Board Policy on Internal Audit and related directives, provide the fundamental framework for the audit planning process at IRCC. IRCC’s audit strategy is outlined in its Risk-Based Audit Plan, which forms the basis for audit activities within the Department.

In accordance with the Policy on Internal Audit, the Internal Audit and Accountability Branch develops a three-year Risk-Based Audit Plan, which is recommended for approval by the Departmental Audit Committee and approved by the Deputy Minister. The list of planned audit projects included here is from the 2015–2018 approved Risk-Based Audit Plan and is therefore subject to change as the 2016–2019 Risk-Based Audit Plan is finalized.

Audits that are currently under way or planned for 2016–17 include the following:

Title of Internal Audit Internal Audit Type Status Expected Completion Date
Audit of New Delhi Mission Mission audit In progress May 2016
Audit of the Integrity of Passport Operations Program audit In progress May 2016
Audit of the Dakar Mission Mission audit In progress May 2016
Audit of the Case Processing Centre – Ottawa Program audit In progress October 2016
Audit of the Management Control Framework over Privacy and Protection of Information Corporate function audit In progress October 2016
Audit of Workload Management and Resource Allocation (Immigration) Program audit Planned February 2017
Audit of the Case Processing Centre – Mississauga Program audit Planned February 2017
Audit of Controlled Documents – Inventory Management Program audit Planned February 2017
Audit of the Sao Paolo Mission Mission audit Planned May 2017
Audit of the Guatemala Mission Mission audit Planned May 2017
Audit of Electronic Travel Authorization Program audit Planned May 2017
Audit of the Beijing Mission Mission audit Planned October 2017
Audit of General Computer Controls: Global Case Management System Program audit Planned October 2017
Audit of Express Entry Program audit Planned October 2017
Audit of the Moscow or Pretoria Mission Mission audit Planned February 2018
Audit of the Case Processing Centre – Vegreville Program audit Planned February 2018

Evaluations

The IRCC Evaluation Plan is organized according to the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture and incorporates input from IRCC branches on new and emerging departmental requirements and priorities. It includes evaluation projects related to IRCC’s core programs, the horizontal initiatives in which the Department is involved, as well as the internal programs and services that support this work.

The Evaluation Plan continues to reflect departmental needs and meets the Federal Accountability Act and Treasury Board Policy on Evaluation requirements for evaluation coverage of transfer payment programs and other direct program spending.

The list of planned evaluations included here is from the 2015–2018 approved evaluation plan and is therefore subject to change as the 2016–2019 plan is finalized.

Evaluations that are currently under way or planned for 2016–17 include the following:

Link to Departmental Program Alignment Architecture Title of the Evaluation Planned Evaluation Start Date Planned Deputy Head Approval Date
1.1.1 Federal Skilled Workers,
1.1.2 Federal Skilled Trades
Evaluation of the Federal Skilled Workers and Skilled Trades Programs November 2016 May 2018
1.1.4 Provincial Nominee Evaluation of the Provincial Nominee Program October 2015 December 2016
1.2.2 Temporary Work Authorization Evaluation of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program August 2016 March 2018
1.2.3 International Experience Canada Evaluation of the International Experience Canada Program October 2017 December 2018
2.1.1 Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification,
2.1.2 Parents and Grandparents Reunification
Evaluation of the Family Reunification Programs December 2017 March 2019
2.1.3 Humanitarian & Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations Evaluation of Humanitarian & Compassionate Considerations June 2016 September 2017
2.1.3 Humanitarian & Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations Evaluation of Public Policy Considerations December 2017 March 2019
2.2.1 Government Assisted Refugees,
2.2.2 Private Sponsorship of Refugees,
2.2.3 Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees,
3.1.4 Resettlement Assistance Program
Evaluation of the Refugee Resettlement Programs January 2015 March 2016
2.2.4 In-Canada Asylum
2.2.5 Pre-Removal Risk Assessment
Evaluation of the In-Canada Asylum System Reforms November 2014 March 2016
3.1.1 Settlement Evaluation of the Settlement Program October 2015 March 2017
3.1.1 Settlement Evaluation of the Support for Official Language Minority Communities September 2015 December 2016
3.1.2 Grant to Quebec Evaluation of the Grant to Quebec September 2016 March 2017
3.2.1 Citizenship Awareness Evaluation of the Citizenship Awareness Program December 2017 March 2019
3.2.2 Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation Evaluation of Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation June 2016 December 2017
4.2.1 Identity Management Evaluation of the Temporary Resident Biometrics Program and Immigration Information Sharing December 2016 March 2018
4.2.2 Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents Evaluation of Temporary Resident Permits November 2015 July 2016
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda Evaluation of the Migration Policy Development Program June 2017 March 2018
4.4 Passport Evaluation of the Passport Program September 2016 March 2018
Horizontal Evaluations
Link to Departmental Program Alignment Architecture Title of the Evaluation Planned Evaluation Start Date Planned Deputy Head Approval Date
3.1 Newcomer Settlement and Integration Evaluation of the Roadmap for Canada’s Official Languages (Heritage-led) December 2015 April 2017
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda Evaluation of Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Program (Justice-led) June 2014 June 2016
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management Evaluation of Immigration and Refugee Protection Act Division 9 National Security Inadmissibility Initiative (Public Safety-led) August 2014 March 2016
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management Evaluation of Entry/Exit Enhanced Document Entry Requirement (CBSA-led) June 2017 June 2018
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management Evaluation of the Strengthening the Criminal Justice System Through Legal Aid Program (Justice-led) June 2016 March 2017
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management Review of the Impact of the Federal Government Investment in the 2015 Toronto Pan and Parapan American Games (Heritage-led) November 2014 January 2016

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

Global Centre for Pluralism

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All CanadiansFootnote 8

Link to recipient’s site: www.pluralism.ca

Start date: 2006–07—one-time conditional grant

End date: Perpetual

Description: The Global Centre for Pluralism is a not-for-profit organization, co-founded by the Aga Khan Development Network and the Government of Canada, which addresses a global gap in institutions that advocate pluralism as a foundation for new governance, peace and human development at the international level. The Global Centre for Pluralism pursues its mandate through four core functions:

  • sustaining an international policy dialogue on pluralism in governance, elections, judicial systems, media and education to help factions integrate in states at risk;
  • providing programs for academic and professional development;
  • fostering research and learning on pluralism; and
  • fostering and sharing the results of research and learning on pluralism.

These activities will target primarily the developing world, offering a platform from which existing organizations and experts on pluralism in Canada can reach an international audience.

Total funding approved: $30,000,000

Total funding received: $30,000,000

Planned funding in 2016–17: N/A

Planned funding in 2017–18: N/A

Planned funding in 2018–19: N/A

Summary of annual plans of recipient: The Global Centre for Pluralism will continue to deliver its strategic program, focusing on:

  • applied research to develop a “pluralism lens”;
  • existing and new country cases to pilot engagement approaches;
  • public dialogue about pluralism through established event series;
  • communications and development of an award to build global awareness of pluralism;
  • the Sussex Drive property renovation project; and
  • programming the Centre’s international headquarters in 2017 and beyond.

Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians Footnote 9

Link to recipient’s site: http://shevchenkofoundation.com

Start date: 2008–09—one-time conditional grant

End date: Funding agreement governing endowment ends in May 2023

Description: Recognizing the historical significance of First World War internment of “enemy aliens,” the Government of Canada provided a conditional grant of $10 million under the Community Historical Recognition Program to the Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko for the establishment and management of an endowment fund known as the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund. (This funding was provided on a one-time basis when Community Historical Recognition Program was managed by the Department of Canadian Heritage.) Affected communities include Ukrainians, Poles, Italians, Bulgarians, Croatians, Turks, Serbians, Hungarians, Russians, Jews and Romanians. Through calls for proposals managed by the Foundation, applicants apply for financial support for activities that commemorate, acknowledge and educate Canadians about the experiences of communities affected by internment and the subsequent contributions of these communities to shaping Canada. The funding agreement will remain in effect for 15 years.

Total funding approved: $10,000,000

Total funding received: $10,000,000

Planned funding in 2016–17: N/A

Planned funding in 2017–18: N/A

Planned funding in 2018–19: N/A

Summary of annual plans of recipient: The Fund is designated for the support of projects to commemorate and recognize the experiences of ethnocultural communities affected by the First World War internment. The Fund will help to address long-standing requests for appropriate recognition of these communities’ experiences.

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