Citizenship Week infographic

The content below is offered in PDF format. For more information or to download the appropriate viewer, check the Help page.

Citizenship Week infographic (PDF, 1.75MB)

Infographic described below

Canadian Citizenship

Canada has welcomed generations of newcomers who have helped us build a free, democratic and prosperous society. For 400 years, settlers and immigrants have contributed to the diversity and richness of our country, which is built on a proud history and a strong identity.

Did you Know?

Canada has the highest rate of naturalization in the world—85 per cent of eligible permanent residents become citizens.

Since 2006, Canada has welcomed over 1,500,000 proud new Canadians.

Citizenship Ceremonies

The citizenship ceremony is legally and symbolically important.  Legally, it completes the process of becoming a Canadian citizen. 

Approximately 2000 citizenship ceremonies are held across Canada each year.

The Oath of Citizenship:

“I swear (or affirm) that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second, Queen of Canada, Her Heirs and Successors, and that I will faithfully observe the laws of Canada and fulfill my duties as a Canadian citizen.”

Celebrating Canadian Citizenship

Citizenship Week is the 2nd week in October.

To celebrate Citizenship Week and Canada Day, we organize special citizenship ceremonies and reaffirmation ceremonies in communities across Canada.

Most citizenship ceremonies are open to the public. Citizenship ceremonies’ times, locations and other details are available at Canada.ca.

Rights and Responsibilities:

Canadian citizens have rights and responsibilities. These reflect our shared traditions, identity, and values.

Your principle responsibilities as a Canadian citizen are to obey the law, to take responsibility for yourself and your family and to respect the rights and freedoms of others.

The Citizenship Act was amended in 2014.

Stronger rules better prepare new citizens to fully participate and integrate into society. The result? Stronger attachment to Canadian values and traditions.

Features

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Privacy statement

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: