Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and visitors to Canada: Uniting with family members

COVID-19 border measures have ended

On October 1, 2022, all COVID-19 border requirements, including vaccination, mandatory use of ArriveCAN, and any testing and quarantine or isolation requirements, ended for all travellers entering Canada by land, air or sea.

We’re working to update the information on this page. Learn more about the changes to travel restrictions.

How to reunite with or accompany a family member to Canada

Travel authorization letters issued before January 15, 2022, at 12:01 am ET

  • Letters previously issued exempting immediate and extended family members from the travel restrictions are no longer valid.
    • We are no longer issuing letters to reunite family members.

Most foreign nationals now need to qualify as a fully vaccinated traveller, or under one of the new limited exemptions, to travel to Canada.

First find out who can enter Canada and about current travel restrictions and measures on entry to Canada.

If you are eligible to unite with family

Immediate family

If over 18 years of age

You must qualify for the fully vaccinated traveller exemption or meet another exemption to travel to Canada.

If under the age of 18 years or a dependant adult

If you’re not fully vaccinated, you’ll need certain documents to demonstrate that you meet an exemption when you travel.

Documents to prove immediate family status and your relationship

You must have 2 types of documents:

Proof of your immediate family member’s status in Canada

The following are examples of documents you can provide. Paper and electronic copies of these documents are accepted. Please note that these are examples only. An officer may request or accept other documents as needed.

  • a Canadian passport
  • proof of Canadian citizenship, such as a citizenship certificate, citizenship card, or provincial or territorial birth certificate
  • a Canadian permanent resident travel document
  • a secure certificate of Indian status, certificate of Indian status or temporary confirmation of registration document (TCRD)
Proof of your relationship to that family member

The following are examples of documents you can provide. Paper and electronic copies of these documents are accepted. Please note that these are examples only. An officer may request or accept other documents as needed.

  • a marriage certificate or proof of common-law status (documents showing a shared address)
  • a birth certificate
  • a Confirmation of Permanent Residence (COPR) for one of the following:
    • the family class (the COPR category under Application Details will be FC)
    • the one-year window of opportunity provision (coded OYW under Special Program)
  • other documents that show an immediate family connection, for example:
    • correspondence from us showing a spousal sponsorship application in progress
    • documents that show a shared home address

Extended family

If over 18 years of age

You must qualify for the fully vaccinated traveller exemption or meet another exemption to travel to Canada.

If under 18 years of age

If you’re not fully vaccinated, you must complete a statutory declaration form. Make sure to:

How to complete your statutory declaration form

You must bring a signed statutory declaration proving your extended family relationship.

Reuniting with an adult – If the person you’re reuniting with in Canada is 18 years or older

Step1: Your family member completes and signs the form by solemn declaration

Your family member must sign the form by solemn declaration.

This is done in front of any official who is legally authorized to receive a solemn declaration in Canada, such as a:

  • commissioner for oaths
  • justice of the peace
  • lawyer or
  • notary public

If your family member is currently outside Canada

If your family member is outside Canada, there are a few options to sign the form by solemn declaration:

  • Canadian service providers who offer this service online, such as
    • some notaries public
    • commissioners of oaths
    • lawyers
  • consular officer of a Government of Canada office overseas
    • Some Canadian consular officers may not be able to perform the solemn declaration due to COVID-19.

Your best option may be to find a designated Canadian service provider.

Step 2: Get a copy of the completed and signed form

Your family member must send you a copy of the completed and signed statutory declaration (IMM 0006)

Step 3: Bring the copy of the signed statutory declaration when you travel.

When you travel to Canada, you must have

  • the statutory declaration
  • your valid travel document (visitor visa or eTA, if needed)

This is mandatory. If you don’t bring these documents with you, you won’t be allowed to board your flight or enter Canada.

Reuniting with a minor – If the person you’re reuniting with in Canada is under the age of 18

If the person you’re requesting to reunite with in Canada is under the age of 18 years, they’re considered a minor. To support your request to reunite with them, Statutory Declaration for the Parent of a Minor (IMM 0016) must be completed.

Step 1: Your family member’s legal parent completes and signs the form by solemn declaration

The legal parent must sign the form by solemn declaration.

This is done in front of any official who is legally authorized to receive a solemn declaration in Canada, such as a

  • commissioner for oaths
  • justice of the peace
  • lawyer or
  • notary public

If your family member is currently outside Canada

If your family member is outside Canada, there are a few options to sign the form by solemn declaration:

  • Canadian service providers who offer this service online, such as
    • some notaries public
    • commissioners of oaths
    • lawyers
  • consular officer of a Government of Canada office overseas
    • Some Canadian consular officers may not be able to perform the solemn declaration due to COVID-19.

Your best option may be to find a designated Canadian service provider.

Step 2: Get a copy of the completed and signed form

Your family member in Canada must send you a copy of the completed and signed Statutory Declaration for the Parent of a Minor (IMM 0016).

Step 3: Bring the copy of the statutory declaration when you travel.

When you travel to Canada, you must have

  • the statutory declaration
  • your valid travel document (visitor visa or eTA, if needed)

This is mandatory. If you don’t bring these documents with you, you won’t be allowed to board your flight or enter Canada.

Before you travel to Canada

All travellers entering Canada must follow testing and quarantine requirements to keep everyone safe. Under certain conditions, you may be exempt from some of these requirements.

Find out about pre-entry testing and quarantine requirements.

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