Tailored Impact Statement Guidelines Template for Designated Projects Subject to the Impact Assessment Act and the Nuclear Safety and Control Act

Table of Contents

Abbreviations and Short Forms

Agency
Impact Assessment Agency of Canada
BCRs
Bird Conservation Regions
CAAQS
Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards
CNSC
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
COSEWIC
Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada
ECCC
Environment and Climate Change Canada
FA
Federal Authority
GBA+
Gender Based Analysis Plus
GHG
Greenhouse gas
HIA
Health Impact Assessment
IA
Impact Assessment
IAA
Impact Assessment Act
Minister
Minister of Environment and Climate Change
NOC
National Occupational Classification
NSCA
Nuclear Safety and Control Act
Registry
Canadian Impact Assessment Registry
SARA
Species at Risk Act
TIS Guidelines
Tailored Impact Statement Guidelines
TISG Template
Tailored Impact Statement Guidelines Template
VC
Valued component (including environmental, health, social, economic and potentially other elements of the natural and human environment)

Part 1 – The Tailored Impact Statement Guidelines Template

1. Introduction

The federal Impact Assessment (IA) process serves as a planning tool that considers a broad range of potential environmental, health, social and economic effects of designated projects identified by regulation or designated by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change (the Minister). Decisions are based on whether the potential adverse effects in areas of federal jurisdiction are in the public interest, as opposed to the previous environmental assessment process, where decisions were based on whether a project is likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects. The public interest determination is guided by the factors set out in the Impact Assessment Act (IAA):

A key element for the IA process is the introduction of Tailored Impact Statement GuidelinesFootnote 2 (TIS Guidelines), which provide direction to the proponent on the factors to be considered, the methodology to be followed and information requirements, in order to guide preparation of the Impact Statement. The TIS Guidelines are developed by the Agency and provided to the proponent early in the IA process and are tailored for the specific designated project. The development of the TIS Guidelines will be informed by consultation and engagement that occurs with the public, Indigenous groups, lifecycle regulators, jurisdictions, federal authorities (FAs) and other interested parties.

The Tailored Impact Statement Guidelines Template (TISG Template), described in Part 2 of this document, is the starting point for process to develop the TIS Guidelines.  The TISG Template sets out a comprehensive list of potential requirements that, through the tailoring process, will be reviewed to identify the project-specific requirements for a complete and detailed Impact Statement, which will then be set out in the TIS Guidelines provided to the proponent. The TIS Guidelines may also contain requirements that are not included in the Template, but are identified during the early planning process.

Under the IAA, designated projects that are also regulated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) will be assessed by an integrated review panel process. For these projects, the TIS Guidelines will be developed by the Agency in coordination with CNSC and will identify information requirements under both the IAA and the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA). Part 3 sets out these additional NSCA requirements that are not directly linked to impact assessment. The requirements provided for in Part 3 will not be tailored in the same manner as the requirements set out in Part 2. The priority will be to avoid any overlap or duplication between the IAA and NSCA requirements. The information necessary to make NSCA decisions may be informed by the IA process, but would not be necessary for decisions under the IAA.

While the TISG Template does not prescribe a preferred structure for the Impact Statement, it is essential that the Impact Statement address all requirements outlined in the TIS Guidelines. The Proponent may present the information in the Impact Statement in the manner it deems most appropriate. To facilitate review of the Impact Statement, a table of concordance must be provided that identifies where each requirement of the TIS Guidelines is located within the Impact Statement.

1.1 Factors to be considered in the Impact Assessment

The TIS Guidelines correspond to factors to be considered in the Impact Assessment (IA). These factors are listed in subsection 22(1) of the Impact Assessment Act (IAA) and prescribe that the IA of a designated project must take into account:

The scope of the factors 22(1)(a) to (f), (h) to (l), (s) and (t) that are to be taken into account, including the extent of their relevance to the impact assessment, is determined by the Agency, in consultation with the CNSC, and will be outlined in the TIS Guidelines.

Pursuant to section 24 of the NSCA, the integrated IA will also need to include consideration of:

Proponents should also refer to CNSC’s REGDOC-2.9.1, Environmental Protection: Environmental Principles, Assessments and Protection Measures and other relevant CNSC regulatory documents (see Part 3) for further information on licensing requirements and guidance.

With respect to the protection of the environment and human health, CNSC requires that proponents demonstrate through their license application that their environmental protection measures:

Further details on CNSC’s licensing requirements are identified in Part 3 of this document.

The information provided by the proponent is to be provided in machine-readable, accessible format. This would support of the Government of Canada’s commitment to Open Science and Data and would facilitate the sharing of information with the public through the Agency’s Registry and Internet Site and the Government’s Open Science and Data Platform. The proponent should contact the Agency to obtain additional direction regarding the format and distribution of the Impact Statement.

Part 2 – Content – Tailored Impact Statement Guidelines Template

The following template presents the type of information that may be required in the TIS Guidelines for a designated project. Each section in the template represents a category of information that may be requested as part of the TIS Guidelines.  Each section provides:

The format of this document is not meant to be the format followed in the Impact Statement (IS). Proponents should present the information in a manner that works for their specific-project.

1. Overview

1.1 The proponent

The Impact Statement must:

1.2 Project overview

The Impact Statement must describe the designated project, key project components and ancillary activities, scheduling details, the timing of each phase of the project and other key features. If the project is part of a larger sequence of projects, the Impact Statement must outline the larger context.

1.3 Project location

The Impact Statement must describe the geographical setting and socio-ecological context in which the project is to take place. The description should focus on aspects of the project and its setting that are important in order to understand the potential environmental, health, social and economic effects and impacts of the project. The following information must be included and, where appropriate, located on map(s):

Maps are to be provided to the Agency as electronic geospatial data file(s) compliant with the ISO 19115 standard.

1.4 Regulatory framework and the role of government

The Impact Statement must identify:

1.5 Qualifications of individuals preparing the Impact Statement

In support of ensuring transparency and the quality of the scientific information and analysis being applied, the proponent must provide information on the individuals who prepared the sections within the Impact Statement related to environmental, economic, social, and health impacts and impacts on Indigenous peoples. Proponents are required to demonstrate that a qualified individual has prepared the information or studies provided. A qualified individual would include someone who, through education, experience or knowledge relevant to a particular matter, may be relied on by the proponent to provide advice within his or her area of expertise.  Knowledge relevant to a particular matter may include Indigenous and community knowledge.

2. Project Description

2.1 Project components

The Impact Statement must describe the designated project, by describing the project components, associated and ancillary works, and other characteristics to assist in understanding the potential environmental, health, social and economic effects, and impacts on Indigenous peoples and Indigenous rights, as identified by the Indigenous group(s). This description must be supported with maps of key project components, boundaries of the proposed site with geographic coordinates, major existing infrastructure, proponent lands, properties or leased lands, adjacent resource lease boundaries, adjacent land uses and any important environmental features.

A list of key project components must be prepared during the IA Planning Phase and is informed by the Detailed Project Description.

2.2 Project activities

The Impact Statement must include descriptions of project activities to be carried out during each project phase, the location of each activity and the activity's duration, magnitude and scale.

The Impact Statement must provide a complete list of project activities and focus on activities with the greatest potential to have environmental, health, social and economic effects, or impacts on Indigenous people and rights of Indigenous peoples. Sufficient information must be included to adequately predict adverse and positive environmental, health, social and economic effects, the interaction between those effects and any disproportionate effects for diverse subgroups.

Evidence that input from diverse subgroups was sought through engagement activities to identify potential effects or other concerns and issues must be provided. The information must be sufficient to provide an analysis regarding the project’s impacts in the context of potential interaction between VCs.

The Impact Statement must highlight activities that involve periods of increased disturbance to environmental, health, social and economic conditions or impacts on Indigenous peoples. The Impact Statement must include a schedule including time of year, frequency and duration for all project activities.

The final list of key project activities must be completed during the planning phase of the IA, and is informed by the Detailed Project Description to be submitted by the proponent. The Impact Statement will include a summary of the changes that have been made to the project since originally proposed, including the benefits of these changes to the environment, Indigenous peoples and the public. Project activities, where relevant to the project, may include, but are not limited to a description of the elements listed below:

2.2.1 Site preparation and construction
2.2.2 Operation
2.2.3 Abandonment or decommissioning

2.3 Workforce requirements

The Impact Statement must describe the anticipated labour requirements, employee programs and policies, and workforce development opportunities for the designated project, including:

3. Project Purpose, Need and Alternatives Considered

3.1 Purpose of the project

The Impact Statement must outline what is to be achieved by carrying out the project. The statement should broadly classify the project (e.g. electricity supply, mineral extraction/processing, etc.) and indicate the target market (e.g. international, domestic, local, etc.), where applicable. The purpose of statement should include any objectives the proponent has in carrying out the project. Proponents are encouraged to consider the perspectives of participants (i.e. public, Indigenous groups, governments) in establishing objectives that relate to the intended effect of the project on society.

3.2 Need for the project

The Impact Statement must describe the underlying opportunity or issue that the project intends to seize or solve and should be described from the perspective of the proponent. In many cases, the need for the project can be described in terms of the demand for a resource. The proponent should provide supporting information that demonstrates the need for a project. The information provided should make it possible to reasonably conclude that there is an opportunity or issue that warrants a response and that the proposed project is an appropriate approach (e.g. the output of an operation does not excessively exceed the projected demand). The proponent may report the comments or views of Indigenous peoples, the public and other participants on the proponent’s need statement.  

3.3 Alternatives to the project

In addressing alternatives to the designated project, the Impact Statement must provide a description of the functionally different ways that are technically and economically feasible to meet the project need and achieve the project purpose from the perspective of the proponent. For these technically and economically feasible alternatives to the project, the Impact Statement must provide sufficient information, for the selection of alternatives to the project. The process of identifying and considering alternatives to the project must consider the views, information and knowledge from Indigenous peoples, the public and other participants, as well as existing studies and reports.

There can be reviews where the scope of alternatives to the project are limited.  For example, in the case of a nuclear energy project, an assessment of energy mandates established through federal and provincial legislation/policy may not be within the scope of the IA - the alternatives to the project need not include alternatives that are contrary or not consistent with federally mandated initiatives and/or a province’s formal plans or directives. However, the proponent should explain where this rationale has been applied to exclude consideration of possible alternatives to the project.

The analysis of alternatives to the project should serve to validate that the preferred alternative for the project is a reasonable approach to meeting the need and purpose and is consistent with the aims of the IAA.

3.4 Alternative means of carrying out the project

The Impact Statement must describe the proponent’s ongoing and proposed public engagement activities regarding the designated project. The proponent’s public engagement strategy will be informed in part by the Public Participation Plan issued by the Agency.

The Impact Statement must describe:

The Impact Statement must identify the elements of each alternative means and the associated adverse and positive environmental, health, social or economic effects or impacts on Indigenous rights, as identified by the Indigenous group(s). The application of Gender Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)Footnote 3 to the effects analysis to describe disproportionate effects for diverse subgroups is required. The proponent must also consider the views or information provided by Indigenous people, the public and other participants in establishing parameters to compare the alternatives means.

The Impact Statement must then identify:

In its alternative means analysis, the proponent must address all project elements, including, but not limited to, the following project elements and components, where relevant to the project activities and design:

As relevant, the alternatives to and alternative means assessments should be informed by, but not limited to, the following:

The proponent should refer to any current Agency guidance on this topic.

4. Description of Public Participation and Views

The Impact Statement must describe the proponent’s ongoing and proposed public engagement activities regarding the designated project. The proponent’s public engagement strategy will be informed in part by the Public Participation Plan issued by the Agency.

The Impact Statement must provide a description of efforts made to distribute project information and provide a description of information and materials that were distributed during the consultation process. The Impact Statement must indicate, for example, the methods used, where the consultation was held, the persons, organizations and diverse groups consulted, the views expressed and the extent to which this information was incorporated in the design of the project as well as in the Impact Statement. The Impact Statement must provide a summary of key issues related to the project that were raised through engagement with the public and the potential environmental, health, social and economic effects, including disproportionate effects, for diverse subgroups within the population. The Impact Statement must describe any outstanding issues raised by the public and ways to address them, such as alternatives means, specific mitigation measures or specific monitoring and follow-up programs to deal with uncertainty.

The Impact Statement should also provide details and commitments regarding how the public will be kept involved if the project were to be approved and were to proceed, such as public involvement in follow-up and monitoring programs.

The Impact Statement must identify public concerns that were not addressed, if any, and provide reasons why the concerns were not addressed.

The proponent should refer to Agency guidance on this topic.

5. Description of Engagement With Indigenous Groups

During the IA Planning Phase and in conjunction with the tailoring process, the proponent must meaningfully engage with Indigenous groups that may be affected by the project.

5.1 Analysis of potentially affected Indigenous groups

The Impact Statement must describe the analysis used to identify all Indigenous groups that may be impacted by the designated project and provide:

5.2 Record of engagement

The Impact Statement must provide a record of engagement that describes all efforts, successful and unsuccessful, taken to seek the views of each potentially affected Indigenous group with respect to the designated project. This record of engagement is to include all engagement activities undertaken prior to the submission of the Impact Statement, during the Planning Phase and in the preparation of the Impact Statement. The Impact Statement must include:

5.3 Analysis and response to questions, comments and issues raised

The Impact Statement must provide an analysis of the input received from Indigenous groups with respect to the designated project. This analysis is to include all input received by Indigenous groups prior to and since commencing the Impact Assessment process. This analysis is to include, and not limited to, the identification of potential effects and impacts, including impacts on Indigenous rights and the identification of specific VCs where appropriate.

The analysis in the Impact Statement must also include consideration of Indigenous knowledge provided by Indigenous groups.  Indigenous knowledge that is not already publicly available or where written consent has not been provided by the Indigenous group(s) should not be included. Permission from the Indigenous group should be sought before including Indigenous knowledge in the Impact Statement, regardless of the source of the Indigenous knowledge.

Indigenous knowledge is holistic and in IA, it can provide insights related to knowledge of the environment, social, cultural, economic, health, Indigenous governance and resource use. It is important that Indigenous knowledge be included for all of these aspects of the technical assessments, not only to look at potential impacts of the project on Indigenous peoples. Given the holistic nature of Indigenous knowledge, it may be presented in one section of the Impact Statement, rather than being broken down into the technical sections or chapters. It is also important to capture the context in which Indigenous groups provide their Indigenous knowledge and to convey it in a culturally appropriate manner.

The Impact Statement must also document how the proponent responded to questions, comments and issues raised by Indigenous groups, and how unresolved matters have been addressed in the Impact Statement. Any proposed mitigation measures are to be clearly linked, to the extent possible, to VCs in the Impact Statement as well as to specific project components or activities. The analysis and responses are to include:

The proponent should refer to Agency guidance on this topic.

6. Baseline Conditions

6.1 Methodology

The Impact Statement must provide a description of the environmental, health, social and economic setting directly and incidentally related to the designated project.  This should include the existing environmental, health, social and economic components, interrelations and interactions as well as the variability in these components, processes and interactions over time scales and geographic boundaries appropriate to the project. Meaningful, two-way dialogue with communities and Indigenous groups provides input that may describe how these components and processes are interrelated.

The information describing the existing baseline conditions may be provided as a stand-alone chapter in the Impact Statement or integrated into clearly defined sections for relevant VCs, including effects assessment of each VC and VC interactions, identification of mitigation measures, residual effects analysis and cumulative effects assessment.

The application of GBA+ to these baseline descriptions to disaggregate and specify baseline conditions for diverse subgroups is necessary to support the GBA+ of effects. Both qualitative and quantitative data may be necessary to describe baseline conditions across diverse subgroups.

There is no need for the Impact Statement to provide detailed descriptions of existing features of environmental, health, social or economic components that would not be impacted by the project as determined by the Agency through engagements with FAs, lifecycle regulators, Indigenous groups, the public and interested parties.

In describing the biophysical environment, the Impact Statement must take an ecosystem approach that considers how the project may affect the structure and functioning of biotic and abiotic components with the ecosystem using scientific, community and Indigenous knowledge regarding ecosystem health and integrity, as applicable. The Impact Statement must provide a description of the indicators and measures used to determine ecosystem health and integrity, identified during early planning and reflected in the TISG. The presence of endangered ecosystems potentially affected by the designated project should be included the description of the biophysical baseline conditions.

The Impact Statement must consider the resilience of relevant species populations, communities and associated habitats to the effects of the project. Ecological processes should be evaluated for potential susceptibility to adverse effects from the project. Considerations include: patterns and connectivity of habitat patches; continuation of key natural disturbance regimes; structural complexity; hydrogeological or oceanographic patterns; nutrient cycling; abiotic-biotic and biotic interactions; population dynamics, genetic diversity, Indigenous knowledge relevant for the conservation and sustainable use of relevant species populations, communities and associated habitats.

If the baseline data have been extrapolated or otherwise manipulated to depict environmental, health, social and/or economic conditions within the study area, modelling methods must be described and must include assumptions, calculations of margins of error and other relevant statistical information. Models that are developed should be validated using field data from the appropriate local and regional study areas.

The Impact Statement must establish appropriate study area boundaries to describe the baseline conditions. The study area boundaries need to encompass the spatial boundaries of the project, including any associated project components or activities, and the anticipated boundaries of the project effects. Considerations in assigning appropriate study areas or boundaries would include, but not be limited to:

6.2 Sources of baseline information

Information sources and data collection methods used for describing the baseline environmental, health, social and economic setting may consist of:

The Impact Statement must provide detailed descriptions of specific data sources, data collection, sampling, survey and research protocols and methods followed for each baseline environmental, health, social and economic condition that is described, in order to corroborate the validity and accuracy of the baseline information collected.

6.3 Consideration and methodology in selecting VCs

The list of VCs must be finalized during the IA Planning Phase and will be informed through engagement with the public, Indigenous groups, lifecycle regulators, jurisdictions, federal authorities (FAs), and other interested parties. The Impact Statement must describe VCs, processes, and interactions that are identified to be of concern or that the Agency considers likely to be affected by the designated project and has included in the TIS Guidelines.

The Impact Statement must indicate to whom these concerns are important (e.g. the public, FAs or Indigenous groups) and the reasons why, including environmental, cultural, spiritual historical, health, social, economic, recreational, aesthetic considerations, and Indigenous knowledge. The value of a component not only relates to its role in the ecosystem, but also to the value people place on it. VCs to be included in the TIS Guidelines will be, in part, based on what communities and Indigenous groups identify as valuable to them in the IA Planning Phase.

Accordingly, the Impact Statement must provide the rationale for selecting specific VCs and for excluding any VCs or information specified in the TIS Guidelines. The priority in selecting VCs to be included and assessed should be project-specific and focused on appropriateness, not influenced by the quantity of information available or the use of the VCs in other assessments.

In selecting a VC to be included, the following factors should be considered:

The VCs must be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to understand their importance and to assess the potential adverse and positive environmental, health, social and economic effects and impacts arising from the designated project activities.

6.4 Spatial and temporal boundaries

The spatial and temporal boundaries determined and established for the IA will vary depending on the VC and are considered separately for each VC, including VCs related to the environmental, health, social and economic conditions of Indigenous peoples, or other potential effects and impacts referred to above. The spatial and temporal boundaries to be used in the IA are outlined and discussed through the tailoring process, and include comments and input from federal and provincial government departments and agencies, lifecycle regulators, local government, Indigenous groups, the public and other interested parties.

The Impact Statement must describe the spatial boundaries, including local and regional study areas, for each VC included in assessing the potential adverse and positive environmental, health, social and economic effects of the designated project and provide a rationale for each boundary. Spatial boundaries are defined taking into account the appropriate scale and spatial extent of potential effects and impacts of the project; community knowledge and Indigenous knowledge; current or traditional land and resource use by Indigenous groups; rights of Indigenous peoples, including cultural and spiritual practices; and physical, ecological, technical, social, health, economic and cultural considerations. It should be noted that in some cases, spatial boundaries may extend to areas outside of Canada. These transboundary spatial boundaries should be identified where transboundary effects are expected.

The temporal boundaries of the IA span all phases of the designated project determined to be within the IA. If potential effects are predicted after project decommissioning or abandonment, this should be taken into consideration in defining specific boundaries.

7. Baseline Conditions – Biophysical Environment

Through the tailoring process for the development of TIS Guidelines, the Agency may determine that there is no need for the Impact Statement to provide detailed descriptions of existing baseline features that would clearly not be impacted by project construction, operation, maintenance, suspension, abandonment or decommissioning.

The following, therefore, is a list of elements, within the existing biophysical environmental setting for all designated projects that could be identified as VCs and which would require a detailed baseline description in the Impact Statement. This list and corresponding requirements will be refined based on engagement, consultations and analyses conducted as part of the planning process.  The same approach will apply to other VC categories.

Where baseline data are available in GIS format, this information is to be provided to the Agency as electronic geospatial data file(s) compliant with the ISO 19115 standard. This would support the Government of Canada’s commitment to Open Science and Data and would facilitate the sharing of information with the public through the Agency’s Registry and Internet Site and the Government’s Open Science and Data Platform. GIS Data Supply Guidelines are currently under development.

7.1 Atmospheric, acoustic, and visual environment

The Impact Statement must:

Guidance from Health Canada regarding baseline information collection is identified in Appendix 1.

7.2 Meteorological Environment

The Impact Statement must:

7.3 Geology, geochemistry and geological hazards

The Impact Statement must:

7.4 Topography, soil and sediment

The Impact Statement must:

For projects within the permafrost regions:

7.5 Riparian and wetland environments

The Impact Statement must:

7.6 Groundwater and surface water

Requirements for the characterization of baseline groundwater and surface water conditions in an Impact Statement will vary depending on the type of project. They will be commensurate in emphasis and detail with potential effects on groundwater and on surface water. Requirements listed here are in a sequence corresponding to the steps of a generic, coupled, groundwater–surface water characterization study.

The Impact Statement must:

7.7 Marine environment and marine geohazards

The Impact Statement must:

7.8 Vegetation

The Impact Statement must:

7.9 Fish and fish habitat

The Impact Statement must:

Certain intermittent and ephemeral watercourses or waterbodies may constitute fish habitat or contribute indirectly to fish habitat during a certain period. The absence of fish or water at the time of the survey does not irrefutably indicate an absence of fish and/or fish habitat (e.g. migratory corridor).

7.10 Birds, migratory birds and their habitat

The Impact Statement must:

The description of bird species and their habitat in the study area may be based on existing sources, but supporting evidence is required that demonstrates that the data used are representative of the avifauna and habitats in the study area. Existing data must be supplemented by surveys, if required to produce a representative sample of the avifauna and habitats of the study area. 

Avian surveys should be designed based on a thorough review of the available scientific literature pertinent to the specific region, bird groups and anticipated effects. The Canadian Wildlife Service’s Framework for the Scientific Assessment of Potential Project Impacts on Birds provides examples of project types and recommended techniques for assessing effects on migratory birds (see Appendix 1).

7.11 Terrestrial wildlife and their habitat

The Impact Statement must:

7.12 Species at Risk

The Impact Statement must:

COSEWIC provides an annual report listing the designated wildlife species on its website (see Appendix 1).

7.13 Ambient Radioactivity

For designated projects or project-related physical activities that potentially could change the radiological conditions within the study area, the Impact Statement must:

Guidance on radiological baseline information requirements is provided in Appendix 1.

8. Baseline Conditions – Human Health

Baseline information is required on existing human health conditions and must include the current state of physical, mental and social well-being and incorporate a social determinants of health approach to move beyond biophysical health considerations. A social determinants of health approach recognizes that health is more than the absence of disease but includes broad factors that support well-being. The scope and content of the human health baseline will reflect the specific project context, taking into account input of public and Indigenous groups, and should include indicators that are meaningful for the effects analysis. The information provided must:

In preparing the report on baseline health conditions, the proponent must identify the social area of influence of the project. Information on interested parties, those likely to be affected directly and indirectly by the project, should be provided in association with a consideration of those in the community who are considered particularly vulnerable to changes brought about by the project.

As applicable, the baseline information must be sufficiently disaggregated and analysed to support the analysis of disproportionate effects as per the GBA+. To understand the community and Indigenous context and baseline health profile, the proponent must:

Guidance for developing baseline information relevant to human health is identified in Appendix 1.

9. Baseline Conditions – Social

Baseline information is required on existing social conditions and must include social well-being and social activities for individual communities and Indigenous groups. The scope and content of the social baseline conditions should be tailored to the specific project context, take into account community and Indigenous input, and should include indicators and information that are useful and meaningful for the effects analysis. The information provided must:

In preparing a baseline, the proponent must identify the social area of influence of the project and prepare a community profile. To understand the community context, the information provided must describe:

Information related to interested parties, those likely to be affected directly and indirectly by the project should be provided in association with a consideration of those in the community who are considered particularly vulnerable to changes brought about by the project.

Baseline information must be sufficiently disaggregated and analysed to support the analysis of disproportionate effects as per GBA+. The information provided must:

Baseline data can often be found in secondary information sources, such as census data, government publications and academic literature. Where secondary sources are unable to provide the required information, primary sources such as surveys, key informant interviews, focus groups or other primary research methods should be used.

10. Baseline Conditions – Economic

This economic baseline should document the local and regional economic conditions and trends based on the spatial and temporal boundaries selected. The scope and content of the economic baseline should reflect the specific project context, take into account community and Indigenous group input, and should include indicators and information that are useful and meaningful for the effects analysis. The information provided must:

Information on those likely to be affected directly and indirectly by the project should be provided in association with a consideration of those in the community who are considered particularly vulnerable to changes brought about by the project. As applicable, the baseline information must be sufficiently disaggregated and analysed to support the analysis of disproportionate effects as per GBA+.

The Impact Statement must:

11. Baseline Conditions - Indigenous Peoples

Proponents are encouraged to engage with Indigenous groups in developing baseline conditions, in order to identify and understand the potential impacts of their projects on Indigenous peoples, and to incorporate Indigenous knowledge into the impact assessment. The results of any engagement should be presented in the Impact Statement, and, as best as possible should reflect the perspective of the Indigenous peoples involved. 

Generally, the proponent is encouraged to provide an opportunity for Indigenous groups to review the information prior to submission of the Impact Statement. The Impact Statement should indicate where input from Indigenous groups has been incorporated, including Indigenous knowledge.  To the extent possible, information should be specific to the individual Indigenous group(s) involved in the assessment, and describe contextual information about the members within an Indigenous group (e.g. women, men, elders and youth). 

Where Indigenous groups do not wish to participate, the proponent is encouraged to continue sharing information and analysis with the Indigenous groups of the potential effects of the project, and to use available public sources of information to support the assessment.

The proponent is encouraged to consult Agency guidance on engaging Indigenous groups, in particular, Interim Guidance on Assessing Potential Impacts on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples under the Impact Assessment Act.

Where possible, the impact statement should include contextual information, both historic and current, regarding an Indigenous group’s history and cultural practices, land use, as well as the manner in which rights of Indigenous peoples are, or may be, exercised and impacted by the project, as identified by the Indigenous groups. The contextual information may include the following:

11.1 Physical and Cultural Heritage

The Impact Statement should include a description of the historical baseline conditions associated with Indigenous cultures. This description should give consideration to understanding historical baseline conditions associated with ability to transmit culture (e.g. through language, ceremonies, harvesting, teaching of sacred laws, traditional laws, stewardship laws, traditional knowledge).

Indigenous physical and cultural heritage is considered to include, but is not limited to, any site, structure or thing of archaeological, paleontological, historical or architectural significance.

Information with respect to Indigenous groups can include:

11.2 Current Use of Lands and Resources for Traditional Purposes

The Impact Statement should include information on the current use of lands and resources for traditional purposes (e.g. hunting, fishing, trapping, plant gathering, ceremonial or spiritual practices). Proponents are encouraged to refer to guidance on the Agency’s website on how to consider the current use of lands and resources for traditional purpose.

In general, the Impact Statement should consider:

Should this type of information be found through public sources, the proponent should advise the Indigenous group and offer a reasonable opportunity to review and comment before including it in the Impact Statement. 

11.3 Health, social and economic conditions

The baseline conditions requirements set out in the sections above for health, social and economic conditions, include Indigenous peoples and GBA+ specific to Indigenous peoples.

11.4 Conditions Related to the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The Impact Statement should document the nature and extent of the exercise of rights of Indigenous peoples, potentially impacted by the project, as identified by the Indigenous group(s). Indigenous groups may also provide their perspective through consultations with the Agency. This information related to rights may include, but is not limited to:

12. Effects Assessment

12.1 Methodology

The Impact Statement must describe in detail the project’s potential adverse and positive effects in relation to each phase of the designated project (construction, operation, maintenance, suspension, decommissioning, and abandonment). The environmental, health, social or economic effects may be described in terms of the context, magnitude, geographic extent, ecological context timing, duration and frequency, and whether effects are reversible or irreversible. The spatial scoping of the assessment will vary depending on the VC and should be consistent with the spatial boundaries that were established for baseline data collection. If there is an ongoing or completed regional assessment in the proposed project area, the proponent should use the information generated through that process to inform the effects assessment. As applicable, the effects assessment must be sufficiently disaggregated and analysed to support the analysis of disproportionate effects as per the GBA+. The proponent is expected to employ standard risk assessment frameworks, where possible.  

The assessment of the effects of each of the project components and physical activities, in all phases, must be based upon a comparison of baseline environmental, health, social and economic conditions and the predicted future conditions with the project and the predicted future conditions without the project. Predictions must be made on clearly stated assumptions and the Impact Statement must clearly describe how it has tested each assumption.

The description of the effect can be either qualitative or quantitative. Effects must be described using criteria to quantify or qualify adverse effects, taking into account any important contextual factors.

With respect to quantitative models and predictions, the Impact Statement must detail the model assumptions, parameters, the quality of the data and the degree of certainty of the predictions obtained.  For other effects, it may be more appropriate to use other criteria, such as the nature of the effects, directionality, causation and probability.  The effects assessment should also set out the probability or likelihood of that effect occurring and describe the degree of scientific uncertainty related to the data and methods used.

Effects may affect the communities and stakeholders in different ways, and therefore they may respond differently to them. Characterizing effects should be based largely on the level of concern expressed through engagement with the affected Indigenous groups and community members. There are tools that can assist with these predictions and analyses, including multi-criteria analysis, risk assessment, modelling, in addition to seeking out expert and stakeholder input. Effects should be characterized using language most appropriate for the effect (e.g. impacts on rights of Indigenous peoples and social effects may be described differently from biophysical effects).

12.2 Interactions between effects and VCs

Although the requirements set out in these guidelines are separated by environmental, health, social or economic conditions and elements, the Impact Statement must consider and describe the interactions between the environmental, health, social and economic effects as well as the interaction and interconnectedness of selected VCs taking into account community values.

For example, an adverse environmental effect on water could also have an adverse effect on human health. That same adverse environmental effect on the physical component, water, could result in an adverse environmental effect on the biological component fish, that could in turn, have an adverse social effect on fishing and/or an adverse economic effect on an outfitter that provides guiding services. Alternatively, this pathway could also be impacted by a positive effect on water (e.g., in remediation-related projects). Considering and describing effects holistically, both positive and negative, requires taking a systems approach that considers interactions between VCs and with other environmental, health, social and economic factors.

13.Predicted Changes to the Physical Environment

Changes to the components of the physical environment outlined below are interrelated with other components as part of the broader ecosystem. The description of changes to the physical environment is to be integrated into the effects assessment of each VC and the interaction between VCs in the Impact Statement.

13.1 Changes to the atmospheric, acoustic, and visual environment

The Impact Statement must:

Guidance from Health Canada regarding air quality health and noise impacts is identified in Appendix 1.

13.2 Changes to groundwater and surface water

With respect to potential project effects on the physical hydrogeological system, the Impact Statement must:

With respect to potential project effects on water quality in the receiving environment, the Impact Statement must:

With respect to potential project effects on water quality resulting from acid rock drainage and/or metal leaching, the Impact Statement must:

13.3 Changes to riparian, wetland and terrestrial environments

The Impact Statement must:

13.4 Changes to the marine environment

The Impact Statement must:

13.5 Radiological conditions

For all phases of the project, and where appropriate and integrated into other appropriate sections within the Impact Statement, the Impact Statement must:

13.6 Electromagnetism and corona discharge

For projects that could potentially create increased electromagnetism or corona discharges within the study area (e.g. new high voltage transmission lines) the Impact Statement must:

14. Effects to Valued Components - Environment

Within the context of the predicted changes to the physical environment, the proponent must assess the effects of the project on environmental VCs. Interconnections between environmental VCs and social, health and economic VCs and interactions between effects must also be described.

14.1 Fish and fish habitat

The Impact Statement must:

For projects requiring the use of natural water bodies frequented by fish for the disposal of mine waste and/or for the management of process water, an amendment to the Metal and Diamond Mining Effluent Regulations (MDMER) will be required. This regulatory process will not be initiated until the proponent has undertaken a detailed assessment of alternatives for mine waste disposal. By fulfilling the requirements of the regulatory authorization during the Impact Assessment, authorizations may be granted in an accelerated manner. For further guidance, the proponent should consult Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Guidelines for the Assessment of Alternatives for Mine Waste Disposal (see Appendix 1).

14.2 Birds, migratory birds and their habitat

The Impact Statement must:

14.3 Terrestrial wildlife and their habitat

The Impact Statement must:

14.4 Species at risk

The Impact Statement must:

14.5 Climate Change

The Impact Statement must:

Additional guidance related to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change is included in the draft Strategic Assessment of Climate Change developed by Environment and Climate Change Canada.

15. Effects to Valued Components – Human Health

Social, economic, health, and biophysical impacts are interconnected. Change in any one of these domains will often lead to changes in the others. Within the context of the predicted changes to the biophysical environment, social and economic conditions resulting from the designated project, the proponent must assess the adverse and positive effects of the project on human health. Interconnections between human health and other VCs and interactions between effects must be described. 

The proponent must describe how community and Indigenous knowledge was used to collect baseline data and assess health effects and disaggregate the source of community knowledge by representation by sex, age and other community relevant identity factors to support identification of disproportionate effects through the application of GBA+. In assessing effects, the analysis should consider circumstances in a community where diverse subgroups, because of their particular circumstances, could experience adverse effects from the designated project more severely than others or be excluded from potential benefits.

The assessment must illustrate an understanding of linkages and effect pathways, so that when a change in one domain is predicted, there is an understanding of what other effects or consequences may be felt across the other domains. Applying a determinants of health approach in the assessment of human health effects will support the identification of these linkages as well as of disproportionate effects across subgroups.

All interconnections between human health and other VCs and interactions between effects must be described.

The Impact Assessment must:

Guidance from Health Canada regarding human Health Impacts is identified in Appendix 1.

16. Effects to Valued Components – Social

Within the context of the predicted changes to the biophysical environment, health and economic conditions resulting from the designated project, the proponent must assess the effects of the project on social conditions. Interconnections between social VCs and other VCs and interactions between effects must be described. 

VCs that require assessment are listed below, including select considerations and indicators to be included in the analysis. If, after engaging with communities and conducting further analysis, the proponent determines that the information and VCs listed below could be more meaningfully organized and presented in an alternate way, it may do so with an explanation and rationale for these changes.  

The proponent must describe how community and Indigenous knowledge was used to collect baseline data and assess social effects, and disaggregate the source of community and Indigenous knowledge by representation by sex, age and other community relevant identity factors to support identification of disproportionate effects through the application of GBA+. In assessing effects to VCs listed below, the analysis should discuss circumstances in a community where diverse subgroups, because of their particular circumstances, could experience adverse effects from the designated project more severely than others, or be excluded from potential benefits.

As applicable to the assessment, the analysis should describe the goals of local or regional land use plans or local or regional development plans and the extent to which the project is aligned with such plans to avoid or enhance social effects. For the VCs listed below, the effects assessment should explore and discuss opportunities by which benefits to local communities can be enhanced.

16.1 Services and infrastructure

The Impact Statement must:

16.2 Land and resource use and recreation

The Impact Statement must:

16.3 Navigation

The Impact Statement must:

16.4 Community well-being

The Impact Statement must:

16.5 Structure, site, things of historical, archaeological, paleontological or architectural significance

The Impact Statement must:

17. Effects to Valued Components – Economic

Within the context of the predicted changes to the biophysical environment, and health and social conditions, the proponent must assess the effects of the project on the economic VCs. All interconnections between these economic VCs and other VCs and interactions between effects must be described.

The proponent must describe how community and Indigenous knowledge was used to collect baseline data and assess economic effects and disaggregate the source of community and Indigenous knowledge by representation by sex, age and other community-relevant identity factors to support identification of disproportionate through the application of GBA+. In assessing effects to VCs listed below, the analysis should discuss circumstances in a community where diverse subgroups, because of their particular circumstances, could experience adverse effects from the designated project more severely than others, or be excluded from potential benefits.

The assessment of economic effects should take into consideration the temporal scale for construction, operation and beyond, to assess the potential for, and avoidance of, boom-and-bust cycles potentially associated with the project.

The Impact Statement must describe potential positive and adverse effects to the local, regional and provincial economies, including whether and how local benefits can be maximized. It must include:

The Impact Statement must:

18. Effects to Indigenous Peoples

Proponents are encouraged to engage with Indigenous groups, in order to identify and understand the potential impacts of their projects on Indigenous peoples, and to incorporate Indigenous knowledge into the impact assessment.  Engagement with Indigenous group is required to inform the impact assessment and identify measures to avoid or minimize potential impacts on Indigenous peoples from the project. This engagement may also identify potential positive outcomes, including measures that could improve the underlying baseline conditions that support the exercise of rights. This engagement should involve ongoing information sharing and collaboration between the proponent and the Indigenous groups to help validate the assessment findings. The results of any engagement should be presented in the Impact Statement, and, as best as possible should reflect the perspective of the Indigenous peoples involved. 

Generally, the proponent is encouraged to provide an opportunity for Indigenous groups to review the information prior to submission of the Impact Statement. The Impact Statement should indicate where input from Indigenous groups has been incorporated, including Indigenous knowledge.  To the extent possible, information should be specific to the individual Indigenous group(s) involved in the assessment, and describe contextual information about the members within an Indigenous group (e.g. women, men, elders and youth). 

Where Indigenous groups do not wish to participate, the proponent is to encouraged to continue sharing information and analysis with the Indigenous groups of the potential effects of the project, and to use available public sources of information to support the assessment. 

18.1 Effects on Indigenous Peoples

The Impact Statement should provide information on how the Project may affect Indigenous peoples, as informed by the Indigenous group(s) involved.  Information on measures proposed to address adverse effects should also be provided, including the perspectives of Indigenous groups on potential mitigation measures. The proponent is encouraged to apply Agency guidance on engaging with Indigenous groups and appropriate methodologies for assessing effects and impacts on Indigenous peoples and their rights.

The potential effects, to consider assessing include both adverse and positive effects to the current use of land and resources for traditional purposes, physical and cultural heritage, and environmental, health, social and economic conditions of Indigenous peoples affected by the designated project, including interferences of the project with the following:

As a best practice, proponents are encouraged to also include the following:

18.2 Impacts on rights of Indigenous peoples

The Impact Statement should describe the level of engagement with Indigenous groups regarding potential impacts of the project on the exercise of rights, and where possible, the project’s potential interference with the exercise of rights. Where an Indigenous group has not provided this information to the proponent, or both parties agree that it is better to provide information related to the impact on the exercise of rights directly to the Government of Canada, the proponent should describe a rationale for the approach taken. Proponents are encouraged to discuss with Indigenous groups their views on how best to reflect the assessment of impacts on rights in their Impact Statement. This may include supporting Indigenous-led studies that are to be provided publicly and to the Government of Canada.

For more information on identifying and assessing impacts on the exercise of rights, please see: the Interim Guidance on Assessing Potential Impacts on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples under the Impact Assessment Act.

The proponent and Indigenous groups may consider:

Proponents are encouraged to work together with Indigenous groups to find mutually agreeable solutions to concerns raised about a proposed project, especially for those concerns raised by Indigenous peoples about impacts on the exercise of their rights.  The impact statement should detail:

Where no mitigation measures are proposed or mitigation is not possible, the Impact Statement should identify potential level of severity of the adverse impacts on the rights of Indigenous peoples, as identified by the Indigenous group(s).

Mitigation measure are further discussed in section 19, “Mitigation and Enhancement Measures”.

19. Mitigation and Enhancement Measures

Every IA conducted under the IA Act must identify measures that are technically and economically feasible and that would mitigate any adverse environmental, health, social and economic effects of the designated project. Conversely, the proponent must identify enhancement measures to increase positive effects. Under the IA Act, mitigation measures include measures to eliminate, reduce, control or offset the adverse effects of a designated project, and includes restitution for any damage caused by those effects through replacement, restoration, compensation or other means. Measures to enhance positive project effects may include skills training, local procurement strategies, investments in community infrastructure (e.g., roads, services). Measures are to be specific, achievable, measurable and verifiable, and described in a manner that avoids ambiguity in intent, interpretation and implementation.

Mitigation and enhancement measures that are proposed are discussed during the review of the Impact Statement and may be modified as a result of the review. Mitigation and enhancement measures may be considered for inclusion as conditions in the IA decision statement. If there is an ongoing or completed regional assessment in the proposed project area, the proponent should use the information generated through that process to inform possible mitigation and enhancement measures. 

As a first step, the proponent is encouraged to use an approach based on the avoidance and reduction of the adverse effects at the source. The proponent is also encouraged to work with the community to align project goals with an aim to enhance positive project effects. Such an approach may include the modification of the design of the project or relocation of project components.

The Impact Statement must:

Where mitigation measures for which there is little experience or for which there is some question as to their effectiveness are proposed to be implemented, the potential risks and effects should those measures not be effective must be clearly and concisely described. In addition, the Impact Statement must identify the extent to which technological innovations may help mitigate effects. Where possible, it will provide detailed information on the nature of these measures, their implementation, management and the requirements of the follow-up program.

20. Residual Effects

After considering the consequences of technically and economically feasible mitigation measures, the Impact Statement must describe any residual environmental, health, social or economic effects of the designated project and whether those effects would occur in the local or regional study area. This includes consideration of both positive and negative effects of the project and input received from the public, Indigenous groups, lifecycle regulators, jurisdictions, federal authorities (FAs) and other interested parties. If an Indigenous group identifies that there are residual effects to rights or interests, those effects should be carried through for residual effects analysis. Where appropriate, information regarding residual effects should be disaggregated by sex, age and other community relevant identity factors to identify disproportionate residual effects for diverse subgroups as per the GBA+.

Proponents must describe the extent to which residual effects are adverse. Where relevant, or where best practice or evidence-based thresholds exist, effects should be described using criteria to quantify adverse effects. This includes criteria such as whether the effects are high or low in magnitude, the geographical extent, timing, frequency, duration and reversibility of the effects, taking into account any important contextual factors. 

In addition, effects should be characterized using language most appropriate for the effect (for example impacts on rights of Indigenous peoples and social effects may be described differently from biophysical effects). The description of the effect can be either qualitative or quantitative. It may be more appropriate for other effects to be described using other criteria, such as the nature of the effects, directionality, causation and probability.

Impacts may affect the communities and stakeholders in different ways, and therefore they may respond differently to them.  Characterizing effects should be based largely on the level of concern expressed through engaging with the affected Indigenous groups and community members. There are tools that can assist with these predictions and analyses, including multi-criteria analysis, risk assessment and modelling, in addition to seeking out expert and stakeholder input.

The Impact Statement must:

21. Cumulative Effects Assessment

The proponent must identify and assess the designated project’s cumulative effects using the approach described in the Agency’s guidance documents related to cumulative environmental, health, social and economic effects. If there is an ongoing or completed regional assessment in the proposed project area, the proponent should use the information generated through that process to inform the cumulative effects assessment. 

Cumulative effects are defined as changes to the environment, health, social and economic conditions as a result of the project’s residual environmental, health, social and economic effects combined with the existence of other past, present and reasonably foreseeable physical activities, as well as within activities of the project itself from multiple emissions and discharges (e.g. simultaneous operations) to understand synergistic or additive effects.

Cumulative effects may result if:

A cumulative effect on an environmental, health, social or economic component may be important even if the project’s effects to this component by themselves are minor.  The tailoring process for developing TIS Guidelines identifies and prioritizes the list of VCs on which the cumulative effects assessment must focus and also substantiates the rationale for the final selection. Finalizing the choice of VCs and the appropriate boundaries, including potential transboundary areas, to assess cumulative effects, is informed and confirmed as part of the tailoring process through consultation with the public, Indigenous groups, lifecycle regulators, jurisdictions, federal authorities (FAs) and other interested parties.

The cumulative effects assessment must include consideration of cumulative effects to rights of Indigenous peoples and cultures. Both the content and means of presenting this information is to be developed in consultation with each potentially impacted Indigenous group. Proponents are encouraged to collaborate with Indigenous groups in the cumulative effects assessment. Where Indigenous groups do not wish to participate in the cumulative effects assessment with the proponent, the proponent is to share a preliminary draft of the cumulative effects assessment on an Indigenous group’s rights and culture with them in order to receive feedback prior to submitting the Impact Statement to the Agency.

The Impact Statement must:

22. Other Effects to Consider

22.1 Effects of potential accidents or malfunctions

The failure of certain works caused by human error or exceptional natural events (e.g. flooding, earthquake, forest fire) could cause major effects. The proponent must therefore conduct an analysis of the risks of accidents and malfunctions, determine their potential effects, and present preliminary emergency response measures.

The Impact Statement must:

22.2 Effects of the environment on the project

The Impact Statement must consider and describe how environmental conditions, including natural hazards such as severe and/or extreme weather conditions and external events (e.g. earthquakes, flooding, drought, ice jams, iceberg impacts, permafrost conditions, landslides/submarine landslides, tsunamis, volcanoes, avalanches, erosion, subsidence, fire, and outflow conditions), could adversely affect the designated project and how this in turn could result in effects to the environment, health, social and economic conditions. These events are to be considered in different probability patterns (e.g. 5-year flood vs. 100-year flood). The focus should be on credible external events that have a reasonable probability of occurrence and for which the resulting environmental effects could be major without careful management.  The Impact Statement should also consider how effects of the environment on the project could have positive effects to the environment, health, social and economic conditions.

The Impact Statement must:

23. Canada’s Ability to Meet Its Environmental Obligations and Its Climate Change Commitments

The Government of Canada, through the IAA, recognizes that IA contributes to Canada’s understanding and ability to meet, first, its environmental obligations, and second, its commitments in respect of climate change.

In accordance with paragraph 22(1)(i) of the IAA, the Impact Statement should describe the effects of the project in the context of environmental obligations and commitments in respect of climate change, with a focus on Government of Canada obligations and commitments relevant to decision-making. The Agency will identify applicable environmental obligations or commitments in respect of climate change that will require consideration in the Impact Statement.

The type and extent of analysis could range from provision of a robust rationale to detailed analysis depending on the specifics of predicted effects and the environmental obligation or commitment in respect of climate change under consideration.

The Impact Statement should consider the need for mitigation and follow-up measures related to Canada’s environmental obligations and its commitment in respect of climate change. Measures proposed to mitigate the adverse effects of a designated project may reduce a project’s hindrance of an environmental obligation or climate change commitment. The implementation of mitigation or complementary measures may also result in a designated project contributing to the Government of Canada’s ability to meet its environmental obligations or its commitments in respect of climate change. 

The Impact Statement may also present the proponent’s views on the extent to which project effects would hinder or contribute to the Government of Canada’s ability to meet its environmental obligations and its commitments in respect of climate change, taking into consideration proposed mitigation measures.

The proponent should refer to Agency guidance on this topic.

24. Description of the Project’s Contributions to Sustainability

Sustainability, as defined in the IAA, “…means the ability to protect the environment, contribute to the social and economic well-being of the people of Canada and preserve their health in a manner that benefits present and future generations”.

As part of the planning phase, the public, Indigenous groups and stakeholders will be engaged to identify key issues of importance to them. This engagement will help identify the elements that will frame the assessment of the project’s contribution to sustainability. When assessing a project’s contribution to sustainability, practitioners should consider those VCs that participants characterize as important. Sustainability is contextual and project dependent; as such, it may be defined differently by communities, or even groups within communities.  Furthermore, practitioners should also consider VCs:

The Impact Statement must characterize a project’s contribution to sustainability. The Impact Statement should describe the context of a particular project, including the issues of importance to participants, the diversity of views expressed and the selection of VCs.

Once the analysis on potential effects of a project is conducted, the sustainability principles should be applied:

The Impact Statement must describe how sustainability principles were applied (outlined above) and identify conclusions drawn from this analysis. This summary should be qualitative in nature, but may draw on quantitative data as necessary.

In addition, the Impact Statement must:

The proponent should refer to Agency guidance on this topic.

25. Follow-up Programs

A follow-up program verifies the accuracy of the effects assessment and evaluates the effectiveness of mitigation measures. This information may be used to determine whether additional actions are necessary (adaptive management) to address unanticipated outcomes. Adaptive management is not considered as a mitigation measure; it is a best management practice in environmental management. If the follow-up program indicates that corrective action is required, the proposed approach for managing the action must be identified and implemented. The follow-up program will explain the uncertainty of the effects outcomes and whether it is related to the IA predictions or the effectiveness of mitigation measures.

Follow-up programs are an opportunity to continue engaging with impacted Indigenous groups, and if undertaken collaboratively, can support solutions-oriented approaches to adaptive management through the early identification of issues in follow-up programs and appropriate solutions with Indigenous knowledge. If there is an ongoing or completed regional assessment in the proposed project area, the proponent should use the information generated through that process to inform considerations for a follow up program. 

Considerations for developing a follow-up program for environmental, health, social or economic effects, as applicable, include:

Monitoring is a key component of effective follow-up programs. Monitoring can identify the potential for environmental, health, social or economic degradation during all phases of project development. Monitoring, as well, can assist in developing clearly defined action plans and emergency response procedures to account for environmental, health, social economic protection and human safety.

25.1 Follow-up program framework

The duration of the follow-up program shall be as long as required to verify the accuracy of the environmental, health, social and economic impacts predicted during the IA and to evaluate the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

The Impact Statement must present a follow-up program that includes:

25.2 Follow-up program monitoring

The Impact Statement must describe the environmental, health, social and economic monitoring to be established, as part of the follow-up program.

Specifically, the Impact Statement must present an outline of the preliminary environmental, health, social and economic monitoring program, including, but not limited to the:

26. Assessment Summary

The proponent must prepare a stand-alone plain language summary of the Impact Statement in both of Canada’s official languages (French and English). The summary must contain sufficient details for the reader to understand the project, any potential environmental, health, social and economic effects, potential adverse impacts on Indigenous peoples, proposed mitigation measures, residual effects and any required follow-up programs.

The Assessment Summary provides an opportunity for the proponent to demonstrate correspondence between issues raised during the planning phase and issues addressed in the assessment. This Assessment Summary should be presented by VC, which allows the proponent to demonstrate the completeness of the assessment and provide the results of the analysis. The summary must include key maps or figures illustrating the project location and key project components.

Part 3 – Licensing Requirements of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) requires the submission of a licence application with sufficient information to meet the requirements of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and associated regulations.

The CNSC’s licensing process may include the issuance of a licence for the following stages:

Applicants are required to determine which stages are to be considered (e.g. site preparation and construction) in their licence application as part of the integrated review. Subsequent licence applications and decisions related to the subsequent licence will be made through the CNSC licensing process.

The regulatory requirements that must be addressed for each stage of licensing are provided in the NSCA and its regulations. These regulations include the following:

Regulatory requirements are also contained in CNSC regulatory documents located on the CNSC website at http://www.nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/acts-and-regulations/regulatory-documents/index.cfm.

Where information requirements overlap between the NSCA and IAA (e.g., environmental protection), the applicant may provide appropriate cross-referencing in the documentation. The applicant will clearly indicate where the requirements of both the NSCA and IAA are addressed.

It is recommended that the applicant contact the CNSC as soon as the applicant has enough information from preliminary activities to determine whether it is a designated project under the IAA. Early communication can help the applicant develop a good understanding of:

Additional information related to the CNSC’s regulatory framework is available on the CNSC website at: http://www.nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/acts-and-regulations/regulatory-framework/index.cfm.

Appendix 1 – Resources and Guidance

Engagement

CNSC’s REGDOC-3.2.2, Indigenous Engagement. Published February 2016

Human Health

Evaluating Human Health Impacts in Environmental Assessments: Air Quality available at http://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/publications/healthy-living/guidance-evaluating-human-health-impacts-air-quality.html. Health Canada. 2017.

Evaluating Human Health Impacts in Environmental Assessments: Country Foods available at http://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/publications/healthy-living/guidance-evaluating-human-health-impacts-country-foods.html. Health Canada. 2017.

Evaluating Human Health Impacts in Environmental Assessments: Noise available at http://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/publications/healthy-living/guidance-evaluating-human-health-impacts-noise.html. Health Canada. 2017.

Evaluating Human Health Impacts in Environmental Assessments: Radiological Impacts available at http://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/publications/healthy-living/guidance-evaluating-human-health-impacts-radiological.html. Health Canada. 2017.

Evaluating Human Health Impacts in Environmental Assessments: Water Quality available at http://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/publications/healthy-living/guidance-evaluating-human-health-impacts-water-quality.html. Health Canada. 2017.

Health Canada’s Risk Assessment Guidance Parts I through VII available at https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/environmental-workplace-health/contaminated-sites/guidance-documents.html. Health Canada. 2017

Social Determinants of Health and Health Inequalities available at: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/health-promotion/population-health/what-determines-health.html.  Public Health Agency of Canada. 2019.

Water Quality

Guidelines for the Assessment of Alternatives for Mine Waste Disposal available at https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/managing-pollution/publications/guidelines-alternatives-mine-waste-disposal.html.  Compiled by Environment and Climate Change Canada

Mine Environment Neutral Drainage (MEND) Report 1.20.1 Prediction Manual for Drainage Chemistry from Sulphidic Geologic Materials.  Prepared by William A. Price. Natural Resources Canada.  2009.

Birds, Migratory Birds and their Habitat

A Framework for the Scientific Assessment of Potential Project Impact on Birds.  Prepasred by Alan Hanson et al.  Available at http://www.publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2010/ec/CW69-5-508-eng.pdf.  Environment and Climate Change Canada.  Technical Report Series Number 508

Bird Survey Inventories in Canada.  Available at (http://www.ec.gc.ca/reom-mbs/default.asp?lang=En&n=B944A67D-1).  Compiled by Environment and Climate Change Canada

Wetlands

Canadian Wetland Classification System.  Developed by the National Wetlands Working Group.  Available at http://www.wetlandpolicy.ca

Wetland Ecological Functions Assessment: An Overview of Approaches. Prepare by Alan Hanson et al. Available at http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/343283/publication.html).  Environment and Climate Change Canada.  2008.

Species at Risk

COSEWIC Status Reports.  Developed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.  Available at: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/committee-status-endangered-wildlife.html

Nuclear

CSA Group, CSA N288.1-14, Guidelines for calculating derived release Limits for Radioactive Material in Airborne and Liquid Effluents for Normal Operation of Nuclear Facilities, Update No.1, March 2014

CSA Group, CSA N288.4-10, Environmental monitoring programs at Class I nuclear facilities and uranium mines and mills, Update No.2, May 2015

CSA Group, CSA N288.5-11, Effluent Monitoring Programs at Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills, May 2010

CSA Group, CSA N288.6-12, Environmental risk assessment at Class I nuclear facilities and uranium mines and mills, June 2012

CSA Group, CSA N288.7-15, Groundwater protection programs at class I nuclear facilities and uranium mines and mills, June 2015

CSA Group, CSA N288.8-17, Establishing and implementing action levels to control releases to the environment from nuclear facilities, February 2017

CSA Group, CSA N294-09 (Reaffirmed 2014), Decommissioning of Facilities Containing Nuclear Substances, Update No.1, August 2014

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