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Government of Canada invests in research to study the effects of contaminants on Pacific aquatic ecosystems 

| Fisheries and Oceans Canada | news releases

The Government of Canada is further investing in research to better inform the protection of our oceans, lakes, rivers and waterways and the many species that call them home. The unfortunate reality is that microplastics, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and oil- and gas-related contaminants enter our water systems due to human activity. This means we must continue to study and understand the threats that our ecosystems face.


Government of Canada invests in research to study the effects of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems in Central Canada

| Fisheries and Oceans Canada | news releases

The Government of Canada is further investing in research to better inform the protection of our oceans, lakes, rivers and waterways and the many species that call them home. The unfortunate reality is that microplastics and pharmaceuticals enter our water systems due to human activity. This means we must continue to study and understand the threats that our ecosystems face.


Government of Canada invests in research to study the effects of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems in Quebec

| Fisheries and Oceans Canada | news releases

Microplastics have been found on almost every beach, on the surface of every ocean, in deepest parts of the sea, and in some of the most remote parts of the planet. The Government of Canada is further investing in research to better inform the protection of our oceans, lakes, rivers and waterways and the many species that call them home from contaminants like microplastics.


Government of Canada invests in research to study the effects of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems in Atlantic Canada

| Fisheries and Oceans Canada | news releases

The Government of Canada is further investing in research to better inform the protection of our oceans, lakes, rivers and waterways, and the many species that call them home. The unfortunate reality is that microplastics, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and oil- and gas-related contaminants enter our water systems due to human activity. This means we must continue to study and understand the threats that our ecosystems face.


Government of Canada invests in research to better understand the effects of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems 

| Fisheries and Oceans Canada | news releases

The Government of Canada is further investing in research to better inform the protection of our oceans, lakes, rivers and waterways and the many species that call them home. The unfortunate reality is that microplastics, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and oil- and gas-related contaminants enter our water systems due to human activity. This means we must continue to study and understand the threats that our ecosystems face.


2021 Newfoundland and Labrador Snow crab quotas increase by 29 per cent

| Fisheries and Oceans Canada | news releases

St. John’s, NL – The Government of Canada is committed to responsibly managing Snow crab fisheries in Newfoundland and Labrador to ensure the sustainability of the stock for today and generations to come. This work requires close collaboration with harvesters, the Fish Food and Allied Workers (FFAW) union, Indigenous partners, and other stakeholders while also considering socioeconomic factors and the most recent science advice.


A call To DFO’s Observe, Record, Report line leads to significant fine for a commercial harvester 

| Fisheries and Oceans Canada | news releases

On February 4, 2021, Hai A. Trinh was found guilty in Powell River Provincial Court for fishing in a closed area of Desolation Sound, retaining undersize prawns, and other violations of the Fisheries Act. The Honourable Justice Leven Wingham ordered the commercial prawn harvester to pay a fine of $30,000 and forfeit the value of his catch, which sold for $12,630.


Invasive Mussels found in Moss Ball products in Canada

| Fisheries and Oceans Canada | news releases

As one of the six prohibited species under the federal Aquatic Invasive Species Regulations, Zebra Mussels are one of the biggest aquatic invasive threats in Canada. Once established, these invasive mussels multiply quickly and can harm Canada’s aquatic ecosystems by altering food webs, damaging habitats, and out-competing native species for food. They also have the potential to cause substantial, costly damage by clogging intake structures in power stations and water treatment plants as well as damaging watercrafts.


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