Canada helps protect the City of London from impacts of extreme weather and flooding events 

News release

London, Ontario, December 7, 2020—The safety and well-being of Canadians remains the Government of Canada’s top priority as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. The federal government is taking decisive action to support families, businesses and communities, and continues to look ahead to see what more can be done. Investing in infrastructure to create jobs and strengthen local economies is a key part of these initiatives.

London is not immune to frequent severe weather brought on by climate change. As recently as January 2020, record rainfall in the area led to extreme flooding along the Thames River causing a significant strain on London’s wastewater and stormwater systems. By investing in the protection of our communities’ critical infrastructure, the Government of Canada can help mitigate damage from flooding in the future as well as help avoid the potential of untreated or partially treated wastewater entering the river during a flood.

Today, along with Josh Morgan Deputy Mayor of London, Kate Young, Member of Parliament for London West and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages (FedDev Ontario), and Peter Fragiskatos, Member of Parliament for London North Centre, both on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities respectively announced funding to upgrade the Greenway wastewater treatment plant and the Adelaide wastewater treatment plant.

The project consists of the construction and rehabilitation of the Greenway and Adelaide wastewater treatment plants. Work will include a flood barrier and an effluent pumping station to protect these critical infrastructure assets and reduce environmental impacts to the Thames River, Lake Erie and neighbouring communities. The plant upgrades will also help mitigate the impacts of flooding and better protect the residents of London.

The Government of Canada is investing over $19.8 million in these improvements through the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund (DMAF). The City of London is contributing more than $29.7 million to the project.

This is one of many flood-related projects funded in Southwestern Ontario, including investments to combat flooding in Tecumseh and LaSalle. 

Quotes

“Record rainfalls and flooding are becoming more frequent in London, as they are in other regions across Canada, as a result of Climate Change.  The construction of these new flood barriers and effluent pumping stations at our local wastewater treatment plants will better protect our river, downstream First Nation communities, and Lake Erie from the impacts of severe weather events.”   

Kate Young, Member of Parliament for London West and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages (FedDev Ontario), on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

“Severe weather events are on the rise, and it is imperative that we invest in infrastructure that protects Canadians, their homes, and their possessions. Climate change is the responsibility of our time. Upgrades to the Adelaide wastewater treatment plant will ensure the protection of the Thames River and Lake Erie, while preserving London and the surrounding natural bodies of water. Canada’s infrastructure plan invests in thousands of projects, creates jobs across the country, and builds cleaner, more inclusive communities.”

Peter Fragiskatos, Member of Parliament for London North Centre, on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

“This important investment in London’s wastewater treatment plants helps us become more resilient to severe weather and protects our critical infrastructure from flooding along the river. By acting now, we can better ensure the health of the Thames River in the future for London as well as other nearby communities.”

His Worship Ed Holder, Mayor of London

Quick facts

  • The Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund (DMAF) is a $2-billion, 10-year program to help communities build the infrastructure they need to better withstand natural hazards such as floods, wildfires, earthquakes and droughts. 

  • To date, over $1.9 billion has been announced through DMAF for 68 large-scale infrastructure projects that will help protect communities across the country from the threats of climate change. 

  • DMAF is part of the federal government’s Investing in Canada plan, which is providing more than $180 billion over 12 years for public transit projects, green infrastructure, social infrastructure, trade and transportation routes, and rural and northern communities.

Associated links

Contacts

Chantalle Aubertin
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities
613-941-0660
Chantalle.Aubertin@canada.ca

Monika Guzy
Manager, media relations
City of London
226-927-1896
mguzy@London.ca

Media Relations
Infrastructure Canada
613-960-9251
Toll free: 1-877-250-7154
infc.media.infc@canada.ca
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