2018-2019 Departmental Plan

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Table of Contents:

Minister’s Message

Carolyn Bennett

The Government of Canada is committed to renewing the relationship between Canada and Indigenous Peoples, tackling the challenge of climate change and promoting economic development and science, creating jobs for the middle class, and improving the quality of life of Northerners and all Canadians. Despite being a relatively new agency, Polar Knowledge Canada (POLAR) is making great strides towards these broader priorities in the North, while strengthening Canada’s polar science leadership.

The opening of the world-class Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) campus in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut will provide a hub for science, technology and innovation in Canada’s North. Based in Inuit Nunangat, it is already attracting international researchers and has begun to position Canada as a leader in polar science and technology. The campus will bring about major opportunities for residents throughout Canada’s North, including job creation and research and ultimately help improve economic opportunities, and environmental stewardship.

POLAR will continue to undertake and support critical scientific research and technology development in partnership with the Canadian and international research and knowledge sharing community to help address the challenges of climate change and strengthen the resilience of northern communities. Engagement is, and will continue to be, an integral part of POLAR activities and will create greater awareness of polar research and related opportunities. It will also support the development of longer-term collaborations and partnerships through technical workshops, roundtable discussions, conferences and project-specific initiatives to strengthen polar research. Central to this is the involvement and engagement of Northerners and Indigenous groups, and the incorporation of Indigenous knowledge. Further capacity-building opportunities at the community level through training and participation in science and technology projects funded or carried out by POLAR.

POLAR’s continued collaboration with federal, territorial and provincial governments and Indigenous governments and groups to co-development an Arctic Policy Framework for Canada will assist in determining our government’s vision and priorities to 2030 with respect to Arctic science and Indigenous knowledge. I am honoured to have this polar agency as part of my portfolio and look forward to its continued success in delivering on its very exciting mandate.


The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

President & CEO’s Message

David Scott

Momentum is building toward the official opening of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) campus in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. With close to half of POLAR’s staff now based at the campus, we look forward to the establishment of our headquarters at the campus once construction is complete in 2018-19. The CHARS campus will provide opportunities for Northerners to get involved in research and share their knowledge, asking questions and collaborating with researchers from around the world to find the answers they need.

By continuing to strengthen connections between government departments and agencies, Indigenous organizations, industry and private sector and academia within Canada and internationally, POLAR will continue to leverage additional capacity to support Government of Canada priorities in areas such as climate change, environmental stewardship, and open data. This includes undertaking and supporting research to expand baseline understanding of northern ecosystems; support alternative and renewable energy; better predict the impacts of changing ice, permafrost and snow; and improve the design and construction of northern infrastructure

POLAR’s first competitive funding process in 2017 marked a significant milestone, with funding for 42 multi-year projects that will support the attainment of POLAR’s departmental results through to 2018-19. With many of these projects led by northern or Indigenous groups or organizations, POLAR is supporting the respectful inclusion of Indigenous and local knowledge in research. By continuing to expand awareness of Arctic and Antarctic research, POLAR is helping to mobilize new knowledge through products that inform decision-makers and support evidence-based policy development. POLAR is also building capacity through science camps for northern children and youth and support for training for early-career researchers and personnel.

POLAR’s engagement in 2018-19 with the Canadian research and knowledge sharing community, especially Northerners and Indigenous groups, will inform the development of POLAR’s next Science and Technology Plan and broader, agency-wide Strategic Plan that will guide POLAR’s future polar research-related activities and investments from 2020 to 2025.


David J. Scott, Ph.D.

President and Chief Executive Officer

Plans at a glance

POLAR will continue to support the mandate letter commitment of the Minister of Crown- Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs to “advance work on a shared Arctic Leadership model and a new Arctic Policy for Canada, and support northern programming, governing institutions, and scientific initiatives”. This includes working collaboratively with territories, provinces, Indigenous governments and groups and other federal departments/agencies to codevelop an Arctic Policy Framework that builds a long-term vision to 2030 for the Canadian and circumpolar Arctic, while advancing a whole-of-government approach to the renewal of a nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, and government-to-government relationship with Indigenous Peoples. More specifically, POLAR will continue to co-lead a working group on Arctic Science and Indigenous Knowledge to ensure that new knowledge is based on both western science and Indigenous knowledge, improves evidence-based decision-making, and responds to local needs.

Building on the Arctic Policy Framework process, POLAR will seek further input to inform the development of its next 5-year Science and Technology Plan and broader, agency-wide Strategic Plan for 2020 to 2025. Input will be sought via an open Call for Input and bilateral meetings with key Canadian Arctic research- and Indigenous knowledge-related groups and organizations. This input, as well as outcomes from the Arctic Policy Framework process, will inform POLAR’s future activities. The following is an overview of additional key priorities for 2018-19 that will support the attainment of departmental results.

Operating the world-class Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) campus
The highly anticipated opening of the CHARS campus in 2018 will be used to showcase the work already underway on ecosystem research and monitoring in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut and the broader Kitikmeot and central Arctic regions. The development and operation of state-of-the-art research labs and technological facilities will provide the necessary space, equipment and analytical capability for researchers and visiting scientists to conduct science in the North. By encouraging industry and innovators to test technologies at the CHARS campus, where POLAR can support regular maintenance, northern solutions can be found and shared with other Arctic communities. This is directly supporting POLAR’s departmental result to ensure that Canada’s polar science and technology research is publicly available and being applied.

Investing in Arctic science and technology research and data management
POLAR will use the CHARS campus to conduct and support environmental research and clean technology projects, leveraging current collaborations, while increasing its outreach and partnerships. In addition to research led by POLAR staff, an investment of approximately $8.2 million in 42 successful projects from POLAR’s 2017-2019 Competitive Funding Process will assist in advancing the use of alternative and renewable energy technologies, gathering data to establish a baseline to assist in understanding and adapting to future environmental changes, predicting the impacts of changing permafrost, snow and sea ice and improving the design, construction and maintenance of infrastructure in Canada’s North, while building research capacity and supporting the mobilization of knowledge to inform decision-making. In the coming year, POLAR will advance community-based monitoring and northern housing infrastructure through engagement, workshops and synthesis reports. These projects help to bring science and Indigenous knowledge together and facilitate its application in decision-making. POLAR will also take greater leadership on polar data management to enhance and share scientific information by determining what products and tools are needed to ensure data collected by POLAR and its partners is open, accessible and interoperable to support evidence-based decision-making.

Supporting the inclusion of Indigenous knowledge in evidence-based decision making
The development of new programming at the CHARS campus, including an Elders-in-Residence program, will seek to increase opportunities for local Elders to share and exchange their knowledge with researchers and support its inclusion in evidence-based decision-making. POLAR will also conduct expanded community engagement in the North and will ensure regular dialogue with key northern organizations to strengthen collaborative opportunities and inform POLAR activities. These initiatives are directly linked to supporting the departmental result that Canada’s Arctic science includes Indigenous and local knowledge.

Supporting strategic Canadian and international polar research partnerships
Canada has 25% of the global Arctic but does not currently possess sufficient research capacity to adequately monitor its ecosystems and the impact of climate change. By strengthening and expanding national and international research collaborations, Canada will gain more knowledge to address regional and circumpolar challenges. These collaborations are directly linked to ensuring that Canada fosters domestic and international knowledge exchange and partnerships in polar science. POLAR will continue to implement the legally binding Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation within Canada, in consultation with Indigenous and northern partners. This Agreement provides a formal mechanism to improve coordination among Canadian and international researchers operating in the Arctic. POLAR will also continue to work towards establishing a Canadian program to strengthen support for Antarctic research.

Supporting the next generation of polar researchers and highly qualified personnel
POLAR will strengthen relationships with Indigenous organizations and northern organizations by exploring potential partnership opportunities for capacity building, including employment, mentoring, and education. Through collaborative opportunities that advance Inuit employment and training, additional highly qualified personnel will be available for science and technology positions in the North, which will support POLAR’s in meeting Inuit employment obligations under Article 23 of the Nunavut Agreement. POLAR will continue to support youth engagement through science camps, summer employment, casual hires and co-op placements. POLAR will also develop early-career researcher exchange programs to build capacity. These initiatives all support the goal of ensuring that the next generation of polar researchers is developed.

For more information on POLAR’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results” section of this report.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core Responsibilities

Polar Science and Knowledge

Description

Polar Knowledge Canada is Canada’s polar science agency operating out of the world-class Canadian High Arctic Research Station campus in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. Polar Knowledge Canada performs and publishes multi-disciplinary polar research. Through its grants and contributions program, it funds external partners such as academia, northern communities and organizations who conduct research and related projects. Polar Knowledge Canada aims to include Indigenous and local knowledge wherever possible, and increases domestic and international research coordination and collaboration by leveraging resources with partners. Through workshops, conferences, social media, and other tools, Polar Knowledge Canada shares and promotes the exchange of knowledge across polar scientific and policy communities and the general public. Throughout all of its core activities, Polar Knowledge Canada aims to fund and train the next generation of polar research personnel, with a focus on northern youth.

Planning highlights

Canada’s polar science and technology research is publicly available and being applied. POLAR supports a diverse range of projects across the Canadian North and at the CHARS campus in Cambridge Bay. Specific activities in 2018-19 in the CHARS campus region include:

  • Completing strategic and operational plans for ecosystem classification and mapping, and deploying and maintaining instruments to collect baseline data.
  • Testing heat/energy recovery ventilation systems, load monitoring, waste management technologies, housing systems, waste-to-energy, and clean energy technologies.
POLAR will facilitate access to data and findings of research through an open data policy, tracking of the percentage of publications available to the general public and the launch of an annual Polar Knowledge: Aqhaliat report to disseminate new knowledge in an accessible format.

Canada’s Arctic science includes Indigenous and local knowledge.
Key activities include:

  • Provide in-kind and financial support to research projects that include Indigenous and local knowledge, and encourage and facilitate engagement between researchers at the CHARS campus and community decision-makers.
  • Support data and information management systems to document Indigenous knowledge to support local and integrated decision-making.
In the coming years, POLAR will develop a community-based monitoring program in the Kitikmeot region to acquire long-term environmental data through research and Indigenous knowledge that aligns with the needs of local communities. POLAR will track advances with respect to the inclusion of Indigenous knowledge in projects, including through an updated Call for Proposals process.

Canada fosters domestic and international knowledge exchange and partnerships in polar science.
Key activities include:

  • Ensuring implementation of the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation, to facilitate collaboration with international researchers.
  • Supporting the 10-year NASA Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment by coordinating the exchange and synthesis of data between researchers across broad scientific and international domains.
  • Coordinating with the Canadian Space Agency to process Radarsat-2 image requests, providing extensive international access to space-borne earth observations.
  • Working collaboratively to support the co-development of a new Arctic Policy Framework for Canada and enhance coordination of Arctic science within Canada.
  • Strengthening a national cryosphere monitoring network for Canada’s Arctic.
Through these activities, POLAR will begin measuring the number of knowledge exchange activities (such as workshops), the ratio of leveraged investment, and the percentage of projects that include external partners. The Planned Results table provides greater detail on performance indicators.

The next generation of Canadian polar researchers is developed.
Over the next year, POLAR will:

  • Increase interest among youth in science and technology related careers through support for science camps in northern communities, visiting scientist presentations, as well as educational tools (such as maps of the polar regions) to support curriculum development.
  • Support early career personnel in preparing for future science and technology-related careers, including supporting participation in science conferences and employment at the CHARS campus to assist POLAR researchers.
A gender gap skewed towards more men in degrees, training and careers related to science, technology, engineering, math or computer science still persists across Canada. Education trends in northern, and in particular Inuit, communities have demonstrated a strong distinction between trades and university degrees, with the former heavily favoured by men and the latter by women. These trends, along with data regarding gender-related participation in POLAR programs and activities, will inform future POLAR activities in support of departmental results.

Departmental results and performance indicators are being measured for the first time in 2018- 19; thus, no past results are available. Risks related to the achievement of results include local and regional buy-in of the CHARS campus and POLAR programming, and recruiting and retaining highly skilled personnel. Community engagement in the developmental stage of projects will mitigate this risk. Support for local and regional capacity development in the North is also needed, along with anticipatory staffing and partnerships with educational institutions. Rigorous project planning and risk assessment can mitigate risks associated with technology failure in the harsh Arctic environment and lack of private sector interest in northern markets.

Planned results

Departmental
Results

Departmental
Result
Indicators
Target


Date to
achieve
target
2014–15
Actual
results
2015–16
Actual
results
2016–17
Actual
results

Canada’s
polar science
and
technology
research is
publicly
available and
being applied

Percentage of
research
publications
led and
supported by
Polar
Knowledge
Canada that
are available
online to the
Canadian public

30%±

2024-25

*Not available

*Not available

*Not available

Number of
citations of
research led
and supported
by Polar
Knowledge
Canada

*Not available

2024-25

*Not available

*Not available

*Not available

Canada’s
Arctic
science
includes
Indigenous
and local
knowledge

Percentage of
Arctic research
projects led or
supported by
Polar
Knowledge
Canada that
include
Indigenous or
local
knowledge§

*Not available

2024-25

*Not available

*Not available

*Not available

Percentage of
Arctic projects
led or
supported by
Polar
Knowledge
Canada that
involve
Northerners#

*Not available

2024-25

*Not available

*Not available

*Not available

Canada
fosters
domestic and
international
knowledge
exchange
and
partnerships
in polar
science

Number of
knowledge
exchange
activities or
initiatives led
or supported
by Polar
Knowledge
Canada **

*Not available

2024-25

*Not available

*Not available

*Not available

Ratio of
leveraged
investment by
partners in
Polar
Knowledge
Canada-led
and supported
projects

100%

2024-25

*Not available

*Not available

*Not available

Percentage of
projects led by
Polar
Knowledge
Canada that
include
external
partners

*Not available

2024-25

*Not available

*Not available

*Not available

The next
generation of
Canadian
polar
researchers
is developed

Number of
youth involved
in activities led
or supported
by Polar
Knowledge
Canada ***

*Not available

2024-25

*Not available

*Not available

*Not available

Number of
early career
researchers,
technicians,
and support
staff involved
in projects led
or supported
by Polar
Knowledge
Canada ****

*Not available

2024-25

*Not available

*Not available

*Not available

±Note: 30% is a conservative estimate based on a range of approximately 30-50%, depending on the definition of openly accessible scientific publications utilized. This includes whether a journal itself is open-access (typically closer to 30%), or if the specific article is openly available online in any fashion (typically closer to 50%).

*Note: Data not available as these are all new indicators and this data has not yet been collected.

ƗIndicator is new and under development. A comprehensive application and reporting process for funded projects is currently being developed in order to measure initial baselines and derive targets and appropriate target dates. POLAR will begin collecting data, from the period April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018, on the departmental results indicators for POLAR-led and supported projects. This data will inform the development of targets for each of the departmental results indicators. The data collected for 2017-18 will be added to the 2019-20 Departmental Plan under the column for “Actuals 2017-18”, which will be the baseline used to develop each target. Indicators and targets relating to gender, Indigenous and northern participation, will be supported by such analyses as POLAR’s Gender Based Analysis Plus and of relevance to POLAR’s mandate and relating to STEM degrees and careers. A target date of 2024-25 for each indicator (unless otherwise noted) coincides with the final year of POLAR’s next five-year Science and Technology Plan.

§Indigenous or local knowledge can be considered practical knowledge built up by communities over generations or knowledge specific to a particular location. This may include, but is not limited to, projects in which locally based expertise is used as one source of historical or baseline data, and/or is used to formulate research questions or hypotheses, and/or is used to inform the analysis of research findings. More specifically, the project is developed and carried out in collaboration with an Indigenous organization or community; an Indigenous organization or community leads the project; the project responds to a need identified by an Indigenous organization or community and that organization or community participates in the research; information from Indigenous sources is essential to carrying out the project (the project focuses on Indigenous perspectives or expertise); the project integrates information from both scientific/academic and Indigenous knowledge sources; and/or the project gathers original information or uses existing information from Indigenous sources (individuals, information holdings, other material).

#Northerners includes individuals of any age who are based in the Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Nunavik or Nunatsiavut. Projects include both scientific research and non-scientific projects. Meaningful involvement can include activities such as scientific studies, workshops, camps, or other training-related activities that would have a significant impact or important effect on the youth involved.
**Knowledge exchange initiatives include, but are not limited to, projects or activities such as workshops or working groups, conferences, and community-based information sharing meetings.
***Youth include individuals who are 30 years of age or younger. This does not include individuals who are currently pursuing studies at a territorial college, or undergraduate or post-doctoral program, or have recently completed their studies (i.e., within two years), as these individuals are defined as early career personnel, and are captured in the following indicator.
****Early career researchers, technicians and support staff include individuals currently pursuing studies in a field related to polar research at a territorial college, or undergraduate, graduate or post-doctoral program, or have recently completed their studies (i.e., within two years).

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
19,847,349 19,847,349 19,499,094 19,499,094

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
32 32 32

Financial, human resources and performance information for Polar Knowledge Canada’s
Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.i

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Material Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
9,259,257 9,259,257 9,259,257 9,259,257

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
26 26 26

Planning highlights

POLAR’s internal services will continue to be grounded in sound financial management practices, and designed to improve the efficient and effective delivery of the agency’s programs in order to contribute to Departmental Results. Strengthening health and safety for science and technology operations (in field and on campus) will be of utmost importance as POLAR plans for the successful opening of the CHARS campus in 2018 and increases collaborations with national and international partners.

POLAR will continue to provide fair, transparent, and merit-based staffing processes in order to ensure capacity at the CHARS campus in Cambridge Bay and at its office in Ottawa. This will involve fully implementing a new hybrid delivery model for human resource services, involving both in-house expertise and external service providers who will provide needed operational capacity for a range of services including staffing, classification and labour relations.

POLAR will continue to support Pilimmaksaivik, the Federal Centre of Excellence for Inuit Employment in Nunavut, in the development and implementation of whole-of-government Inuit employment and training initiatives, while implementing POLAR’s departmental Inuit Employment Plan. This will include such items as developing an action plan for general and targeted advertising for external job postings for Nunavut-based positions, supporting cultural awareness training and participating in Nunavut career fairs.

In 2018-19, the agency will continue to build the foundation for its corporate services. This will include assessing options for establishing a Human Resource Management System and implementing a grant and contribution database to strengthen the delivery of POLAR’s funding programs. POLAR will also establish and implement service standards and risk-based management framework for its funding programs and continue to develop its broader grant and contribution policies. In regards to financial management, POLAR will establish better budget forecasting tools and engage management in more detailed financial planning.

From a broader corporate perspective, the agency will aim to improve upon its information management practices by transitioning to GC Docs. It will also strengthen occupational health and safety protocols and procedures for the CHARS campus, and science and technology field operations. POLAR will also continue to collaborate with the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs to ensure a smooth transition into full operation of the CHARS campus.

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Departmental spending trend graph

Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

Core
Responsibilities
and Internal
Services
2015–16
Expenditures


2016–17
Expenditures


2017–18
Forecast
spending

2018–19
Main Estimates


2018–19
Planned
spending

2019–20
Planned
spending

2020–21
Planned
spending

Polar Science and
Knowledge

6,479,969 11,569,877 16,582,533 19,847,349 19,847,349 19,499,094 19,499,094

Subtotal

6,479,969 11,569,877 16,582,533 19,847,349 19,847,349 19,499,094 19,499,094

Internal Services

1,806,742 4,296,601 5,748,112 9,259,257 9,259,257 9,259,257 9,259,257

Total

8,286,711 15,866,478 22,330,645 29,106,606 29,106,606 28,758,351 28,758,351

The increase in the voted spending in 2018-19 is primarily attributable to the planned growth of the agency, which will be in its third year of full operation since its creation in June 2015. The overall increase in spending of $20.5 million from 2015–16 to 2020–21 can mainly be explained by the planned growth of the organization and the opening of the CHARS campus scheduled in

2018-19. POLAR’s first year of operation was a partial year since it was established on June 1, 2015. The increase from 2016-17 expenditures and 2017-18 forecast spending is primarily due to a transfer of $2.5 million in Grants and Contributions funds from 2016-17 to 2017-18 in order to fulfill POLAR commitments. Planned spending increases in 2018-19 due to the opening of the CHARS campus.

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)

Human resources
planning summary for
Core Responsibilities
and Internal Services
(full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibilities
and Internal Services
2015–16
Actual





2016–17
Actual





2017–18
Forecast





2018–19
Main Estimates





2018–19
Planned





2019–20
Planned





2020–21
Planned





Polar Science and
Knowledge

20 25 31 32 32 32

Subtotal

20 25 31 32 32 32

Internal Services

8 15 26 26 26 26

Total

28 40 57 58 58 58

Estimates by vote

For information on Polar Knowledge Canada’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2018–19 Main Estimates.ii

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of Polar Knowledge Canada’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on Polar Knowledge Canada’s website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)

Financial information



2017–18
Forecast results


2018–19
Planned results


Difference
(2018–19 Planned
results minus 2017–18
Forecast results)

Total expenses

22,982,734 28,239,373 5,256,639

Total revenues

(204,911) (300,140) (95,229)

Net cost of operations
before government
funding and transfers

23,187,645 28,539,513 5,351,868

The increase of $5.4 million in the 2018–19 planned results of the net cost of operations,
when compared to the 2017–18 forecast results, is mainly attributable to:

  • An increase of $1.7 million in new funding for Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP).
  • An increase of $7.2 million due to new funding attributed to the
    planned growth of the agency and the planned opening of the CHARS campus in the next few months.
  • A decrease of $3.5 million in transfer payments.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, P.C., M.P.

Chairperson: Mr. Richard Boudreault

Institutional head: Dr. David J. Scott, President and Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial portfolio: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Enabling instrument: Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act

Year of incorporation / commencement: 2015

Other: A nine-member Board of Directors, including a Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson,
provide strategic oversight of Polar Knowledge Canada. The Board approves the organization’s
science and technology plan and annual work plans and budget. The Board is accountable to the
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs. All Board members are appointed
by Order-in-Council to hold office for terms not exceeding five years, and are eligible for re-
appointment for a second term of office. Members of the Board of Directors hold office on a
part-time basis.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Polar Knowledge Canada’s website.

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on Polar Knowledge Canada’s website.

Reporting framework

Polar Knowledge Canada’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record
for 2018–19 are shown below:

Departmental results framework

Concordance between the Departmental Results Framework and the
Program Inventory, 2018–19, and the Program Alignment Architecture, 2017–18


2018–19 Core Responsibilities and
Program Inventory








2017–18 Lowest-level program of the
Program Alignment Architecture








Percentage of
lowest-level
Program
Alignment
Architecture
program (dollars)
corresponding to
the program in
the Program
Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Polar Science and Knowledge

Program A: Science and technology

1.1.1 Science and Monitoring 100%
1.1.2 Technology Development and Transfer 100%

Program B: Knowledge management and engagement

1.2.1 Knowledge Management 100%
1.2.2 Outreach and Capacity Building 100%

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to Polar
Knowledge Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.iii

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on
Polar Knowledge Canada’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special
measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of
Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the
Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.iv This report also provides detailed background information
on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to
related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the
responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

General Inquiries

info@polar-polaire.gc.ca

Cambridge Bay Headquarters:
1 Uvajuq Road
PO Box 2150
Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, X0B 0C0
Telephone: (867) 983-3694

Ottawa Office:
170 Laurier Avenue West
2nd Floor, Suite 200
Ottawa, ON, K1P 5V5
Telephone: (613) 943-8605

Media requests and communications

E-mail: communications@polar.gc.ca

Phone: (613) 292-1759

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government,
organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with
respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that
the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year
period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often
outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a
Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result
Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out
in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions
and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works
and what does not.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a
departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to
scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+)
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, programs and
services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges
that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences to consider multiple identity factors that
intersect to make people who they are (such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or
physical disability).
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those
high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne,
namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean
Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and
Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding
agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been
designated (by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and
reporting purposes.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the
composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare
to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of
gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected
results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting
supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those
amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The
determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be
able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and
Departmental Results Reports.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends
to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the
strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning
period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to
support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to
achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)1
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship
between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

1. Under the Policy on Results, the Program Alignment Architecture has been replaced by the Program Inventory.

results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative.
Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead
they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The
legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which
they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate,
vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the
program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of
a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to
achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote
wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Endnotes

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