Departmental Performance Report 2015-16

Table of Contents:

Minister’s Message

Carolyn BennettOn June 1, 2015, the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act came into force and Polar Knowledge Canada (POLAR) was officially established as a new federal research organization within the portfolio of the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs. This new federal organization combines the mandate and resources of the former Canadian Polar Commission and the pan-northern Science and Technology program associated with the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) initiative at Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.
At this early stage of its launch as a new Government of Canada and polar-focused agency, POLAR engagement with federal, territorial, national and international research institutions and networks of circumpolar expertise has been critical, to create greater awareness and initiate longer term collaborations and partnerships. These partnering efforts have involved a high level of engagement with the Arctic and Antarctic scientific community through technical workshops, roundtable discussions, conferences and the development of agreements and project-specific initiatives in the North.

Partnerships have been established with other federal agencies such as the Sustainable Development Technology Canada and Public Services and Procurement Canada to deploy alternative and renewable technologies in the North. POLAR has also been actively pursuing partnership arrangements with research institutions in other countries, an example being POLAR’s work with the NASA ABoVE team on the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment. Through investment in strategic Arctic infrastructure for the benefit of the broad Canadian and international Science and Technology community, these collaborative arrangements will enable research and knowledge generation specific to the North.

A major focus of Polar Knowledge Canada has also been to engage, collaborate and partner with the indigenous peoples of the North, through staffing at the Cambridge Bay Canadian High Arctic Research Station, the involvement of Northerners in research and technology projects, training, and community leadership in projects.

Ultimately, Polar Knowledge Canada success in advancing Canada’s knowledge of the polar regions will help improve economic opportunities, environmental stewardship, and the quality of life of Northerners and all Canadians. CHARS will be a key enabler to help advance this knowledge, and Polar Knowledge Canada in its first ten (10) months of operation has established clear priorities and a Science and Technology Program to strengthen baseline information for improved decision-making, provide a better understanding of the terrestrial cryosphere and changing ice conditions, and test how technologies in alternative and renewable energy and infrastructure can best be adapted to northern conditions.

In closing, I also commend the work done by the Canadian Polar Commission with Indigenous and Northern Affair Canada to help launch Polar Knowledge Canada. With its pan-northern science and technology program, its world-class research facility to begin operating in 2017, and its knowledge mobilization function inherited from the Commission, POLAR will strengthen Canada’s position as an international leader in polar science and technology.

The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

President’s Message

Carolyn BennettSince coming into force on June 1, 2015, Polar Knowledge Canada (POLAR) has been strengthening connections between science-based departments and agencies, Indigenous organizations, academia and industry in Canada and internationally. POLAR has also been moving ahead with a growing number of projects that align with the Science and Technology priority areas approved by the Board of Directors. These priority areas are: alternative and renewable energy for the North; baseline information to prepare for northern sustainability; predicting the impacts of changing ice, permafrost and snow on shipping, infrastructure and communities; and catalyzing improved design, construction and maintenance of northern built infrastructure.

A key focus during the first ten months of operation, to March 31, 2016, was the creation of greater awareness of POLAR with Arctic and Antarctic stakeholders and partners, to consult with them in the development of project priorities and forward-looking plans, and to leverage existing programs that can be adapted to Northern requirements.

Going forward, POLAR will increasingly focus on engaging northern indigenous communities to ensure POLAR’s priorities align with their needs and their values and to ensure Indigenous Knowledge is respectfully incorporated in our research efforts. POLAR is also working to facilitate greater access to scientific information, providing value added knowledge products to inform decision-makers, creating greater awareness of Arctic and Antarctic science and technology in Canada and internationally, and building capacity in northern communities (and youth) through participation in science and technology projects. Overall, POLAR will support the Government of Canada’s priorities in areas such as climate change, environmental stewardship, innovation, sustainable technologies, and open data all in support of evidence-based decision-making.

POLAR has continued to support research and technology projects through competitive funding processes and in-kind support, and has actively supported coordination efforts such as, the Canadian Network of Northern Research Operators (CNNRO), the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and other polar science and technology groups and networks. POLAR is leading Canada’s efforts in advancing the development of a Canadian Antarctic Research Program to better coordinate and increase Canadian Antarctic research to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the Antarctic region, global systems, and polar linkages.

POLAR has established corporate policies, processes and systems in human resources, finance, information technology, security and administration of grants and contributions. POLAR is working in close collaboration with Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada to prepare to operate the Canadian High Arctic Research Station in 2017.

A critical milestone to increase POLAR’s internal capacity, was the launch of a national staffing initiative at the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut in December 2015. In addition, staffing POLAR corporate positions in human resources, finance and administrative support, and beginning to staff internal Science and Technology teams responsible for leading the work on the priority S&T areas.

Finally, with the challenges of launching a new organization, POLAR remained sensitive to creating a healthy workplace, encouraging worklife balance and overall employee wellness, with a focus on team building and common values that reflect POLAR’s operational context.

David J. Scott, Ph.D.
President and Chief Executive Officer

Results Highlights

Actual spending in 2015-2016 was $8,286,711, involving some 28 full-time equivalents (FTEs).

Major achievements of POLAR since its launch in June 2015 are highlighted below:

  • POLAR created greater awareness of its mandate and role amongst stakeholders, and proactively engaged with potential partners as a broker to pursue research opportunities and leverage existing programs in the North. POLAR held a series of introductory meetings and presentations with stakeholders during the fall of 2015, and engaged with other federal departments, Indigenous peoples, the scientific community in Canada, Arctic and Antarctic research organizations in other countries, as well as multiple multilateral groups and task forces in place to enhance scientific cooperation in the Arctic and Antarctic.
  • POLAR pursued and established partnership arrangements based on identified priorities, with a wide range of stakeholders, across all the Science and Technology priority areas. These partnerships, and the corresponding investments, will enable research and knowledge creation in the priority S&T areas and are highlighted in the pages that follow.
  • POLAR has been working with private sector and government partners to bring alternative and renewable energy technologies to the north, identify sites, test and adapt these to the extreme northern environments, and to demonstrate viability and cost savings for the communities. Pilot projects are being pursued in select communities. Renewable energy technologies include solar, wind power, biomass heat, run of river hydro, combined heat and power, permafrost methane and smart metering.
  • POLAR has made significant progress in building internal capacity, in terms of:
    • Establishing corporate structures, processes and systems
    • Staffing for Cambridge Bay, assembling leadership teams for each of the Science and Technology priority areas, and functional experts at the corporate level
    • Working with Indigenous and Northern Affairs to facilitate the transfer of the CHARS facilities and ensure readiness
    • Fostering a healthy and productive workplace.

Section I: Organizational Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, P.C., M.P.

Chairperson: Mr. Richard Boudreault, Chairperson

Deputy Head: Dr. David J. Scott, President and Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial Portfolio: Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Enabling Instrument(s): Canadian High Arctic Research Station Acti

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 2015

Web site: https://www.canada.ca/en/polar-knowledge.htmlii

Other: Administration of the Polar Knowledge Canada (POLAR) is overseen by a nine-member Board of Directors, including a Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson. The Board approves the organization’s science and technology plan and annual work plans and budget. The Board is accountable to the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs. All positions are appointed by Order-in-Council to hold office for terms not exceeding five years, and are eligible for re-appointment for a second term of office. Members of the Board of Directors hold office on a part-time basis.

Organizational Context

Raison d’être

Polar Knowledge Canada (POLAR) is a federal agency (departmental corporation) that was established with the coming into force of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act on June 1, 2015. The Act merged the mandate and functions of the Canadian Polar Commission and the pan-northern science and technology program associated with the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) project of AANDC (now INAC).

The purpose of Polar Knowledge Canada as stated in the Act is to:

  • Advance knowledge of the Canadian Arctic in order to improve economic opportunities, environmental stewardship and the quality of life of its residents and all other Canadians
  • Promote the development and dissemination of knowledge of the other circumpolar regions, including the Antarctic
  • Strengthen Canada’s leadership on Arctic issues
  • Establish a hub for scientific research in the Canadian Arctic.

Responsibilities

The functions of Polar Knowledge Canada are to:

  • Undertake scientific research and develop technology
  • Implement scientific research and technology development programs and projects
  • Promote the testing, application, transfer, diffusion and commercialization of technology
  • Publish and disseminate studies, reports and other documents
  • Complement national and international networks of expertise and of facilities.

Polar Knowledge Canada will be headquartered at the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, once the station is operational in 2017. The CHARS campus encompasses a main research building, a field and maintenance building and triplex accommodation units for visiting researchers and scientists. CHARS construction continues to be managed by INAC until commissioning is completed. It will then become part of Polar Knowledge Canada. Key elements of the governance arrangements are:

  • Polar Knowledge Canada reports to the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs
  • A nine member Board of Directors is responsible for oversight, long-term strategic direction and decisions on the annual budget and work plans of the organization
  • The President and CEO, as the Deputy Head of the agency, is accountable for day-to-day management of Polar Knowledge Canada
  • Science and Technology is responsible for managing the implementation of the Science and Technology Program; Knowledge Management and Engagement is responsible for knowledge mobilization, communications, outreach and capacity building activities; and Human Resources and Corporate Services is responsible for internal services.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

Strategic Outcome: Canada has world-class Arctic science and technology to support the development and stewardship of Canada’s North and is recognized as a leader on circumpolar research issues.

  • 1.1 Program: Science and Technology for the North
    • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: Science and Monitoring
    • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Technology Development and Transfer
  • 1.2 Program: Polar Knowledge Application
    • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Knowledge Management
    • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Outreach and Capacity Building

Internal Services

The Program Alignment Architecture is depicted in the chart below.

Program Alignment Architecture Chart

Operating Environment and Risk Analysis

Operating Environment

Canada’s North is undergoing significant change driven by a number of complex factors, some global in nature, others rooted in the dynamics of the region’s unique history, and others stemming from the increased empowerment of Indigenous peoples through settled comprehensive land claims. Key influences at this time on scientific research and technology development include:

  • Rapid environmental transformations occurring in the Arctic are affecting the entire Earth system, including its climate and weather extremes, through increased temperatures and the continuing loss of ice, glaciers, snow and permafrost. These changes in the Arctic are challenging our understanding of their consequences and our ability to provide knowledge for decision-makers.
  • New economic interests in the Arctic have established the region as a larger player in the global economy, but also with very significant local effects. In spite of rapid environmental and social change, the Arctic remains a region of geopolitical stability which is a pre-condition for sustaining Arctic research.
  • Increasing political and economic empowerment of Northerners exemplified by the devolution of responsibility for lands and resource management to territorial governments and the gradual shifting of the control of the research agenda northward.
  • Ongoing advances in indigenous self-government taking place throughout the region and their positive effects on government policies, including how research is undertaken.
  • Heightened northern interest on the part of Canadians.
  • Developing local technical capacity and ensuring community buy-in and participation will be critical to technology development and transfer in the North. The private sector must also be motivated to pursue the smaller northern markets for these new technologies.

Key Risks

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to POLAR’s Program(s)
Technology failure. Technologies that are tested may not be suitable to the extreme northern environments and may therefore be abandoned as viable options. Rigorous project planning and risk assessment; periodic re-evaluations of projects; consultation with technology leaders; testing of multiple technologies; and building on previous work and lessons learned.
  • 1.1.2 Technology development and transfer
Community buy-in. Northern communities may not be receptive to certain technology solutions. Community outreach and engagement; community involvement in projects; development of local capacity.
  • 1.2.2 Outreach and capacity building
Limited local technical capacity. Some demonstration/pilot projects will require technical capacity at the community level, and will be hindered if such capacity is not available. Plan for community involvement in projects; provide training/internship support; and ongoing community outreach and communications.
  • 1.2.2 Outreach and capacity building
Lack of private sector interest in pursuing northern markets. Lack of interest in partnering if there is insufficient market potential for technologies. POLAR contribution programs will be used as an incentive to attract the interest of the private sector. Other response measures will include market assessments as well as scaling projects to market potential.
  • 1.2.1 Knowledge management
  • 1.1.2 Technology development and transfer
Ability to attract and retain staff with the required competencies in a timely manner. Given the remote location of Cambridge Bay and the high demand and strong competition among northern-based organizations for highly qualified personnel. Collective and anticipatory staffing, fast track staffing processes, partnerships with educational institutions, human resources planning, competency profiling, and innovative human resources programs to attract and retain staff.
  • Internal services

Organizational Priorities

Priority: Alternative and renewable energy for the North

Reduce the dependency on high-cost imported energy, explore feasibility of local sources and enhance northern application of alternative technologies. Work with national and international technology leaders to ensure the latest advances in new energy technology are tested in northern conditions so that they become increasingly available to Northerners. (New priority)

Key Supporting Initiatives

Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to POLAR’s Program(s)
“Northernization” of existing technologies. Adapt, use and test prototypes in Cambridge Bay to develop integrated alternative energy systems suited to supply power to households in town or at remote locations. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.2 Technology Development and Transfer
Assess local energy sources. Investigate potential for the use of solar and wind power, biomass, permafrost methane and smart metering to inform decisions on energy technology for communities. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.2 Technology Development and Transfer
Energy storage solutions. Work with industry and government partners to adapt energy storage technology solutions to the North. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.2 Technology Development and Transfer

Progress Toward the Priority             

  • POLAR partnered with Sustainable Development Technology Canada to provide support for their Call for Proposals for Clean Technology. One project was selected that met the POLAR mandate: the Sigma Energy Storage Compressed Air Energy Storage System. POLAR provided funding that will be used to refine component selection to allow the system to operate in a northern climate and in remote communities and to prepare for the deployment of a beta prototype system in Cambridge Bay in 2018.
  • POLAR worked with Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) to deploy SolarSIM solar monitors sponsored through the Build in Canada Innovation Program. SolarSIM will be deployed at seven sites across Canada in the coming year to test and demonstrate the technology in a variety of locations. Among these sites, Cambridge Bay will provide the furthest northern site for test and demonstration of the technology.
  • POLAR contributed to a successful application of Natural Resources Canada’s ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative (ecoEII) for Clean Energy Projects. This three-phase project includes: support to the Arctic Council-led ATLAS project to develop a pan-Arctic renewable energy atlas; field testing of renewable energy microgrids with intelligent load management in Cambridge Bay; and a techno-economic assessment of renewable microgrid design and operation. The three-year project was approved for full funding with activities for phases one and two beginning in 2016-2017.

Priority: Baseline information to prepare for northern sustainability

Improve decision support for sustainable communities and responsible development in the North. (New priority)

Key Supporting Initiatives

Planned  Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to POLAR’s Program(s)
Strengthen the information base for improved land-based decision-making. Enhanced characterization, knowledge, understanding and monitoring of Valuable Ecosystem Components (VEC); large area information collection using airborne and satellite-based remote sensing; and modelling of data. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.1 Science and Monitoring
Strengthen the information base for safe shipping, improved marine decision making. Enhanced characterization, knowledge and monitoring; in situ and remotely-sensed observation; modelling of data. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.1 Science and Monitoring

Progress Toward the Priority             

  • POLAR continues to pursue and establish partnership arrangements based on identified priorities. For example, POLAR worked with the NASA ABoVE team on the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE). In January 2016, POLAR partnered with the University of Victoria and Ocean Networks Canada to convene a workshop on the ocean/climate nexus and explore the global and domestic context, approaches to, and gaps in research.
  • In partnership with the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Alaska, Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK) and Oceans North, POLAR hosted a workshop on developing a standardized international approach to monitoring biodiversity in Arctic coastal ecosystems. Representatives from all Arctic Council nations were present as well as Inuit representation from across North America, industry and academia. Key outcomes were the identification of key issues facing Arctic coastal ecosystems, biodiversity elements to monitor, conceptual ecosystem models, and a path forward for incorporating Indigenous Knowledge in ongoing plan development and implementation.
  • POLAR scientists, their science colleagues and Inuit students processed the findings of a third field session of research into lake ecology, insect monitoring and observations of the flowering dates of Arctic tundra plants as sensitive indicators of climate change.
  • Long-term research and monitoring for marine and terrestrial ecosystems in the CHARS Experimental and Reference Area (ERA) included a classification of terrestrial ecosystems with a view to a standardized nomenclature for Arctic Plant communities; monitoring of tundra arthropods; detailed plant phenology studies; stream water sampling in the Greiner watershed and regionally in rivers entering Queen Maude and Coronation Gulfs; baseline studies of physical oceanography of marine ecosystems; snow monitoring and analysis; and bi-weekly sampling of microbes, phytoplankton, zooplankton and physical limnology in Greiner Lake.
  • Through a competitive funding process, POLAR provided support to 15 multi-year projects focused on improving land- and marine-based baseline information, supporting Canadian and community-based Indigenous researchers.

Priority: Predicting the impacts of changing ice, permafrost and snow on shipping, infrastructure and communities

Increase knowledge of the frozen elements of the terrestrial and marine cryosphere to support adaptation and improve climate models. Work with the leading players to strengthen cryosphere research to understand how and why changes are happening in ice, snow, and permafrost across the Arctic and the impact of these changes on shipping, infrastructure and global processes. (New priority)

Key Supporting Initiatives

Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to POLAR’s Program(s)
Understanding changing terrestrial cryosphere. Better understand terrestrial cryosphere changes and improve ability to predict impacts of change. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.1 Science and Monitoring
Understanding changing ice conditions. Changing sea ice conditions and their impact on weather patterns, local climate and marine shipping. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.1 Science and Monitoring
Improved predictive capacity. Integrate Canadian cryospheric and sea-ice data into global prediction models. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.1 Science and Monitoring

Progress Toward the Priority             

  • The focus in 2015-2016 was on staffing the POLAR team and developing a strategic plan to deliver on the priority. Two specialists in cryosphere and marine research were hired to outline the current state of knowledge on terrestrial cryosphere and changing marine ice conditions, and to identify gaps and opportunities for collaboration. Consultation with experts and stakeholders, including northern organizations, established the rationale for future Science and Technology (S&T) initiatives and partnership agreements and resulted in the development of a forward-looking plan.
  • POLAR pursued collaborations to invest in strategic Arctic infrastructure for the benefit of the broad Canadian and International S&T community. These investments will enable research and knowledge generation towards POLAR’s cryosphere priority.
  • Through a competitive funding process, POLAR provided support to six (6) multi-year projects focused on cryospheric research and monitoring, including three (3) terrestrial cryosphere projects and three (3) marine cryosphere projects. Canadian and community-based Indigenous researchers were supported through this process.
  • POLAR remained active in the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) Cryosphere Working Group with the appointment of Dr. Shawn Marshall as Canada’s representative on the Working Group.
  • A 4-year Marine-Coastal Research and Monitoring Plan was developed for the CHARS Experimental and Reference Area (ERA): the Kitikmeot region centered on the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. The first field season was carried out in the summer of 2015, and Canadian and International collaborations established.

Priority: Catalyzing improved design, construction and maintenance of northern built infrastructure

Apply innovative designs, materials and techniques to increase energy efficiency, quality, and reduce life-cycle costs of northern infrastructure. (New priority)

Key Supporting Initiatives

Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to POLAR’s Program(s)
Research, develop and test energy efficient housing for the North. Research, develop and test the latest advances in energy efficient housing for the North. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.2 Technology Development and Transfer
Adapt waste processing systems to northern environments. Apply innovative designs, materials and techniques to increase energy efficiency and reduce life-cycle costs. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.2 Technology Development and Transfer

Progress Toward the Priority 

  • With a view to fostering communication and collaboration among the many organizations working to improve housing in the North, and the complexity, scope, and urgency of the issue, POLAR hosted a workshop in February 2016 titled “Collaborative Action on Arctic Housing Infrastructure”. The workshop, a collaboration of POLAR, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), and the National Research Council (NRC), brought together experts from across the North, including Alaska, and from southern Canada with expertise and experience related to housing in the North.
  • POLAR pursued further partnerships with key US and Canadian stakeholders that have experience in northern housing and infrastructure design at the Sustainable Northern Shelter forum in Fairbanks, Alaska held in March 2016.
  • POLAR also began to establish a project team to identify and seek partners to pursue emerging wastewater technologies appropriate for the North. There is concern among territorial representatives, Inuit organizations, and other parties that proposed wastewater treatment and sanitation regulations, which may be suitable for most southern regions, are not appropriate for the North and do not reflect conditions in northern communities. POLAR has been an active member of the Ad Hoc Committee on Arctic Housing and Community Infrastructure, comprised of federal departments and agencies.
  • POLAR has agreed to partner with Alaska’s Cold Climate Housing Research Centre to coordinate and discuss joint activities that will help to improve housing conditions in the Canadian and Alaskan Arctic.

Priority: Knowledge management and engagement

Engage key stakeholders and indigenous communities, and produce and disseminate Arctic and Antarctic science and technology results through a variety of media to support the translation of knowledge into tangible outcomes. (New priority)

Key Supporting Initiatives

Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to POLAR’s Program(s)
Engage domestic stakeholders and indigenous communities, and encourage collaboration to support the production and dissemination of science and technology results. Through the hosting of workshops on topics including oceans, infrastructure, and the Antarctic and related follow-up activities to facilitate discussion of priority research gaps and areas for collaboration. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.2.1 Knowledge Management
Increase international collaboration and partnerships to support the production of science and technology results. Through the hosting of the Arctic Council’s Science Task Force Meeting, participation at international science conferences and polar events to establish contacts, and establishment of institution-level cooperation agreements. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.2.1 Knowledge Management
Facilitate improved access to data and information. Through collaboration with the Polar Data Catalogue and policies that ensure open access to data, and synthesis of scientific information into value-added knowledge products to support decision-making. April 2016 To be determined On track 1.1.2 Technology Development and Transfer

Progress Toward the Priority             

  • Horizontal engagement efforts with the scientific community included technical workshops on the ocean/climate nexus in the Arctic in January 2016, roundtable discussions with other funding agencies on fostering international research collaboration, discussions with territorial science advisors, meetings with Science and Technology advisory committees, and ongoing support to the Canadian Network of Northern Research Operators (CNNRO). Participation in the Arctic Science Summit Week (ASSW) held in March 2015, an annual gathering of international organizations involved in Arctic research, enabled POLAR to make important progress on the development of MOUs and project-specific initiatives.
  • Bilaterally, collaboration arrangements to enhance Arctic research coordination and pursue research areas of joint interest, were pursued with a range of international research organizations in other countries such as Sweden, Norway, Germany, Italy, Japan and Iceland. POLAR’s collaboration with NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) was highlighted during Prime Minister Trudeau’s visit to Washington in March 2016.
  • Multilaterally, POLAR hosted the next Arctic Council Task Force for Enhancing Scientific Cooperation in the Arctic (SCTF) held in Ottawa in July 2016. This Task Force included representatives from all eight Arctic Council Member States as well as Permanent Participant organizations and several observer countries.
  • Engagement activities with other government departments (OGDs) focused on leveraging existing programs, for example, Natural Resources Canada’s Polar Continental Shelf Program, Environment and Climate Change Canada’s investments in environmental monitoring equipment, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s Northern Contaminants Program (NCP), and Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) research in key health areas such as nutrition, obesity, mental health and oral health. POLAR also worked with OGDs to promote the idea of connecting Canada’s Arctic with a multi-user fibre optic backbone, and with Global Affairs Canada on the development of legal tools to enhance international Arctic science collaboration.
  • Ongoing discussions were held with the Indigenous community (e.g., Inuit Advisory Committee) to discuss POLAR plans and priorities and share updates. POLAR made presentations to the Territorial governments and indigenous groups, for example, through the Arctic Council Advisory Committee. POLAR launched a national Cambridge Bay staffing initiative in December 2015 and made plans for its 2016 Summer Student Hiring. A partnership was established with the Kitikmeot Heritage Society for them to develop a community guidebook for incoming researchers to Cambridge Bay.
  • POLAR continued to advance the development of a Canadian Antarctic Research Program, and strengthen Canadian engagement in Antarctic science and technology, with advice and guidance from its Canadian Committee on Antarctic Research (CCAR). This included continued participation in the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting and the annual meeting of the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Program (COMNAP) to represent Canadian Antarctic research interest and explore opportunities for further collaboration. As Canada’s adhering body to the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR), POLAR promoted strong Canadian participation in SCAR activities to initiate, develop, and coordinate Antarctic research among the international community. POLAR will host a Canadian Antarctic Research Workshop in Ottawa in October 2016 to bring together the Canadian Antarctic/polar research community to explore opportunities to strengthen Canadian Antarctic research activities including through the development of a program.

Priority: Outreach and capacity building

Work with partner organizations to build awareness of Arctic and Antarctic science and technology domestically and internationally and build capacity through training, outreach and employment opportunities. (New priority)

Key Supporting Initiatives

Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to POLAR’s Program(s)
Strengthen awareness of POLAR’s mandate and science and technology in the Polar Regions among a broad audience. Through the release of external communications products and tools including the video ‘What is Polar Knowledge Canada’, the Polar Knowledge App, the Polar Blog and social media, and participation in key domestic and international polar research meetings and conferences. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.2 Technology Development and Transfer
Advance and support the next generation of researchers and highly qualified personnel. Through an assessment of existing northern capacity-building initiatives to identify gaps that POLAR is well placed to address, and support for the delivery of science camps to northern youth. June 2015 To be determined On track 1.1.2 Technology Development and Transfer

Progress Toward the Priority             

Communications were mainly focused on creating greater awareness of POLAR:

  • The video, What is Polar Knowledge Canada?, was produced and made available on the Polar web site, Canada’s embassy network abroad as well as Youtube channels, in English, French and Inuktitut in subtitles.
  • The content on the Polar Knowledge App was updated, including information on Arctic and Antarctic experts, polar research locations, polar science infrastructure and monitoring sites, northern communities, and upcoming workshops and conferences.
  • POLAR increased its social media presence, for example, by increasing POLAR’s online audience through ongoing news on circumpolar events and research findings, and creating online libraries to share best practice information among stakeholders.

POLAR outreach activities focused on polar Science and Technology stakeholders, the community in Cambridge Bay, and the public at large:

  • POLAR made several presentations at polar science meetings, conferences and workshops to discuss research priorities, activities, opportunities, and the Northern Science Training Program (NSTP).
  • POLAR participated in local community events, radio talk shows, conferences, trade shows, visited schools in the North and at Cambridge Bay, emphasizing employment and capacity building.
  • POLAR supported Nunavut Arctic College in the delivery of Year 1 of their Environmental Training Program at their Cambridge Bay campus.
  • POLAR initiated conversations with the Canadian Museum of Nature and Canadian Science and Technology Museum Arctic Advisory Committee on collaborative initiatives aimed at the public.
  • POLAR continued to administer the nomination process for the Northern Science Award.

In addition to staffing underway at Cambridge Bay, POLAR undertook other activities to further develop capacity in the North, for example:

  • POLAR is a proponent of the establishment of Pilimmaksaivik, the Federal Centre of Excellence for Inuit Employment in Nunavut. The Centre will coordinate federal government initiatives to increase representation of Inuit in government positions in Nunavut, including pre-employment training.
  • POLAR provided support to two key capacity building initiatives in alternative and renewable energy for the North. Financial and physical support was provided to the Lumos Energy Catalyst 2020 program, which builds capacity amongst First Nations, Métis and Inuit clean energy champions; POLAR sponsored two people to attend the first phase of the course.
  • POLAR also provided technical support to the Arctic Council’s Arctic Remote Energy Network Academy (ARENA). POLAR has worked to develop the curriculum and selecting instructors for the Canadian element of the course.
  • POLAR organized and hosted science sessions for kids and youth in Cambridge Bay to build interest in science and technology.

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Minister’s mandate letteriii

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Section II: Expenditure Overview

Actual Expenditures

Note that as POLAR came into force on June 1, 2015, figures for the period 2013-15 in the tables below do not exist. In addition, figures related to the 2015-16 Main Estimates and 2015-16 Planned Spending do not exist as POLAR was created after these processes were finalized.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (actual minus planned)
0 0 9,866,693 8,286,711 8,286,711

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents FTEs)

2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
0 28 28

Budgetary Performance Summary

Budgetary Performance Summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)

Program(s) and Internal Services 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending 2017–18 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2014–15 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used)
1.1 Science and Technology for the North 0 0 13,679,282 12,811,623 6,709,512 5,391,920 0 0
1.2 Polar Knowledge Application 0 0 2,993,760 3,298,843 1,204,015 1,088,049 0 0
Subtotal 0 0 16,673,042 16,110,466 7,913,527 6,479,969 0 0
Internal Services Subtotal 0 0 2,802,232 3,014,536 1,953,166 1,806,742 0 0
Total 0 0 19,475,274 19,125,002 9,866,693 8,286,711 0 0

Departmental Spending Trend

Note that as POLAR came into force on June 1, 2015, figures for the periods 2013-14 and 2014-15 in spending trends do not exist.

The increase in the voted spending in 2018-2019 is related to the transfer of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) facilities to POLAR from Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. POLAR will be responsible for the governance and maintenance of all facilities and program.

Departmental Spending Trend

Expenditures by Vote

For information on POLAR’s voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2016iv.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015-16 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government Frameworkv (dollars)

Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2015–16 Actual Spending
1.1 Science and Technology for the North Economic affairs A clean and healthy environment 5,391,920
1.2 Polar Knowledge Application Economic affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 1,088,049

Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic affairs 0 6,479,969
Social affairs 0 0
International affairs 0 0
Government affairs 0 0

Financial Statements and Financial Statements Highlights

Financial Statements

Financial statements are available on POLAR’svi website.

Financial Statements Highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)

For the period of June 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016 (dollars)

Financial Information 2015–16 Planned Results 2015–16 Actual 2014–15 Actual Difference (2015–16 actual minus 2015–16 planned) Difference (2015–16 actual minus 2014–15 actual)
Total expenses                   0 8,687,741 0 8,687,741 8,687,741
Total revenues 0 0 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 0 8,687,741 0 8,687,741 8,687,741

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
As at March 31, 2016 (dollars)

Financial Information 2015–16 2014-15 Difference (2015–16 minus 2014–15)
Total net liabilities 1,315,375 0 1,315,375
Total net financial assets 1,100,802 0 1,100,802
Departmental net debt 214,573 0 214,573
Total non-financial assets 136,154 0 136,154
Departmental net financial position (78,419) 0 (78,419)
Spending Distribution by Program

Based on POLAR’s financial statements, total expenses were $8.7 million in 2015–16. The majority of the funds, $5.5 million or 63%, were spent on the Science and Technology for the North; while Polar Knowledge Application represented $1.1M or 13% of total expenses and Internal Services represented $2.1 million or 24% of total expenses.

Spending Distribution by Type

Total expenses for POLAR were $8.7 million in 2015–16 of which $3.3 million or 38.4% were spent on salaries and employee benefits, $1.9 million or 21.8% were spent on transfer payments and $1 million or 11.7% were spent on professional services fees. The balance of $2.4 million or 28.1% of POLAR costs was spent on other operating costs such as transportation costs, machinery and equipment, utilities, materials and supplies as well as rentals.

Section III: Analysis of Program(s) and Internal Services Programs

Programs

Program 1.1: Science and Technology for the North

Description
This program aims to create the conditions for Polar Knowledge Canada to anchor a strong research presence in Canada’s Arctic. Through both partnering and internal science and technology, POLAR will acquire the wide range of information needed for effective solutions to Arctic issues, policy and research program development in the North, and to advance Canada’s position as a leading Arctic nation. The depth of knowledge gained through scientific and technological research and training will support greater sustainable use of the North’s land and natural resources.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

  • The second field season of the five-year Science and Technology (S&T) Program took place across Canada’s North, as well as in and around Cambridge Bay, Nunavut.
  • Scientific field instrumentation procurement was completed, all instruments were delivered to Cambridge Bay, and research licences obtained, for deployment in the summer field work.
  • POLAR updated its S&T priorities in the fall of 2015, and developed work plans to support the delivery of these priorities. POLAR continues to build capacity in Science and Technology (S&T) by staffing internally for the delivery of the program and its strategic priorities. In addition, four summer students were hired to support POLAR staff to conduct field work around the CHARS campus.
  • In 2015-2016, POLAR supported 21 research projects through contribution agreements to various organizations in the field of northern monitoring and for projects located in regions of significant resource development.
  • POLAR staff participated in a number of major national and international conferences and workshops to share knowledge and bridge connections for the delivery of the S&T program. This enabled POLAR to solicit input about key gaps in arctic science and arctic-technology support for energy and infrastructure, better coordinate Canada’s Arctic S&T community, and ensure its integration within a broader international framework to further leverage the delivery of the S&T Program.
  • A number of partnerships were pursued with industry, academia, NGOs and governments to help the delivery of a strong research program in the Arctic. Project examples include POLAR’s MOU with the NASA’s Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment; the SolarSIM solar monitors sponsored through the Build in Canada Innovation Program; and the ECO EII program for Clean Energy projects.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
0 0 6,709,512 5,391,920 5,391,920

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents FTEs)

2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
0 14 14

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Sustainable use of Arctic land and resources is supported by science and technology research and training activities facilitated by the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Percentage of Northerners using science and technology training camps and training opportunities at POLAR To be determined To be determined

Program 1.2: Polar Knowledge Application

Description
Lead the mobilization of polar science and technology into action. POLAR will analyze and disseminate polar knowledge from its Science and Technology Program, as well as that from other federal, territorial and other stakeholders, and investments to inform management, programming, and policies; promote Arctic and Antarctic science and technology nationally and internationally; and build capacity through training, outreach, and learning opportunities. This will ensure polar knowledge is relevant to stakeholders and indigenous communities, and builds a science culture in Canada that incorporates indigenous and local knowledge.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

  • The initial focus of POLAR was on creating awareness through communications products such as the “What is Polar Knowledge Canada?” video, participation in science conferences and polar events, increasing POLAR’s social media presence, and a strong presence in the Cambridge Bay community.
  • The focus will increasingly shift to synthesizing and communicating scientific information on the Arctic and Antarctic for the public, students and policy makers, and leveraging collaborations with organizations such as the Canadian Museum of Nature and Canadian Science and Technology Museum Arctic Advisory Committee.
  • Revised maps of the Circumpolar North and Antarctica were produced in March 2016 by Polar Knowledge Canada and Natural Resources Canada's Atlas of Canada and Polar Continental Shelf programs, in collaboration with Global Affairs Canada and the British Antarctic Survey.
  • Capacity building activities focused on launching the Cambridge Bay staffing and summer student hiring initiatives, continuing to support learning through programs such as the Northern Scientific Training Program (NSTP), hosting workshops (e.g., ocean/climate nexus in the Arctic, upcoming Canadian Antarctic Research Workshop at the Canadian Museum of Nature), and targeting support to groups such as the Canadian chapter of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
0 0 1,204,015 1,088,049 1,088,049

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents FTEs)

2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
0 6 6

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's science and technology programming and policies are improved by polar science and technology knowledge and the incorporation of indigenous and local knowledge Percentage of projects directly linked to domestic and international investment of Arctic programming and policies 100% To be determined

Canadian Polar Commission

Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge

Program: Research Facilitation and Communication

Description
This Strategic Outcome creates the conditions for Canada to acquire the wide range of information needed for effective policy and research program development in the polar regions, and to maintain Canada's position as a leading polar nation. The Canadian Polar Commission is Canada's primary polar knowledge agency. It maintains and builds active knowledge networks, synthesizes polar knowledge to identify opportunities, issues and trends, and communicates polar knowledge.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

  • When the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act came into force on June 1, 2015, the Commission’s mandate and functions merged with those of Polar Knowledge Canada. This report covers the two months of April-May 2015.
  • A significant portion of the Commission’s effort, working in partnership with Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, was devoted to establishing the new Polar Knowledge Canada organization. Supported by a clear vision and direction from the Board of Directors, this required meticulous planning and preparation to ensure the new POLAR organization would strengthen Canada’s position as an international leader in polar science and technology.
  • The Commission continued to foster partnerships with national research organizations in other polar nations, and through the Commission’s work with the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR).
  • The Commission continued to build the profile of polar knowledge through its social media channels, the Polar Knowledge App, the Polar Blog, and the release of a Report on the State of Environmental Monitoring in Northern Canada and accompanying meta-dataset, to assist decision-makers in identifying gaps and opportunities to coordinate monitoring.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
2,574,085 2,574,085 1,287,927 1,287,927 (1,286,158)

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents FTEs)

2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
0 19 10

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The Commission facilitates Canada fully embracing its place as a polar nation. Polar knowledge networks are maintained, broadened and strengthened. Northern and southern-based polar research institutions exchange knowledge and collaborate as active members of polar research networks.
  • Support to the Canadian Network of Northern Research Operators (CNNRO)
  • Participated in annual Arctic Science Summit Week (ASSW) in Toyama, Japan in April 2015
Canadian Arctic and Antarctic experts contribute to global knowledge creation and dissemination through engagement in international research co-ordination mechanisms and related working groups and subcommittees.
  • Continued liaison with polar research institutions in other countries (e.g., Korea, Japan)
  • Partnered in knowledge-sharing events and conferences
  • Participated and supported IASC and SCAR
  • Continued work on strategy to establish a Canadian Antarctic research program
  • Participated in the 2015 Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting
Priority polar issue analysis and synthesis products used by target audiences. Development of products that provide analysis and synthesis of priority issues related to polar knowledge, such as the analysis of environmental monitoring sites in Canada (2014–2015) and the monitoring results bulletin.
  • Released a report on the State of Environmental Monitoring in Northern Canada and accompanying meta-dataset
  • The State of Knowledge in Northern Canada report was submitted as one of Canada’s contributions to the Third International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP III) in April 2015
  • Piloted SAON Canada Results Bulletins to communicate results of monitoring and links to policy
Promotion and distribution of these products.
  • Continued to inform policy decisions by participating in meetings and conferences as a follow-up to the Commission’s State of Northern Knowledge in Canada Report and State of Environmental Monitoring in Northern Canada Report
The wide variety of communications channels through which the Canadian Polar Commission disseminates polar knowledge to Canadians are maintained and strengthened. The Canadian Polar Commission website, other partners' websites, social media channels, the Polar Knowledge App, and its Polar Blog partnership reach larger number of Canadians and maximize their awareness of polar issues.
  • Maintained the Canadian Polar Commission web site
  • Updated content on the Polar Knowledge App
  • Produced Polar Blog in partnership with Canadian Geographic Magazine
  • Prepared regular updates on social media

Internal Services

Description
Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

  • A key focus of POLAR during 2015-2016 was on developing internal capacity in terms of staff, processes and systems, and putting into place the corporate structures. This entailed:
    • Preparing strategic and business plans with a three-year horizon and detailed work plans for the upcoming fiscal year 2016-2017.
    • Designing the organizational structure, preparing work descriptions for all positions, developing human resources and staffing plans and the initial staffing of positions on a permanent basis, for example, administrative and human resources support, project manager for grants and contribution programs, financial specialist, etc.
    • Launch of a Canada-wide staffing process in December 2015 for a range of positions in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, in office support, environmental science and technology, research and technical support; this required extensive preparatory work to develop the staffing and assessment tools and review and screen applications.
  • New corporate processes were established as part of the POLAR start-up, in particular:
    • Financial management processes for budgeting, forecasting and reporting, to support internal planning and decision-making, meet external financial reporting requirements, and ensure adequate financial controls are in place.
    • Travel policies and processes for seeking approval of travel, processing travel claims and ensuring cost-effective and consistent travel practices.
    • Security framework, policies and procedures, including personnel security through an MOU with INAC, to mitigate security risks, ensure compliance with the Policy on Government Security, and ensure the security of information.
    • Grants and contributions (G&C) policies and processes to enable a smooth and continued delivery of grants and contributions programs, the future timely support of research projects, and the launch of new grants and contribution programs, all in accordance with government-wide standards; during 2015-2016, this entailed designing the G&C delivery model, and developing processes and tools, operating procedures, roles and responsibilities, and training and communications programs.
  • POLAR established the information technology infrastructure with the support of Shared Services Canada and Public Services and Procurement Canada. This involved:
    • Assessing technology needs and requirements at the Cambridge Bay and Ottawa sites.
    • Determining telecommunications support required, updating the asset inventory and reviewing the contracting arrangements in place.
    • Developing and updating the Intranet web site.
    • Implementing the Phoenix pay system (March 2016).
  • Facilities were and will remain a key priority:
    • POLAR worked in collaboration with INAC to prepare for the transfer of the CHARS facilities in Cambridge Bay to POLAR in 2017 and ensure POLAR readiness in terms of legal authorities, occupancy agreements, operating procedures, occupational health and safety, competencies, etc.
    • At present most Polar Knowledge Canada staff are located at temporary offices in Ottawa, but as housing becomes available, staff will be increasingly based in Cambridge Bay. In the meantime, plans were made during 2015-2016 to consolidate office space in Ottawa.
  • Ensuring a healthy workplace and work environment as part of the new organization:
    • A strong focus was put on team building, wellness, ensuring work-life balance, mental health, and access to Employee Assistance Programs (EAP) through Health Canada.
    • Developing and adapting values and ethics to the POLAR scientific environment, and engaging staff in the development of these values through staff retreats and workshops.
    • Meeting employment equity and official language targets.
  • A number of challenges remain, namely: developing the expertise to operate in the North as common or standard delivery practices for functions such as human resources, facilities management, health and safety, etc., are often not suitable in the unique northern context; attracting and retaining corporate staff at Cambridge Bay; and as is typical of other small agencies, keeping up-to-date with changes to the Treasury Board government-wide policy suite given staff carry out multiple functions.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
0 0 1,953,166 1,806,742 1,806,742

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents FTEs)

2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
0 8 8

Section IV: Supplementary Information

Supplementary Information Tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the POLAR’svii website.

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Federal Tax Expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Report of Federal Tax Expendituresviii. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational Contact Information

POLAR’s Ottawa Office
2nd floor
170 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, ON, K1P 5V5
Canada

POLAR’s Science and Technology Program Interim Office
360 Albert Street, 17th floor
Ottawa, ON, K1R 7X7
Tel.: (613) 943-8605

David J. Scott, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer
Tel. (613) 943-8605
Email : info@polar.gc.ca   

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation (crédit): Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires): Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report (rapport ministériel sur le rendement): Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

Full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein): A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes (résultats du gouvernement du Canada): A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats): A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

Non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires): Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement): What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement): A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement): The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues): For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans (plan): The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities (priorité): Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program (programme): A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes): A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities (rapport sur les plans et les priorités): Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

results (résultat): An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives): Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique): A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé): A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible): A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées): Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Whole-of-government framework (cadre pangouvernemental): Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Endnotes


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