Introduction

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In the spirit of reconciliation, as public servants we honour Indigenous Peoples and respect the traditional lands on which we work across Canada. We lift up the work of Indigenous public servants who have chosen the path of working for the Crown. We acknowledge our partnerships with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities and their critical importance in our work to support the Government’s agenda.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Clerk Michael Wernick

The Public Service of Canada is a strong and proud institution. We are recognized internationally as being one of the most effective public services. There are many accomplishments to be proud of—from the Government of Canada’s financial statements receiving clean, unqualified audits for 20 years in a row to being ranked first in the world on the 2018 Open Data Barometer. Our skill and resilience in responding to natural disasters and other emergencies are things that Canadians can depend on.

To provide the best service to Canadians and support the Government, we are responsive to feedback and criticism. And, like any other world-leading institution, we are constantly renewing ourselves.

One important instrument in advancing renewal has been these annual reports. Back in 1990, then-Clerk of the Privy Council Paul Tellier released a paper, Public Service 2000: The Renewal of the Public Service of Canada. It examined ways to renew the Public Service to help Canada meet the challenges ahead. A key recommendation was an annual report by the Clerk of the Privy Council “on the state of the Public Service.”

Twenty-six reports later, the Federal Public Service has undergone significant change—see Annex: Transforming our services over the years for more details. We have embraced the rise of the Internet and digital platforms, responded to waves of economic and fiscal change, and welcomed thousands of new public servants from different generations, who bring with them new ideas and energy.

The bedrock that underlies and enables all these changes is that of our shared values, which guide us and ultimately contribute to public confidence in the integrity of the Canadian Public Service.

In 2013, we launched Blueprint 2020. Public servants in Canada and around the world brought their ideas, energy, and passion to drive us towards a vision for a “world-class Public Service equipped to serve Canada and Canadians now and into the future.”

This is a solid foundation on which to build—but we cannot stand still. Looking Beyond2020, our Public Service must collaborate by default, adopt agile approaches to how we work, and draw in all kinds of voices to help shape our ideas, directions, and decisions. This report is really the 26th chapter in the Federal Public Service’s ongoing renewal story. It explains how we are building a more agile, better equipped, and fundamentally more inclusive Public Service.

 
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