2016-2017 - Departmental Results Report (DRR) - Privy Council Office

[ PDF version ] 


Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication

Canada. Privy Council Office
Departmental Results Report 2016–17.

Annual.
Title in French: Rapport sur les résultats ministériels 2016-2017. 
Available also on the Internet: www.canada.ca/en/privy-council.html
CP1-18E-PDF
ISSN: 2560-9599

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2017.



Prime Minister’s message

I am happy to present the 2016-17 Departmental Results Report. 

Over the last year, the Government of Canada has taken great strides to deliver on its mandate to grow the middle class, promote sustainable economic growth, and position Canada as a leader on the international stage. This work would not have been possible without the advice and support of the Privy Council Office.

Since forming government, we have raised taxes on the wealthiest one per cent so we could cut taxes for the middle class. We have put more money in the pockets of nine out of ten families through the Canada Child Benefit, and strengthened the Canada Pension Plan so more Canadians can achieve a strong, secure, and stable retirement.

To help Canadians prepare for the jobs of today and tomorrow, we have boosted investment in skills and training and introduced an ambitious Innovation and Skills Plan. Our plan includes measures that will benefit everyone, from students looking to get work experience, to adult workers juggling the costs of returning to school, to unemployed or underemployed people hoping to improve their skills.





We continue to collaborate with provinces and territories to make our communities even better places to work and live. Together, we have taken action to improve, modernize, and expand public transit, and create high-quality early learning and child care services, across the country. We will continue to move forward together with provinces and territories in a spirit of partnership and cooperation. 

We have also taken historic steps as we map the way forward to a nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, and government-to-government relationship with Indigenous Peoples. These steps include significant investments to provide affordable housing for Indigenous people, and ensure First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities get the services and opportunities they need.

Now, more than ever, we are committed to providing leadership on climate change. We know that the environment and economy are inextricably linked, and will continue to fight climate change, build a clean growth economy, and protect our clean air and water for generations to come.

At home and abroad, we continue to promote the rights of women and girls. We recently launched Canada’s new Feminist International Assistance Policy, which focuses Canada’s international assistance on the empowerment of women and girls, and positions Canada as a leader on gender equality in aid programming.

We also unveiled Canada’s new defence policy, which establishes a credible, realistic, and funded strategy for our military and, most importantly, will deliver the standard of service and care our women and men in uniform deserve.

We have worked hard to promote economic growth that benefits the middle class, including through our trade agreements. In September, the provisional application of our Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the European Union came into effect. CETA gives consumers more choice, makes it easier and less costly for businesses to compete, and creates good, middle class jobs on both sides of the Atlantic.

This year, we celebrated the 150th anniversary of Confederation. Together, we reflected on our past and present, and our shared hopes and aspirations for the future. We are proud to call Canada home – a country that is both united and diverse, and made stronger through our differences.

The Government of Canada and the Public Service, including the Privy Council Office, share a commitment to deliver real results, and open, transparent, and professional government to Canadians.

I thank the Privy Council and the entire Public Service for their hard work and dedication over the past year. Together, we will continue to strengthen the middle class today, while building a better, more sustainable future for our children and grandchildren.


The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau
Prime Minister of Canada

Results at a glance

This is the first full fiscal year of support by the Privy Council Office (PCO) to the 23rd Prime Minister and 29th Canadian ministry. Highlights of the results achieved include:

  • Providing non-partisan advice to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, Cabinet and Cabinet committees on matters of national and international importance. PCO’s advice and support helped shape the Prime Minister’s meetings with First Ministers and national Indigenous organizations, and Canada’s response to the Alberta wildfires. PCO supported Canada’s global engagement—strengthening economic ties with global partners (e.g. China and the European Union), positioning Canada as open to trade and investment, and increasing Canada’s profile as a responsible partner on global matters, including climate resilience and security. PCO implemented a process to select the Prime Minister’s Youth Council and elicit their views. The government introduced legislation to enhance the integrity of elections and make political fundraising more open and transparent.  PCO delivered analysis on the protection of Canada’s democracy from cyber threats and the Senate appointments process was reformed leading to the creation of the Independent Advisory Board on Senate Appointments. The government adopted a more rigorous approach to open, transparent and merit-based selection processes which helped ensure that high-quality candidates, reflective of Canada’s diversity, are recommended by ministers to fill vacancies on commissions, boards, crown corporations, agencies and tribunals across the country.
  • Supporting the smooth functioning of the Cabinet decision-making process and facilitating the implementation of the Government’s agenda. PCO supported the functioning of Cabinet committees, which oversee implementation of the Government’s priorities, including assisting ministers in considering several hundred submissions. PCO made recommendations to improve the processes of Cabinet by supporting paper reduction through the E-cabinet pilot. PCO also provided advice and support to modernize processes related to Standing Orders in the House of Commons.
  • Fostering a high-performing and accountable Public Service. PCO supported efforts to build a professional public service by facilitating the recruitment and retention of highly qualified personnel, establishing plans to ensure the leadership development of senior public servants, and coordinating PCO’s analysis on various matters through deputy-minister level committees (including youth engagement).  PCO also took steps to improve employee health and wellness, and to ensure healthy workplaces.
  • Actual spending: $154,240,941.

Actual full‑time equivalents: 946

For more information on the department’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the section of this report entitled, “Results: what we achieved.”

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

PCO supports the development of the Government of Canada's policy and legislative agendas, coordinates responses to issues facing the Government and the country, and supports the effective operation of Cabinet. PCO is led by the Clerk of the Privy Council. In addition to serving as the Deputy Head for PCO, the Clerk also acts as Secretary to the Cabinet and the Head of the Public Service.

Mandate and role

PCO’s mandate is to serve Canada and Canadians by providing professional, non-partisan advice and support to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, and Cabinet.

PCO has three main roles:

  1. Provide non-partisan advice to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, Cabinet and Cabinet committees on matters of national and international importance.
  2. Support the smooth functioning of the Cabinet decision-making process and facilitate the implementation of the Government’s agenda.
  3. Foster a high-performing and accountable Public Service.

For more general information about PCO, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.i

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

PCO is responsible for logistical support to Cabinet, coordination of Cabinet committees, shaping government policy and ensuring that Cabinet decisions are properly implemented. The domestic and international contexts continued to change throughout the year. Domestic and global economic and political trends drove the fast-paced work environment, and demanded strong, precise and thorough responses to emerging issues. PCO maintained a vigorous pace of work, providing advice in a timely manner and responding effectively and quickly to issues and policy challenges facing the Government as circumstances evolved. PCO provided insightful and coordinated advice following the elections in the United States, setting the stage for the Prime Minister and the Government of Canada to develop good quality relations with the new Administration.

As the organization supporting the Clerk in his role as the Head of the Public Service, PCO leads an impartial, merit-based Public Service that provides continuity from one government to the next. The Clerk sets the priorities for the Public Service as a whole to deliver the Government’s agenda, and works with senior leadership to ensure that the Public Service has the policy, management and human resources capacity it needs to deliver that agenda. High-quality programs and services to and for Canadians are designed and delivered in a manner that is consistent with Public Service values and ethics.

PCO effectively delivered on its roles and responsibilities in 2016-17 by:

  • Providing timely, sound, evidence-based, non-partisan and impartial advice and support;
  • Responding with agility to issues that arise on a daily basis;
  • Working in partnership with other departments and agencies to serve the Government; and
  • Striving for professional excellence.

Key Risks

Risk
Risk Response Strategy
Link to Organization’s Programs
Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities
Risks to the Policy and Legislative Agendas
  • effectively monitored and responded to domestic and international events and developments that could affect Canada’s interests.
  • ensured coordination occurred with other federal departments and other partners in support of Canada’s response to emerging issues.
Program 1.1
Program 1.2
Program 1.3
Program 1.4
Priority 1: Support the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers in advancing the Government’s priorities and delivering results for Canadians.

Priority 2: Support the deliberations of Cabinet and its committees on key policy initiatives, coordinate policy planning and provide non-partisan advice.
Risks to Information Technology Infrastructure
  • advanced PCO email modernization and enhancements (not related to ETI – email@canada.ca).
  • enhanced client-focused change management through enhancements to end user and client support services.
  • strengthened secure network connectivity by improving PCO’s security postures and implementing upgrades to mobile device services.
Program 1.1
Program 1.2
Program 1.3
Program 1.4
Internal Services
Priority 1: Support the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers in advancing the Government’s priorities and delivering results for Canadians.

Priority 2: Support the deliberations of Cabinet and its committees on key policy initiatives, coordinate policy planning and provide non-partisan advice.

Priority 3: Strengthen PCO’s internal management practices.
Risks to Security and Emergency Management
  • continued to mature business continuity planning at PCO, improved security awareness through issuance of regular InfoBulletins, Security Tips, and security related emails and messages, and developed the Crisis Management Plan to harmonize and coordinate actions to maintain operations during incidents.
  • maintained a priority on ensuring coordinated responses within PCO and the Office of the Prime Minister to incidents and crises.
Program 1.1
Program 1.2
Program 1.3
Program 1.4
Internal Services
Priority 1: Support the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers in advancing the Government’s priorities and delivering results for Canadians.

Priority 2: Support the deliberations of Cabinet and its committees on key policy initiatives, coordinate policy planning and provide non-partisan advice.

Results: what we achieved

Programs

1.1: Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers

Description

PCO provides professional, non-partisan advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers on the full spectrum of issues they address. PCO also provides advice and support on: the structure and organization of government; government-wide communications; Governor in Council appointments; the development and implementation of parliamentary and legislative programs; the reform of democratic institutions; intergovernmental relations; and legal issues. In addition, PCO provides administrative advice and support pertaining to the budgets of the Prime Minister’s Office and those of the offices of portfolio ministers.

Results

PCO provided advice and support in assessing implementation, progress and outcomes of priority initiatives and commitments as set out in the 2015 Speech from the Throne.

Issues, policies, machinery, communications and appointments

PCO delivered timely advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers on a wide range of issues related to the delivery of the Government’s agenda. The Government’s policies and decisions on social issues including immigration, open and transparent government, the environment, gender and diversity were shaped with advice and support from PCO. Inclusive economic growth, innovation, trade, infrastructure, employment and sustainable development were among the economic matters on which PCO provided analysis and advice. Swift, timely action and coordination by PCO ensured that the Government effectively addressed emerging domestic issues, including natural disasters, fires and floods.

PCO advised the Prime Minister, as Minister of Youth, on engaging young Canadians in consultations on government initiatives on such diverse topics as accessibility legislation, climate change and Budget 2016. PCO managed the process that established the Prime Minister’s Youth Council and supported two in-person meetings between the Prime Minister and the Council members in 2016-17.

Progress on the Government’s priority to strengthen relationships with Indigenous Canadians was realized through strategies, synthesized analysis, support and coordination from PCO. In February 2017, the Prime Minister announced the creation of a Working Group of Ministers to review laws and policies related to Indigenous Peoples.

The Prime Minister and portfolio ministers received policy and procedural advice to support their attendance at meetings of the Cabinet and its committees, appearances before parliamentary committees, stakeholder meetings, engagement with provincial and territorial governments, the development of products for Question Period and communications with Canadians.

PCO managed and oversaw the open, transparent and merit-based selection processes for Government of Canada appointments. Almost 12,000 applications from the public were processed. With advice and coordinated support from PCO, 429 Governor in Council appointments were made in 2016-17. Of these, 123 were made following open, transparent and merit-based selection processes. The remaining were either short-term, transitional appointments to ensure continuity of government operations, or made through other processes, such as those involving other levels of government.   

In June 2016, PCO developed and implemented a new application website to allow Canadians to apply directly for vacant Senate positions. More than 2,700 applications were received. PCO supported the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments in its work to provide recommendations to the Prime Minister, which resulted in the appointment of 20 independent senators in the summer 2016 cycle.

PCO’s strategic advice and operational support were instrumental in the coordination and prioritization of federal efforts to improve Canada’s strategic engagement and capacity to attract, secure and retain global investment to further the Government’s economic growth objectives.

International affairs and national security

PCO’s advice and support focused on international engagements, taking into account the impact of changes in leadership of key states, and their impacts on Canada’s global interests and security. Notable issues included changes in the United States Administration, the successful release of two Canadian citizens being detained in foreign countries, and the launch of Canada’s bid for a seat on the United Nations Security Council.

The Council for the Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders was launched by Prime Minister Trudeau and President Trump on February 13, 2017 to assist in the removal of barriers to women’s economic participation and to support women’s advancement in the business community, through sharing of opportunities and best practices.

Trade policy advice was provided to facilitate the approval of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement. As a result, Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement was approved and awaits full ratification.

Intergovernmental Affairs

The December 2016 First Ministers’ Meeting included Indigenous leaders and resulted in the adoption of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. PCO supported the conclusion of bilateral agreements with provinces and territories to provide new targeted federal funding over 10 years for investments in home care and mental health care. Advice and support resulted in the formation of the Atlantic Growth Leadership Committee and the Atlantic Growth Advisory Group. In the context of the Atlantic Growth Strategy, PCO worked with all four Atlantic provinces, as well as multiple federal institutions, to provide support and build momentum towards stronger Atlantic economic growth.

Legislation, parliamentary issues and democratic reform

PCO provided support to the Minister of Democratic Institutions in leading a national dialogue on the future of Canada’s democracy. The Government introduced Bill C-33 in November 2016, which proposes seven measures to increase participation and enhance the integrity of elections at the federal level in Canada. PCO also supported the Minister in introducing, in May 2017, Bill C-50 which proposes measures to make political fundraising events more open and transparent, as part of ongoing efforts to restore Canadians’ trust and participation in our democratic processes.

Offices of the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers

PCO delivered appropriate resources and support services in a timely manner to the Office of the Prime Minister and the offices of portfolio ministers. This included effective management of inbound and outbound written and telephone communications for the Office of the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers. As well, PCO provided the Prime Minister with policy and machinery of government advice and portfolio ministers with policy and procedural advice. It also supported their attendance at meetings of the Cabinet and its committees, appearances before parliamentary committees, stakeholder meetings, engagement with provincial and territorial governments, the development of products for Question Period and communications with Canadians.

For more information on this program and how PCO supported the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers in 2016–17, please visit the PCO website.

Results achieved

Expected results
Performance indicators
Target
Date to achieve target
2016-17 Actual results
2015-16 Actual results
2014-15 Actual results
PCO advice enables the Government to achieve its legislative, policy and management agendas. The Prime Minister and portfolio ministers are fully supported in carrying out their respective responsibilities. Target not applicable to indicators pertaining to the policy function. March 31, 2017 Effective, timely, high-quality advice, support and coordination from PCO ensured that the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers were fully able to carry out their respective responsibilities.



Almost 12,000 applications processed and 429 Governor in Council appointments made in 2016-17.

Key priorities of the Government (e.g., Indigenous relations, International Engagement, the Middle Class, and Diversity and Inclusion) advanced. Royal Assent was given to 14 bills, and 35 bills were introduced in Parliament.
PCO provided the Government with effective, high-quality, advice and support to ensure that the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers were fully able to carry out their respective responsibilities.



403 Governor in Council appointments in 2015-16.

PCO delivered advice and supported and coordinated on: the legislative, policy and government administration agendas of two prime ministers in fiscal year 2015–16; the government-wide transition exercise for the October 2015 federal election, e.g. briefing the new Prime Minister.
PCO provided the Government with effective, high-quality advice and support to ensure that the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers were fully able to carry out their respective responsibilities.

599 Governor in Council appointments in 2014-15.

PCO successfully provided advice and support that enabled the government-wide implementation of Budget 2014, and the extent of legislation that received Royal Assent in Parliament.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
available for use
2016–17
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
64,933,100
66,239,718
79,702,173
72,402,148
6,162,430
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
518
524
6

Information on PCO’s lower-level programs is available in the annex on the departmental website and in the TBS InfoBase.ii

1.2: Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees

Description

PCO supports the efficient and effective functioning of Cabinet and Cabinet committees on a day-to-day basis. As part of this work, PCO coordinates departmental policy, legislative and government administration proposals going to Cabinet and its committees; performs a challenge function during the policy development process; and prepares briefing materials and accompanying policy analyses to facilitate Cabinet’s decision-making process. PCO also provides a secretariat function for Cabinet and its committees, which includes scheduling and support services for meetings, as well as preparation and distribution of Cabinet documents. In addition, PCO supports effective policy integration across the federal government so that proposals take into account the full range of departmental and Public Service-wide perspectives and issues related to implementation, such as communications, parliamentary affairs, intergovernmental relations and budget impacts.

Results
Operation of Cabinet committees

PCO supported the work of Cabinet, eleven Cabinet committees, one ad hoc Cabinet committee and one working group of Ministers to assist Ministers in the consideration of submissions during the 2016-17 fiscal year. In all, 166 Cabinet and Cabinet committee meetings (including Cabinet retreats) were held; almost 597 Cabinet documents issued, including Memoranda to Cabinet and presentations; and Ministers and officials spent approximately 300 hours in committee. In fulfilling this function, PCO successfully played a policy challenge function to departments and provided high quality logistical support to ensure the efficient and effective functioning of the Cabinet committee system. PCO also supported the seamless implementation of periodic changes to the ministry and the composition of Cabinet committees during this time.

Integration across the federal government

PCO’s advice, support and coordination contributed to successful Deputy Minister level retreats that ensured an integrated approach to the Government’s agenda and major initiatives across departments. PCO facilitated regular Deputy Ministers’ Breakfast meetings and Deputy Minister and Clerk meetings. PCO also coordinated meetings of the Committee of Deputy Ministers.

For more information on this program and how PCO supported Cabinet and Cabinet committees in 2016–17, please visit the PCO website.

Results achieved

Expected results
Performance indicators
Target
Date to achieve target
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
The functioning and integrity of the Cabinet decision- making process are maintained.
Cabinet and Cabinet committees are provided with timely support to enable decision-making.
  • Number of meetings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees.
  • Number of Cabinet documents produced.
Target not applicable to indicators pertaining to policy function.
March 31, 2017
PCO provided timely support to enable decision making at Cabinet and Cabinet committees.
  • 166 meetings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees were organized and supported.
  • 597 Cabinet documents were produced.





A total of 109 meetings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees were organized.





A total of 130 meetings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees were organized.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
available for use
2016–17
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
13,876,838
13,876,838
14,758,790
12,816,810
(1,060,028)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
108
102
(6)

Information on PCO’s lower-level programs is available on the departmental website and in the TBS InfoBase.iii

1.3: Public Service leadership and direction

Description

PCO supports the development and maintenance of a high-quality Public Service that meets the highest standards of accountability, transparency and efficiency. As part of this work, PCO provides advice to the Clerk of the Privy Council and the Prime Minister on the renewal of the Public Service and government operations in order to position the Public Service workforce and workplace of the future as more adaptable, innovative and streamlined. PCO also supports the human resources management of senior leaders across the government, including performance management and leadership development.

Results
Public Service Renewal

The Public Service that supports the government today is highly complex. The public service has grown from about 5,000 public servants in 1918 – the year a new Civil Service Act was passed – to just over 259,000 today.

Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017, PCO supported the Clerk and Deputy Clerk’s engagement with public servants across Canada to discuss ongoing efforts to renew the Public Service. This included appearances at large scale events organized by PCO such as the Third Annual Blueprint 2020 Innovation Fair, as well as more than 30 events providing opportunities for exchanges with over 14,000 public servants in a wide range of departments, organizations and horizontal communities across all regions of Canada. The Clerk broadened his methods of engaging with public servants by increasing his presence on social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook.

PCO also supported the Clerk in his efforts to advance key renewal issues like mental health, diversity and inclusion. For example, to help gauge how efforts to build a healthy and respectful work environment are being felt by employees, the Clerk struck a Mental Health Contact Group comprising a cross-section of public servants from a variety of organizations to discuss mental health topics. In addition, the Clerk’s Table on Diversity and Inclusion was created to provide the Clerk with expertise and advice from outside the Public Service on how to increase representation and institute a meaningful culture of inclusion. 

The Deputy Minister Network on Public Service Renewal was struck to maintain Deputy Minister-level leadership and focus on the renewal agenda. This group replaced the Blue Print 2020 individual Deputy Minister-champion role and is designed to draw on the champions of communities, recognized as key to renewal (e.g. employment equity and diversity, youth, managers, internal services, HR, learning, results). This helps to promote an integrated and coherent approach to public service renewal that leverages and aligns existing actions and momentum for change. Similarly, the Board of Management continued to provide senior leadership to strategically guide the Public Service renewal agenda, and advanced work to renew Public Service capabilities needed to more effectively deliver on the Government’s agenda.

PCO led the development of the Twenty Fourth Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada, which provided highlights of work carried out by public servants over the fiscal year 2016-17 in helping to deliver the Government’s mandate. The Report also highlighted work underway to create a healthy and productive workforce and to improve the capabilities of the Public Service to better serve Government and Canadians, while providing an overview of 150 years of the Public Service. The Annual Report website was visited 43,341 times, which represents a 150% increase over last year.

Management of senior leaders

In 2016-17, in part to address succession planning for senior executives, there were 39 appointments made to and within the deputy minister ranks of the Public Service, including 21 new appointments to the deputy minister community and the movement of 18 existing deputy ministers. In support of learning and development of this community, PCO oversaw the development of a new orientation program for Heads of Agencies and Administrative Tribunals which will be delivered for the first time in 2017-18.  PCO participated in sessions with the Canada School of Public Service for Directors of crown corporations and Deputy Ministers and Associate Deputy Ministers. PCO also administered a one-on-one orientation program to provide personalized briefings to senior leaders, in partnership with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

PCO supported the timely completion of the Performance Management Program for all eligible Governor in Council appointees in 2016-17. PCO also supported as part of effective succession planning the completion of the Talent Management Program for both assistant and associate deputy ministers during 2016-17. Designed to assess the potential of individuals for suitability for future appointments, this Talent Management Program served to minimize vacancies in senior leader positions and assess the performance of leaders in order to identify opportunities for improvement.

PCO supported the Clerk of the Privy Council in identifying the membership of all deputy minister-level committees. PCO also acted as the Secretariat for the Committee of Senior Officials and Board of Management and Review.

For more information on this program and how PCO delivered Public Service leadership and direction in 2016-17, please visit the PCO website.

Results achieved

Expected results
Performance indicators
Target
Date to achieve target
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
The Public Service has the talent, capacity and management frameworks to provide advice on and implement the Government’s agenda.
The Public Service is engaged in renewal and business transformation activities, which advance the vision of the Public Service set out in Blueprint 2020.
Targets are not applicable to indicators pertaining to the policy function.
March 31, 2017
The Clerk delivered the Twenty-fourth Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada.

Annual Report website was visited 43,341 times, which represents a 150% increase over last year.

PCO supported the Clerk and the Deputy Clerk in extensive engagement events on renewal reaching over 14,000 employees.

Over 2,100 employees from 70 federal organizations participated in the 2016 Innovation Fair.

The Clerk created the Mental Health Contact Group and the Clerk’s Table on Diversity and Inclusion to seek advice on advancing key priority issues.
Public Service engagement in renewal and business transformation activities was reported in the Clerk’s Twenty-Third Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada.

PCO supported the Clerk and the Deputy Clerk in extensive engagement events on renewal and transformation.

The Blueprint 2020 National Secretariat was integrated into PCO in July 2015. PCO advised on activities aimed at engaging public servants (e.g., first inter-departmental innovation fair, weekly calls by the Champion for Blueprint 2020).
Public Service engagement in renewal and business transformation activities was reported in the Clerk’s Twenty-Second Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada.

Public servants participated in activities in support of Blueprint 2020.

The Central Innovation Hub, launched in 2014-15, was created at PCO under the leadership of the Clerk.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
available for use
2016–17
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
4,674,197
4,674,197
4,644,710
4,104,309
(569,888)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
31
33
2

Information on PCO’s lower-level programs is available on the departmental website and in the TBS InfoBase.iv

1.4: Commissions of inquiry

Description

PCO provides commissions of inquiry with financial and administrative support. As part of this work, PCO can, when necessary, provide ongoing administrative advice and support in the following areas: staffing; acquisition services; contracting; financial services; access to funding; records management; payroll support; publishing information online; translation; legal services; security; and systems support.

Results

Since its launch in September 2016, the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls has received corporate services support from PCO to enable the Commission to fulfill its mandate to examine and report on the systemic causes of all forms of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada. The National Inquiry is authorized to act independently and has the authority to determine how best to accomplish its mandate while maintaining compliance with the Financial Administration Act and applicable Treasury Board policies. In 2016-17, as the National Inquiry progressed with its purpose, the demand for support rose accordingly, and PCO successfully responded to the expected rise in financial, administrative and human resources support requirements. 

Results achieved

Expected results
Performance indicators
Target
Date to achieve target
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
Commissions of inquiry receive required resources as well as advice and guidance on financial and administrative matters.
Commissions of inquiry have received appropriate resources as well as the necessary services, advice and guidance in a timely manner.
Targets are not applicable to indicators pertaining to the policy function.
March 31, 2017 (or upon completion of the mandate of the Commission).
The Clerk delivered the PCO provided financial, procurement, human resources and administrative support for the Inquiry’s activities. Guidance has also been provided on a regular basis.

The Commission has received appropriate resources.
Not Applicable.Ŧ
Not Applicable.Ŧ

Ŧ No commissions of inquiry were planned or undertaken during the fiscal year.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
available for use
2016–17
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
0
0
0
3,105,893
3,105,893
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
0
0
12

Information on PCO’s lower-level programs is available on the departmental website and in the TBS InfoBase.v

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Results

Progress continued with the implementation of PCO’s initiatives on People Management, Innovative Practices and Networking, and Technology. PCO undertook the following key initiatives in 2016–17:

  • PCO’s Sustainable Framework for Mental Health in the Workplace and corresponding Action Plan were approved and officially launched. In addition to leveraging the efforts of PCO’s Senior Management Champion for Wellness and Mental Health in the Workplace to engage employees, the “Not Myself Today” awareness and education campaign was launched in March 2017, as were various tools, training and support mechanisms for both     employees and managers.

  • PCO carried out a number of enterprise-wide Information Management/Information Technology (IM/IT) projects, including enhancements to end user and client support services, modernizing PCO’s internal email, upgrades to mobile device services, and improvements to PCO’s security IT infrastructure.

  • The new PCO Staffing Policy came into effect April 1, 2016, in compliance with and coincidental with the government-wide implementation of the Public Service Commission’s new Staffing Framework.
  • PCO supported the Government of Canada’s efforts to modernize office accommodation by implementing the Workplace 2.0 standards. The department completed and advanced a number of accommodation projects to modernize and renew its office space. Project goals focused on updating office space to maximize the use of available space, meeting operational requirements and security standards, and increasing the portion of space     allocated to meeting and collaboration spaces.

  • The Crisis Management Plan was developed to harmonize and coordinate actions to maintain continuity of operations during incidents affecting PCO.

  • A number of enhancements significantly improved the security of individuals and infrastructure, including the alignment of security provisions with required standards. To increase security awareness, PCO issued over 35 InfoBulletins, Security Tips, emails and messages.

  • PCO launched the new Prime Minister’s website that improves the Prime Minister’s engagement with Canadians.

  • PCO completed a pilot with the Cabinet Committee on Diversity and Inclusion that allows for meetings to be held in a paperless environment.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities
available for use
2016–17
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
37,200,245
40,865,520
60,703,557
61,811,781
20,946,261
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016-17
Difference (actual minus planned)
297
275
(22)

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Text version
Fiscal year Total Voted Statutory Sunset Programs – Anticipated
2014–15 123,193,655 109,734,217 13,459,438 0
2015–16 123,119,021 109,302,918 13,816,103 0
2016–17 154,240,941 141,450,160 12,790,781 0
2017–18 181,994,357 165,620,159 16,374,198 0
2018–19 155,347,823 139,367,720 15,980,103 0
2019-20 139,444,320 124,251,813 15,192,507 0

Departmental Spending Trend Graph Analysis

The graph above illustrates PCO's spending trend over a six-year period from 2014‑15 to 2019‑20.

Fiscal years 2014‑15 to 2016‑17 reflect the Department’s actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts of Canada. Fiscal years 2017‑18 to 2019‑20 represent the Department’s planned spending.

Spending remained stable at approximately $123 million in fiscal years 2014‑15 and 2015‑16. It then increased by $31.1 million in 2016‑17, resulting in $154.2 million in spending. This is mainly due to increased spending related to continuing Budget 2016 initiatives to enhance PCO’s internal capacity, strengthen security and invest in infrastructure.

The graph shows an overall increase in spending, which peaks at $182.0 million in 2017‑18 and decreases to $139.4 million in 2019‑20.

Variances in the planned spending from 2017‑18 to 2019‑20 are largely attributable to the spending for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, which ends in 2019‑20.

For more information about these variances, please see the analysis provided in the Budgetary Performance Summary section.

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and
Internal
Services
2016-17
Main
Estimates
2016-17
Planned
spending
2017-18
Planned
spending
2018-19
Planned
spending
2016-17
Total
authorities
available for
use
2016-17
Actual
spending
(authorities
used)
2015-16
Actual
spending
(authorities
used)
2014-15
Actual
spending
(authorities
used)
1.1: Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers
64,933,100
66,239,718
76,934,405
76,217,030
79,702,173
72,402,148
64,371,121
63,488,309
1.2: Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees
13,876,838
13,876,838
14,511,298
14,178,919
14,758,790
12,816,810
13,338,225
13,636,584
1.3: Public Service leadership and direction
4,674,197
4,674,197
4,807,034
4,807,244
4,644,710
4,104,309
3,417,213
2,748,542
1.4: Commissions of inquiry
0
0
34,147,019
14,011,332
0
3,105,893
0
0
Subtotal
83,484,135
84,790,753
130,399,756
109,214,525
99,105,673
92,429,160
81,126,559
79,873,435
Internal Services
37,200,245
40,865,520
51,594,601
46,133,298
60,703,557
61,811,781
41,992,462
43,320,220
Total
120,684,380
125,656,273
181,994,357
155,347,823
159,809,230
154,240,941
123,119,021
123,193,655

Variance between 2016-17 Planned Spending ($125,656,273) and 2016-17 Actual Spending ($154,240,941)

PCO’s Actual Spending for fiscal year 2016-17 was $28.6 million higher than its Planned Spending. This is due to additional spending for new priorities announced in Budget 2016, which included the following initiatives:

  • Modernizing the information technology infrastructure to efficiently support activities and improve performance, as well as the implementation of the E-Cabinet initiative;

  • Engagement activities on electoral reform;

  • Investments to update and modernize PCO’s buildings and strengthen PCO’s security;

  • Enhancing PCO’s overall communications approach;

  • Support for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls;

  • The creation of a Results and Delivery Unit to ensure the alignment and tracking of progress of the Government’s priorities and support the Cabinet Committee on Agenda, Results and Communications;

  • The creation of the Youth Secretariat and supporting the Prime Minister’s role as Minister of Youth;

  • An enhanced role to support open, transparent and merit-based selection processes for Governor in Council appointments; and

  • Increased federal government engagement with the provinces and territories, as well as Indigenous people, which included two First Ministers’ Meetings.

These increases are partially offset by the following:

  • Decreased spending due to the winding down of activities for the Office of the Special Advisor on Human Smuggling and the Beyond the Border Action Plan, and the transfer of the Canadian Secretariat to the Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council to the Treasury Board Secretariat;
  • Decreases in contributions to employee benefit plans and salary related costs such as severance and separation pay; and
  • A reduction due to the implementation of the government-wide initiative to reduce spending on professional services, travel and government advertising.

The variance between 2016-17 total authorities available for use ($159,809,230) and 2016-17 actual spending ($154,240,941) resulted in PCO lapsing $5.5 million, which is mainly attributable to:

  • $4.8 million in frozen allotments that lapsed at year end related to the following:
    • $2.0 million for government-wide initiatives such as the back office transformation initiative and the reduction on spending in professional services, travel and government advertising;

    • $1.5 million set aside for future collective bargaining pressures; and

    • $1.3 million for initiatives such as the IM/IT Modernization Project, Electoral Reform, PCO Security, and Advertising;

  • $0.7 million of the remaining lapse was due to expenditures not materializing as planned because of some delays in staffing.

For variance details between PCO’s 2016-17 planned spending and 2016-17 actual spending, by program and sub-program, please refer to PCO’s website.

Human resources

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and
Internal
Services
2014-15
Actual
2015-16
Actual
2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Planned
2017-18
Planned
2018-19
Planned
1.1: Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers
484
461
518
524
540
539
1.2: Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees
102
104
108
102
115
114
1.3: Public Service leadership and direction
17
28
31
33
31
31
1.4: Commissions of inquiry
0
0
0
12
65
43
Subtotal
603
593
657
671
751
727
Internal Services
281
279
297
275
295
295
Total
884
872
954
946
1,046
1,022

Expenditures by vote

For information on PCO’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017.vi

Alignment of spending with the whole-of-government framework

Alignment of 2016-17 actual spending with the whole-of-government frameworkvii (dollars)
Program
Spending area

Government of Canada activity

Date to achieve target
Actual spending

1.1: Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers

Government Affairs

Strong and independent democratic institutions

72,402,148

1.2: Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees

Government Affairs

Strong and independent democratic institutions

12,816,810

1.3: Public Service leadership and direction

Government Affairs

Strong and independent democratic institutions

4,104,309

1.4: Commissions of inquiry

Government Affairs

Strong and independent democratic institutions

3,105,893

Total spending by spending area (dollars)
Spending area
Total planned spending
Total actual spending

Economic affairs

0

0

Social affairs

0

0

International affairs

0

0

Government affairs

84,790,753

92,429,160

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

PCO’s financial statements [unaudited] for the year ended March 31, 2017, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial information
2016–17
Planned results
2016–17
Actual
2015–16
Actual
Difference
(2016–17
actual minus
2016–17 planned)
Difference (2016–17 actual minus
2015–16 actual)

Total expenses

147,406,320

169,929,787

139,930,865

22,523,467

29,998,922

Total revenues

(87,322)

(91,046)

(79,329)

(3,724)

(11,717)

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

147,318,998

169,838,741

139,851,536

22,519,743

29,987,205

The department’s Future-Oriented Statement of Operations can be found on PCO’s website in the Reports and Publications section.

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers:

Difference between 2016–17 Actual and 2015–16 Actual

The Department’s actual net cost of operations before government funding and transfers in 2016‑17 was $29,987K higher than the previous year.

The increase is mainly attributable to Budget 2016 initiatives and to the launch of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

The increase is also attributable to additional spending to update and modernize buildings, and more spending for the Office of the Prime Minister and ministers’ offices. It is also attributable to the increase of the vacation pay liability, which is explained by the fact that vacation pay was not automatically cashed-out on March 31, 2017 and done so only if requested by employees. 

These increases are partially offset by a decrease related to salary costs such as severance and separation pay and a decrease related to temporary initiatives such as the coordination of government-wide communications for Canada’s Economic Action Plan, the Office of the Special Advisor on Human Smuggling, and the Beyond the Border Action Plan. During the year, more costs for informatics and accommodation projects were reallocated from expenses to capital assets as work in progress compared to last year. In addition, there was a decrease in inventory usage costs and the employee benefits plans.

Difference between 2016–17 Actual and 2016–17 Planned Results

The department’s actual net cost of operations before government funding and transfers in 2016–17 was $22,520K more than the planned results for the same fiscal year.

The increase in expenditures is mostly explained by Budget 2016 initiatives and by the launch of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Women and Girls.

This increase is partially offset by a decrease in the employee benefits plan, a decrease related to temporary initiatives, less spending in relation to staff turnover, delays in staffing and other operating costs.

Other offsets include decreases in inventory usage costs, salary costs such as severance and separation pay and spending for the Office of the Prime Minister and ministers’ offices.

Text version
Expenses per Program Activity Amounts %
1.1 Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers $72,707,931 42.79%
1.2 Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees $12,848,952 7.56%
1.3 Public Service leadership and direction $4,159,446 2.45%
1.4 Commisions of inquiry $3,169,790 1.87%
Internal Services $77,043,668 45.34%
Total $169,929,787 100.00%

As illustrated above, departmental expenses in 2016-17 were highly concentrated in two key areas: Program 1.1 (Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers) and Internal Services. Program 1.1 represents 45% of departmental expenses, since it directly supports the central core of PCO’s mandate. Internal Services represents 43% of expenses, since the department operates in a highly centralized and unique environment in which many costs are covered by Corporate Services.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as at March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial Information
2016–17
2015–16
Difference
(2016–17 minus
2015–16)

Total net liabilities

39,988,930

22,267,094

17,721,836

Total net financial assets

30,112,345

12,908,636

17,203,709

Departmental net debt

9,876,585

9,358,458

518,127

Total non-financial assets

12,440,525

6,640,252

5,800,273

Departmental net financial position

2,563,940

(2,718,206)

(5,282,146)

In 2016–17, the department’s net financial position increased by $5,282K from the previous year. The following charts provide more detailed information on the department’s net financial position.

Text version
Liabilities by type Amounts %
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities $29,306,941 73.29%
Vacation pay and compensatory leave $5,878,248 14.70%
Employee future benefits $4,803,741 12.01%
Total $39,988,930 100.00%

In 2016-17, total liabilities increased by $17,722K when compared to 2015-16. This increase is primarily attributable to an overall increase in spending related to continuing Budget 2016 initiatives and includes an increase of $15,849K in accounts payable and accrued liabilities, an increase of $1,492K in vacation pay and compensatory leave, and an increase of $381K in employee future benefits, mostly attributable to the Prime Minister’s staff which has been on strength for the full year in 2017 compared to less than four months in 2016.

Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund represents the net amount of cash that PCO is entitled to draw from the Consolidated Revenue Fund without further authorities to discharge its liabilities.

Text version
Assets by type Amounts %
Accounts receivable and advances $4,796,377 11.27%
Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund $25,316,368 59.49%
Prepaid expenses $759,522 1.78%
Inventory $2,010,609 4.72%
Tangible capital assets $9,669,994 22.72%
Total $42,552,870 100.00%

Total net financial and non-financial assets were $42,553K in 2016-17, which represents an increase of $23,004K compared to 2015-16. This increase is primarily attributable to an increase of $13,921K in Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund which mainly results from an increase of Accounts payable and Accrued liabilities; an increase of $3,849K in tangible capital assets, mainly due to the IM/IT Modernization Project and Workplace 2.0 Accommodation; an increase of $3,282K in Accounts receivable and advances, mostly due to interdepartmental settlements; and an increase of $1,791K in Inventory, representing the purchase of IT equipment to support early delivery in 2017 as part of IM/IT Modernization project.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

Institutional head: Michael Wernick, Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet

Ministerial portfolio: Privy Council Office

Enabling instrument: Order in Council P.C. 1940-1121

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1867

Reporting framework

PCO’s Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2016–17 are shown below.

  1. Strategic Outcome: The Government’s agenda and decision-making are supported and implemented and the institutions of government are supported and maintained.

  2. Program Alignment Architecture

    • 1.1 Program: Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers
      • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: Issues, policies, machinery, communications and appointments
      • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: International affairs and national security
      • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: Intergovernmental affairs
      • 1.1.4 Sub-Program: Legislation, parliamentary issues and democratic reform
      • 1.1.5 Sub-Program: Offices of the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers
    • 1.2 Program: Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees
      • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Operation of Cabinet committees
      • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Integration across the federal government
    • 1.3 Program: Public Service leadership and direction
      • 1.3.1 Sub-Program: Business transformation and Public Service renewal
      • 1.3.2 Sub-Program: Management of senior leaders
    • 1.4 Program: Commissions of inquiry
    • Internal Services

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on PCO’s website.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on PCO’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.viii This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

General Enquiries
Room 1000, 85 Sparks Street
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada
 K1A 0A3

Telephone: (613) 957-5153 (9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST)
TTY: (613) 957-5741
Fax: (613) 957-5043
Email: info@pco-bcp.gc.ca

 

Appendix : definitions

  • appropriation (crédit): Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

  • budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires): Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

  • Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle): An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

  • Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel): Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

  • Departmental Result (résultat ministériel): A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

  • Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel): A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

  • Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats): Consists of the Department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

  • Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels): Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

  • Evaluation (évaluation): In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision-making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.

  • full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein) : A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

  • government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales): For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

  • horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale): An initiative where two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (for example, by Cabinet or a central agency) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

  • Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats): A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

  • non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires): Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

  • performance (rendement): What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

  • performance indicator (indicateur de rendement): A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

  • performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement): The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.

  • planned spending (dépenses prévues): For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

  • plans (plans): The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

  • priorities (priorité) : Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

  • program (programme) : A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

  • Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes) : A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

  • results (résultat): An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

  • statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives): Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

  • Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique): A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

  • sunset program (programme temporisé):: A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

  • target (cible): A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

  • voted expenditures (dépenses votées): Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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