2017–18 Departmental Results Report


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Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication

©Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada (2018)
All rights reserved

All requests for permission to reproduce this document or any part
thereof shall be addressed to the Privy Council Office.

Cette publication est également disponible en français :
Rapport sur les résultats ministériels 2017-2018

CP1-18E-PDF
ISSN : 2560-9599



Prime Minister’s message

I am pleased to present the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report.

This past year, the Privy Council Office continued to play an important role in implementing the Government of Canada’s agenda. From providing advice and supporting Cabinet to coordinating cross-government initiatives, the Privy Council Office helped deliver results on issues that matter most to Canadians.

With the department’s support, we worked to create the type of economic growth that works for everyone, to advance gender equality and women’s empowerment, to tackle climate change, and to narrow persistent socio-economic gaps so that everyone has a real, fair chance at success.

Here at home, we put people first by investing in Canada’s middle class and the people working hard to join it. We introduced the Canada Workers Benefit, lowered taxes for the middle class, and provided more help with the high cost of raising a family, through programs such as the Canada Child Benefit.

We continued to work with provincial and territorial governments to invest in Canada’s infrastructure. When we invest in innovation, public transit, green infrastructure, and social infrastructure like affordable housing, we create good, well-paying middle class jobs and build stronger, healthier communities.


The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

To support Canada’s young people and empower them to make our country an even better place to live, we put in place the Canada Service Corps, and we continue to work toward Canada’s first-ever youth policy. Together, we can make sure that young Canadians get the skills and training they need to succeed.

Internationally, Canada worked closely with partners and supported important initiatives to address some of the world’s most pressing challenges. In support of Canada’s 2018 G7 Presidency, we put forward a progressive agenda focused on finding meaningful solutions that will make a real difference in the lives of people, here at home and abroad. Much of our work on the international stage was driven by our commitment to advance gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls because we believe that they are key to building peace, reducing poverty, and growing economies.

With the signing of the new Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, we will expand Canada’s market access and open the door for Canadian businesses to seize key opportunities in the fast-growing Asia-Pacific region. We will continue to collaborate to achieve progressive trade deals that benefit all Canadians and to stand up for the workers and businesses that are at the heart of our country’s prosperity.

This year, Canada also continued to advance LGBTQ2 rights and call for a world free of stigma, persecution, and discrimination. At home, we recognized and apologized for the historical unjust treatment of Canadians who identify as LGBTQ2, and passed legislation to put into place a process to destroy permanently records of convictions for offences involving consensual sexual activity between same-sex partners that would be lawful today.

We also took further steps to advance meaningful reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples. We launched a review of laws and policies related to Indigenous peoples so that we can best meet constitutional obligations and international commitments to Indigenous peoples. We also announced the development of a Recognition and Implementation of Rights Framework, including the creation of two new departments to replace Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, so we can better serve the distinct priorities of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples.

While calling on Indigenous peoples’ valuable experience and expertise to safeguard our environment, we made one of the most significant investments in nature conservation in Canadian history. Through these investments and the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, we are working to protect Canada’s environment so that our children and grandchildren can enjoy our majestic forests, breathe clean air, and play by our beautiful lakes, rivers, and streams.

The Government of Canada’s agenda for the past year was ambitious, and the Privy Council Office was vital in supporting its implementation and helping us to bring about real change for Canadians.

I would like to thank public servants in the Privy Council Office and across the government for playing an important role to keep our democracy healthy, strengthen our communities, and grow the middle class. Their excellent work and dedication make a difference each day in the lives of Canadians and set an example for public service excellence around the world.

Together, we will continue to build on progress accomplished and create a better future for generations to come as we continue to deliver real results and an open, transparent, and professional government for Canadians.


The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau
Prime Minister of Canada

Results at a glance

In 2017–18, the Privy Council Office (PCO) supported the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, Cabinet and Cabinet committees in delivering key elements of the Government’s mandate.

Providing non-partisan advice to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, Cabinet and Cabinet committees on matters of national and international importance.

PCO provided advice to: advance trade negotiations; develop economic strategies; and coordinate other government departments to develop bilateral agreements with provincial and territorial governments. PCO provided advice and support on establishing a national housing strategy, addressing training and labour standards, and implementing measures to improve immigration and refugee policy. PCO supported reconciliation with Canada’s First Nations and Indigenous Peoples by providing advice and support to the Working Group of Ministers on the Review of Laws and Policies Related to Indigenous Peoples. In addition, PCO assisted in creating two new departments to improve services to Indigenous Peoples. PCO continued to provide administrative advice and support to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Supporting the smooth functioning of the Cabinet decision-making process and facilitating the implementation of the Government’s agenda.

In 2017-18, PCO facilitated the implementation of Cabinet decision on such matters as Cannabis Legislation, Regional Growth Strategies, asylum seekers, implementing Canada’s infrastructure plan, Canada-US relations and the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth.

PCO coordinated the response to ongoing inequalities faced by Canada’s LGBTQ2 communities by supporting the Prime Minister’s apology for historical unjust treatment of Canadians who identify as LGBTQ2 and supporting passage of the Expungement of Historically Unjust Convictions Act. The Act puts into place a process to permanently destroy the records of convictions for offences involving same-sex partners that would be lawful today.

Fostering a high-performing and accountable Public Service.

To enhance transparency and openness, PCO developed and published the Mandate Letter Tracker that enables Canadians to track the progress made on mandate letter commitments.

PCO continues to support senior leadership development and to coordinate deputy-minister level committees on subjects of relevance for the Public Service, including Public Service renewal, public sector innovation and workplace harassment.

Actual spending: $202,940,898 (including the resources for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls)
Actual full-time equivalents: 1,111

For more information on PCO’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

PCO supports the development and implementation of the Government of Canada's policy and legislative agendas, coordinates responses to issues facing the Government and the country, and supports the effective operation of Cabinet. PCO is led by the Clerk of the Privy Council. The Clerk also serves as Secretary to the Cabinet and the Head of the Public Service.

Mandate and role

PCO’s mandate is to serve Canada and Canadians by providing professional, non-partisan advice and support to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, and Cabinet.

PCO has three main roles:

  1. Provide non-partisan advice to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, Cabinet and Cabinet committees on matters of national and international importance.
  2. Support the smooth functioning of the Cabinet decision-making process and facilitate the implementation of the Government’s agenda.
  3. Foster a high-performing and accountable Public Service.

For additional general information about PCO, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report. For more information on the ministers’ mandate letter commitments, see the website of the Prime Minister of Canada.

 

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

PCO is responsible for providing public service support to the Prime Minister across the entire spectrum of policy questions and operational issues facing the Government on a daily basis. PCO delivers consistent, timely advice and support on the subjects of greatest importance to the Prime Minister, to Cabinet and to Cabinet committees. Advice and support delivered by PCO enables discussions at Cabinet, which lead to the shaping of government policy.

PCO maintained a vigorous pace of work as domestic and international contexts continued to evolve throughout 2017–18. PCO is also pivotal in providing government-wide participation in enabling coherent and consistent implementation of Cabinet decisions, operating the Cabinet decision-making system, setting overall policy directions, appointing senior office holders, fostering effective intergovernmental relations and in managing specific issues and policy challenges facing the Government.

Global economic and political trends such as the negotiation of new and existing trade agreements, responding to humanitarian crises and contributing to international peace and security, led to a fast-paced work environment and demanded strong, precise and coordinated responses by the Government. PCO also provided sound analysis and advice to deal with ongoing domestic issues, including irregular migration, the negotiation of health and social transfers with provinces and territories, and making progress on reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples.

This year also marked the 150th anniversary of Canada’s Public Service. As the organization supporting the Clerk in his role as the Head of the Public Service, PCO leads an impartial, professional and merit-based Public Service that delivers a wide range of services and programs to support the Government of Canada and the needs of Canadians in their day-to-day lives. The Clerk sets the priorities for the Public Service as a whole to deliver the Government’s agenda, and works with senior leadership to ensure that the Public Service has the policy, management and human resources capacity it needs to deliver that agenda. High-quality programs and services to and for Canadians are designed and delivered in a manner that is consistent with Public Service values and ethics.

Key risks

Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the department’s Programs Link to mandate letter commitments and any government‑wide or departmental priorities
Risks to the Policy and Legislative Agenda

Description:

  • International and domestic macroeconomic developments, policy changes in trade partner countries as well as global events (e.g., economic downturns, conflicts, and natural disasters) may impact Canada’s economy and may require the Government to shift its priorities.
  • Changes in the political and public environments, and complex multi-stakeholder interests could result in delays in reaching consensus on reforms, implementing legislation and delivering programs within optimal timelines, and could result in cost over-runs.
PCO provided high-quality advice and leveraged opportunities that arose by:

  • Monitoring domestic and international events, emerging issues, evolving political contexts, and developments and trends that may affect Canada’s interests, and providing timely advice on the implementation of Government priorities.
  • Working closely with key federal departments and agencies, provincial/territorial governments, the private sector, stakeholders, including philanthropic and non-profit advocacy groups and independent experts, to monitor laws, policies and practices related to the Government’s priorities, to leverage expertise and to produce the best advice.
Program 1.1

Program 1.2

Program 1.3

Program 1.4
Priority 1: Support the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers in advancing the Government’s priorities and delivering results for Canadians.

Priority 2: Support the deliberations of Cabinet and its committees on key policy initiatives, coordinate policy planning and provide non-partisan advice.
Risks to delivering quality and timely service, advice and support.

Description:

  • Increased workload and shorter timelines means an increasingly heavy burden on existing resources and expertise.
  • Demographic changes facing the leadership of the Public Service impact the ability of the Public Service to effectively serve Canadians.
PCO deployed new technology, with training and ongoing support, that has resulted in the efficient and secure delivery of Cabinet documents to government departments supporting a minister.

Internal human resources processes were streamlined to improve efficiency across the organization.

Human Resources has piloted the use of social media to attract talented candidates as part of a more dynamic approach to recruitment and talent acquisition.
Program 1.1

Program 1.2

Program 1.3

Program 1.4

Internal Services
Priority 1: Support the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers in advancing the Government’s priorities and delivering results for Canadians.

Priority 2: Support the deliberations of Cabinet and its committees on key policy initiatives, coordinate policy planning and provide non-partisan advice.

Priority 3: Strengthen PCO’s internal management practices.
Risks to Information Technology Infrastructure

Description:

  • Aging systems and tools could threaten the required level of service delivery, accessibility to information and security for business practices at PCO.
  • Accidental or intentional dissemination of sensitive material may negatively impact Canada’s interests.
Through the IM/IT Modernization initiative, PCO upgraded workplace technology devices and reviewed its security architecture. Information Management Services provided expertise, advice and guidance in support of modernization objectives.

PCO collaborated and leveraged government-wide initiatives and expertise, such as the implementation of the Government of Canada Remote Access Service, which increased the availability of service for PCO employees.

PCO provided information management awareness training and coaching on existing tools.
Program 1.1

Program 1.2

Program 1.3

Program 1.4

Internal Services
Priority 1: Support the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers in advancing the Government’s priorities and delivering results for Canadians.

Priority 2: Support the deliberations of Cabinet and its committees on key policy initiatives, coordinate policy planning and provide non-partisan advice.

Priority 3: Strengthen PCO’s internal management practices.
Risks to Security and Emergency Management

Description:

  • Rapid response could result in security coordination gaps.
  • Emerging or rapidly evolving domestic and international developments could negatively affect Canada’s interests.
  • Environment of unpredictability could result in ineffectual response.
PCO provided timely information, assessments and policy advice by engaging early and continuously with lead security agencies, and providing fora at the senior management level to share critical information and to advise on security requirements, limitations and best practices across relevant departments.

PCO continuously conducted risk assessments and gap analysis to address the ever-changing security environment.

PCO regularly reviewed response plans and conducted tabletop exercises with the wider security and intelligence community, to ensure increased coordination, interoperability, efficiency and effectiveness in response to crises.

PCO worked with lead agencies to improve its response time to address urgent or large-scale cyber threat alerts.
Program 1.1

Program 1.2

Program 1.3

Program 1.4

Internal Services
Priority 1: Support the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers in advancing the Government’s priorities and delivering results for Canadians.

Priority 2: Support the deliberations of Cabinet and its committees on key policy initiatives, coordinate policy planning and provide non-partisan advice.

Results: what we achieved

Programs

1.1: Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers

Description

PCO provides professional, non-partisan advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers on the full spectrum of domestic and international issues they address on a daily basis. PCO also provides advice and support on: the structure and organization of government; government-wide communications; Governor in Council appointments; the development and implementation of parliamentary and legislative programs; the reform of democratic institutions; intergovernmental relations; and legal issues. In addition, PCO provides administrative advice and support pertaining to the budgets of the Prime Minister’s Office and those of the offices of portfolio ministers.

Results

In 2017–18, PCO provided timely, non-partisan advice, and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers on a range of issues related to the delivery of the Government’s agenda. PCO supported growing the middle class by providing advice on a range of economic, tax and fiscal priorities during the implementation of Budget 2017, in preparation for the Fall Economic Statement 2017 and as part of Budget 2018. PCO also assisted in the development of Canada’s Women Entrepreneurship Strategy, Regional Growth Strategies, streamlining Regional Development Agencies’ innovation programs and advancing work on the Economic Strategy Tables.

PCO supported Government efforts to address climate change through assisting with the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change and providing advice and support to the Prime Minister in working collaboratively with the provinces and territories. This resulted in the approval of the first annual Synthesis Report to First Ministers on the Framework.

PCO supported intergovernmental affairs priorities by advising the Prime Minister in his role as chair of the 2017 First Ministers’ Meeting, which included discussions on Indigenous economic development, economic growth and job creation, tax reform, Canada-U.S. relations and cannabis legalization and regulation.

PCO also provided advice to the Prime Minister regarding the federal government’s collaboration with provinces and territories, notably Quebec and Ontario, to manage the significant increase in asylum seekers.

PCO contributed to efforts to better understand and address the needs of Canada’s youth. For example, PCO directly supported the work of the Prime Minister’s Youth Council, engaged senior decision makers on youth-related issues, launched a national dialogue with Canadian youth on developing Canada’s first youth policy and supported the design phase of the Canada Service Corps with Employment and Social Development Canada.

In 2017–18, PCO provided the Prime Minister, Cabinet ministers and senior officials with analysis and advice for international engagements, which increased Canada’s global profile and influence. This included:

  • preparation for multilateral engagements at the UN, Commonwealth and World Economic Forum, as well as summits such as those of the G7, G20, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), and the Summit of the Americas;
  • advancing a progressive trade agenda by concluding and implementing agreements with partners in the Americas, Asia and the European Union, and furthering negotiations with others, including negotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement;
  • security and intelligence analysis of emerging and ongoing international events and crises, protecting Canadians and Canada’s interests; and
  • cooperating with international and domestic partners to improve information sharing on vital security issues.

PCO provided timely advice and support on machinery of government to the Prime Minister and on the structure and functioning of the government as a whole. For example, PCO helped develop a non-partisan, merit-based process to advise the Prime Minister on Senate appointments. PCO provided the necessary machinery of government advice and support for the creation of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNAC), and Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) in 2017.

PCO supported the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons to implement the mandate letter commitments. For example, PCO provided support on legislation to establish the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) as an independent Agent of Parliament, reporting directly to Parliament. This legislation provided the PBO with the ability to request from the Speakers of the House and Senate, the funds needed to fulfill their mandate. In addition, in coordination with the Minister of Public Safety, PCO also assisted with the creation of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians (NSICOP) which will have a broad government-wide mandate to scrutinize any national security matter to help ensure the protection of the public and that the rights and freedoms of individual Canadians are upheld.

PCO provided ongoing policy analysis, advice and support to the Minister of Democratic Institutions to fulfill the Minister’s mandate letter commitments. These included improvements to the Senate appointments process, such as keeping applications open year-round, retaining submitted applications for two years, and adding the ability for organizations or individuals to nominate potential candidates.

Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers

  • 32 bills introduced, 25 bills received Royal Assent
  • More than 10 global fora and 17 bilateral meetings with international heads of government
  • Over 200 foreign intelligence briefs
  • 4 conference calls with provincial and territorial premiers
  • 21 bilateral meetings and calls with provincial and territorial premiers
  • The PM’s Youth Council met 3 times in person and held monthly teleconferences
  • Government apologies issued to the LGBTQ2 community and to former students of Newfoundland and Labrador residential schools
  • Appointment of the LGBTQ2 Special Advisor to the Prime Minister; agreement-in-principle to resolve the LGBTQ2 Class Action
  • New open, transparent and merit-based Governor in Council appointment process
  • Supported appointments of the current Governor General, five lieutenant governors and 2 territorial commissioners
  • Over 1000 Governor in Council appointments
  • Improvements to processes used by the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments
  • Procedural support provided to make 6 Senate appointments
  • Coordinated 2 ministerial shuffles and the appointment of parliamentary secretaries
  • Supported dissolution of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and creation of two new departments: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNA), and the Department of Indigenous Services Canada (DISC)
  • Creation of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians (NSICOP)

PCO provided leadership to advance government communications priorities and inform Canadians on the activities, programs, policies and services of the Government of Canada. PCO collaborated with departments, effectively and efficiently coordinating federal communications activities, including coordinating the Government of Canada Advertising Plan, within a context of reduced advertising expenditures to focus on key communications initiatives. PCO also expanded the Public Opinion Research (POR) program, which includes a continuous survey and focus groups in various regions across Canada every month to support evidence-based decision making and to incorporate other departmental research needs.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
PCO advice enables the Government to achieve its legislative, policy and management agendas. The Prime Minister and portfolio ministers are fully supported in carrying out their respective responsibilities. Target not applicable. March 31, 2018 The PM and portfolio ministers were fully able to carry out their respective responsibilities as a result of the timely, high-quality, and effective advice, support and coordination delivered by PCO. Effective, timely, high-quality advice, support and coordination from PCO ensured that the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers were fully able to carry out their respective responsibilities. PCO provided the Government with effective, high-quality, advice and support to ensure that the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers were fully able to carry out their respective responsibilities.
Assessed over 10,000 applications; over 1000 Governor in Council appointments in 2017–18, more than half through open, transparent, merit-based selection processes. Almost 12,000 applications processed and 429 Governor in Council appointments in 2016–17. 403 Governor in Council appointments in 2015–16.
Key priorities of the Government advanced (e.g., Clean Growth and Climate Change, Indigenous relations, trade negotiations, LGBTQ2, open data, electoral process, and Parliamentary accountability). 25 bills received Royal Assent, and 32 bills were introduced in Parliament. Key priorities of the Government (e.g., Indigenous relations, international engagement, the middle class, and diversity and inclusion) advanced. Royal Assent was given to 14 bills, and 35 bills were introduced in Parliament. PCO delivered advice on, and supported and coordinated: the legislative, policy and government administration agendas of two prime ministers in fiscal year 2015–16; the government-wide transition exercise for the October 2015 federal election, e.g., briefing the new Prime Minister.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
76,934,405 76,934,405 84,806,508 82,917,353 5,982,948
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
540 594 54

Information on PCO’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.

1.2: Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees

Description

PCO supports the efficient and effective functioning of Cabinet and Cabinet committees on a day-to-day basis. As part of this work, PCO coordinates: departmental policy; legislative and government administration proposals going to Cabinet and its committees; performs a challenge function during the policy development process; and prepares briefing materials and accompanying policy analysis to facilitate Cabinet’s decision-making process. PCO also provides a secretariat function for Cabinet and its committees, which includes scheduling and support services for meetings, as well as preparation and distribution of Cabinet documents. In addition, PCO supports effective policy integration across the federal government so that proposals take into account the full range of departmental and Public Service-wide perspectives and issues related to implementation, such as communications, parliamentary affairs, intergovernmental relations and fiscal impacts.

Results

In 2017–18, PCO coordinated the operation of Cabinet and various Cabinet committees in support of government priorities. These included growth of the middle class, diversity and inclusion, protection of the environment, reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples, skills and innovation development, infrastructure, national security, Canada-U.S. relations as well as the work on the stabilization of the pay system.

PCO provided secretariat functions for Cabinet committees, which includes management of the agenda, memoranda to Cabinet, presentations made and other supporting documents. PCO ensured that information received from departments was responsive to the needs of Cabinet and supported evidence-based decision-making. PCO also ensured that Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) was carried out and that Cabinet committees were fully supported in carrying out their mandates.

To advance work on reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples, PCO coordinated the federal approach, across multiple departments, to the review of laws and policies related to Indigenous Peoples. PCO also ensured that all proposals for review and consideration by the Working Group of Ministers on the Review of Laws and Policies Related to Indigenous Peoples met Canada’s domestic and international obligations with regard to Indigenous Peoples. PCO also ensured that proposals are consistent with Canada’s constitutional obligations, international human rights standards, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action.



PCO’s support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees 2017-18

  • 25 full Cabinet meetings
  • 2 Cabinet retreats
  • 10 Cabinet committees and 1 ad hoc Cabinet committee
  • 85 hours in Cabinet meetings
  • 250 hours spent in Cabinet committees by ministers
  • 578 Cabinet documents (317 Memoranda to Cabinet and 261 presentations/others)
  • 1,839 Orders in Council
  • 22 meetings of the Working Group of Ministers on the Review of Laws and Policies Related to Indigenous Peoples

PCO provided regular updates to Cabinet on progress and outcomes of government-wide priorities and mandate letter commitments. In November 2017, PCO launched the Mandate Letter Tracker, which is updated monthly. This is the first time the Government of Canada has reported publicly on the status of mandate letter commitments, a necessary step toward government transparency and accountability to Canadians.

PCO successfully implemented the E-Cabinet solution, which was deployed to all departments supporting a minister. With few exceptions, E-Cabinet is now the primary distribution method for all Cabinet documents, ensuring security of Cabinet document distribution and enhancing efficiency by providing quick access to documents.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) Activities in 2017–18

  • Two reviews of GBA+ reporting in the Memorandum to Cabinet Due Diligence tool completed (105 Due Diligence statements).
  • Summary reports of findings guided forward thinking on the future of the GBA+ function across PCO.
  • Provided findings to Status of Women and other departments to support their ongoing efforts to develop GBA+ capacity.
  • A Gender Focal Point was created within the Social Development Policy Secretariat to support the advancement of the GBA+ function at PCO.

PCO co-chaired and provided secretariat support for the Cabinet Affairs Community of Practice, which consists of directors and managers of Cabinet Affairs units from across the government. It meets regularly to discuss best practices, and new or changing requirements; to promote Cabinet Affairs units as centres of expertise within each department; and to enhance the role of the Community.

PCO provided advice, support and policy coordination for deputy minister-level meetings and for deputy minister committees on a number of policy issues to support the advancement of the Government’s agenda and initiatives across the federal government. This includes Deputy Minister and Clerk meetings, two Deputy Minister retreats and regular Deputy Ministers’ Breakfast meetings. As part of this work, PCO continued to implement the medium-term planning process across government to advance policy proposals on various emerging global and national trends (e.g., socio-economic impacts of disruptive technologies).

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
The functioning and integrity of the Cabinet decision- making process are maintained. Cabinet and Cabinet committees are provided with timely support to enable decision making. Target not applicable. March 31, 2018 PCO provided timely support to enable decision making at Cabinet and Cabinet committees. PCO provided timely support to enable decision making at Cabinet and Cabinet committees.  
  • Number of meetings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees.
  • 164 meetings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees were organized and supported.
  • 166 meetings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees were organized and supported.
A total of 109 meetings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees were organized and supported.
  • Number of Cabinet documents produced.
  • 578 Cabinet documents were produced.
  • 597 Cabinet documents were produced.
 
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
14,511,298 14,511,298 18,496,961 15,521,667 1,010,369
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
115 116 1

Information on PCO’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.

1.3: Public Service leadership and direction

Description

PCO supports the development and maintenance of a high-quality Public Service that meets the highest standards of accountability, transparency and efficiency. As part of this work, PCO provides advice to the Clerk of the Privy Council and the Prime Minister on the renewal of the Public Service and government operations, in order to position the Public Service workforce and workplace for the future as more adaptable, innovative and streamlined. PCO also supports the human resources management of senior leaders across the government, including performance management and leadership development.

Results

During Canada’s 150th year, PCO supported the Clerk and the Deputy Clerk in engaging with the Public Service and promoting a healthy workplace culture during outreach activities with public servants, partners and the media. PCO provided briefings on Public Service renewal issues, such as diversity and inclusion, mental health and workplace well-being, harassment, recruitment and student engagement. PCO also supported the Clerk in delivering the Twenty-Fifth Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada.

PCO supported the Clerk of the Privy Council in selecting the membership of all deputy-minister level committees. PCO coordinated and provided secretariat functions for meetings on advancing the renewal agenda for the Public Service, policy advice, including the stabilization of the pay system, and other proposals to improve efficiency and effectiveness. These included:

  • Deputy Minister Board of Management and Renewal;
  • Deputy Minister Network on Public Service Renewal;
  • Clerk’s Contact Group on Mental Health;
  • Deputy Minister Task Force on Public Sector Innovation; and
  • Deputy Minister Task Team on Harassment.

Public Service leadership and direction in numbers

  • Coordinated 12 meetings for Deputy Minister Board of Management and Renewal and the Deputy Minister Network on Public Service Renewal
  • Convened 3 meetings with the Clerk’s Contact Group on Mental Health
  • 13 Innovation Fairs across Canada, which attracted over 4,700 employees
  • 45 renewal outreach activities, reaching over 23,500 public servants
  • 55 departments and agencies shared over 350 stories with public servants and the public

Federal, provincial and territorial Clerks and Cabinet Secretaries signed the Declaration on Public Sector Innovation in November 2017. The Declaration is a formal commitment for governments to work together and explore new and innovative ways to achieve meaningful and lasting results for Canadians. As a key part of delivering on this commitment, PCO launched two key initiatives to build Public Service capacity for innovation in pursuit of better outcomes in top priority areas:

  • The Impact Canada Initiative (ICI), launched in November 2017, is a Government of Canada-wide effort that will help departments accelerate the adoption of outcomes-based funding approaches to deliver meaningful results for Canadians. First areas of focus include smart cities, clean technologies, Indigenous housing and addressing Canada’s opioids crisis.
  • An innovative staffing strategy, implemented in January 2018, aims to draw in new skills from outside government (behavioural insights, innovative finance, impact measurement, data science), and deploy skills better from within the Public Service to address top priority issues more effectively.

In recognition of the importance of senior leadership to support Public Service renewal, PCO assisted the Prime Minister and the Clerk of the Privy Council in the management of senior leaders. Both the Performance Management Program, which assesses the performance of eligible Governor in Council appointees and the Talent Management Program, which assesses the potential and suitability of individuals for future appointments in the deputy minister ranks, were completed.

In support of the learning and development of the senior leadership community, PCO oversaw the development and completion of orientation programs for new members of the senior ranks, and actively participated in the delivery of these sessions with the Canada School of Public Service. PCO also administered a one-on-one orientation program to provide personalized briefings to senior leaders.

PCO co-led (with Policy Horizons Canada) a 10-month professional development program for talented new public servants. Participants applied innovative tools and ways of thinking to pressing policy issues of concern to Canadians. The summary report of the Canada Beyond 150 initiative is available online.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
The Public Service has the talent, capacity and management frameworks to provide advice on and implement the Government’s agenda. The Public Service is engaged in renewal and business transformation activities which advance the vision of the Public Service set out in Blueprint 2020. Target not applicable. March 31, 2018 The Clerk delivered the Twenty-Fifth Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada.

Annual Report website was visited over 76,000 times, within one month following the report’s release, which represents an increase of 105% from the same period last year.
The Clerk delivered the Twenty-Fourth Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada.

Annual Report website was visited 43,341 times, which represents a 150% increase over last year.
Public Service engagement in renewal and business transformation activities was reported in the Clerk’s Twenty-Third Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada.
        PCO supported the Clerk and Deputy Clerk in 45 renewal outreach activities, reaching over 23,500 public servants. PCO supported the Clerk and the Deputy Clerk in extensive engagement events on renewal, reaching over 14,000 employees.  
        Over 4,700 employees from multiple departments participated in 13 Innovation Fairs across Canada in 2017-18. Over 2,100 employees from 70 federal organizations participated in the 2016 Innovation Fair.  
        Three meetings of the Clerk’s Contact Group on Mental Health were convened. The Clerk created the Mental Health Contact Group and the Clerk's Table on Diversity and Inclusion to seek advice on advancing key priority issues. PCO supported the Clerk and the Deputy Clerk in extensive engagement events on renewal and transformation.

The Blueprint 2020 National Secretariat was integrated into PCO in July 2015. PCO advised on activities aimed at engaging public servants (e.g., first inter-departmental innovation fair, weekly calls by the Champion for Blueprint 2020).
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
4,807,034 4,807,034 4,759,997 3,962,978 (844,056)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
31 32 1

Information on PCO’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.

1.4: Commissions of inquiry

Description

PCO provides commissions of inquiry with financial and administrative support. As part of this work, PCO can, when necessary, provide ongoing administrative advice and support in the following areas: staffing; acquisition services; contracting; financial services; access to funding; records management; payroll support; publishing information online; translation; legal services; security; and systems support.

Results

Since its launch in September 2016, the Commission for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls has received corporate services support from PCO. This enables the Commission to fulfill its mandate to examine and report on the systemic causes of all forms of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada. The Commission is authorized to act independently and has the authority to determine how best to accomplish its mandate while complying with the Financial Administration Act and applicable Treasury Board policies.

In 2017–18, as the Commission progressed with its work, the demand for support rose accordingly, and PCO successfully responded to the expected increase in requirements for financial, administrative and human resources support.

As part of the Government’s response to the Interim Report of the Commission, PCO led the creation of a working group to help remove barriers that could prevent the Commission from completing its work. This led to the amendment of the terms and conditions of the Contribution Program for Commissions of Inquiry that will enable the Commission to better support the participation of families and survivors, as well as parties granted standing before the Inquiry.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Commissions of inquiry receive required resources as well as advice and guidance on financial and administrative matters. Commissions of inquiry have received appropriate resources as well as the necessary services, advice and guidance in a timely manner. Target not applicable. March 31, 2018 (or upon completion of the mandate of the Commission) PCO provided financial, procurement, human resources and administrative support for the Inquiry’s activities. Guidance has also been provided on a regular basis.

The Commission has received appropriate resources.
PCO provided financial, procurement, human resources and administrative support for the Inquiry’s activities. Guidance has also been provided on a regular basis.

The Commission has received appropriate resources.
Not Applicable.*
* No commissions of inquiry were planned or undertaken during the fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
0 34,147,019 34,147,353 19,653,398 (14,493,621)
The Inquiry has lapsed funds in each of the last two fiscal years as the initial estimates needed to be adjusted once the National Inquiry became operational.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
*Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
65 71 6
* Planned full-time equivalents to Commissions of inquiry are subject to parliamentary approval.

Information on PCO’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

In 2017–18, PCO completed the following internal initiatives:

  • Digitized Cabinet documents (E-Cabinet) used by all ministers, which reduced the environmental footprint associated with Cabinet papers; and
  • Improved IM/IT governance, project management, operational procedures, business processes and security practices related to departmental information.

PCO coordinates the communications activities of federal departments in support of the Government’s priorities and facilitates public opinion research and public consultation activities across government. PCO also supports the communications activities of portfolio ministers (Youth, Democratic Institutions and Government House Leader) in addition to the official website and social media accounts of the Prime Minister.

In 2017–18, PCO provided effective coordination and strategic communications support on numerous international and domestic activities, as well as international trips by the PM and incoming visits.

In support of human resources services, PCO continued implementation of the Mental Health Strategy and Action Plan developed in 2016–17. PCO promoted awareness of mental health matters through regular communications and delivered activities to engage employees. To continue to foster a mentally healthy workplace, PCO identified other performance indicators for measuring employee health, safety and overall well-being in addition to those already contained in the Public Service Employee Survey.

PCO strengthened its existing people management system (PeopleSoft) and took back administration of some critical pay functions as interim measures, pending resolution to issues with the Public Service pay system.

Communication Activities in Summary

  • 1,160 products were posted on behalf of the PM (e.g., news releases, statements, itineraries and readouts)
  • 130 videos were added to the Prime Minister’s YouTube channel
  • 530 photo galleries were posted     
  • Responded to more than 300 media calls
  • 755 Question Period Cards

PCO also led different security-related initiatives, including security briefs and participation in the Annual Security Practitioners Conference, which has enhanced coordination among all security practitioners within the government.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
48,621,818 51,594,601 82,942,001 80,885,502 29,290,901
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
295 298 3

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph
Text version - Departmental spending trend graph
Fiscal year Total Voted Statutory Sunset Programs – Anticipated
2015-16 123,119,021 109,302,918 13,816,103 0
2016-17 154,240,941 141,450,160 12,790,781 0
2017-18 202,940,898 187,449,564 15,491,334 0
2018-19 168,364,988 152,017,889 16,347,099 0
2019-20 146,830,082 131,409,581 15,420,501 0
2020-21 144,542,061 129,323,739 15,218,322 0

The graph above illustrates PCO's spending trend over a six-year period (2015–16 to 2020–21).

Fiscal years 2015–16 to 2017–18 reflect the department’s actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts of Canada. Fiscal years 2018–19 to 2020–21 represent the department’s planned spending.

Spending increased by $31.1 million in 2016–17, resulting in $154.2 million in spending. This was mainly due to increased spending related to Budget 2016 initiatives to enhance PCO’s internal capacity, strengthen security, and invest in information technology and security infrastructure.

PCO’s spending increased by $48.7 million from fiscal year 2016–17 to 2017–18. This increase is mainly due to:

  • Budget 2016 initiatives, including incremental resources used for PCO’s Information Technology Modernization Project, the increased role of PCO in supporting the open, transparent and merit-based Governor in Council appointments process, spending related to the Access Control and Physical Security Project and spending for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls;
  • Budget 2017 initiatives, including the establishment of two secretariats within PCO ‒ the LGBTQ2 and the Review of Laws and Policies related to Indigenous Peoples secretariats and the Impact Canada Initiative;
  • Retroactive salary payments to PCO employees for recently signed collective agreements;
  • Employee benefit plans costs due to increased salary spending over the period; and
  • Other spending related to accommodation projects and telecommunication, security, desktop computing evergreening and additional technical support.

The graph shows an increasing spending trend, which peaks at $202.9 million in 2017–18 and decreases to $144.5 million in 2020–21. The decrease in the planned spending from 2018–19 to 2020–21 is largely attributable to reductions in planned spending for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, PCO’s Information Technology Modernization and the Access Control and Physical Security projects.

For more information about these variances, please see the Budgetary Performance Summary for Programs and Internal Services section.

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2017–18 
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016–17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2015–16
Actual spending (authorities used)
1.1 Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers 76,934,405 76,934,405 N/A1 N/A1 84,806,508 82,917,353 72,402,148 64,371,121
1.2 Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees 14,511,298 14,511,298 N/A1 N/A1 18,496,961 15,521,667 12,816,810 13,338,225
1.3 Public Service leadership and direction 4,807,034 4,807,034 N/A1 N/A1 4,759,997 3,962,978 4,104,309 3,417,213
1.4 Commissions of inquiry 0 34,147,019 N/A1 N/A1 34,147,353 19,653,398 3,105,893 0
Subtotal 96,252,737 130,399,756 85,694,0101 68,676,7931 142,210,819 122,055,396 92,429,160 81,126,559
Internal Services 48,621,818 51,594,601 82,670,9782 78,153,2892 82,942,001 80,885,502 61,811,781 41,992,462
Total 144,874,555 181,994,357 168,364,988 146,830,082 225,152,820 202,940,898 154,240,941 123,119,021

Note 1: PCO’s reporting structure transitioned from Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture, required under the previous Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures, to results-based reporting in accordance with PCO’s Departmental Results Framework. The change in reporting structure was required following the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s implementation of the new Policy on Results. The planned spending for 2018–19 and 2019–20 was prepared as per the new policy and as per PCO’s Departmental Results Framework.

Note 2: PCO also aligned its Internal Services with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Guide on Recording and Reporting of Internal Services Expenditures. The financial and human resources of the offices of the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, the Clerk and Deputy Clerk, as well as a portion of Communications and Legal Services, have been removed from the core responsibility and included in Internal Services

Variance between 2017–18 Actual Spending and 2017–18 Planned Spending

PCO’s actual spending for fiscal year 2017–18 was $20.9 million higher compared to its planned spending, due mainly to the following items:

  • Supporting PCOʼs Information Technology Modernization Project;
  • Supporting the increased role of the open, transparent and merit-based Governor in Council appointments; and
  • Budget 2017 initiatives, including the establishment of two secretariats within PCO ‒ the LGBTQ2 and the Review of Laws and Policies related to Indigenous Peoples secretariats and the Impact Canada Initiative.

These increases are partially offset by lower actual spending for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services
(full time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2015–16
Actual full-time equivalents
2016–17
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
1.1 Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers 461 524 540 594 N/A1 N/A1
1.2 Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees 104 102 115 116 N/A1 N/A1
1.3 Public Service leadership and direction 28 33 31 32 N/A1 N/A1
1.4 Commissions of inquiry 0 12 65 71 N/A1 N/A1
Subtotal 593 671 751 813 548 489
Internal Services 279 275 295 298 5212 5202
Total 872 946 1,046 1,111 1,069 1,009

Note 1: PCO’s reporting structure transitioned from Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture, required under the previous Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures, to results-based reporting in accordance with PCO’s Departmental Results Framework. The change in reporting structure was required following the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s implementation of the new Policy on Results. The planned spending for 2018–19 and 2019–20 was prepared as per the new policy and as per PCO’s Departmental Results Framework.

Note 2: PCO also aligned its Internal Services with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Guide on Recording and Reporting of Internal Services Expenditures. The financial and human resources of the offices of the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, the Clerk and Deputy Clerk, as well as a portion of Communications and Legal Services, have been removed from the core responsibility and included in Internal Services.

Expenditures by vote

For information on PCO’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017–2018.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of PCO’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

PCO’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18
Planned
results
2017–18
Actual
results
2016–17
Actual
results
Difference (2017–18 Actual results minus 2017–18 Planned results) Difference (2017–18 Actual results minus 2016–17 Actual results)
Total expenses 202,747,994 218,957,765 169,929,787 16,209,771 49,027,978
Total revenues (87,481) (20,041) (91,046) 67,440 71,005
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 202,660,513 218,937,724 169,838,741 16,277,211 49,098,983
The department’s Future-Oriented statement of Operations is published on the Reports and Publications section of the PCO website.

Net cost of operations from continuing operations

Difference between 2017–18 Actual results and 2016–17 Actual results

The department’s actual net cost of operations from continuing activities in 2017–18 was $49.1 million higher than the previous year. The increase is mainly attributable to the additional spending for Budget 2016 and Budget 2017 initiatives as well as the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Difference between 2017–18 Actual results and 2017–18 Planned results

The department’s actual net cost of operations from continuing activities in 2017–18 was $16.3 million higher than the planned results for the same fiscal year. The increase in mainly attributable to the additional spending for Budget 2016 and Budget 2017 initiatives.

As illustrated below, departmental expenses in 2017–18 were highly concentrated in two key areas:

  • Program 1.1 - Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers which represents 38% of the total departmental expenses and directly support PCO’s core mandate.
  • Internal Services which represents 44% of the total departmental expenses. The department operates in a highly centralized and unique environment in which Corporate Services expenditures are centralized.

Fiscal Year 2017–18 – Expenses by Program

Fiscal Year 2017–18 – Expenses by Program
Text version - Fiscal Year 2017–18 – Expenses by Program
Expenses per Program Activity Amounts %
1.1 Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers $83,747,549 38%
1.2 Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees $15,930,288 7%
1.3 Public Service leadership and direction $3,962,315 2%
1.4 Commissions of inquiry $19,868,981 9%
Internal Services $95,448,632 44%

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as at March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial Information 2017–18 2016–17 Difference
(2017–18 minus
2016–17)
Total net liabilities 50,426,767 39,988,930 10,437,837
Total net financial assets 40,008,010 30,112,345 9,895,665
Departmental net debt 10,418,757 9,876,585 542,172
Total non‑financial assets 16,043,560 12,440,525 3,603,035
Departmental net financial position 5,624,803 2,563,940 3,060,863

In 2017–18, the department’s net financial position increased by $3.1 million from the previous year. The following charts provide additional information on the department’s net financial position.

Fiscal Year 2017–18 – Liabilities by Type

Fiscal Year 2017–18 – Liabilities by Type
Text version - Fiscal Year 2017–18 – Liabilities by Type
Liabilities by type Amounts %
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities $37,312,631 74%
Vacation pay and compensatory leave $8,583,062 17%
Employee future benefits $4,531,074 9%

In 2017–18, total net liabilities increased by $10.4 million when compared to 2016–17. This increase is primarily attributable to accounts payables and accrued liabilities arising from:

  • Budget 2016 initiatives, including the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls; and
  • Budget 2017 initiatives, including the establishment of two secretariats within PCO — the LGBTQ2 and the Review of Laws and Policies related to Indigenous Peoples secretariats— and the Impact Canada Initiative.

Fiscal Year 2017–18 – Assets by Type

Fiscal Year 2017–18 – Assets by Type
Text version - Fiscal Year 2017–18 – Assets by Type
Assets by type Amounts %
Accounts receivable and advances $8,455,511 15%
Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund $31,551,599 56%
Prepaid expenses $913,427 2%
Inventory $271,387 0%
Tangible capital assets $14,859,646 27%

Total net financial and non-financial assets were $56.1 million in 2017–18, which represents an increase of $13.5 million compared to 2016–17. This increase is primarily attributable to:

  • Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund, representing authorities available to discharge increase account payable and accrued liabilities;
  • Tangible capital assets purchased as part of the Information Technology Modernization Project and accommodation projects; and,
  • Accounts receivable and advances mostly related to interdepartmental settlements and HST paid at year-end on accounts payable.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

  • Appropriate minister: The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada
  • Institutional head: Michael Wernick, Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet
  • Ministerial portfolio: Privy Council Office
  • Enabling instrument: Order in Council P.C. 1940-1121
  • Year of incorporation / commencement: 1867

Reporting framework

The Privy Council Office’s Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2017–18 are shown below.

Strategic Outcome: The Government’s agenda and decision making are supported and implemented and the institutions of government are supported and maintained.

Program Alignment Architecture
  • 1.1 Program: Advice and support to the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers
    • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: Issues, policies, machinery, communications and appointments
    • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: International affairs and national security
    • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: Intergovernmental affairs
    • 1.1.4 Sub-Program: Legislation, parliamentary issues and democratic reform
    • 1.1.5 Sub-Program: Offices of the Prime Minister and portfolio ministers
  • 1.2 Program: Advice and support to Cabinet and Cabinet committees
    • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Operation of Cabinet committees
    • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Integration across the federal government
  • 1.3 Program: Public Service leadership and direction
    • 1.3.1 Sub-Program: Business transformation and Public Service renewal
    • 1.3.2 Sub-Program: Management of senior leaders
  • 1.4 Program: Commissions of inquiry
  • Internal Services

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on lower‑level programs is available on the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on PCO’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

General Enquiries

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical approach used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The “plus” in GBA+ acknowledges that the gender-based analysis goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. Examples of GBA+ processes include using data disaggregated by sex, gender and other intersecting identity factors in performance analysis, and identifying any impacts of the program on diverse groups of people, with a view to adjusting these initiatives to make them more inclusive.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada’s Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (structure de gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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