2018–19 Departmental Results Report

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Prime Minister’s message

Headshot of Justin Trudeau

Today, I welcome the 2018-19 Departmental Results Report.

Every day, dedicated public servants in the Privy Council Office and across government work hard to make life better for their fellow Canadians.

With unparalleled professionalism, you deliver real, positive results for people of every age in every part of the country. Whether by supporting the government in tackling the climate crisis, or by advancing accessibility and gender equality, your work makes a difference. Just think of our progress on drastically reducing poverty with investments in affordable housing and a stronger Canada Pension Plan.

This past year, we continued to build economic growth that works for all Canadians. Our government signed trade deals that will create opportunities for the middle class and Canadian businesses, including the new North American Free Trade Agreement. At the same time, we welcomed growing trade with the European Union, and championed gender equality, ocean protection, and clean growth at this year’s G20 and G7 Summits. At home, we worked with provinces and territories to reduce barriers to trade across the country.

As Canadians, we know how important it is to protect the environment. That is why we introduced a plan to ban harmful single-use plastics where science warrants it, put a price on pollution, and invested in renewable energy. This is the time to be ambitious – after all, in 2019 we surpassed our target of protecting 10% of Canada’s marine and coastal areas. With the help of public servants across government, we are stepping up for today and tomorrow.

Building a brighter future also means ensuring that everyone has the tools they need to succeed. Working with young people across the country we introduced Canada’s first-ever Youth Policy. We also modernized the Youth Employment Strategy, helping students participate in on-the-job training and work placements, and introduced new measures to make post-secondary education more accessible and affordable.

This year, we also continued to walk the road of reconciliation and renew Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples. We reduced the number of long-term drinking water advisories on reserves, and are closing the gaps in everything from housing to healthcare. The government also worked in partnership with Indigenous peoples to co-develop legislation to protect Indigenous languages. Although we have taken important steps forward, we know there is a long road ahead. This summer, we received the final report from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. We will continue to work in partnership with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities to implement the Calls for Justice and end this national tragedy.

As public servants, you help build a stronger, more resilient country. That includes making government even more transparent and accountable through initiatives like the Mandate Letter Tracker and Beyond2020. To the public servants in the Privy Council Office and across government: thank you. Your dedication and hard work keep our democracy healthy, strengthen our communities and the middle class, and create a better future for generations to come.


The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau,
Prime Minister of Canada

Results at a glance

In 2018–19, the Privy Council Office (PCO) used the following resources to support the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, Cabinet, and Cabinet committees in delivering key elements of the Government’s mandate.

Providing non-partisan advice to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, Cabinet and Cabinet committees on matters of national and international importance

PCO advised and supported national and international programs and policies in 2018–19, including:

Supporting the smooth functioning of the Cabinet decision-making process and facilitating the implementation of the Government’s agenda

PCO provided secretariat services to the Cabinet and its committees including: managing the Cabinet's decision-making system, coordinating departmental policy proposals to Cabinet, scheduling and providing support services for Cabinet and committee meetings, advancing the Government's agenda across federal departments and agencies, providing advice to Cabinet on Governor in Council appointments, and providing administrative services to the Prime Minister's Office, Portfolio Ministers and to commissions of inquiry.

To that end, PCO played a critical challenge function in the development of 497 departmental Cabinet documents, including 330 Memoranda to Cabinet and 167 presentations and other documents, ensuring that these policy proposals supported evidence-based decision making and that submissions were consistent with the Government’s overall policy direction.

To enhance transparency and openness, PCO launched the Mandate Letter Tracker. This was the first time the Government of Canada had reported publically on the status of mandate letter commitments and a step forward in terms of government transparency and accountability to Canadians. In the 2018–19 fiscal year, the mandate letter tracker was updated seven times.

Fostering a high-performing and accountable Public Service

With the launch of Beyond2020, a framework to make the Public Service more agile, inclusive and better equipped, PCO conducted engagement across the Public Service including 15 meetings with the Board of Management and Renewal and the Deputy Minister Network on Public Service Renewal.

The Clerk of the Privy Council released the Data Strategy Roadmap for the Federal Public Service (the Strategy) in November 2018. The Strategy sets the foundation for the Federal Public Service to ensure, first, that data is leveraged as a strategic asset to better serve Canadians, and, second, that their personal information is protected. It includes a wide variety of examples from government that highlight the strong and innovative uses of data to support government operations in a digital environment, provide better services, support effective decision making and enable reporting to Canadians on the results of government actions and activities.

PCO also released the following documents on the overall state and health of the federal public service:

Actual net spending: $214,277,265 (including the resources for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls)
Actual full-time equivalents: 1,180

For more information on PCO’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core responsibility

Serve the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Description

To deliver analysis, advice and support to the Prime Minister and Ministers of the Portfolio including non-partisan advice and information from across the Public Service resulting from consultations and collaboration with international and domestic sources inside and outside government.

To act as secretariat to the Cabinet and its committees including managing the Cabinet's decision-making system; coordinate departmental policy proposals to Cabinet; schedule and provide support services for meetings of Cabinet and Cabinet committees; advance the Government's agenda across federal departments and agencies; and provide administrative services to the Prime Minister's Office, Portfolio Ministers and to Commissions of Inquiry.

To lead and renew the Public Service in order to advise the Government; implement its agenda; and deliver services and results to Canadians.

Results

Throughout 2018–19, PCO was responsible for providing public service support to the Prime Minister across the entire spectrum of policy questions and operational issues facing the Government on a daily basis, including the following:

Helping the Government achieve its priorities through the delivery of high-quality information, expert analysis and advice

PCO has provided advice and guidance on the machinery of government for multiple policy proposals and key government commitments, including the Poverty and National Housing strategies, and the Pay Equity Act.

PCO continued to support the government’s commitment to open, transparent and merit-based selection processes for Senate and Governor in Council appointments that reflect Canada’s diversity. Between April 1, 2018 and March 31, 2019, 383 Governor in Council appointments were made following an open, transparent, and merit-based selection process.

PCO supported the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons in advancing the Government’s legislative agenda, including the introduction of 22 government bills and 24 bills receiving Royal Assent.

Through the National Security and Intelligence Advisor to the Prime Minister PCO continued to provide timely and relevant assessments, advice and support to the Prime Minister and Cabinet to advance Canada’s national security and the country’s intelligence, foreign policy, defence and economic interests.

In 2018–19, PCO supported the Prime Minister and Cabinet by providing information on which to base decisions that impact the daily lives, health, safety, well being and prosperity of all Canadians. This involved strategic recommendations and advice on a range of economic, social policy, trade and foreign policy issues, including on reconciliation, environment and clean growth and the modernization of trade agreements, including during the renegotiation of the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement and the ratification and entry into force of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership. In achieving this, PCO provided clear direction to departments, ensuring the Prime Minister and Cabinet ministers received informed and high-quality proposals consistent with the Government’s overall policy direction.

PCO supported the Prime Minister’s participation in a significant number of high profile multinational and bilateral engagements by coordinating travel and providing comprehensive communications support. In February 2018, the Minister of Democratic Institutions announced additional improvements to the Senate appointments process, including keeping the application period open year-round, retaining submitted applications for two years, and allowing third parties to nominate candidates.

In 2018–19, all Senate vacancies were filled for the first time in eight years. During the reporting period, PCO supported the appointment of 16 Senators. Of these appointees, nine self-identified as women, five as Indigenous and two as visible minorities.

In October 2018, the Minister of Democratic Institutions announced the creation of the independent Leaders' Debates Commission, mandated to organize two leaders' debates, one in each official language, for the 2019 federal general election.

The Minister of Democratic Institutions also led a whole-of-government initiative to safeguard Canada’s elections and democratic institutions from interference. This initiative brought together 10 departments and agencies and resulted in a plan that included activities with respect to citizen preparedness, organizational resilience, combatting foreign interference and getting social media companies and digital platforms to act to improve transparency, authenticity and integrity online. The plan was publicly announced in January 2019.

Ensuring Cabinet decision-making processes are effective, of high quality, and consistent with the Government’s priorities

PCO supported Cabinet deliberations on a large volume of policy, legislative and operational matters. PCO helped triage the various proposals brought forward for Cabinet consideration. The typical agenda of a full Cabinet meeting includes a small number of main items, which are complex proposals or key government priorities, as well as annex items for ratification, which have previously been considered in a Cabinet committee.

The Office of the Counsel to the Clerk of the Privy Council (OCC), contributed to the support of Cabinet and its committees. The OCC helped ensure that materials prepared to support Cabinet decision making accurately reflected legal advice on the legal risk associated with government initiatives, such as litigation positions, actions and statutory amendments). The OCC advised PCO, the Prime Minister’s Office and government departments on the laws and practices respecting the confidentiality of cabinet decision-making, including their application to specific proposed cabinet meetings, discussions between ministers, and other consultations and events.

PCO supported the Cabinet Committee on Agenda, Results and Communications continued to meet to track progress on the Government’s agenda and priorities.

Building a strong middle class

PCO continued to work with provinces, territories and other government departments to develop economic policies to foster the growth of the middle class, including through:

  • the Atlantic Growth Strategy, under which, for example, the Atlantic provinces participated in a trade mission to China in November 2018
  • the provision of comprehensive support for the December 2018 First Ministers’ Meeting, which focused on diversifying Canada’s international trade, promoting clean growth, and strengthening trade between provinces and territories
  • support for the Prime Minister’s appointment of the Minister of Intergovernmental and Northern Affairs and Internal Trade in July 2018

Further, PCO continued to provide analysis and recommendations to Cabinet and the Prime Minister with respect to a broad range of economic and social policies, such as Innovation and Skills Plan initiatives, infrastructure and industrial policy. PCO also exercised policy leadership in areas such as the streamlining of business innovation programming and the strengthening of federal scientific research. As well, it continued to provide advice on economic and trade policy through its support of the negotiation and implementation of Canada’s free trade agreements, regulatory modernization, investment agreements and in the resolution of trade irritants and disputes. PCO also supported the development and implementation of policy proposals — for example, on labour market skills, training programs and worker benefits — to enhance Canadians’ labour market attachment and mobility.

Strengthening diversity and inclusion to ensure all Canadians have the opportunity to attain full economic and social participation

PCO furthered the Government of Canada’s youth agenda and worked towards the creation of Canada’s Youth Policy, in consultation and collaboration with youth-serving organizations and stakeholders, as well as with other government departments and agencies.

In 2018, the Government integrated considerations of gender impacts at each step of the budgeting process and introduced a new Gender Results Framework to guide decisions and measure Canada’s progress in achieving greater gender equality. PCO provided ongoing support through oversight, monitoring and public reporting on mandate commitments seeking to enhance gender equality.

To advance inclusive federal policies, programs and laws for LGBTQ2 (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit) communities, PCO continued to engage with transgender, non-binary and two-spirit Canadians. PCO’s advice informed work, led by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) and the Department of Justice Canada, on a renewed federal approach to the collection, use, and display of sex and gender information.

To that end, PCO continued to support implementation of the Action Plan on Gender Based Analysis (2016–2020) across the public service, in collaboration with Women and Gender Equality Canada (WAGE) and TBS. In May 2018, the Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) Focal Point Unit was created at PCO. The Unit leads PCO commitments to:

  • develop and implement a framework to monitor progress on GBA+ capacity and implementation across Government
  • report regularly on GBA+
  • ensure GBA+ is considered in every Cabinet proposal
  • support WAGE in assessing departmental performance
  • work with WAGE to identify examples of GBA+ affecting outcomes of policies, programs and legislation
Supporting the Government on renewing relationships with Indigenous Peoples in multiple ways

PCO played a significant role in the establishment of Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNA) by providing advice and support on the machinery of government.

PCO also provided advice and support during the adoption of the Indigenous Languages Act, which is intended to support the reclaiming, revitalizing, maintaining and strengthening of Indigenous languages in Canada.

PCO also supported other departments’ efforts to improve federal programming, policy and legislation to better serve Indigenous people in such areas as First Nations education from kindergarten to grade 12, First Nations health system transformation, social and water infrastructure investments and legislation regarding First Nations child and family services and the revitalization of Indigenous languages.

PCO continued to help other central agencies and government departments develop transformative legislation and policies promoting reconciliation with, and increased self-determination of Indigenous Peoples by:

To the same end, PCO also continued to give administrative advice and assistance to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in such areas as staffing, contracting, and acquisition and financial services.

PCO supported the implementation of other key Government commitments to advancing whole-of-government approaches to reconciliation. PCO worked with CIRNA, ISC and other departments to:

PCO supported the Deputy Minister’s Task Force on Reconciliation and implemented several internal operational practices aimed at overcoming specific obstacles to the Government’s reconciliation efforts. These practices focus on three priority areas: human resources, agreements and authorities, and procurement and investments.

PCO assisted government departments in the on-going development of new policies to replace the current Comprehensive Land Claims Policy and the Inherent Right of Self-Government Policy. PCO also worked to increase the numbers of comprehensive modern treaties and of new self-government agreements, the fulfillment of treaty obligations through progress at discussion tables on recognition of indigenous rights and self-determination as required by the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Fostering experimentation, Promoting Open Government and Renewing the Public Service

Since 2017, Impact Canada, led by PCO has worked to provide systems-level support to departments and agencies as they tailor policy responses to improve results for Canadians. Drawing on domestic and global best practices, Impact Canada identifies, tests and scales methodologically sound outcomes-based approaches, such as challenge prizes and behavioral insights, to improve policy implementation.

Fiscal year 2018–19 was a period of rapid growth for Impact Canada, and several of its key initiatives reached important milestones:

Together, these investments bring total funding under Impact Canada to approximately $700M, making important progress toward mainstreaming outcomes-based funding approaches in government. Ultimately, it will equip the Public Service to improve results for Canadians in key areas.

Focussing on outcomes to improve results for Canadians is paramount to our Beyond2020 renewal efforts. Supported by PCO, departments and agencies have champions for Beyond2020 who are responsible for driving greater organizational agility, deeper inclusion, and a better equipped Public Service. PCO regularly convened conversations across organizations, communities and external partners to build government-wide capacity through sharing of concrete approaches to public service renewal. PCO led ongoing efforts to build on the momentum from previous Innovation Fairs. In 2018–19, PCO coordinated 16 such fairs across Canada — up from 13 in 2017–18 — to foster learning, experimentation and engagement among public servants. The fairs attracted over 7,200 attendees — a 53% increase over the previous year —including public servants, academics, students, and not-for-profit and private sector representatives.

PCO also supported the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons in legislation, passed by Parliament, that:

Results achieved

To implement the Policy on Results, PCO adopted the Departmental Results Framework for planning and reporting in 2018–19. Therefore, results from previous years are, for the most part, not available and would not, in any case, be comparable to this year’s. For information on results achieved in previous years, please see the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report. The methodology used in the calculation of the departmental results indicators in the table below is available on GC Infobase.

PCO monitors and reports on four departmental results categories, consisting of eleven departmental performance indicators. They are as follows:

Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Government‘s priorities are achieved Percentage of Mandate Letter commitments achieved 70% or more March 2019 51%
By the end of the mandate (October 2019) the results were 82%.
N/A N/A
Percentage of Mandate Letter commitments underway 30% or less March  2019   47%
By the end of the mandate (October 2019) the results were 16%.
N/A N/A
Percentage of Stock Take priorities achieved 75% or more March 2019 54%*
By the end of the mandate (October 2019) the results were 80%.
N/A N/A
Percentage of Stock Take priorities underway 25% or less March 2019 46%*
By the end of the mandate (October 2019) the results were 20%.
N/A N/A
Cabinet receives high quality advice Percentage of Cabinet ministers satisfied with service and advice from the Privy Council Office Improvement of 5% from benchmark to be established after the first year of reporting. March 2019 75% N/A N/A
Percentage of Cabinet documents distributed to Ministers that meet the Privy Council Office’s guidance on drafting Cabinet documents 50% of Cabinet documents To be determined after first year of reporting. 93% N/A N/A
Cabinet and its committees focus on priorities Percentage of Cabinet items devoted to mandated Government priorities 50% of Cabinet items March 2019 50% N/A N/A
Percentage of Cabinet items devoted to Prime Minister’s priorities To be determined after first year of reporting March 2019 31% N/A N/A
The Clerk’s priorities are achieved Percentage of employees who describe their workplace as being psychologically healthy 1 to 3% increase March 2019 59% 56% 60%**
Percentage of employees who are encouraged to be innovative or take initiative in their work 1 to 3% increase March 2019 66% 67% 66%**
Percentage of employees who get the training they need to do their job 1 to 3% increase March 2019 70% 66% Question not included in 2016–17 employee survey**
* The calculations supporting the Percentage of Stock Take priorities achieved and Percentage of Stock Take priorities underway capture the total commitments completed across all four priority areas combined. For more information please refer to the methodology section on GC InfoBase.
**Refers to Public Service Employee Annual Survey results
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
85,694,010 85,694,010 140,061,986 122,134,560 36,440,550
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
548 636 88

PCO’s actual spending for its core responsibility “Serve the Prime Minister and Cabinet” in fiscal year 2018–19 was $36.4 million higher compared to its planned spending, due mainly to the following items:

Financial, human resources and performance information for PCO’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: 

Results

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
80,666,491 82,670,978 93,932,257 92,142,705 9,471,727
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
521 544 23

PCO’s actual spending for Internal services in fiscal year 2018–19 was $9.5 million higher compared to its planned spending. This was primarily due to: the establishment of the Office of the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Northern Affairs, and Internal Trade; increased departmental support for existing Ministers; and, additional support for the management and oversight of Governor in Council appointments.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph

The graph above illustrates PCO's spending trend over a six-year period (2016–17 to 2021–22).

Text version - Departmental spending trend graph

Fiscal years 2016–17 to 2018–19 show actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts, while fiscal years 2019–20 to 2021–22 present planned spending.

The 2017–18 spending of $202.9 million increased by $48.7 million (32%) as compared to 2016-17. This increase is mainly due to continuing Budget 2016 initiatives to strengthen security and increase investment in PCO's information technology modernization project, and spending for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

The 2018–19 spending of $214.3 million increased by $11.3 million (6%), compared to 2017-18. The increase is mainly due to increased spending to support the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Planned spending in 2019–20 is lower than 2018–19 spending by $34.9 million (16%), primarily due to a significant decrease in funding for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Spending is expected to decrease by $16.2 million (9%) in 2020–21 compared to 2019–20. These planned decreases are mainly due to: the sun-setting of funding for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (which ceased operating in June 2019), the decrease of funding for the Secure Communications for National Leadership Initiative and the decrease in funding for the management and oversight of Governor in Council appointments. Spending will decrease by an additional $5.4 million (3%) in 2021–22, mainly due to lower funding for PCO's Governor in Council appointments system and the Workplace 2.0 accommodations fit-up initiative.

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016–17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Serve the Prime Minister and Cabinet1 85,694,010 85,694,010 90,755,672 76,230,633 140,061,986 122,134,560 91,286,880 65,761,246
Subtotal 85,694,010 85,694,010 90,755,672 76,230,633 140,061,986 122,134,560 91,286,880 65,761,246
Internal Services2 80,666,491 82,670,978 88,637,796 86,955,631 93,932,257 92,142,705 111,654,018 88,479,695
Total 166,360,501 168,364,988 179,393,468 163,186,264 233,994,243 214,277,265 202,940,898 154,240,941
  1. In 2017–18, PCO transitioned from its Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture, which was required under the previous Policy on Management Resources and Results Structures, to a Departmental Results Framework, which is required under the new Policy on Results. The planned spending for 2018–19 and 2019-–20 were prepared as per the Departmental Results Framework.
  2. With the implementation of the Policy on Results and the transition to the Departmental Results Framework, Internal Services spending was realigned in keeping with TBS Guide on Recording and Reporting of Internal Services Expenditures. The financial and human resources of the offices of the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, Clerk and Deputy Clerk, as well as a portion of Communications and Legal Services were removed from the Core Responsibility and included in Internal Services.
2018–19 Budgetary actual gross spending summary (dollars)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2018–19
Actual gross spending
2018–19
Actual gross spending for specified purpose accounts
2018–19
Actual revenues netted against expenditures
2018–19
Actual net spending (authorities used)
Serve the Prime Minister and Cabinet 122,737,393 - -602,833 122,134,560
Subtotal 122,737,393 - -602,833 122,134,560
Internal Services 92,499,776 - -357,071 92,142,705
Total 215,237,169 - -959,904 214,277,265

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (full time equivalents)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2016–17
Actual full‑time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full‑time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full‑time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full‑time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full‑time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full‑time equivalents
Serve the Prime Minister and Cabinet1 461 568 548 636 573 539
Subtotal 461 568 548 636 573 539
Internal Services2 485 543 521 544 579 580
Total 946 1,111 1,069 1,180 1,152 1,119
  1. In 2017–18, PCO transitioned from its Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture, which was required under the previous Policy on Management Resources and Results Structures, to a Departmental Results Framework, which is required under the new Policy on Results. The planned FTEs for 2018–19 and 2019–20 were prepared as per the Departmental Results Framework.
  2. With the implementation of the Policy on Results and the transition to the Departmental Results Framework, Internal Services FTEs were realigned in keeping with TBS Guide on Recording and Reporting of Internal Services Expenditures. The financial and human resources of the offices of the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, the Clerk and Deputy Clerk, as well as a portion of Communications and Legal Services were removed from the core responsibility and included in Internal Services.

Explanations for change in full-time equivalents by year are in line with the explanations provided for variances in the departmental spending section.

Expenditures by vote

For information on PCO’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018–2019.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of PCO’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

PCO’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018–19
Planned results
2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
Difference (2018–19 Actual results minus
2018–19 Planned results)
Difference (2018–19 Actual results minus
2017–18 Actual results)
Total expenses 255,528,075 233,343,863 218,957,765 22,184,212 14,386,098
Total revenues (1,094,883) (973,875) (20,041) 121,009* (953,834)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 254,433,191 232,369,988 218,937,724 22,063,203 13,432,264
(*) Net cost of operations from continuing operations

Difference between 2017–18 actual results and 2018–19 actual results

The Department’s actual net cost of operations from continuing activities in 2018–19 was $13.4 million higher than the previous year. This is primarily attributed to increased spending related to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Difference between 2018–19 actual results and 2018–19 planned results

The Department’s actual net cost of operations from continuing activities in 2018–19 was $22.1 million lower than the planned results for the same fiscal year. While spending in support of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls was higher in the previous fiscal year, it was lower than the 2018–19 planned results as the activities of the Inquiry were extended into 2019–20.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial Information 2018–19 2017–18 Difference
(2018–19 minus
2017–18)
Total net liabilities 62,682,538 50,426,767 12,255,771
Total net financial assets 50,824,959 40,008,010 10,816,949
Departmental net debt 11,857,579 10,418,757 1,438,822
Total non‑financial assets 19,855,748 16,043,560 3,812,188
Departmental net financial position 7,998,169 5,624,803 2,373,366

In 2018–19, the Department’s total net liabilities increased by $12.2 million when compared to 2017–18. This increase is primarily attributable to accounts payable and accrued liabilities arising from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Total net financial and non-financial assets were $70.7 million in 2018–19, representing an increase of $14.6 million compared to 2017–18. This increase is primarily attributable to amounts due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund representing authorities available to discharge increased accounts payable and accrued liabilities.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

The Privy Council Office:

Mandate and role

PCO serves Canada and Canadians by providing advice and support to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, and Cabinet.

PCO’s three main roles are to:

  1. Provide professional non-partisan advice to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, Cabinet and Cabinet committees on matters of national and international importance.
  2. Ensure that the Cabinet decision-making process runs smoothly and help implement the Government’s agenda.
  3. Foster a high-performing and accountable Public Service.

Our “Raison d’être” is available on PCO’s website.

For more information on the Department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the mandate letters website.

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on the Key Risks website.

Reporting framework

PCO’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below.

Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory
Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory
Text version

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for PCO’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available through PCO’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the Government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada’s Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication

Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication

©Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada (2019)
All rights reserved

All requests for permission to reproduce this document or any part
thereof shall be addressed to the Privy Council Office.

Cette publication est également disponible en français :
Rapport sur les résultats ministériels 2018-2019

ISSN : 2560-9599

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