Annual Report on the Privacy Act 2011-2012

2011-2012 Annual Report on the Privacy Act
is available on the PHAC web site.
Également disponible en français sur le site Web de l’ASPC sous le titre :
Rapport annuel 2011-2012 sur la
Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

To obtain additional copies, please contact:
Access to Information and Privacy Office
Public Health Agency of Canada
1600 Scott Street
Holland Cross, Tower B, Suite 700
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9
Tel: 613-948-8187
Fax: 613-957-9093
This publication can be made available in alternative formats upon request.
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2012

Cat.: HP2-17/2012E-PDF

Table of Contents

Introduction

I. Privacy Act

The Privacy Act (the Act) gives individuals the right of access to information about themselves held by the federal government with certain specific and limited exceptions. The Act protects an individual's privacy by setting out provisions related to the collection, retention, accuracy, disposal, use and disclosure of personal information.

The Privacy Act requires (in section 72) the head of every federal government institution to submit an annual report to Parliament on the administration of the Act following the close of each fiscal year. This report describes how the Public Health Agency of Canada has taken collective action to raise the awareness of its employees with regards to their privacy responsibilities. The report covers the fiscal year 2011-2012.

II. About The Public Health Agency of Canada

Public health involves the organized efforts of society to keep people healthy and to prevent injury, illness and premature death. It includes programs, services and policies that protect and promote the health of all Canadians. In Canada, public health is a responsibility that is shared by the three levels of government in collaboration with the private sector, non-governmental organizations, health professionals and the public.

In September of 2004, the Public Health Agency of Canada was created within the federal Health Portfolio to deliver on the Government of Canada’s commitment to increase its focus on public health in order to help protect and improve the health and safety of all Canadians and to contribute to strengthening the health care system.

The Agency has the responsibility to:

  • contribute to the prevention of disease and injury, and to the promotion of health;
  • enhance the quality and quantity of surveillance data and expand the knowledge of disease and injury in Canada;
  • provide federal leadership and accountability in managing public health emergencies;
  • serve as a central point for sharing Canada’s expertise with the rest of the world and for applying international research and development to Canada’s public health programs; and
  • strengthen intergovernmental collaboration on public health and facilitate national approaches to public health policy and planning.

The Public Health Agency of Canada develops, implements and enforces regulations, legislation, policies, programs, services and initiatives and works with other federal partners, the provinces and territories.

The issue of privacy and the appropriate management of personal information, including personal health information, are extremely important for Canadians and the Public Health Agency of Canada. The Agency takes its role in the management of personal information seriously and has taken steps to raise awareness and implement processes to comply with the Privacy Act.

Public trust in the Public Health Agency of Canada’s handling of information, particularly personal information is critical to the development and management of its program, policies and services. That trust is built on integrity, transparency and openness.

Please visit the Public Health Agency of Canada website for more information about the Agency.

Privacy Infrastructure

I. The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Division

The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Division within the the Emergency Management and Corporate Affairs Branch is responsible for administering the Privacy Act, as well as associated Treasury Board policies and directives for the Public Health Agency of Canada.

The Privacy responsibilities of the ATIP Division include:

  • Responding to privacy requests;
  • Providing advice and guidance to Agency staff on the application of the Privacy Act and TB Policies;
  • Promoting staff awareness and providing training on the Privacy Act;
  • Monitoring trends in national and international privacy issues to provide informed advice to Agency clients;
  • Coordinating and overseeing the Privacy Impact Assessment process for the Public Health Agency of Canada;
  • Analysing privacy practices in the health sector;
  • Ensuring that the Public Health Agency of Canada’s personal information holdings are published in Info Source;
  • Preparing an Annual Report to Parliament and contributing to Management Accountability Framework (MAF) assessments; and
  • Developing corporate privacy policies and practices that promote a culture of privacy awareness within the Public Health Agency of Canada;
  • Liaising with the Privacy Commissioner, Treasury Board Secretariat, other government federal departments and agencies, provincial ministries of health and other key stakeholders to develop privacy policies, tools and guidelines.

Delegation of Authority

The Delegation Order is attached as Appendix A.

Requests under the Privacy Act - Statistical Figures and Interpretation and Explanation

I. Statistical Report

The Public Health Agency of Canada’s statistical report summarizing Privacy Act activity is attached as Appendix B and covers the period between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012.

II. Number of Privacy Requests and Case Load

a) Requests under the Privacy Act

Overall, PHAC received 47 privacy requests in 2011-2012. The Agency has maintained a compliance rate of 95.8% in relation to the legislated time frames to respond to requests, despite an increase of 275% over the previous year in the total number of pages processed (from 47,812 to 133,628). In total, 8 requests were carried forward from 2010-2011 and 2 requests were carried over to the 2012-2013 period.

Privacy Requests Completed/Received

Figure - Privacy Requests Completed/Received
Text Equivalent - Figure 1
  Completed Received
2011-12 53 47
2010-11 21 25

Enlarge Figure 1

b) Case Load

The 53 requests completed and reviewed by PHAC averaged 2,521 pages per request. The increase in the number of pages has had an impact on the amount of time required for processing requests.

Pages Reviewed

Figure - Pages Reviewed
Text Equivalent - Figure 2
  • 2011-12 - 133,628
  • 2010-11 - 47,812

Enlarge Figure 2

c) Consultations Received from Other Institutions and Organizations

Other government institutions are defined as institutions other than the Public Health Agency of Canada who are subject to the Privacy Act. The Public Health Agency of Canada has completed 4 consultations from these institutions, which represents 18 pages of records.

The consulting institutions request the Public Health Agency of Canada’s input on documents they are considering for release in response to their processing of privacy requests.

III. Disposition of Completed Requests

Completed requests were classified as follows:

  • All disclosed – The Public Health Agency of Canada completed 53 requests of the total case load of 55 for 2011-2012. Of the 53 completed requests, the applicants received full disclosure of relevant records in 8 instances (15.09%).
  • Disclosed in part – In 25 cases (47.17%), applicants received partial disclosure of relevant records.
  • All exempted – There were no requests that fell under this category for the reporting period.
  • All excluded – There were no requests that fell under this category for the reporting period.
  • No records exist – In 13 instances (24.52%) the applicants were informed that the Public Health Agency of Canada had no records pertaining to their requests.
  • Requests abandoned – Applicants abandoned 7 requests (13.21%).

Disposition of Completed Requests

Figure - Disposition of Completed Requests
Text Equivalent - Figure 3
  • No records - 15%
  • Disclosed in part - 47%
  • All exempted - 0%
  • All excluded - 25%
  • All disclosed - 0%
  • Abandoned - 13%

Enlarge Figure 3

IV. Exemptions Invoked

Sections 18 through 28 of the Privacy Act set out the exemptions intended to protect information pertaining to a particular public or private interest.

PHAC makes every effort to release as much information as possible. All of the exemptions invoked by PHAC, 25 in total, fell under section 26 of the Privacy Act, which protects information about another individual.

In terms of how PHAC reports exemptions, if five different exemptions were used in one request, one exemption under each relevant section would be reported for a total of five exemptions. If the same exemption was used several times for the same request, it would be reported only once.

This section categorizes the exemptions invoked to refuse disclosure by sections of the Act.

Principal Exemptions Applied
Exemptions Number of Times Applied
Section 26 – Personal information of other individuals 25

V. Exclusions Cited

The Privacy Act does not apply to personal information that is available to the public (section 69) nor does it apply to confidences of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada, other than those outlined in section 70. Requests containing proposed exclusions under section 70 require consultation with the Privy Council Office.

The Public Health Agency of Canada did not exclude any information under either section 69 or 70.

VI. Completion Time

The Public Health Agency of Canada was able to respond within 30 days or less in 35 (66.3%) of the completed cases. The remaining requests were completed within 31 to 60 days in 10 (18.7%) cases, 61 to 120 days in 4 (7.5%) cases and 121 or more days in 4 (7.5%) cases.

Completion Time

Figure - Completion Time
Text Equivalent - Figure 4
  • 30 days or under - 66%
  • 31 days to 60 days - 19%
  • 61 days to 120 days - 7%
  • 121 days or over - 8%

Enlarge Figure 4

VII. Extensions

The Privacy Act allows departments to extend the legislated deadline of a request if the request cannot be completed within the legislated 30-day time limit. Section 15 of the Privacy Act permits extensions if:

  • Meeting the original time limit would unreasonably interfere with the operations of the government institution;
  • Consultations are necessary to comply with the request that cannot reasonably be completed within the original time limit; or
  • If additional time is necessary for translation purposes or for the purposes of converting the personal information into an alternative format.

In total, 14 extensions were applied to requests in 2011-2012. Due to the nature of the records handled by PHAC, all of the extensions requested required (100%) as meeting the original time limit would interfere with the operations of the institution. PHAC ATIP Division did not invoke any extensions for the translation of documents or for consultation with another institution.

VIII. Translations

There were no requests for translation of the personal information kept in the Public Health Agency of Canada’s records.

IX. Format of Information Released

This section refers to the format in which applicants have received their records. Applicants received records in paper format in all instances (100%).

X. Corrections and Notations

There were no requests for the correction or the notation of personal information during the reporting period.

XI. Costs

The ATIP Division spent a total of $149,730 on the processing of Privacy Act requests. Of this total, salaries accounted for $88,713. Salaries for the fiscal year amounted to 1.75 dedicated full-time employees.

These figures exclude the time spent by employees of other Public Health Agency of Canada divisions on the processing of personal information requests. Also excluded was the time and other resources involved in the implementation of security and other measures throughout the Agency in order to protect the privacy of PHAC employees, clients and other Canadians.

Training and Awareness

In 2011-2012, resources were focused on educational initiatives that supported the implementation of streamlined processing procedures and built an awareness of privacy obligations throughout PHAC. To this end, the ATIP Office held half-day ATIP Awareness Sessions. These sessions are designed to ensure that the participants fully understand their responsibilities under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, with a focus on requests made pursuant to the Acts, and the duty to assist principles.

The ATIP Office has also delivered customized sessions to program staff. These sessions have been well received. The sessions and targeted training will be offered again in the new fiscal year.

The ATIP Office worked with the Information Management program to design a joint ATIP and Information Management online training session. This material will be finalized and sessions delivered in 2012-2013.

The ATIP Office staff also participated in the Canadian Access and Privacy Association Conference that took place in November 2011 in Ottawa. Furthermore, employees attended courses provided by the Treasury Board Secretariat such as the Parliamentary Reporting Requirement course. Finally, employees were provided with ongoing mentoring by an expert ATIP consultant.

New and/or Revised Institution-Specific Privacy Related Policies, Guidelines and Procedures Implemented During the Reporting Period

In 2011-2012, the ATIP Office submitted an updated Info Source as required by TBS.

  • PHAC’s Info Source chapter mirrors PHAC’s 2011 Program Activity Architecture (PAA) to the sub-activity level; and
  • The ATIP Office registered 14 new institution-specific personal information banks (PIBs).

The ATIP Office will continue to revise its Info Source throughout the 2012-2013 fiscal year in accordance with TBS requirements. The ATIP Office plans to:

  • undertake an extensive review of its Classes of Records to ensure they properly reflected the information created, collected and maintained as evidence of administering a Program Activity/Sub-Activity; and
  • remove all form numbers from the Document Types field.

PHAC updated its ATIP internal and external websites, internal routing documents, and correspondence to ATIP requesters with its duty to assist commitment to process requests in a timely, transparent and efficient manner.

The ATIP Office has also provided the service of informally severing Agency records as if they had been requested under the Privacy Act. In light of the increase in both formal and informal requests received by PHAC over the past year, and in order to better manage its workload, the ATIP Office has created service standards for the processing of records within the Agency. These standards were communicated to Agency staff in August 2011.

PHAC plans also to implement numerous measures respecting the privacy practices of the Agency. These measures will include:

  • drafting of a privacy protocol guidance document to assist programs in developing privacy protocols when collecting, using, or disclosing information for non-administrative purposes. This document will be finalized in fiscal year 2012-2013; and
  • introduction of new policy and guidelines for Written Collaborative Arrangements (WCAs) that identify the ATIP Division as a key stakeholder in the development of new WCAs that collect, use, and disclose personal information.

Further, PHAC is working on a Privacy Management Framework (PMF) for the Agency that is expected to be completed in 2012-2013. The PMF is a gap analysis of how PHAC administers the privacy program and provides a set of recommendations for training, tools, performance measures, and governance structures to address these gaps.

PHAC believes that the PMF and its associated Action Plan will greatly strengthen PHAC’s ability to meet its legislative and policy requirements, thereby demonstrating transparency, accountability, and leadership in the protection of privacy rights.

Finally, for its efforts in promoting and strengthening its access to information program in 2011-2012, PHAC received an “Acceptable” rating in Management Accountability Framework line of evidence: 12.4 – Access to Information, an “Acceptable” rating in 12.5 -Privacy and Protection of Personal Information, and an “Acceptable” rating in 12.6 - Governance and Capacity. PHAC is confident that its achievements over the past year provide the solid foundation required to continue building and optimizing a robust and effective Access to Information and Privacy program for the Agency.

Key Issues Raised as a Result of Privacy Complaints and/or Investigations during the Reporting Period

There are no such issues to report.

I. Complaints to the Privacy Commissioner

Subsection 29(1) of the Privacy Act describes how the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC) receives and investigates complaints from individuals in respect to their personal information held by a government institution. Examples of complaints the OPC may choose to investigate include: refusal of access to personal information, an allegation that personal information about them held by a government institution has been misused or wrongfully disclosed, or if an individual has not been given access to personal information in the official language requested by the individual.

Throughout the 2011-2012 fiscal year, four privacy complaints were filed against PHAC. This number represents less than 8% of all the requests completed during this period. The complaints received during the fiscal year were related to the following: application of exemptions or exclusions (1), and, refusal to disclose (3).

There were no active complaints outstanding from 2010-2011. A total of four complaints were carried forward into the 2012-2013 fiscal year (three of them were abandoned in April 2012). During the 2011-2012 fiscal year, there were no PHAC privacy complaints resolved by the OPC.

Complaints Statistics

Received
4
Outstanding
0
Closed
0
Carried Over
4

II. Applications/Appeals Submitted to the Federal Court or the Federal Court of Appeal

There were no applications or appeals submitted to the Federal Court or the Federal Court of Appeal during fiscal year 2011-2012.

III. The Public Health Agency of Canada Responses to Recommendations Raised by Other Agents of Parliament (e.g. Auditor General)

There were no recommendations raised by other Agents of Parliament during fiscal year 2011-2012.

Privacy Impact Assessments during the Reporting Period

In 2011-2012, PHAC initiated 2 PIAs, which are yet to be completed.

The first PIA pertains to the Human Pathogens and Toxins Act (HPTA). PHAC is responsible for administering and enforcing both the HPTA and the Human Pathogens Importation Regulations (HPIR). The HPTA provides clear regulatory-making authorities for the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication and distribution of information required by the Agency to fulfill its mandate, as well as the protection of that information. To that effect, the HPTA provides the Minister of Health with various authorities, including the authority to collect information, which could include personal information about persons having access to pathogens and toxins, to the extent that the information is relevant to the administration of the Act. Another objective is to collect information about people who work in laboratories to ensure that they meet security requirements.

The second PIA pertains to the International Health Regulations (IHR). The revised IHR (2005) adopted by the World Health Assembly Member States in May 2005 recognizes the need to prevent, protect against, control, and provide a public health response to the international spread of disease in ways that commensurate with and are restricted to public health risks, and avoid unnecessary interference with international traffic and trade. In an increasingly globalized world, journey times are often shorter than the incubation period of disease, placing Canadian cities and citizens at risk of being affected by outbreaks that begin in other parts of the world. The Regulations are an innovative set of rules and procedures agreed upon by 193 countries aimed at making the world more secure from threats to global health by governing key elements in the prevention and control of infectious disease spread. The rules and procedures set out in the Regulations represent a universal platform from which member states can evaluate, enhance and build a complete and comprehensive epidemic alert and response system consistent with international norms. Once fully implemented, the tools, systems, rules, procedures and mechanisms put in place will establish a critical and fundamental element of the national public health system and will serve as a vital tool for international and domestic public health security.

Internationally, Canada has provided and will continue to provide, technical advice and support to the World Health Organization (WHO) Secretariat in developing tools for member states to implement the Regulations. Canada is also working with its North American neighbours on the development of common practices for such matters as border screening and control, and will continue regional and global bi-lateral and multi-lateral efforts in order to promote and build on best practices with other member states.

In Canada, the PHAC has the lead for implementing the Regulations within the Agency and for encouraging implementation across federal and provincial/territorial governments. An IHR implementation team and project have been initiated. Many of the systems and programs that are required by the Regulations are in place or under development. For example, the Agency has been designated as the National IHR Focal Point. The National Focal Point is a national public health operations centre designated by each World Health Assembly Member State that is accessible at all times (24/7/365) for communication within its jurisdictions, as well as all other World Health Organization IHR Contact Points. The 24/7/365 monitoring capability has already been established, and work to develop the supporting programs around the focal point is underway. Full IHR compliance is expected by June 2012.

It is anticipated that both PIAs will be completed in 2012-2013. Both PIAs will address privacy concerns identified during the review of PHAC’s activities.

Disclosures Made Pursuant to Subsections 8(2)e) and 8(2)m) of the Privacy Act During the Reporting Period

Sub-paragraph 8(2)e) allows for the disclosure of personal information to an investigative body specified in the regulations for the purpose of enforcing any law of Canada or a province or carrying out a lawful investigation. During the 2011-2012 fiscal year, no disclosure pursuant to paragraph 8(2)e) of the Privacy Act was made by PHAC.

Sub-paragraph 8(2)m)(i) allows for the disclosure of personal information where the head of a government institution is of the opinion that the public interest in the disclosure clearly outweighs any invasion of privacy that could result from the disclosure. During the 2011-2012 fiscal year, no disclosure pursuant to paragraph 8(2)m) of the Privacy Act was made by PHAC.

Appendix A: Delegation Order—Privacy Act

Privacy Act - Delegation Order
Text Equivalent - Appendix A

Appendix A: Delegation Order—Privacy Act

Pursuant to the powers of delegation conferred upon me by Section 73 of the Privacy Act, the person exercising the functions and position of Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator for the Public Health Agency of Canada and the respective successor, including in the Coordinator's absence, a person or officer designated in writing to act in the place of the holder of such functions and position is hereby authorized to exercise these powers, duties or functions of the Minister as the head of the government institution under the Act, set out in the attached schedule.

The person exercising the functions and position of Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator for the Public Health Agency of Canada and the respective successor, including in the coordinator's absence, a person or officer designated in writing to act in the place of the holder of such functions and position, is hereby authorized to exercise these powers, duties or functions of the Minister as the head of the government institution under the Act, set out in sections 13 and 15 of the Act.

Public Health Agency of Canada Schedule of Delegation Order

Delegation of Powers, Duties and Functions
Pursuant to Section 73 of the Privacy Act
Sections of Act Powers, Duties or Functions Responsible Position
8(2) Disclose personal information without the consent of the individual to whom it relates ATIP Co-ordinator
8(4) Retain a copy of 8(2)(e) requests and disclosed records ATIP Co-ordinator
8(5) Notify the Privacy Commissioner of 8(2)(m) disclosures ATIP Co-ordinator
9(1) Retain a record of the use of personal information ATIP Co-ordinator
9(4) Notify the Privacy Commissioner of a consistent use of personal information and update the index accordingly ATIP Co-ordinator
10 Include personal information in personal information banks ATIP Co-ordinator
14 Respond to a request for access within statutory deadlines; give access or give notice ATIP Co-ordinator
15 Extend the time limit and notify the applicant ATIP Co-ordinator
17(2)(b) Determine the necessity for a translation or interpretation for requested personal information ATIP Co-ordinator
18(2) Refuse to disclose information contained in an exempt bank ATIP Co-ordinator
19(1) Refuse to disclose information obtained in confidence from another government ATIP Co-ordinator
19(2) Disclose any information referred in 19(1) if the other government consents to the disclosure or makes the information public ATIP Co-ordinator
20 Refuse to disclose information injurious to federal-provincial affairs ATIP Co-ordinator
21 Refuse to disclose information injurious to international affairs and/or defense ATIP Co-ordinator
22 Refuse to disclose information injurious to law enforcement and investigation ATIP Co-ordinator
23 Refuse to disclose information injurious to security clearance ATIP Co-ordinator
24 Refuse to disclose information collected by the Canadian Penitentiary Service, the National Parole Service or the National Parole Board ATIP Co-ordinator
25 Refuse to disclose information which could threaten the safety of the individual ATIP Co-ordinator
26 Refuse to disclose information about other individuals, and shall refuse to disclose such information where disclosure is prohibited under Section 8 ATIP Co-ordinator
27 Refuse to disclose information subject to solicitor-client privilege ATIP Co-ordinator
28 Refuse to disclose information relating to an individual's physical or mental health where disclosure is contrary to the best interests of the individual ATIP Co-ordinator
31 Receive notice of an investigation by the Privacy Commissioner ATIP Co-ordinator
33(2) Make representations to the Privacy Commissioner during an investigation ATIP Co-ordinator
35(1) Receive the Privacy Commissioner's report of findings of the investigation and give notice of action taken ATIP Co-ordinator
35(4) Give the complainant access to information after a 35(1)(b) notice ATIP Co-ordinator
36(3) Receive the Privacy Commissioner's report of findings of investigation of exempt banks ATIP Co-ordinator
37(3) Receive the report of the Privacy Commissioner's findings after a compliance investigation ATIP Co-ordinator
51(2)(b) Request that a matter be heard and determined in the National Capital Region ATIP Co-ordinator
51(3) Request and make representations in Section 51 hearings ATIP Co-ordinator
72(1) Prepare an Annual Report to Parliament ATIP Co-ordinator
77 Carry out responsibilities conferred on the head of the institution by regulations made under section 77 which are not included above ATIP Co-ordinator

Appendix B: Statistical Report—Privacy Act

Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution: Public Health Agency of Canada

Reporting period: 2011-04-01 to 2012-03-31

PART 1 – Requests under the Privacy Act

  Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 47
Outstanding from previous reporting period 8
Total 55
Closed during reporting period 53
Carried over to next reporting period 2

PART 2 – Requests closed during the reporting period

2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 0 6 1 1 0 0 0 8
Disclosed in part 1 11 6 3 3 1 0 25
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 5 8 0 0 0 0 0 13
Request transferred 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 2 2 3 0 0 0 0 7
Total 8 27 10 4 3 1 0 53
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 0
19(1)(b) 0
19(1)(c) 0
19(1)(d) 0
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 0
22(1)(a)(i) 0
22(1)(a)(ii) 0
22(1)(a)(iii) 0
22(1)(b) 0
22(1)(c) 0
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 0
26 25
27 0
28 0
2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 8 0 0
Disclosed in part 25 0 0
Total 33 0 0

2.5 Complexity
2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 230 230 8
Disclosed in part 127,397 3,755 25
All exempted 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 6,001 0 7
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less than 100 pages processed 101-500 pages processed 501-1000 pages processed 1001-5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Requests Pages disclosed Requests Pages disclosed Requests Pages disclosed Requests Pages disclosed Requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 8 194 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 10 201 3 541 2 885 6 1,453 4 711
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Total 23 395 3 541 3 885 6 1,453 5 711
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Legal advice sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 0 0 1 0 1
Disclosed in part 0 0 6 10 16
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 0 0 0 2 2
Total 0 0 7 12 19
2.6 Deemed refusals
2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
11 11 0 0 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 2 3 5
16 to 30 days 1 0 1
31 to 60 days 1 0 1
61 to 120 days 0 3 3
121 to 180 days 0 1 1
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 4 7 11
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

PART 3 – Disclosures under subsection 8(2)

Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Total
0 0 0

PART 4 – Requests for correction of personal information and notations

  Number
Requests for correction received 0
Requests for correction accepted 0
Requests for correction refused 0
Notations attached 0

PART 5 – Extensions

5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 15(a)(i) Interference with operations 15(a)(ii) Consultation 15(b) Translation or conversation
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 1 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 11 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 2 0 0 0
Total 14 0 0 0

5.2 Length of extensions
Length of extensions 15(a)(i) Interference with operations 15(a)(ii) Consultation 15(b) Translation purposes
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 14 0 0 0
Total 14 0 0 0

PART 6 – Consultations received from other institutions and organizations

6.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other government institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during reporting period 4 18 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 4 18 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 4 18 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0
6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

PART 7 – Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences

Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 0 0
16 to 30 0 0
31 to 60 0 0
61 to 120 0 0
121 to 180 0 0
181 to 365 0 0
More than 365 0 0
Total 0 0

PART 8 – Resources related to the Privacy Act

8.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $71,617
Overtime $17,096
Goods and Services $87,869
Contracts for privacy impact assessments $26,852
Professional services contracts $61,017
Other $0
Total $176,582
8.2 Human Resources
Resources Dedicated full-time Dedicated part-time Total
Full-time employees 1 1 2
Part-time and casual employees 0 0 0
Regional staff 0 0 0
Consultants and agency personnel 0 4 4
Students 0 0 0
Total 1 5 6
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