All-cause mortality: Report from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System: Hypertension in Canada, 2010

All-Cause Mortality among Adults with Diagnosed HypertensionFootnote 1

  • In 2006/07 mortality rates were higher for adults with diagnosed hypertension compared to adults without diagnosed hypertension (Figure 10).
  • In 2006/07, younger adults aged 20 to 49 with diagnosed hypertension had mortality rates that were 2 to 3 times higher than those without diagnosed hypertension. In contrast, adults aged 50 years and older with diagnosed hypertension had mortality rates 1.2 to 1.7 times higher than adults without diagnosed hypertension (Figure 10). This is in part because in these age groups, other chronic problems develop which increase the risk of dying.
  • Overall, all-cause mortality rates have decreased from 1998/99 to 2006/07 for all individuals (Figure 11).
  • Between 1998/99 and 2006/07, all-cause mortality rates were higher for men than women and consistently higher for those with diagnosed hypertension when compared to those without (Figure 11). Specifically, in 2006/07, the all-cause mortality rate among women with diagnosed hypertension was 6.7 per 1,000 compared to 5.0 per 1,000 in women without hypertension. Similarly, the rates among men were 10.2 per 1,000 and 7.1 per 1,000.

Figure 10. All-Cause Mortality Rates - Aged 20 plus - Diagnosed Hypertension vs.  those without Diagnosed Hypertension
Text Equivalent - Figure 10

Figure 10. All-Cause Mortality Rates - Aged 20 plus - Diagnosed Hypertension vs. those without Diagnosed Hypertension

All-cause mortality rates and rate ratios among people aged 20 years and older with diagnosed hypertension compared to those without diagnosed hypertension are presented in Figure 10 for the year 2006/07. Note that data for Nunavut and Québec were unavailable.

In 2006/07 mortality rates were higher for adults with diagnosed hypertension compared to adults without diagnosed hypertension. In 2006/07, younger adults aged 20 to 49 with diagnosed hypertension had mortality rates that were 2 to 3 times higher than those without diagnosed hypertension. In contrast, adults aged 50 years and older with diagnosed hypertension had mortality rates 1.2 to 1.7 times higher than adults without diagnosed hypertension. For additional information, refer to the second paragraph on page 15.




Figure 11. All-cause mortality rates - people 20 years and older with hypertension vs those without hypertension
Text Equivalent - Figure 11

Figure 11. All-cause mortality rates - people 20 years and older with hypertension vs those without hypertension

Age-standardized all-cause mortality rates among people aged 20 years and older with diagnosed hypertension compared to those without diagnosed hypertension, by sex, from 1998/99 to 2006/07 are presented in figure 11. Note that data for Nunavut and Québec were unavailable and rates were standardized to the 1991 Canadian population.

Overall, all-cause mortality rates have decreased from 1998/99 to 2006/07 for all individuals. Between 1998/99 and 2006/07, all-cause mortality rates were higher for men than women and consistently higher for those with diagnosed hypertension when compared to those without. Specifically, in 2006/07, the all-cause mortality rate among women with diagnosed hypertension was 6.7 per 1,000 compared to 5.0 per 1,000 in women without hypertension. Similarly, the rates among men were 10.2 per 1,000 and 7.1 per 1,000.



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