The 2008 Report on the Integrated Pan-Canadian Healthy Living Strategy - Supplement

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Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

The third section of the 2008 Report on the Integrated Pan-Canadian Healthy Living Strategy (HLS) profiles a selection of initiatives taking place across the country under each of the HLS’s two goals, and within each of its four strategic directions. Given the rich mosaic of policies, programs and initiatives underway across Canada, it was not possible to profile all initiatives in the 2008 Report. This supplement highlights additional initiatives that were not included in the report itself.

The HLS is oriented around four strategic directions – four distinct yet highly inter-related courses of action that support the advancement of the HLS goals.

  1. Leadership and Policy Development is defined as a federal, provincial and territorial (F/P/T) commitment to providing strong and continuing leadership to a sustainable, long-term strategy and the creation of policy at all levels (public and private) that enable people to live healthy lives.
  2. Knowledge Development and Transfer is defined as a continuum of activities that includes gathering knowledge (e.g. research, surveillance, reviews of best practices); analyzing and synthesizing knowledge; and making knowledge available to people who can use it, in forms that are most useful to them.
  3. Community Development and Infrastructure is defined as support for effective, sustainable community actions and infrastructures that build community capacity to promote healthy living and provide supportive environments for health.
  4. Public Information is defined as the provision of information and other communications strategies to motivate people and groups to adopt positive health practices throughout the lifecycle, to develop the skills they need to be healthy and to support others in healthy lifestyle decisions.

HLS Goal: Reduce Health Disparities

Strategic Direction 1: Leadership and Policy Development

British Columbia

In fall 2008, the Premier committed to develop a strategy to improve produce availability in remote communities in partnership with the Union of British Columbia Municipalities. A cross-government, cross-sector task force was created to assist in meeting the Premier’s commitment. A report has been submitted to the Minister for consideration of next steps.

Manitoba

The Immigrant/Refugee Physical Activity and Healthy Eating Initiative, carried out under a bilateral agreement with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), includes an education and awareness program, a youth leadership development program, and summer/after school physical activity programs for immigrant and refugee children and youth. The project also supports service and recreational providers to plan, implement and evaluate community-based programs that address barriers to physical activity and support active lifestyles for immigrant children, youth and their families.

Manitoba has supported several programs for youth and schools related to tobacco use and smoking cessation, including Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT), Back-Off Tobacco, Not on Tobacco and Review and Rate. Evaluation results of the Review and Rate program indicated a very positive response to the program.

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia’s Annual Participatory Food Costing initiative tracks the cost of a basic, nutritious diet in Nova Scotia and contextualizes it relative to total household income and expenses. Food costing results were published in a 2007 report. An evaluation of the initiative is underway.

Newfoundland and Labrador

The Newfoundland and Labrador Poverty Reduction Strategy is a government-led collaborative effort to reduce, prevent and alleviate poverty in the province. To date, the government has committed over $132 million on an ongoing, annual basis to fund new initiatives to prevent, reduce and alleviate poverty. The first biannual progress report will be released in 2009.

Yukon

The Kids’ Recreation Fund helps children aged zero - 19 whose families are experiencing financial hardship to actively participate in organized sport, recreational and other programs by helping to offset registration, clothing and equipment costs. The Yukon Sport for Life initiative provides sport participation opportunities for Aboriginal children and youth in rural communities by offsetting travel costs. Both programs have resulted in an increase in the number of children and youth participating in organized sport and non-organized activities.

Northwest Territories

In the fall of 2008, work on a NWT Nutrition Strategy as part of the NWT Healthy Choices Framework was initiated. The priority areas include a focus on food security. Food insecurity rates in the Northwest Territories are the second highest in Canada. The Strategy intends to address health inequalities resulting from poor access to and affordability of healthy foods.

Federal Government

In 2008, the National Nutritious Food Basket (NNFB) template was revised to reflect the latest dietary guidance and food consumption data. The NNFB describes the quantity (and purchase units) of approximately 60 foods that represent a nutritious diet for individuals in various age and gender groups. Stakeholders use the NNFB to monitor the cost and affordability of healthy eating.

Strategic Direction 2: Knowledge Development and Transfer

Saskatchewan

Regional health authorities and their partners provided training opportunities for early learning and childcare professionals to support them with tools and supports when making physical activity and physical literacy a priority for the preschool-aged population.

The Aboriginal Community Recreation Activators Program, launched in 2007, aims to enhance quality of life for remote Aboriginal communities by hiring recreation Activators to provide quality recreation and physical activity opportunities. The program currently includes 15 remote Aboriginal communities and will be expanded to include an Urban Aboriginal Healthy Living initiative in 16 communities province-wide.

Manitoba

The Early Development Instrument (EDI) is Manitoba’s province-wide method for measuring the readiness for school of all children transitioning from Kindergarten to grade one, including children of Aboriginal identity, children who have recently immigrated to Canada, and children with special needs. A province-wide EDI collection in 2008/09 provided three data points in which to determine trends, strengths and needs related to the children’s development, including their physical health and well-being. The 2008/09 data report will be available at the end of 2009.

Yukon

A telephone survey of 600 families of school-aged children was conducted to evaluate the use of healthy living materials (Healthy Living Calendar Challenge, Healthy Snack Cupboard Resource), identify information needs and obtain baseline data on how Yukon families meet their food needs. The methodology included over-sampling of rural Yukon families. The survey confirmed widespread interest in obtaining more information on a variety of healthy eating and nutrition topics.

Nunavut

Hip Hop to Wellness uses hip hop as a means to connect with youth-at-risk and engage them in discussions and activities about issues such as nutrition and healthy lifestyles. According to front-line wellness workers, parents and educators, the program has had a very positive impact on youth-at-risk. Evaluation activities, including focus groups with youth from hip hop groups in each community, are underway.

Federal Government

In 2008, Health Canada, in partnership with community organizations and Canadian Heritage, organized half-day meetings in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal to discuss healthy eating in multi-ethnic communities. Almost 150 health intermediaries attended the sessions, which featured highlights from recent focus group research with intermediaries who promote healthy eating among specific ethno-cultural communities.

Strategic Direction 3: Community Development and Infrastructure

British Columbia

The Aboriginal Youth Futures in Recreation and Sports Training (FIRST) program uses sport and recreation as a positive intervention in the lives of Aboriginal youth, providing opportunities to learn job skills, increase self-esteem and self-efficacy and promote sport, physical activity and positive lifestyle habits. The program has three components: the Urban Native Youth FIRST program, which is geographically restricted to Aboriginal youth (with an emphasis on girls and women) living in downtown and eastside Vancouver; the Aboriginal Youth Excellence Program, which provides enhanced programs and services to Aboriginal athletes striving to represent BC at the North American Indigenous Games, Canada Games and other competitions; and, the Junior Eagle Training Program, which teaches Aboriginal youth leadership, life and job skills and provides certification in scuba diving, aquatics and back country training.

Everybody Active is an initiative of the Physical Activity Strategy that provides resources, workshops and grants to service providers committed to increasing access to physical activity for people living in poverty. It is delivered by BC Recreation & Parks Association in partnership with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC and Yukon.

Alberta

In 2008, Active Living Project Grants in Alberta supported eight projects with funding from the Alberta Sport, Recreation, Parks and Wildlife Foundation totalling $368,000. Most projects supported child and youth physical activity and many addressed barriers associated with rural/remote areas, low socio-economic status families, reserve school communities, and after school issues. Project evaluations were conducted using the PHAC’s Project Evaluation and Reporting Tool.

Saskatchewan

In Saskatchewan, regional health authorities work with local partners to build the capacity to support access to nutritious, affordable food, including food costing, good food boxes, community kitchens and leadership development. They also work with their local communities to improve opportunities for active transportation through the development and expansion of bike lanes and walking trails, and are working toward an active transportation policy. Health promoting schools and comprehensive school health are also a focus within the province and there is ongoing work at local levels to ensure this remains a priority. Work to address the social determinants of health continues across the province focusing on decreasing inequities.

Manitoba

Manitoba’s Healthy Baby Program is a two-part program offering financial assistance and social and educational support to expectant and new families. The first part, Manitoba Prenatal Benefit Program provides income-eligible pregnant women with a monthly cheque during pregnancy to support them with healthy nutrition choices during their pregnancy. The Healthy Baby Community Support Program provides prenatal and postnatal outreach programs in communities across Manitoba, offering social support and learning opportunities. Initial analysis of evaluation findings indicates that participants are very satisfied with the Healthy Baby Program and that higher ratings of satisfaction are associated with increased program attendance.

In the fall of 2008, an external evaluator carried out a review of the Manitoba in motion Community Physical Activity Grants. The review found the current distribution of grants appears fair and equitable. The grants are very popular, and have a positive reputation with communities. The grant program design has been acknowledged for incorporating community needs.

Over 110 communities throughout Manitoba are registered as Communities in motion. Of those communities, ten are First Nations and 11 are Aboriginal and Northern Affairs communities.

Nova Scotia

Sport Nova Scotia offers a physical activity program for at-risk girls in three Nova Scotia communities: an Acadian community, an African community and a First Nations community. The project seeks to increase the physical activity levels of girls aged 11-13, increase physical activity outside physical education classes and foster commitment on the part of participants to be active throughout their lifetime.

The Micmac Friendship Center offers an after-school program that targets urban Aboriginal youth aged eight - 13 and 14-24. Program components include sports, fitness, dance, traditional First Nations sport and recreational activities, survival camp and sport and recreation outings. Youth mentors and role models between the ages of 25-29 are an essential part of the program.

The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia has initiated a program called Enlisting Libraries to Lead toinspire rural Nova Scotians to increase physical activity levels. Seventy-seven libraries across Nova Scotia have been equipped with physical activity resources and tools. Key resources include pedometers that can be loaned to community members, a website and a self-monitoring tool for use in tracking progress. Libraries will also provide space for walking clubs to meet.

Newfoundland and Labrador

The Poverty Reduction Strategy provided expanded funding to a number of programs and initiatives that focus on physical activity, healthy eating and healthy weights. Of particular note, additional funding was provided to the following programs:

  • Kids Eat Smart, which was expanded to include the participation of more schools across the province. More than 18,400 children participated in over 180 Kids Eat Smart Programs in 2008.
  • The Special Diets Allowance for income support clients who have conditions such as diabetes, celiac disease or renal disease, or those who require low sodium or high or low protein diets. The special diet rate increased from $45 to $60 per month. This increase is benefiting approximately 3,500 individuals.
  • The Mother Baby Nutritional Supplement, a monthly financial benefit for low-income pregnant mothers and families with children under 12 months. The supplement is intended to help with the cost of nutritious food during pregnancy and infancy. The supplement was increased to $60/month, along with a one-time payment of $90 during the month of the child’s birth. More than 1,200 families benefit from this initiative annually.

Yukon

Rural Community Master Recreation Plans, of which healthy living initiatives are an integral part, are under development, with the goal of a completed plan for every rural community by March 2011. In smaller communities, Rural Community Recreation Plans have raised the profile of healthy living initiatives to improve quality of life for community members.

A Rural Active Living Coordinator program is building local human capacity to support healthy living behaviours with the potential to become sustainable within the community. The program has been evaluated and will be expanded in 2008/09 into a “Community Healthy Living Leaders” initiative.

Strategic Direction 4: Public Information

Federal Government

Physical Activity and Healthy Eating: A Project for Children and Youth, delivered by the Active Living Alliance (ALA) for Canadians with a Disability,is one of 11 national projects supported by the Healthy Living Fund. In 2008, the ALA produced Moving to Inclusion, a series of on-line learning modules designed for physical education teachers and leaders of community-based active living programs. This resource provides a practical approach for leaders to use that will support the inclusion of young people with different types of disabilities in physical activity programs. Thirteen workshops are expected to be delivered in 2009 with an estimated participation of 250 people.

HLS Goal: Improve Overall Health Outcomes

Strategic Direction 1: Leadership and Policy Development

British Columbia

Beginning in September 2008, under the new Daily Physical Activity Initiative, all BC students from Kindergarten to grade 12 participated in 30 minutes of instructional or non-instructional physical activity per day. Schools now provide 30 minutes of daily physical activity up to Grade 9 and students in grades ten to 12 will perform an average of 150 minutes a week of daily physical activity as part of their graduation requirements. Discussions regarding an evaluation process are currently underway.

The Guidelines for Food and Beverage Sales in BC Schools were developed to identify the food and beverage products that may be sold in BC schools to meet BC’s commitment to provide a healthy eating environment for students. The Guidelines were mandated for implementation in all BC elementary schools in January 2008, and all middle and high schools in September 2008.

The BC Healthy Schools Network was established to address a variety of health and learning issues of students through a comprehensive school health approach. The Network enhances the ability of the education and health sectors to work together more effectively through the school setting. Network members support healthy school targets which actively promote healthy eating, active living, tobacco-free living and creating and fostering healthy environments. The network represents a partnership between the BC Ministries of Education, Healthy Living and Sport and the Directorate of Agencies for School Health.

Alberta

The Alberta Healthy Living Network is a provincial alliance with the mandate for leadership on collaborative, integrated action to promote health and prevent chronic disease, and a World Health Organization Country-Wide Integrated Non-Communicable Disease Intervention Demonstration Site. The Network builds, evaluates and sustains partnerships at the provincial, regional and local community level. A key result in 2008 was the development of common messaging, providing consistent, clear recommendations for the public related to healthy eating, active living and mental health.

In response to increasing rates of childhood obesity, with the goal to reduce the risk for chronic disease in adulthood, Alberta invested $18 million in strategies to encourage healthy eating and active living among Alberta’s children and youth. In 2008, Healthy School Communities Awards were created to recognize individual champions, groups of parents, teachers, and/or students, and partnerships that demonstrate collaboration between members from the education and/or health sectors as well as other organizations. Eighteen recipients have been recognized to date. A Healthy Weights Social Marketing Campaign Create A Movement, was initiated, featuring TV, radio, transit, print and movie theatre ads.

Saskatchewan

In 2008, regional health authorities in Saskatchewan worked with local partners on population health promotion initiatives to plan and implement activities related to healthy eating, physical activity, tobacco reduction and mental well-being. Leadership and policy development activities included implementing school food/nutrition policies, including the collection of data to monitor progress in this area. This is supported by the Ministry of Education, which is working with the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Social Services and other partners to develop guidance for school divisions on the development of food/nutrition policy. The number of schools in Saskatchewan with food/nutrition policies continues to increase. Guidelines related to menu planning for child-care facilities were revised and implemented by the Ministry of Education in partnership with the Ministry of Health. Regional health authorities and their partners are also supporting employers to create healthy workplaces through initiatives such as food/nutrition policies.

The Ministry of Tourism, Parks, Culture and Sport continued to support Saskatchewan in motion and its initiatives, which encourage communities, schools and workplaces to take action on improving physical activity levels.

Ontario

ACTIVE2010, announced in 2004, is Ontario’s Sport and Physical Activity Strategy. The Strategy’s goals include increasing the number of Ontario adults who are active from 43% to 55% by 2010 and enhancing sport development leading up to the 2010 Olympic Games. Through ACTIVE2010 grants, over one million Ontarians have benefited from increased opportunities to become active.

Nova Scotia

The Nova Scotia Government has established a multi-sectoral Provincial Advisory Group to inform the development of a Food and Nutrition Policy for licensed child-care facilities in Nova Scotia. The goal of the policy is to increase food and nutrition support to child care facilities and will include, but is not limited to guidance for food and beverages served, family meal environments, special dietary considerations and nutrition education. An evaluation will be undertaken to assess the policy’s effectiveness.

Government and school community partners in Nova Scotia collaborated to create a Food and Nutrition Monitoring and Feedback Tool to help schools determine the level of progress made toward full implementation of the food and nutrition policy. This will help identify resources for policy implementation and inform future planning. Results are to be released in spring 2009.

Prince Edward Island

The Prince Edward Island Strategy for Healthy Living, launched in 2003, provides a framework within which government, community alliances and non-government organizations work together to address the three common risk factors for chronic disease and to encourage healthy eating, active living and tobacco reduction. In 2008, members of the multi-sectoral Provincial Healthy Living Strategy Committee renewed the strategy for an additional five years (2008-2013), establishing new goals and targets. Parents with children aged zero - 12 years were identified as a target population.

The PEI Department of Health adopted a Healthy Meetings and Events policy, designed to support, educate and engage staff in behavioural change and demonstrate leadership in health promotion. The policy directs meeting planners to choose healthier foods and beverages (by increasing servings of fruits and vegetables and milk and alternatives, reducing fats, salt and sugar and providing smaller serving sizes), and to consider ways of incorporating locally grown and produced foods and physical activity.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Healthy Students Healthy Schools (HSHS) aims to support and promote healthy school environments for students to learn and to foster healthy lifestyles for life. Based on a comprehensive school health approach, HSHS supports the development and implementation of policies and programs that promote healthy eating, physical activity and living smoke-free in both the school and the larger school community. In 2008, HSHS continued to provide leadership on school health initiatives, support the school ground smoke-free policies and support the active school projects, partner on public health and safety issues in schools, and support the distribution and use of physical education equipment. Numerous school health promotion projects were also funded through grants from Provincial Wellness, Regional Health Authority and Regional Wellness Coalitions.

The School District Healthy Eating/Nutrition Policies, based on the revised provincial School Food Guidelines, were fully implemented following a two-year phase-in in the four Anglophone school districts. The Guidelines outline a selection of food and beverage choices to be served and sold in school cafeterias, canteens and vending machines and at school-related events. School District Healthy Eating/Nutrition Policies continued to be supported through the provision of funds to purchase food service equipment for school cafeterias and canteens in all school districts.

School Food Guideline resources including Supporting School Food Guidelines — Information for Parents and Caregivers as well as the School Food Guidelines for School Providers were revised and distributed throughout the school system.

HSHS was evaluated as part of the 2008 evaluation of the Provincial Wellness Plan. HSHS initiatives continue to be evaluated on an ongoing basis.

Yukon

Implementation of the Yukon Active Living Strategy continues with new initiatives including Active Yukon Seniors, Active-Healthy Kids, and Active Playground Experiences (APE).The Active Yukon Seniors initiative supports travel to rural Yukon for special events in sport and physical activity and promoting good nutrition habits. Evaluation shows that more seniors in the Yukon are becoming involved in the program, with a significant increase in numbers since 2004. The Active-Healthy Kids initiative enhances the skills and knowledge of Yukon caregivers to help them increase active living and healthy eating opportunities for children in their care. The APE program delivers one-day workshops to enhance and develop leadership skills for employment and community development by learning new ideas involving playground games, camp games and Aboriginal games. Community interest in these initiatives is high. Active-Healthy Kids and APE will be formally evaluated in 2010.

Strategic Direction 2: Knowledge Development and Transfer

Prince Edward Island

The PEI Department of Health partnered with the Capital Health Behavioural Change Institute of Nova Scotia to offer a workshop for front-line primary care staff. This initiative focuses on minimal intervention techniques to support realistic and sustainable behaviour change in clients. Health care providers learn skill-based, short approaches to help clients make lifestyle changes such as adopting healthier eating habits, increasing activity levels and stopping or reducing tobacco consumption.

The PEI Department of Health created a Primary Care Health Promotion Planning Committee to inform and support primary care front line staff, increasing their capacity to promote clients’ health. Committee activities included coordinating staff training and workshops, developing and piloting a social determinants inclusion lens and developing bulletin board packages on monthly health promotion topics for health facilities.

Federal Government

Health Canada is working closely with the Canadian Institutes for the Health Research (CIHR) and Statistics Canada to build capacity and research opportunities in using Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS)2.2 (nutrition focus) data. In May 2008, the partners sponsored a pre-conference session at the joint Canadian Society of Nutritional Sciences / Canadian Society of Clinical Nutrition conference. The symposium provided an introduction to the CCHS 2.2 datasets, presentations by leading academic researchers of the latest research results and panel discussions on dietary recall data and food security issues.

Health Canada continues to support the advancement of the scientific underpinning for the development of national dietary guidance in collaboration with the US Institute of Medicine (IOM). In 2008, Health Canada supported the review of Dietary Reference Intakes for vitamin D and calcium by the US Food Nutrition Board. One of the first deliverables for the review was to establish the IOM expert committee which included two Canadian academics. The review findings are expected to be published in 2010.

Health Canada, in collaboration with Statistics Canada, produced a three-volume set of tables entitled Nutrient Intakes from Food, Provincial, Regional and National Summary Data Tables compiling the usual intakes from food of 30 nutrients and other dietary components obtained by Canadians in 2004. The documents are a reference for those who will use the CCHS Cycle 2.2 data and its findings to guide nutrition-related program and policy decisions.

The PHAC supported the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology in enhancing the effectiveness of the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire — an internationally recognized tool to identify those who should consult with their doctor before becoming much more physically active and the Physical Activity Readiness Medical Examination for doctors. Revisions to these tools will help reinforce that becoming more active is safe for most people and help reduce barriers to physical activity, identify those who need to consult with their health professional before becoming more active and reduce health care costs associated with unnecessary medical clearance for physical activity.

Funding was provided by the PHAC and the Inter-provincial Sport and Recreation Council to support the continuation of the F/P/T Physical Activity Monitoring (PAM) and the CANadian Physical Activity Levels Among Youth (CANPLAY) Study by the Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute (CFLRI). Results of the PAM 2007 study were released while data collection was completed for PAM 2008 and the 2008 Capacity Study on communications and parental awareness. The CANPLAY Studyyear three (2007) results were released, showing a significant increase in average steps taken among five to 19 year olds, and in the proportion meeting 16,500 steps per day, since year one.

The PHAC participates in the development of new content for the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) produced by Statistics Canada. In June 2008, Statistics Canada released cycle 4.1 of the CCHS containing updated information on leisure physical activity and active transportation in Canada. Cycle 4.1 also included a new module related to physical activity facilities at work, which asks whether respondents have access to a variety of physical activity opportunities at or near their place of work. The questionnaire and background material are available at Statistics Canada.

In partnership with provincial and territorial governments, the federal government supported the development and delivery of one regional workshop on physical literacy in 2008, with two more planned for delivery in 2009 to promote the “Active Start” phase of the Long-Term Athlete Development Model (www.canadiansportforlife.ca). The workshops support professionals and volunteers working in Early Childhood Education (ECE) and related disciplines in learning how to integrate physical literacy principles and approaches into ECE instruction, recognizing that physical activity is essential for healthy child development.

In 2007/08, the PHAC piloted four issues of the Healthy Living E-Bulletin, a newsletter designed to keep Intersectoral Healthy Living Network members informed about efforts to promote physical activity, healthy eating and healthy weights across the country. An evaluation of the E-bulletin was completed in January 2009, supporting the production of future editions.

In 2008, the PHAC provided funding for an analysis of existing systematic reviews of interventions related to active transportation (i.e. walking and cycling) and physical activity in order to add them to the Canadian Best Practices Portal. After reviewing available systematic reviews of active transportation, a total of ten intervention studies were added.

Strategic Direction 3: Community Development and Infrastructure

British Columbia

The BC Healthy Living Alliance (BCHLA) has initiated a number of Healthy Eating Strategy Initiatives. Examples include:

  • Sip Smart! BC, an elementary school curriculum program for students in grades four to six that includes innovative resource materials and a teacher-friendly learning module to encourage children to drink less sugary drinks and choose healthy beverage choices more often.
  • Cooking Skills for Families, which builds cooking skills and nutritional knowledge within four identified communities: Aboriginal, Punjabi, new immigrant and low-income through a six — session curriculum adapted to meet the needs of the four priority communities.

The BCHLA initiated a number of Healthy Physical Activity Initiatives. Examples include:

  • Community-Based Awareness, featuring aMarketing Action Plan to assist communities with implementing a full marketing campaign.
  • Built Environment/Active Transportation Initiative (BEAT – The Path to Health), which provides community planning grants and hosts regional summits to improve community environments that support active living.
  • Walk BC, which works with communities to develop local walking programs and to increase awareness of the importance of a physically active lifestyle.

Alberta

The Alberta Healthy School Community Wellness Fund is used to promote healthy school communities and improve the health and wellness of school-aged children and youth with a primary focus on healthy eating, active living and positive social environments. In 2008, 38 projects, selected throughout the year, received funding for a current total of 53 projects, which includes three Healthy Living Fund projects funded jointly with the PHAC, benefiting more than 275 school communities in Alberta.

Manitoba

In September 2008, Manitoba Education, Citizenship and Youth implemented mandatory grade 11 and 12 physical education and health curricula focusing on developing active, healthy lifestyles through in-class and out-of-class activities. Students are encouraged to take greater ownership of their own physical fitness and find activities suited to their interests and abilities. In-class instructional time led by teachers may be supplemented with out-of-class options. An evaluation plan includes pre-curriculum population-wide data collection of youth physical activity across the province, and additional sample-based data using accelerometers, with follow-up in later years to begin measuring post-curriculum changes.

Ontario

Introduced in December 2006, the Healthy School Recognition Program recognizes the efforts of Ontario schools in supporting healthier school environments, including the promotion of healthy and active living. In the program’s first year, approximately 1,300 schools responded to the challenge, identifying approximately 2,500 new healthy activities. In 2007/08, 996 schools accepted the challenge, identifying 1,441 new healthy activities.

Newfoundland and Labrador

The Provincial Wellness Grants are a key component of the Provincial Wellness Plan providing short-term funding to community groups and organizations to enhance their capacity to address the wellness priority areas. The Plan priority areas include healthy eating, physical activity, tobacco control and injury prevention. In 2008, a total of 24 projects received funding to carry out health promotion initiatives.

The Healthy Living Messages Group is an intergovernmental working group, chaired by the Department of Health and Community Services, to promote healthy eating opportunities, access to physical activity and the development of smoke-free environments. Healthy living messages are supported through the creation of healthy environments for children and youth participating in youth groups, on sports teams, at recreation events and in sport facilities across the province. 

Strategic Direction 4: Public Information

Alberta

The Create A Movement social marketing campaign, aimed at getting kids and parents to eat better and move more, launched a new Catch Health theme in September 2008. Warning teens and parents about the symptoms of better health, the campaign put an ironic twist on a conventional public health message. An on-line baseline survey of teens, tweens and parents measuring knowledge, behaviours and attitudes regarding healthy eating and physical activity was completed prior to launching the campaign. The survey will be repeated in March 2009. 

Nova Scotia

The Department of Health Promotion and Protection is in the process of developing a provincial Breastfeeding Social Marketing Campaign to re-normalize breastfeeding in our culture and increase provincial breastfeeding rates. The campaign, which will be launched in 2009, will consist of television ads, print ads, community posters and bookmarks all directing consumers to a new provincial breastfeeding website to support moms and families in the early weeks of breastfeeding.

In 2008, the Department of Health Promotion and Protection released two in a series of four age-paced health education resources called Loving Care: Parents and Families and Loving Care: Birth to six months. The evidence-based, comprehensive booklets provide information to parents in areas such as healthy eating, breastfeeding and physical activity.

Newfoundland and Labrador

As part of the Healthy Students Healthy Schools initiative, the Living Healthy Schools provincial website provides information on health promotion initiatives, research and resources on healthy eating, physical activity, living smoke-free, addictions prevention and environmental health. The website also provides a vehicle for students, teachers, parents and the larger school community to share their successes and challenges around developing healthier school environments.

Yukon

A new resource, Good nutrition=Good learning, was developed for, and distributed to, parents of school-aged and pre-school children. This resource contains helpful tips on preparing nutritious breakfasts, snacks and lunches for children, and includes easy to prepare and inexpensive recipes. Between 3,500 and 4,000 resources were distributed to parents of all Kindergarten through grade seven students and to all parents with children in daycares, family day homes and preschools.

Federal Government

To support the Healthy Eating Advertising Campaign, Health Canada’s nutrition labelling website was redesigned to make information more easily accessible to consumers and intermediaries. The Nutrition Labelling Toolkit for Educators,launched in 2003, was also revised to include information related to the 2007 Canada's Food Guide. Also updated was a series of nutrition labelling articles that were published in News Canada in the spring of 2008.

In 2008 the PHAC continued to promote Canada's Physical Activity Guides, distributing over 3.4 million copies, as well as other related resources, across Canada. More information on the Guide and other related resources is available from the Public Health Agency of Canada or by calling our toll-free line at 1-888-334-9769.

Food and Consumer Products of Canada

Industry leadership and commitment to change is further exemplified through support for programs and initiatives designed to promote healthy active living or physical activity including research, sponsoring physical activity programs for children and workplace wellness programs for employees.

CONCLUSION

The 2008 Report on the HLS showcases examples of strategies and initiatives that support healthy living where the HLS acts as a conceptual framework for action. The 2008 Report on the Integrated Pan-Canadian Healthy Living Strategy Supplement includes additional examples of policies, programs and initiatives underway across Canada that have been submitted by HLS partners to demonstrate momentum toward the advancement of the goals of the HLS.

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