ARCHIVED: Section D: National Immunization Strategy (NIS): Final report 2003 – Concluding Remarks

 

This final report represents a vision for moving forward with a national strategy on immunization. It represents a new way of doing business in Canada with regard to one of our most important and proven public health program areas.

The five components of the strategy, outlined in the body of this report, are as follows: national goals and objectives; immunization program planning; vaccine safety; vaccine procurement; and immunization registry network. The supporting activities, which cut across and support the five strategy components, include immunization research; public and professional education; approaches to special populations; and vaccine-preventable disease surveillance.

If fully implemented, it is anticipated that the strategy will improve our ability to face the new challenges ahead and will be associated with the following important benefits:

  • Reduction in vaccine-preventable diseases
  • Improved access to timely vaccine programs
  • Improved efficiencies
  • Better vaccine safety monitoring and response
  • Enhanced affordability of vaccines
  • Improved security of vaccine supply
  • Public confidence in vaccines/response to growing anti-immunization concerns

ARCHIVED - References

  1. Division of Immunization, Bureau of Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada. Canadian national report on immunization, 1996. Can Commun Dis Rep1997; 23S4: Preface.
  2. National Advisory Committee on Immunization. Canadian Immunization Guide. 6th ed. Ottawa, ON: Health Canada, 2002. Public Works and Government Services Canada, Cat. No. H49-8/2002E.
  3. Division of Immunization, Bureau of Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada. Canadian national report on immunization, 1996. Can Commun Dis Rep 1997; 23S4: Section 1: Immunization in Canada.
  4. Guyer B, Smith DR, Chalk R. Calling the shots: immunization finance policies and practices. Executive summary of the report of the Institute of Medicine. Am J Prev Med 2000; 19(3):4-12.
  5. McIntyre P, Gidding H et al. Vaccine-preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Australia, 1999-2000. Supplement to Commun Dis Intell 2002;26 (May): 109-10.
  6. Salisbury D M, Beverley P C L, Miller E. Vaccine programmes and policies. Br Med Bull 2002; 62: 201-11.
  7. Division of Immunization, Bureau of Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada. Canadian national report on immunization, 1996. Can Commun Dis Rep 1997; 23S4: Section 2: The Development of National Goals for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases of Infants and Children.
  8. Division of Immunization, Bureau of Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada. Canadian national report on immunization, 1996. Can Commun Dis Rep 1997; 23S4: Section 5: Measles Elimination in Canada.
  9. Division of Immunization, Bureau of Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada. Canadian national report on immunization, 1996. Can Commun Dis Rep 1997; 23S4: Section 10: Current Immunization Programs in Canada.
  10. The Canadian Paediatric Society. Your Child's Best Shot: A parent's guide to vaccination . The Canadian Paediatric Society 1997: 64.
  11. Division of Immunization, Bureau of Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada. Canadian national report on immunization, 1998. Paediatr Child Health, 1999; 4 (Supplement C).
  12. Gold R. Your Child's Best Shot: A parent's guide to vaccination. Second ed. The Canadian Paediatric Society 2002: 175.
  13. Nichol KL, Lind A, Margolis KL, Murdoch M, McFadden R, Hauge M et al.. The effectiveness of vaccination against influenza in healthy, working adults.N Engl J of Med 1995; 333(14): 889-93.
  14. White T, Lavoie S, Nettleman MD. Potential cost savings attributable to influenza vaccination of school-aged children. Pediatrics 1999;103:e73.
  15. United States General Accounting Office: Report to Congressional Requesters. Childhood vaccines: ensuring an adequate supply poses continuing challenges.GAO-02-987. September 2002.
  16. Network for Health Surveillance in Canada, Centre for Surveillance Coordination, Health Canada.

 

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