Transcript - Newcomers to Canada and the Canadian Tax System, Segment: Identification for taxes and benefits

Host: Welcome to the segment called Identification for taxes and benefits, part of the Newcomers to Canada and the Canadian Tax System video.

This segment mentions webpages where you can get more information. You can find links to these webpages in the Related links for this video.

I'm Karen Davis, your host for this segment.

And with me is Sarah Taylor. Welcome Sarah.

Subject matter expert: Thank you Karen.

Host: So tell me, what kind of identification does a newcomer need for tax purposes?

Subject matter expert: As a newcomer to Canada, if you're a permanent resident or if you came to Canada to work, you will need a social insurance number, also called a SIN.

Host: So, what is a SIN and what is it used for?

Subject matter expert: A SIN is a nine-digit number that you need to work in Canada or to have access to government programs and benefits.

Your SIN is unique, personal, and confidential. Only you can use it.

Host: Can I use my SIN for other purposes?

Subject matter expert: No, your SIN is confidential and is not a piece of identification. You should keep this number in a safe place.

Host: Who can ask for my SIN?

Subject matter expert: The people who can ask for your SIN are employers preparing T4 slips that show your wages and deductions; financial institutions that prepare T3, T4A, or T5 slips to record various types of investment income or other amounts; and government programs such as the Canada child tax benefit and employment insurance. Other organizations may also ask for your SIN. For more information, go to the Service Canada webpage on who can ask for your SIN.

Host: What if I'm neither a Canadian citizen nor a permanent resident; can I still get a SIN?

Subject matter expert: Yes. If you're a temporary worker who is neither a Canadian citizen nor a permanent resident, you can still get a SIN. It will start with a 9. This is a temporary SIN that is valid only until the expiry date shown on the immigration document that authorizes you to work in Canada. If your SIN starts with a 9, it's important that you update your SIN record to make sure that the expiry date always corresponds with the expiry date on your document from Citizenship and Immigration Canada authorizing you to work in Canada.

Host: If I'm not eligible for a SIN, is there another number I can use for tax purposes?

Subject matter expert: If you don't qualify for a SIN, the CRA will assign you a temporary tax number or an individual tax number.

Host: Will I have to continue using these numbers if I become a permanent resident of Canada?

Subject matter expert: No. If you become a permanent resident of Canada, you have to apply for a new SIN.

Host: Where can I apply for a SIN?

Subject matter expert: To apply for your SIN, go to a Service Canada office. You must provide a document that proves your identity and status in Canada, as well as a supporting document if the name on your identification document is different from the name you are currently using. Your documents must be originals and must be written in English or French, or be accompanied by an official translation. If everything is in order, you will get your SIN during your visit. For more information on how to apply for a SIN or to find a Service Canada office near you, visit the Service Canada website or call 1-800-206-7218.

Host: Thank you Sarah.

This concludes the segment called Identification for taxes and benefits, part of the CRA's Newcomers to Canada and the Canadian Tax System video.

Thank you for watching.

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