Corporation Instalment Guide 2019

From: Canada Revenue Agency

T7B Corp.(E) Rev. 18

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La version française de ce guide est intitulée Guide des acomptes provisionnels pour les sociétés.

Unless otherwise stated, all legislative references are to the Income Tax Act and the Income Tax Regulations.

This guide uses plain language to explain the most common tax situations. It is provided for information only and does not replace the law.

Table of contents

Is this guide for you?

This guide will help you determine if your corporation needs to make instalment payments and how to calculate them.

Generally, corporations have to pay their taxes in instalments. An instalment payment is a partial payment of the total amount of tax payable for the year.

The Income Tax Act requires most corporations to make instalment payments so that they are treated the same as taxpayers who have tax deducted from their income at source. Some corporations, like new corporations and those with tax payable of $3,000 or less, may not have to pay taxes by instalment. Special rules may apply. Read "Do you need to make instalment payments?" for more details.

The Income Tax Act authorizes the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to charge instalment interest and penalties, and arrears interest, if we do not get the required payments on time.

Note

The terms instalment payment and interim payment are interchangeable. Either term may appear in correspondence and publications you get from us. The term reporting period has the same meaning as the term tax year since both terms describe the period assessed.

Instalment requirements

Corporations generally make monthly or quarterly instalment payments toward their tax liability under the following parts of the Income Tax Act:

  • Part I – Tax on income
  • Part VI – Tax on capital of financial institutions
  • Part VI.1 – Tax on corporations paying dividends on taxable preferred shares
  • Part XII.1 – Tax on carved-out income
  • Part XII.3 – Tax on investment income of life insurers
  • Part XIII.1 – Additional tax on authorized foreign banks

Do you need to make instalment payments?

New corporations

You do not have to make instalment payments for a new corporation until you have started your second year of operation. However, for your first year of operation, you have to pay any tax you owe on or before your balance-due day for that tax year. Part XII.1 tax, tax on carved-out income, is an exception to this.

Note

You may have to start making instalment payments for your second year even before you pay your balance due or file your first return. To help us allocate your first payment to the correct tax year-end, you can contact us to have your tax year-end established before you make the first payment. Otherwise, the system will allocate your first payment to a December 31 year-end.

Your first tax year should start on your incorporation date. If you start your tax year after this date, it may affect your requirement to make instalments later.

Tax payable of $3,000 or less

You do not have to make instalment payments on your federal taxes if the total of your taxes payable under Parts I, VI, VI.1, and XIII.1, determined before taking into consideration specified future tax consequences before the deduction of current year refundable tax credits for either the current or previous year, is $3,000 or less [subsection 157(2.1)].

If your Part XII.3 tax is $3,000 or less in the current or previous year, you do not have to make instalment payments on this tax.

Similarly, you do not have to make instalment payments on your provincial or territorial taxes if the total of your provincial or territorial taxes for the current or previous year is $3,000 or less. However, you have to pay your taxes, if any, on your balance-due day.

Short tax years

You do not have to make an instalment payment for a tax year that is shorter than one month, or in the case of an eligible small Canadian-controlled private corporation (CCPC), shorter than one quarter.

Calculating your instalments

Parts I, VI, VI.1, and XIII.1 tax instalments

These taxes are added together to determine your instalment requirements:

  • Part I – Tax on income
  • Part VI – Tax on capital of financial institutions
  • Part VI.1 – Tax on corporations paying dividends on taxable preferred shares
  • Part XIII.1 – Additional tax on authorized foreign banks

Calculate instalment payments online

You can use the “Calculate instalment payments” service to calculate instalment payments and view their due dates through:

Instalment payment worksheets

You can use the following worksheets for the calculations: Worksheet 1 (T2WS1), Worksheet 2 (T2WS2), and Worksheet 3 (T2WS3).

We have split the instructions into 3 steps as follows:

  • Step 1 - Start by estimating amounts for 2019
  • Step 2 - Choose if you'll be making monthly payments or quarterly payments
  • Step 3 - Calculate the amounts of each payment based on 3 options

Step 1 – Calculating your estimated tax payable and tax credits for 2019 (Worksheet 1)

The first step when calculating your instalments is to estimate the total tax you have to pay under Parts I, VI, VI.1, and XIII.1 and the tax you have to pay to provinces and territories (other than Quebec and Alberta).

Worksheet 1 is used to calculate these estimated amounts.

Note

Unlike other provinces and territories, Quebec and Alberta administer and collect their own corporation taxes. Corporations that earned taxable income in these provinces pay provincial tax directly to those provinces.

Estimated tax payable for 2019

Amount A – Estimated taxable income for 2019

Enter the amount of taxable income you're estimating for your 2019 fiscal year.

Estimated 2019 federal tax on income (amounts 1 to 3)

Amount 1 – Base amount of federal tax on income
Multiply your estimated income (amount A) by the current federal basic tax rate on corporations (38%).

Amount 2 – Recapture of investment tax credit
A corporation that disposed of a property used in scientific research and experimental development (SR&ED), or converted it to commercial use, should report a recapture in its income tax return for the year in which the disposition or conversion occurred. For more details on recapture of investment tax credit (ITC), see line 602 in Guide T4012, T2 Corporation – Income Tax Guide (T2 guide).

Amount 3 – Refundable tax on Canadian controlled private corporation's (CCPC's) investment income
An additional refundable tax of 10 2/3% is levied on the investment income (other than deductible dividends) of a CCPC. For more details, see line 604 in the T2 guide.

Estimated 2019 non-refundable tax credits (amounts N1 to N11)

Amounts N1 to N11 correspond to federal non-refundable credits that you estimate will apply to your 2019 fiscal year.

Amount N1 – Small business deduction
Corporations that were CCPCs throughout the tax year may be able to claim the small business deduction (SBD). The SBD is 19% of whichever of the following amounts is less: the income from active business carried on in Canada, the taxable income, the business limit, or the reduced business limit. For more details, see Small business deduction in the T2 guide.

Amount N2 – Federal tax abatement
The Federal tax abatement is equal to 10% of taxable income earned in the year in a Canadian province or territory. Income earned outside Canada is not eligible for the Federal tax abatement.

Amount N3 – Manufacturing and processing profits deduction
Corporations that derive at least 10% of their gross revenue for the year from manufacturing or processing goods in Canada for sale or lease can claim the manufacturing and processing profits deduction (MPPD). It allows them to reduce the Part 1 income tax that they must pay. The MPPD applies to the part of taxable income that represents Canadian manufacturing and processing profits. Calculate the MPPD at the rate of 13% on income that is not eligible for the small business deduction. For more details, see line 616 in the T2 guide.

Amount N4 – Investment corporation deduction
A Canadian public corporation that is an investment corporation, as defined in subsection 130(3), can claim a deduction from Part I tax that the corporation would otherwise have to pay. This deduction is equal to 20% of the taxable income for the year that is more than the taxed capital gains for the year. For more details, see lines 620 and 624 in the T2 guide.

Amount N5 – Federal foreign non–business income tax credit
A Federal foreign non–business income tax credit is available to Canadian residents to prevent double taxation of any non–business income earned in a foreign country that was taxed by that foreign country. The credit is also available to authorized foreign banks on their Canadian banking business from sources in a foreign country. For more details, see line 632 in the T2 guide.

Amount N6 – Federal foreign business income tax credit
To prevent double taxation, a corporation that pays foreign tax on income or profits it earned from operating a business in a foreign country can claim a Federal foreign business income tax credit. For more details, see line 636 in the T2 guide.

Amount N7 or N8 – General tax reduction
A general tax reduction of 13% is available on qualifying income. Corporations benefit from the general tax reduction only on taxable income that is subject to a rate of 38%.This reduction generally does not apply to income eligible for the following deductions:

  • Small business deduction (amount N1)
  • Manufacturing and processing profits deduction (amount N3)
  • Investment corporation deduction (amount N4)

CCPCs enter the calculated amount at N7. Other corporations enter the amount at N8. For more details, see General tax reduction in the T2 guide.

Amount N9 – Federal logging tax credit
Corporations that have income from logging operations and have paid logging tax to the Province of Quebec or the Province of British Columbia can claim this credit. For more details, see line 640 in the T2 guide.

Amount N10 – Federal qualifying environmental trust tax credit
A corporation that is the beneficiary under a qualifying environmental trust can claim a tax credit equal to Part XII.4 tax payable by the trust on that income. For more details, see line 648 in the T2 guide.

Amount N11 – Investment tax credit
A corporation earns an investment tax credit by applying a specified percentage to the cost of acquiring certain property (investments) or on certain expenditures.

For more details, see Schedule 31 or line 652 in the T2 guide.

Estimated 2019 federal tax payable (amounts D to G)

Amount D – Estimated 2019 tax payable on income
Amount calculated on the worksheet.

Amount E – Estimated 2019 tax payable on capital of financial institutions (Part VI tax)
Part VI levies a tax on a financial institution's taxable capital employed in Canada. Part VI tax is 1.25% of the taxable capital employed in Canada that is more than the $1 billion capital deduction for the year. For more details, see line 720 in the T2 guide.

Amount F – Estimated 2019 tax payable on corporations paying dividends on taxable preferred shares (Part VI.1 tax)
Generally, the first $500,000 of dividends paid in the year on taxable preferred shares is exempt from Part VI.1 tax liability. This basic annual exemption is called the dividend allowance.

However, the $500,000 dividend allowance is reduced if you paid more than $1 million of dividends on taxable preferred shares in the previous year.

For more details, see line 724 in the T2 guide.

Amount G – Estimated 2019 additional tax payable on authorized foreign banks (Part XIII.1 tax)
Every authorized foreign bank is subject to Part XIII.1 tax equal to 25% of its taxable interest expense for the year. For more details, see line 727 in the T2 guide.

Amount I – Estimated 2019 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable credits
You have to calculate and pay provincial or territorial income tax in addition to your federal income tax.
Generally, provinces and territories have two rates of income tax—a lower rate and a higher rate.
The lower rate applies to either:

  • the income eligible for the federal small business deduction
  • the income based on limits established by the particular province or territory

The higher rate applies to all other income. Various deductions, credits, and tax relief may affect the rates. This amount is net of provincial and territorial non-refundable credits.

Example

Corporation A resides and operates only in Nova Scotia. Its estimated income for 2019 is $600,000 and is eligible for the small business deduction.

Corporation A would estimate its provincial tax as follows:
The lower rate of 3% applies to the first $500,000 (Nova Scotia business limit). The amount over the $500,000 business limit is taxed at the higher rate of 16%. The total estimated net provincial tax is calculated as follows:

$500,000 × 3% (lower rate)
$15,000
 
$100,000 × 16% (higher rate)
$16,000
 
Total estimated net provincial tax
$31,000
 

If you have a permanent establishment in more than one province or territory, you have to calculate the taxable income you earned in each province or territory and file Schedule 5, Tax Calculation Supplementary – Corporations. See the schedule or Part IV of the Income Tax Regulations for more details.

Quebec and Alberta do not have corporation tax collection agreements with the federal government. If you have a permanent establishment in these provinces, send your provincial income tax return and your instalment payments for the provincial corporation tax to the applicable province.

For more information, see the T2 guide or go to Corporation tax rates.

Table of income tax rates and business limits for provinces and territories
Province or territory Tax rate on taxable
income eligible for the
small business
deduction
(lower rate)
Tax rate on other
taxable
income
(higher rate)
 
Business limit
Newfoundland and Labrador 3% 15% $500,000
Nova Scotia 3% 16% $500,000
New Brunswick 2.5% 14% $500,000
Prince Edward Island 3.5% 16% $500,000
Ontario 3.5% 11.5% $500,000
Manitoba nil 12% $500,000
Saskatchewan 2% 12% $600,000
British Columbia 2% 12% $500,000
Nunavut 4% 12% $500,000
Northwest Territories 4% 11.5% $500,000
Yukon 2% 12% $500,000
Note
These rates are in effect January 1, 2019 and may change during the year.
Calculating your estimated refundable tax credits for 2019

Your refundable federal, provincial, and territorial tax credits are included in the calculation of your instalment payments. Use the estimated refundable credits (as appropriate) to calculate your total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019.

Amounts R1 to R8

Amount R1 – Investment tax credit refund
Any investment tax credit you earned in the tax year must first be used to reduce taxes payable to zero, before the remainder can be claimed as a refund. For more details, see line 780 in the T2 guide.

Amount R2 – Dividend refund
A private or subject corporation may be entitled to a dividend refund for dividends it paid for the tax year. For more details, see Dividend refund in the T2 guide.

Amount R3 – Federal capital gains refund
Investment corporations and mutual fund corporations may be eligible for a Federal capital gains refund. For more details, see line 788 in the T2 guide or Schedule 18.

Amount R4 – Federal qualifying environmental trust tax credit
The amount of Federal qualifying environmental trust tax credit refund that would not be used in the Part I tax calculation. For more details, see line 792 in the T2 guide.

Amount R5 – Canadian film or video production tax credit
A fully refundable tax credit is available to qualified corporations that produce an eligible production certified by the minister of Canadian Heritage to be a Canadian film or video production. For more details, see line 796 in the T2 guide.

Amount R6 – Film or video production services tax credit
A fully refundable tax credit is available to eligible production corporations for a film or video production certified by the minister of Canadian Heritage to be an accredited production. For more details, see line 797 in the T2 guide.

Amount R7 – Tax withheld at source
The amount shown as “income tax deducted” on any information slips, such as NR4, T4A, or T4A-NR, you may receive. For more details, see lines 800 and 801 in the T2 guide.

Amount R8 – Provincial and territorial capital gains refund
Investment corporations and mutual fund corporations may be eligible for a provincial or territorial capital gains refund. For more details, see line 808 in the T2 guide or Schedule 18.

Amounts R9 to R52

Amounts R9 to R52 are the provincial refundable tax credits available to all provinces (other than Quebec and Alberta).

Information on these provincial refundable credits can be found in Chapter 8 of the T2 guide under Provincial and territorial tax.

After you've estimated your tax payable and refundable credits, you can calculate your instalments.

Step 2 – Choose: monthly (Worksheet 2) or quarterly (Worksheet 3) instalment payments

Monthly instalment payments

All corporations are eligible to make monthly instalment payments. Use the Worksheet 2 (T2WS2) to calculate your monthly instalments.

Quarterly instalment payments

A small Canadian-controlled private corporation (CCPC) is eligible to make quarterly instalment payments if, at the time the payment is due:

  • it has a perfect compliance history
  • it has claimed a small business deduction for the current or previous tax year
  • together with any associated corporations, for the current or previous tax year:
    • it has taxable income of $500,000 or less
    • it has taxable capital employed in Canada for the tax year of $10 million or less

We consider you to have a perfect compliance history if, during the previous 12 months ending at the time your last instalment was due:

  • you remitted on time all the amounts required for GST/HST, withholding under subsection 153(1), Canada Pension Plan contributions and employment insurance premiums
  • you filed on time all returns required under the Income Tax Act or under Part IX of the Excise Tax Act (GST/HST)
Note

When a corporation ceases at any time in a tax year to be eligible to pay quarterly instalments, the corporation is still allowed to pay its next instalment due at the end of the current quarter; however, the corporation will have to begin to pay monthly instalments following that quarter.

Example

If the corporation has made quarterly instalments on March 31 and June 30 and is currently deciding whether or not a quarterly instalment on September 30 is allowed, see if the corporation met the compliance requirements throughout the 12-month period ending June 30, which is the due date of the last previous instalment.

Use the Worksheet 3 (T2WS3) to calculate your quarterly instalments.

Calculating your instalments for Parts I, VI, VI.1, and XIII.1 tax

Regardless of whether you're making monthly or quarterly instalment payments, there are common things to note.
You will have three options to calculate the least amount of tax you have to pay by instalment for the current tax year [subsections 157(1) and 157(3)]:

  • Option 1 – current year estimated tax payable
  • Option 2 – previous year tax payable
  • Option 3 – a combination of the previous year and the year before the previous year's tax payable

Complete the worksheet (2 or 3) to determine the payable amounts under each option, then you can choose the option that results in the least amount payable by instalments.

Note

For Quebec and Alberta, do not enter the provincial tax payable since it is paid directly to the province.

Keep in mind that these are estimates and any remaining unpaid tax is payable on or before the balance–due day.

We will assess your return using the option that results in the least amount payable by instalments. We will charge interest if you use option 1 and your estimated tax was lower than the year's actual tax and the tax calculated using option 2 or 3.

Note

We do not issue instalment payment reminder notices. Corporations are responsible for calculating and remitting their own instalment payments.

Step 3 Monthly option – Calculating your monthly instalment payments for 2019 (Worksheet 2)

You can calculate the least amount of tax you have to pay by monthly instalment payments using one of the following options:

  • Option 1 – One-twelfth (1/12) of the estimated tax payable for the current tax year (2019) is due each month of the tax year
  • Option 2 – One-twelfth (1/12) of the tax payable from the previous tax year (2018) is due each month of the current tax year
  • Option 3 – One-twelfth (1/12) of the tax payable from the year before the previous tax year (2017) is due in each of the first two months of the current tax year; then one-tenth (1/10) of the difference between the tax for the previous tax year (2018) and the total of the first 2 payments is due in each of the remaining 10 months of the current tax year

Use Worksheet 2, Calculating your monthly instalment payments for 2019, to help you calculate your monthly instalment payments.

Step 3 Quarterly option – Calculating your quarterly instalment payments for 2019 (Worksheet 3)

If you are an eligible small CCPC (see Quarterly instalment payments above), you can calculate your quarterly instalment payments for parts I and VI.1 using one of the following options:

  • Option 1 – One-quarter (1/4) of the estimated tax payable for the current tax year (2019) is due each quarter of the tax year
  • Option 2 – One-quarter (1/4) of the tax payable from the previous tax year (2018) is due each quarter of the current tax year
  • Option 3 – One quarter (1/4) of the tax payable from the year before the previous tax year (2017) is due the first quarter of the current tax year. One-third (1/3) of the difference between the tax for the previous tax year (2018) and the first payment is due in each of the remaining three quarters of the current tax year

Use Worksheet 3, Calculating your quarterly instalment payments for 2019, to help you calculate your quarterly instalment payments.

What to do if a corporation is no longer eligible to make quarterly instalments.

Should a corporation no longer be eligible for quarterly instalments, it will need to start making monthly instalments starting the month after the next quarterly instalment payment is due.

Here is the formula to calculate remaining monthly instalment payments:

The estimated tax payable for the current year, minus the total of all instalment payments due quarterly while eligible, divided by the number of months remaining in the tax year.

Example

Corporation B has a December 31 year-end and an estimated tax payable for the current year: $120,000

Divided by 4

Quarterly instalment payments: $30,000

Corporation B ceases to be compliant on May 31, 2019. It is allowed to pay its next instalment due at the end of the current quarter, which is June 30, 2019. Corporation B will have to begin to pay monthly instalments starting on July 31, 2019.

The first two instalment payments of $30,000 are due quarterly on March 31 and June 30, 2019.

The number of months remaining in the tax year after June 30, 2019 is six.

Once again, the formula to calculate remaining monthly instalment payments:

Estimated tax payable for the current year minus the total of all instalment payments due quarterly while eligible, divided by the number of months remaining in the tax year.

[$120,000 – ($30,000 x 2)] ÷ 6 = $10,000

Therefore, six monthly instalment payments of $10,000 are due on July 31, August 31, September 30, October 31, November 30, and December 31, 2019.

Note

You can also base this calculation on the first instalment base; however, you have to add to your monthly payments any estimated Part VI and XIII.1 tax payable for the current year, divided by the number of months remaining in the tax year. In general, the first instalment base is the previous year's tax payable and the second instalment base is the tax payable for the second preceding year [Regulation 5301].

Special rules

Short tax years

Your tax year may be less than 12 months. If so, you have to pay one-twelfth (1/12) or one-tenth (1/10) of your tax each complete month in the tax year, depending on which calculation option you choose. If you are an eligible small Canadian-controlled private corporation (CCPC), you have to pay one-quarter or one-third of your tax each complete quarter in the tax year. To learn how to calculate instalments, see previous sections.

You do not have to make an instalment payment for a tax year that is shorter than one month, or for an eligible small CCPC, shorter than one quarter.

The tax you did not pay in instalments is due on your balance-due day.

Example

Corporation C's previous tax year end was January 14, 2019. Its current tax year is cut short as follows:

Start of tax year: January 15, 2019
End of tax year: August 31, 2019

Tax owed by instalments under option 2: $300,000.

Seven monthly instalments of $25,000 (1/12 of $300,000) each must be paid on February 14, March 14, April 14, May 14, June 14, July 14, and August 14.

If the actual tax for the year is $400,000, the remaining $225,000 is due by the balance-due day.

For an eligible small CCPC, two quarterly instalments of $75,000 (1/4 of $300,000) each must be paid on April 14 and July 14.

If the actual tax for the year is $400,000, the remaining $250,000 is due by the balance-due day.

For option 2 or 3, when a previous tax year is less than 12 months, the tax payable for that year is adjusted to a 12-month equivalent [Regulation 5301(1)]. This is called the adjusted base.

To calculate the adjusted base, divide 365 by the number of days in the tax year. Multiply this figure by the actual tax payable for that year.

Note

365 is not adjusted for the leap year.

For option 2 or 3, when a previous tax year is less than 183 days, the adjusted base is whichever of the following amounts is greater:

  • the adjusted base for that tax year
  • the adjusted base for the next previous tax year of more than 182 days [Regulation 5301(3)]

Fluctuating filing period ending

No change to the fiscal period is considered to occur when a corporation follows the practice of ending its fiscal period on a chosen day of the week that is nearest to a certain day of the year provided that the resulting period does not exceed 53 weeks.

Amalgamations

When a new corporation is formed by amalgamation, it is treated as a continuation of the predecessor corporations [section 87]. Generally, the instalment base of the new corporation is the total of the predecessor corporations' instalment bases [Regulation 5301(4)].

For an example, see Appendix 1.

Wind-ups

When a subsidiary corporation is wound up into a Canadian parent corporation [subsection 88(1)], the parent corporation generally has to include, in addition to its own instalment base, the instalment base of its subsidiary corporation [Regulation 5301(6)]. For an example, see Appendix 2.

Transfers or rollovers

There are situations where, in a transaction to which subsection 85(1), 85(2), or 142.7(3) applies, a corporation receives all or substantially all (generally 90% or more) of the property of another corporation that it does not deal with at arm's length. In this case, the corporation has to include, in addition to its own instalment base, the instalment base of the other corporation [Regulation 5301(8)]. For an example, see Appendix 3.

Reference
S1–F5–C1, Related persons and dealing at arm's length.

Change of control

If there is a change of control of a corporation under subsection 249(4), the corporation continues to exist as it was before for instalment purposes. When there is a short tax year, see the special rules for short tax years.

Reference
IT–302, Losses of a Corporation – The Effect that Acquisitions of Control, Amalgamations, and Windings up have on Their Deductibility – After January 15, 1987

Specified future tax consequences

For instalment calculations, the tax payable for a tax year is the total tax payable for the year before taking into consideration the specified future tax consequences for the year [Regulation 5301(10)].

Specified future tax consequences are defined in subsection 248(1). These include things like loss carryback, foreign tax credit adjustments, and flow-through share renunciation.

Part XII.1 – Tax on carved-out income

Part XII.1 applies to the income from carved-out property acquired after July 19, 1985 [section 209]. Carved-out property includes Canadian resource property when certain conditions are met. The tax rate is 45% of this income.

Arrears and refund interest apply to Part XII.1.

Reporting Part XII.1 tax

Report the Part XII.1 tax you owe on form T2096, Part XII.1 Tax Return – Tax on Carved-out Income. We should receive the return within six months of the end of your tax year.

Calculating your instalments for Part XII.1 tax

You have to make instalment payments equal to one-twelfth of the estimated tax payable under Part XII.1 each month in the tax year. Do not use options 1, 2, or 3 mentioned previously to calculate these instalments.

The remaining tax, if any, is due on or before your balance-due day.

Part XII.3 – Tax on investment income of life insurers

Life insurers may have to pay tax under Part XII.3 [section 211.1]. The amount of tax you may have to pay is 15% of your taxable Canadian life investment income for the year.

Arrears and refund interest apply to Part XII.3.

Reporting Part XII.3 tax

Report the Part XII.3 tax you owe on form T2142, Part XII.3 Tax Return – Tax on Investment Income of Life Insurers. We should receive the return no later than six months after the end of your tax year.

Calculating your instalments for Part XII.3 tax

Calculate each instalment payment as one-twelfth (1/12) of the lesser of:

  • the estimated Part XII.3 tax payable for the current tax year
  • the Part XII.3 tax payable for the previous tax year

Do not use options 1, 2, or 3 mentioned previously to calculate Part XII.3 instalment payments.

Use Form T901, Remittance Voucher, to make your instalment payments under Part XII.3. You can request a remittance voucher using our Online services.

The remaining tax, if any, is due on or before your balance-due day.

Note

If you use the estimated Part XII.3 tax payable for the current tax year to determine your instalment payments and the actual amount is greater than your estimate, you may not have made the required monthly instalments. If so, we may charge you interest.

Due dates

Instalment due dates

Instalment payments are due on the last day of every complete month of your tax year [subsection 157(1)], or of every complete quarter [subsection 157(1.1)] if you are an eligible small CCPC. The first payment is due one month or one quarter less a day from the starting day of your tax year. The rest of the payments are due on the same day of each month or of each quarter that follows.

You can view your instalment due dates by using the “Calculate instalment payments” service, see Online services.

Download the CRA Business Tax Reminders mobile app to create custom reminders and alerts for key due dates such as instalment payments. For more information, go to Mobile apps.

Example 1

Start of tax year: January 1, 2019
End of tax year: December 31, 2019

Each of the monthly instalment payments is due by the last day of each month during the tax year. The first payment is due by January 31, 2019. The last payment is due by December 31, 2019.

If the corporation is allowed to make quarterly instalment payments, the payments are due on March 31, June 30, September 30, and December 31, 2019.

Example 2

First day of tax year: October 10, 2018
End of tax year: October 9, 2019

The first monthly instalment payment is due by November 9, 2018. The last payment is due by October 9, 2019.

If the corporation is allowed to make quarterly instalment payments, the payments are due on January 9, April 9, July 9, and October 9, 2019.

Balance-due day

The balance-due day is the date by which you have to pay the remainder of the tax you owe for the tax year [paragraph 157(1)(b)].

Generally, all corporation taxes (except Part III and Part XII.6) charged under the Income Tax Act are due two months after the end of the tax year. However, for Parts I, VI, VI.1, and XIII.1 tax, the balance of tax is due three months after the end of the tax year if conditions 1 and 2 that follow are met, as well as condition 3 or 4:

  1. the corporation is a CCPC throughout the tax year
  2. the corporation claimed the small business deduction for the current or previous tax year
  3. the corporation's taxable income for the previous tax year does not exceed its business limit for that tax year (if the corporation is not associated with any other corporation during the tax year)
  4. the total of the taxable incomes of all the associated corporations for their last tax year ending in the previous calendar year does not exceed the total of their business limits for those tax years (if the corporation is associated with any other corporation during the tax year)

Note

For determining balance-due days, the previous-year taxable income of corporations and associated, subsidiary, and predecessor corporations means taxable income before considering specified future tax consequences, such as applying loss carrybacks.

For information on your business limit, see the T2 Guide.

Amalgamations

The balance-due day of a new corporation formed after an amalgamation has taken place will be affected by the new corporation's taxable income for the previous year. This taxable income is the total of the predecessor corporations' taxable income for their tax years that ended just before they amalgamated [paragraph 87(2)(oo.1)].

The same rule applies for determining the business limit.

Wind-ups

To determine a parent corporation's balance-due day in its first tax year after it receives the assets of a subsidiary corporation that is winding up [paragraph 88(1)(e.9)], the taxable income for the previous tax year is the total of:

  • the parent corporation's taxable income for that year
  • the subsidiary corporation's taxable income for its tax years ending in the calendar year that the parent corporation's previous tax year ended

The same rule applies for determining the business limit.

Statements

We issue statements of interim payments on a periodic basis. This statement shows interim balances carried forward from previous statements, plus the details of any credit activity that occurred during the statement period.

All information is displayed by reporting period. Interim information shows you the balance of instalment payments for each reporting period for which we have not processed a return.

Review the Statement of Interim Payments to make sure we have applied your payments correctly. You can transfer a payment online within a program account and between program accounts of the same nine-digit business number and immediately view the updated balance. For more information, see Transferring instalment payments.

Keep the statements with your records for future use.

Account balance and activities

At any time, you can view your interim balance, account balance, and transactions using the "Account balance and activities" service. You can also select dates to customize the view to see account transactions for a time period of your choice, see Online services.

Online requests for statements and remittance vouchers

You can use the "Enquiries" service to make an online request for:

  • customized statements for a time frame of your choice
  • copies of notices issued previously
  • stopping or restarting the mailing of statements, remittance vouchers and/or return envelopes
  • remittance vouchers

See Online services.

Statement of account

The customized statement of account is issued upon request. The statement shows all amounts posted and charged to your account for a particular reporting and/or non reporting period. It is used to:

  • acknowledge receipt of interim payments
  • show all other transactions posted to interim, assessed and non-reporting periods (for example, (re)assessments and transfers)
  • provide balances by period

Register an alternate address

You can have statements and any notification of returned payment sent to either:

  • your program account mailing address
  • your business' physical location
  • the mailing address we have on record for your business number

You can register an alternate address for a definite or indefinite period, effective immediately or in the future.

Manage addresses online

You can change the address we have on file for the physical location of your business, mailing address, as well as the location of your books and records with our Online services.

Paying your instalments

Making payments

You can make your payment:

  • electronically using your financial institution's online or telephone banking services. For more information go to Make a payment or contact your financial institution
  • online using CRA's My Payment
  • by setting up a pre-authorized debit agreement at your convenience through the CRA's My Business Account
  • by wire transfer (for non-residents who do not have a Canadian bank account). For more information, see Other payment methods
  • at your Canadian financial institution. Present your remittance voucher with your payment to the teller. The teller will return the top part to you as a receipt. You must have an original CRA voucher for your financial institution to accept the payment. Photocopies are not accepted

Note

Do not send cash in the mail.

Paying on time

We consider you to have made your tax payment on the day that:

  • it is received by the CRA
  • it is processed at any financial institution belonging to the Canadian Payments Association. Payments made at an Automated Teller Machine (ATM) may not be processed that same day

If your payment due date falls on a Saturday, a Sunday, or a public holiday, the payment will be considered received on time if it is received on the first business day after the due date.

Payment vouchers

We have four common personalized remittance vouchers that we may send with your statements or notices:

  • Form RC158, Payment on Filing Remittance Voucher
  • Form RC159, Amount Owing Remittance Voucher
  • Form RC160, Interim Payments Remittance Voucher
  • Form RC177, Balance Due Remittance Voucher

These forms are available only in paper format due to technical requirements.

To request a remittance voucher go to: 

If you are a new corporation making its first payment or you need to start making instalment payments, you can make an interim payment electronically or you can order Form RC160, Interim Payments Remittance Voucher.

Form RC158, Payment on Filing Remittance Voucher

Use Form RC158 to send a payment along with a return. Form RC158 will show the tax year-end.

You have to enter the amount you are paying in the “Amount paid” box.

Form RC159, Amount Owing Remittance Voucher

Use Form RC159 to make payments on an existing debt or to make an advance deposit for an anticipated reassessment. When using this payment voucher to make an advance deposit, clearly indicate that it is an advance deposit and include the tax year-end for which the advance deposit is intended.

If you are making an advance deposit for multiple tax years, include a list of the individual tax years for which you are expecting a reassessment and the amount to be held for each year.

Form RC159 can also be used to pay tax under Parts IV, IV.1 and XIV.

Form RC160, Interim Payments Remittance Voucher

Use Form RC160 only to make interim payments for the tax year-end for which we have not processed a return. Form RC160 will show the remittance period-end, that is, your monthly or quarterly instalment payment due date, not the tax year-end.

If you are making one payment for taxes under different parts of the Income Tax Act, tell us how to allocate each amount to make sure that we credit your accounts correctly.

Form RC177, Balance Due Remittance Voucher

Use Form RC177 to make a payment to pay:

■    to replace a previous remittance that may have been returned by a financial institution
■    if the final payment due date for the return is before the filing due date of the return

You may have to enter the remittance period end.

Payments over $25 million

You must make arrangements with your financial institutions for payments of more than $25 million.

Owing $2 or less

After we process your return and apply any interest or penalty charges, if the total amount owing at that time is $2 or less, you do not have to pay that amount.

If an amount of $2 or less is owed to you, the amount will not be paid; however, it will be applied to any existing liability.

Transfers

Transferring instalment payments

Our transfer policy allows for the movement of excess instalment payments. You can move an excess amount from one account to another account where there is:

  • an existing balance
  • a required instalment amount

We will transfer an amount to pay an outstanding balance on a corporation, a GST/HST, or an employer account or to cover a required payment on an employer account.

Instalment payments may not be transferred to another period or account as an advance deposit for an anticipated reassessment.

We will consider transfers within the same account or between related accounts of a corporation based on the following guidelines:

  • Only an authorized officer of the corporation can ask for a transfer of instalment payments
  • The request has to specify how you want to apply the payments
  • You can transfer funds between tax years, in the same account or to another account, to pay an existing balance, required instalments or a remittance on your employer account
  • You can transfer either part of a payment or an amount made up of several payments
  • You can ask for more than one transfer during the year
  • You cannot transfer a payment after we have assessed the income tax return for the tax year in question

You can transfer a payment online from one interim period to another or to pay an amount owing within a program account and between program accounts of the same nine-digit business number and immediately view the updated balance, including interest, if applicable, using the "Account balance and activities" service. You can also make an online request to transfer a payment using My Business Account's "Enquiries" service, see Online services.

You can also write to your tax centre's Corporation Services section.

You must make every effort to remit your payments to the correct account. Our transfer policy is meant to provide you with flexibility in reallocating payments when it has been determined that the instalment requirement previously estimated has been overpaid. If you make continuous requests for multiple transfers, we may ask you to explain why in writing.

Notes

For calculating interest, transferred payments keep their original payment date [section 221.2]. We consider any other allocation not to have occurred.

If you do not file an income tax return within three years of the end of the tax year, instalment payments correctly processed to this tax year will not be refunded [subsection 164(1)]. However, you may request to apply credits from this tax year to an established debt. For more information, see Re-appropriation of T2 statute-barred credits.

Refunds and overpayments

Refunding instalment payments

We will not refund instalment payments until we have assessed the T2 return for the year in question. We will refund any overpayment [subsection 164(1)], provided there is no debt or missing return on your account or any of your related business number accounts.

Note

You must file a return no later than three years after the end of a tax year to get a tax refund.

We will consider refunding a payment posted as an instalment payment that was intended for a third party.

We may refund all, or part, of the instalment payment(s) paid if you give us information showing that the payment of instalments has caused, or will cause, undue hardship [subsection 164(1.52)]. You will need to support your request by providing a description of your circumstances: Include your corporation’s current financial statements.

You can request a refund by using the "Enquiries" service. See Online services.

We do not pay refund interest on this type of refund.

Direct deposit

Direct deposit is a fast, convenient, reliable, and secure way to get your CRA payments directly into your account at a financial institution in Canada.

To enrol for direct deposit or to update your banking information, go to Direct deposit.

If, for any reason, we cannot deposit a refund into a designated account, we will mail a cheque to you at the address we have on file at the time of the original refund. This does not apply for large refunds of $25 million or greater.

Expecting a large refund

We must transfer all large-value refunds ($25 million or more) through the Large Value Transfer System (LVTS) as required by the Canadian Payments Association (CPA). If you are expecting a large-value refund, you need to be registered for both direct deposit and for the LVTS. Contact your tax centre to begin the registration process.

Transferring overpayments

You may ask to transfer an overpayment when you file your income tax return. This can be done by either entering "2" on line 894 of the return or attaching a letter to the front page of the return.

If you enter "2" on line 894 of your return, we will apply the residual overpayment to any outstanding debit(s) on your account and then to any debt(s) on a related business number account. We will transfer any remainder to the next year's instalment account, along with refund interest, as applicable. We will calculate refund interest using the effective interest rate [subsection 164(3)].

We do not transfer the overpayment to a related business number account if your returns are not filed up-to-date.

Prepaying reassessments

If you anticipate a reassessment to a previous tax year, you may choose to make a payment in advance (advance deposit) to reduce interest charges.

To make advance deposits, use Form RC159, Amount Owing Remittance Voucher. To assist us in processing your payment, clearly indicate that it is an advance deposit and include your 15-character business number and the tax year-end for which the advance deposit is intended.

If you are making an advance deposit for multiple tax years, include a list of the individual tax years for which you are expecting a reassessment and the amount to be held for each year. We will hold the advance deposits for this purpose and apply them when we process the reassessments.

Note

If the required information (for example, business number and tax year-end) is not provided, the payment will be refunded.

Advance deposits are reviewed on a regular basis to make sure that there is a risk of reassessment for the period(s) in question and that the amount on deposit is reasonable. During this review process, we may contact you to confirm that the advance deposit is still needed. There are guidelines limiting the transfer of an advance deposit once it has been assigned to a specific tax year; however, you can transfer an advance deposit to pay:

  • an amount owing
  • an instalment for an unassessed tax year on your corporation account
  • an instalment for an unassessed period on your GST/HST account
  • a remittance due on your employer account

If you need remittance vouchers, see Payment vouchers.

Interest and penalties

We will charge interest if you make late or insufficient payments. This interest is called instalment interest or arrears interest, depending on the debt. We pay applicable refund interest up to the day an overpayment is refunded, repaid, or applied.

The interest rate is based on the average rate of three-month treasury bills sold during the first month of the previous quarter.

Underpayments are rounded to the next higher whole percentage point and raised four percentage points.

Overpayments are rounded to the next higher whole percentage point.

For a list of prescribed interest rates, go to Prescribed interest rates.

You can request an interest review or a Statement of Interest by using the "Enquiries" service and view a previously issued Statement of Interest Calculated by using the "View mail" service. See Online services.

Instalment interest

We will charge interest [subsection 161(2)] according to the prescribed interest rate [Regulation 4301] if you make late or insufficient instalment payments.

We calculate instalment interest compounded daily [subsection 248(11)], according to your instalment requirements for the year [subsection 157(1)].

We use the offset method to calculate instalment interest. This means we give you credit when you prepay or overpay your instalments, and this can reduce or eliminate the interest we charge on late or insufficient payments.

We do not refund any excess of this credit. It is used only when calculating instalment interest charges. See the example that follows.

Note

Credit instalment interest is only calculated on instalment payments from the start of the tax year.

The interest rate on overpayments is lower than on underpayments; however, when we calculate instalment interest using the offset method, the interest rate is the same on prepayments and overpayments as it is on underpayments.

Example

Corporation D has a December 31 year-end and has to make monthly instalment payments of $75,000 starting in January 2019. Corporation D only makes two instalment payments in the year. It makes one payment of $120,000 on March 12 and a second payment of $150,000 on April 25. Therefore, when we assess Corporation D's return, we will charge $16,175.00 in instalment interest. We used an underpayment interest rate of 5% compounded daily in the following calculation.

An interest rate of 5% compounded daily with a balance-due day of
February 29, 2020 is used in the following calculation

Date
2019
 

Instalment
payment
due
($)

Payment
received
($)

Balance
($)

Number
of days
 

Interest
($)

January 31 75,000 0   75,000.00 28   288.20
February 28 75,000 0 150,288.20 12   247.24
March 12  0 120,000   30,535.44 19     79.57
March 31 75,000 0 105,615.01 25   362.29
April 25  0 150,000   (44,022.70) 5     (30.16)
April 30 75,000 0   30,947.14 31   131.69
May 31 75,000 0 106,078.83 30   436.81
June 30 75,000 0 181,515.64 31 772.41
July 31 75,000 0 257,288.05 31 1,094.84
August 31 75,000 0 333,382.89 30 1,372.79
September 30 75,000 0 409,755.68 31 1,743.64
October 31 75,000 0 486,499.32 30 2,003.29
November 30 75,000 0 563,502.61 31 2,397.88
December 31 75,000 0 640,900.49 60
5,274.51
Total instalment interest $16,175.00    

Instalment penalty

When instalment interest is more than $1,000, we may charge an instalment penalty under section 163.1.

We calculate the penalty by subtracting from the instalment interest the greater of:

  • $1,000
  • 25% of the instalment interest calculated if no instalment payment had been made for the year

One-half of the difference is the amount of the penalty.

Example

In the previous example, we charged Corporation D instalment interest of $16,175.00. Therefore, we assess a penalty of $4,507.82 as follows:

Example of instalment penalty
Description Amount
Instalment interest $16,175.00
Minus the greater of:
$1,000 and 25% of the instalment interest charged if Corporation D had made no payment at all $28,637.40 × 25% =
  $7,159.35
Difference   $9,015.65
Instalment penalty (half of difference)   $4,507.82

Arrears interest

We charge arrears interest [subsection 161(1)] according to the prescribed interest rate [Regulation 4301]. Arrears interest is compounded daily on any unpaid balance from the balance-due day to the date of payment.

We charge arrears interest [subsection 161(11)] on the instalment penalty from the balance-due day to the date it is paid.

If you have an amount owing, you can view a revised balance that includes interest calculated to a date you select by using the "Account balance and activities" service and selecting the "Calculate future balance" option. See Online services.

Refund interest

We pay refund interest [subsection 164(3)] according to the prescribed interest rate [Regulation 4301]. Refund interest is compounded daily on an overpayment [subsection 164(7)] up to and including the day the overpayment is refunded, repaid, or applied.

When we refund or apply an overpayment, we pay refund interest from the later of the following dates:

  • the date of the overpayment
  • the 120th day after the end of the tax year if the return for the year is filed on time
  • the 30th day after the date the return was filed if it is filed late

In the case of a repayment of tax in controversy, special provisions apply.

Carrybacks

You cannot use a carryback to reduce instalment interest [subsection 161(7)]. We will not adjust instalment interest we previously charged if the amount of the current year credit (for example, dividend refund or capital gains refund) is adjusted because of the carryback.

We will calculate arrears interest, refund interest, or both, for the carryback [subsection 164(5)] from 30 days after the later of the following dates:

  • the first day following the tax year in which the carryback originates
  • the date the tax return on which the carryback originates is filed
  • the date a prescribed form, such as Schedule 4, or an amended return is filed
  • the date a request is made in writing to reassess a year to take into account a loss from another tax year

Forgiven interest

If you pay an amount quoted on a notice of assessment or reassessment in full by the date specified, any additional interest from the notice date to the date of payment will not be charged.

Cancelling small amounts of penalty and interest

We will cancel any penalty or interest on an amount owed if the total amount of penalty and interest charged is $25 or less when the tax is paid in full; however, if a future adjustment is processed, this cancellation will be reversed and the account reviewed.

Cancelling or waiving penalties and interest

We may cancel or waive penalties or interest charges when you fail to pay an amount due to circumstances beyond your control. Such circumstances include:

  • natural or man-made disasters, such as flood or fire
  • civil disturbances or disruptions in services, such as a postal strike
  • a serious illness or accident
  • serious emotional or mental distress, such as a death in the immediate family

We may also cancel or waive penalties or interest charges if such charges arose mainly because our actions, such as errors made in the material available to the public, led you to file returns or make payments based on incorrect information.

In addition, we may cancel or waive penalties or interest charges in certain circumstances based on your inability to pay or if you suffered from financial hardship.

If you are in one of these situations, let us know about the problem and try to pay any amount owing as soon as possible. If you think there is a valid reason for cancelling or waiving penalty or interest charges, send us a letter explaining why you feel the penalty or interest charges should be cancelled or waived. Or, you can use form RC4288, Request for Taxpayer Relief, to make a request. A copy of this form is available at Forms and publications.

For more information on cancelling or waiving penalties and interest, see Information Circular IC07-1, Taxpayer Relief Provisions, and the Taxpayer relief provisions.

You may have paid an amount of interest or a penalty that is later cancelled after you make an application under our taxpayer relief provisions. We will calculate interest on this overpayment 30 days after your written request or Form RC4288 was received.

Appendices

Appendix 1 – Instalment base – Amalgamations
[Regulation 5301(4)]

Corporation A Corporation B Corporation C
Start of tax year:
January 1, 2017
Start of tax year:
January 1, 2017
Start of tax year:
January 1, 2017
End of tax year:
December 31, 2017
End of tax year:
December 31, 2017
End of tax year:
December 31, 2017
Tax payable:
$2,000
Tax payable:
$2,500
Tax payable:
$3,000
Start of tax year:
January 1, 2018
Start of tax year:
January 1, 2018
Start of tax year:
January 1, 2018
End of tax year:
December 31, 2018
End of tax year:
December 31, 2018
End of tax year:
December 31, 2018
Tax payable:
$4,000
Tax payable:
$5,000
Tax payable:
$6,000
Instalment base – Amalgamations

Corporations A, B, and C amalgamated on January 1, 2019 to form Corporation ABC.

For its first tax year, ending on December 31, 2019, Corporation ABC estimated its tax payable to be $20,000.

Tax year-end
December 31, 2019
First instalment
base amount Footnote (1a)
Second instalment
base amount Footnote (2a)
Corporation ABC Predecessors
(Corporations A + B + C)
Predecessors
(Corporations A + B + C)
$20,000 4,000 + 5,000 + 6,000 =
$15,000
2,000 + 2,500 + 3,000 =
$7,500
For Regulation 5301(4), the instalment base year amounts for Corporation ABC's first tax year ending on December 31, 2019 would be:
Tax year-end
December 31, 2020
First instalment
base amount Footnote (1b)
Second instalment
base amount Footnote (2b)
Corporation ABC Corporation ABC Predecessors' bases
(Corporations A + B + C)
$25,000 Footnote (3b) $20,000 4,000 + 5,000 + 6,000 =
$15,000
For Regulation 5301(4), the instalment base year amounts for Corporation ABC's second tax year ending December 31, 2020 would be:

Appendix 2 – Instalment base – Wind-ups
[Regulation 5301(6)]

On July 31, 2019, a subsidiary corporation wound up and dissolved, and all of its assets were distributed to its parent corporation.

Note

Although the subsidiary must file a return for the tax year that includes January 1, 2019 to July 31, 2019, the tax assessed for this period will not be part of the instalment base in any year for the parent corporation.

Tax year-end Tax payable (parent) Tax payable (subsidiary)
December 31, 2017 $14,000 $5,000
December 31, 2018 $12,000 $6,000
December 31, 2019 Footnote (1c) $20,000 N/A
Example of a Wind-up

For Regulation 5301(6), the instalment base year amounts for the parent corporation's tax year ending December 31, 2019 would be:

Tax year-end
December 31, 2019
First instalment
base amount
Second instalment
base amount
$20,000 $12,000 $14,000
Before the wind-up

Seven instalment payments of $1,000 each ($12,000 ÷ 12) are due up to July 31, 2019.

Tax year-end
December 31, 2019
First instalment
base amount Footnote (1d)
Second instalment
base amount Footnote (2d)
$20,000 12,000 + 6,000 =
$18,000
14,000 + 5,000 =
$19,000
After the wind-up

Five instalment payments of $1,500 each ($18,000 ÷ 12) are due up to December 31, 2019.

Tax year-end
December 31, 2020
First instalment
base amount Footnote (1e)
Second instalment
base amount Footnote (2e)
$26,000 Footnote (3e) 20,000 + (6,000 × 7/12) =
$23,500
12,000 + 6,000 =
$18,000
For Regulation 5301(6), the instalment base year amounts for the parent's tax year ending December 31, 2020 would be:

Appendix 3 – Instalment base – Transfers or rollovers
                       [Regulation 5301(8)]

On October 31, 2018, a corporation (transferor) disposed of all its property through a section 85 rollover to another corporation with which it was not dealing with at arm's length (transferee).

Note

Although the transferor may have an income tax liability for its tax year that includes the period of July 1, 2018 to October 31, 2018, in which all or substantially all of its property has been disposed of, the actual tax assessed for that year will not be part of the transferee's instalment base in any year.

Tax year-end Tax payable (transferee) Tax payable (transferor)
June 30, 2017 $14,000 $5,000
June 30, 2018 $12,000 $6,000
       June 30, 2019 Footnote (1f) $20,000 N/A
Instalment base - Transfers or rollovers

For Regulation 5301(8), the instalment base year amounts for the transferee's tax year ending on June 30, 2019 would be:

Tax year-end
June 30, 2019
First instalment
base amount
Second instalment
base amount
$20,000 $12,000 $14,000
Before the rollover

Four instalment payments of $1,000 each ($12,000 ÷ 12) are due up to October 31, 2018.

Tax year-end
June 30, 2019
First instalment
base amount Footnote (1g)
Second instalment
base amount Footnote (2g)
$20,000 12,000 + 6,000 =
$18,000
14,000 + 5,000 =
$19,000
After the rollover

Eight instalment payments of $1,500 each ($18,000 ÷ 12) are due up to June 30, 2019.

Tax year-end
June 30, 2020
First instalment
base amount Footnote (1h)
Second instalment
base amount Footnote (2h)
$27,000 Footnote (3h) 20,000 + (6,000 × 4/12) =
$22,000
12,000 + 6,000 =
$18,000
For Regulation 5301(8), the instalment base year amounts for the transferee's tax year ending June 30, 2020 would be:

Appendix 4 – Worksheet 2 – Example 1

Corporation D has estimated its tax for 2019 at $900,000. The actual taxes for 2018 and 2017 are $912,000 and $60,000 respectively. Using Worksheet 2, we will determine the most advantageous option.

Calculating your monthly instalment payments for 2019

  • Use this worksheet to calculate your monthly instalment payments for 2019. If you're eligible to make quarterly instalment payments, use Worksheet 3.
  • To find out if you are eligible to make quarterly instalment payments, see the T7B-Corp, Corporation Instalment Guide.
  • Use the estimates calculated from Worksheet 1 to complete this worksheet. If you had tax payable for 2018, complete option 2; if you had tax payable for 2017, complete option 3.
  • Instalment payments are due on the last day of every complete month of your corporation's tax year. See the T7B-Corp for more information on due dates and payments.
  • This worksheet does not have to be filed with your T2 Corporation Income Tax Return.

Option 1 – 2019

Total estimated 2019 federal tax payable Footnote (1j) (amount H from Worksheet 1) 900,000 1A
Estimated 2019 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable creditsFootnote (2j)(amount I from Worksheet 1)   1B
Total estimated 2019 tax payable (amount J from Worksheet 1) 900,000 1C
Total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019 (amount K from Worksheet 1)   1D
Option 1 instalment base amount (amount 1C minus amount 1D) 900,000 1E
12 monthly payments due under option 1 (amount 1E divided by 12) 75,000 1F

Option 2 – 2018

Total 2018 federal tax payable Footnote (1j) (total of lines 700, 720, 724, 727 from your T2 return for 2018) 912,000 2A
2018 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable creditsFootnote (2j) (line 760 from your T2 return for 2018)   2B
Total 2018 tax payable (amount 2A plus amount 2B) 912,000 2C
Total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019 (amount K from Worksheet 1)   2D
Option 2 instalment base amount (amount 2C minus amount 2D) 912,000 2E
12 monthly payments due under option 2 (amount 2E divided by 12) 76,000 2F

Option 3 – 2017

Total 2017 federal tax payable (total of lines 700, 720, 724, 727 from your T2 return for 2017) 60,000 3A
2017 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable credits (line 760 from your T2 return for 2017)   3B
Total 2017 tax payable (amount 3A plus amount 3) 60,000 3C
Total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019 (amount K from Worksheet 1)   3D
Option 3 instalment base amount (amount 3C minus amount 3D) 60,000 3E
First two monthly payments due under option 3 (amount 3E divided by 12) 5,000 3F
Option 2 instalment base amount 912,000 3G
Total of the first two monthly payments (amount 3F multiplied by 2) 10,000 3H
Difference (amount 3G minus amount 3H) 902,000 3I

Remaining 10 monthly payments due under option 3 (amount 3I divided by 10)

90,200 3J

Summary

Under option 1, $75,000 is due each month of the tax year.

Under option 2, $76,000 is due each month of the tax year.

Under option 3, $5,000 is due each month for the first two months of the tax year, then $90,200 is due each month for the remaining 10 months of the tax year.

Note:
You can use the option that results in the least amount payable by instalments. Any remaining unpaid tax is payable on or before the balance-due day. We will charge interest if you use option 1 and the estimated tax is lower than the year's actual tax and the tax calculated using option 2 or 3.

Option 1 is the most advantageous of the three options. Therefore, Corporation D will have to remit an instalment payment of $75,000 for each month. We may charge interest if the corporation uses option 1 and its estimated tax was lower than the year's actual tax and the tax calculated using option 2 or 3.

Appendix 5 – Worksheet 2 – Example 2

Corporation E has estimated its tax for 2019 at $912,000. The actual taxes for 2018 and 2017 are $912,000 and $60,000, respectively. Using Worksheet 2, we will determine the most advantageous option.

Calculating your monthly instalment payments for 2019

  • Use this worksheet to calculate your monthly instalment payments for 2019. If you're eligible to make quarterly instalment payments, use Worksheet 3.
  • To find out if you are eligible to make quarterly instalment payments, see the T7B-Corp, Corporation Instalment Guide.
  • Use the estimates calculated from Worksheet 1 to complete this worksheet. If you had tax payable for 2018, complete option 2; if you had tax payable for 2017, complete option 3. 
  • Instalment payments are due on the last day of every complete month of your corporation's tax year. See the T7B-Corp for more information on due dates and payments.
  • This worksheet does not have to be filed with your T2 Corporation Income Tax Return.

Option 1 – 2019

Total estimated 2019 federal tax payable Footnote (1j) (amount H from Worksheet 1) 912,000 1A
Estimated 2019 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable creditsFootnote (2j)(amount I from Worksheet 1) 1B
Total estimated 2019 tax payable (amount J from Worksheet 1) 912,000 1C
Total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019 (amount K from Worksheet 1) 1D
Option 1 instalment base amount (amount 1C minus amount 1D) 912,000 1E
12 monthly payments due under option 1 (amount 1E divided by 12) 76,000 1F

Option 2 – 2018

Total 2018 federal tax payable Footnote (1j) (total of lines 700, 720, 724, 727 from your T2 return for 2018) 912,000 2A
2018 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable creditsFootnote (2j) (line 760 from your T2 return for 2018) 2B
Total 2018 tax payable (amount 2A plus amount 2B) 912,000 2C
Total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019 (amount K from Worksheet 1) 2D
Option 2 instalment base amount (amount 2C minus amount 2D) 912,000 2E
12 monthly payments due under option 2 (amount 1E divided by 12) 76,000 2F

Option 3 – 2017

Total 2017 federal tax payable (total of lines 700, 720, 724, 727 from your T2 return for 2017) 60,000 3A
2017 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable credits (line 760 from your T2 return for 2017) 3B
Total 2017 tax payable (amount 3A plus amount 3B) 60,000 3C
Total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019 (amount K from Worksheet 1) 3D
Option 3 instalment base amount (amount 3C minus amount 3D) 60,000 3E
First two monthly payments due under option 3 (amount 3E divided by 12) 5,000 3F
Option 2 instalment base amount 912,000 3G
Total of the first two monthly payments (amount 3F multiplied by 2) 10,000 3H
Difference (amount 3G minus amount 3H) 902,000 3I
Remaining 10 monthly payments due under option 3 (amount 3I divided by 10) 90,200 3J

Summary

Under option 1, $76,000 is due each month of the tax year.

Under option 2, $76,000 is due each month of the tax year.

Under option 3, $5,000 is due each month for the first two months of the tax year, then $90,200 is due each month for the remaining 10 months of the tax year.

Note:
You can use the option that results in the least amount payable by instalments. Any remaining unpaid tax is payable on or before the balance-due day. We will charge interest if you use option 1 and the estimated tax is lower than the year's actual tax and the tax calculated using option 2 or 3.

Option 3 is the most advantageous of the three options. Therefore, Corporation E will have to remit an instalment payment of $5,000 in each of the first two months and $90,200 for each of the last 10 months.

Note

The total amount of instalments calculated under option 3 is always the same as under option 2, but option 3 is often chosen when the first two payments are lower.

Appendix 6 – Worksheet 3 – Example

Corporation F has estimated its tax for 2019 at $240,000. The actual taxes for 2018 and 2017 are $240,000 and $36,000, respectively. Using Worksheet 3, we will determine the most advantageous option.

Worksheet 3 – Calculating your quarterly instalment payments for 2019

  • Use this worksheet to calculate your 2019 quarterly instalment payments for an eligible Canadian-controlled private corporation (CCPC). If you are not eligible to make quarterly instalment payments, use Worksheet 2.
  • To find out if you are eligible to make quarterly instalment payments, see the T7B-Corp, Corporation Instalment Guide.
  • Use the estimates calculated from Worksheet 1 to complete this worksheet. If you had tax payable for 2018, complete option 2; if you had tax payable for 2017, complete option 3.
  • Instalment payments are due on the last day of every complete quarter of your corporation's tax year. See the T7B-Corp for more information on due dates and payments.
  • This worksheet does not have to be filed with your T2 Corporation Income Tax Return.
Option 1 – 2019
Total estimated 2019 federal tax payable Footnote (1j) (amount H from Worksheet 1) 240,000 1A
Estimated 2019 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable creditsFootnote (2j)(amount I from Worksheet 1)   1B
Total estimated 2019 tax payable (amount J from Worksheet 1) 240,000 1C
Total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019 (amount K from Worksheet 1)   1D
Option 1 instalment base amount (amount 1C minus amount 1D) 240,000 1E
Four quarterly payments due under option 1 (amount 1E divided by 4) 60,000 1F
Option 2 – 2018
Total 2018 federal tax payable Footnote (1j) (total of lines 700, 720, 724, 727 from your T2 return for 2018) 240,000 2A
2018 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable creditsFootnote (2j) (line 760 from your T2 return for 2018) 2B
Total 2018 tax payable (amount 2A plus amount 2B) 240,000 2C
Total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019 (amount K from Worksheet 1) 2D
Option 2 instalment base amount (amount 2C minus amount 2D) 240,000 2E
Four quarterly payments due under option 2 (amount 2E divided by 4) 60,000 2F

Option 3 – 2017

Total 2017 federal tax payable (total of lines 700, 720, 724, 727 from your T2 return for 2017) 36,000 3A
2017 net provincial and territorial tax payable before refundable credits (line 760 from your T2 return for 2017)   3B
Total 2017 tax payable (amount 3A plus amount 3B) 36,000 3C
Total estimated refundable tax credits for 2019 (amount K from Worksheet 1)   3D
Option 3 instalment base amount (amount 3C minus amount 3D) 36,000 3E
First payment due under option 3 (amount 3E divided by 4) 9,000 3F
Option 2 instalment base amount 240,000 3G
First payment due under option 3 9,000 3H
Difference (amount 3G minus amount 3H) 231,000 3I
Remaining 3 quarterly payments due under option 3 (amount 3I divided by 3) 77,000 3J

Summary

Under option 1, $60,000 is due each month of the tax year.

Under option 2, $60,000 is due each month of the tax year.

Under option 3, $9,000 is due for the first quarter of the tax year, then $77,000 is due each quarter for the remaining three quarters of the tax year.

Note:
You can use the option that results in the least amount payable by instalments. Any remaining unpaid tax is payable on or before the balance-due day. We will charge interest if you use option 1 and the estimated tax is lower than the year's actual tax and the tax calculated using option 2 or 3. 

Option 3 is the most advantageous of the three options. Therefore, Corporation F will have to remit an instalment payment of $9,000 for the first quarter and $77,000 for each of the last 3 quarters.

Note

The total amount of instalments calculated under option 3 is always the same as under option 2, but option 3 is often chosen when the first payment is lower.

Online Services

Handling business taxes online

Use the CRA's online services for businesses throughout the year to:

  • make payments to the CRA by setting up pre-authorized debit agreements in My Business Account or by using the My Payment service
  • file a return, view the status of filed returns and amend returns online
  • send documents to the CRA
  • authorize a representative for online access to your business accounts
  • register to receive email notifications and to view mail from the CRA in My Business Account
  • change adresses
  • manage direct deposit information
  • view account balance and transactions
  • calculate a future balance
  • transfer payments and immediately view updated balances
  • view closing balances (for example, non-capital loss balances)
  • send account related enquiries and view answers to common enquiries
  • send an enquiry about your audit
  • download reports

To log in to or register for the CRA's online services, go to:

For more information, go to E-services for Businesses.

CRA BizApp

CRA BizApp is a mobile web application for small business owners and sole proprietors. The application offers secure access to view accounting transactions, pay outstanding balances, and more.

For more information, go to Mobile apps – Canada Revenue Agency.

Receiving your CRA mail online

Sign up for e-mail notifications to get most of your CRA mail, like your notice of assessment, online.

For more information, go to Online mail – Reduce your cost of doing business by saving time – go online.

Authorizing the withdrawal of a pre-determined amount from your bank account

Pre–authorized debit (PAD) is a secure online, self-service, payment option for individuals and businesses. This option lets you set the payment amount you authorize the CRA to withdraw from your Canadian chequing account to pay your tax on a specific date or dates you choose. You can set up a PAD agreement using the CRA's secure My Business Account service. PADs are flexible and managed by you. You can view historical records, modify, cancel, or skip a payment.

For more information, go to Make a payment and select “Pay by pre-authorized debit.” 

Electronic payments

Make your payment using:

  • your financial institution's online or telephone banking services
  • the CRA's My Payment service
  • your credit card through one of the CRA’s third party service providers
  • pre-authorized debit at My Business Account

For more information, go to Make a payment.

For more information

What if you need help?

If you need more information after reading this guide, visit Taxes or call 1-800-959-5525.

For detailed information on topics in this guide, see the federal Income Tax Act and the Income Tax Regulations. We have identified legislative references with square brackets.

For information about filing your T2 Corporation Income Tax Return, see Guide T4012, T2 Corporation – Income Tax Guide. Go to Corporation Internet Filing for corporation Internet filing and Corporations for corporate income tax information.

Forms and publications

To get our forms and publications, go to Forms and publications or call one of the following numbers:

  • from Canada and the United States, 1-800-959-5525
  • from outside Canada and the United States, 613-940-8497. We accept collect calls by automated response. Contact your service provider or operator to initiate the collect call. You may hear a beep and experience a normal connection delay.

Electronic mailing lists

The CRA can notify you by email when new information on a subject of interest to you is available on the website. To subscribe to the electronic mailing lists, go to Electronic mailing lists

Teletypewriter (TTY) users

If you have a hearing or speech impairment and use a TTY, call 1-800-665-0354.

If you use an operator-assisted relay service, call our regular telephone numbers instead of the TTY number.

Service-related complaints

If you are not satisfied with the service you received, try to resolve the matter with the CRA employee you have been dealing with or call the telephone number provided in the CRA’s correspondence. If you do not have contact information, go to Contact Information.

If you still disagree with the way your concerns were addressed, you can ask to discuss the matter with the employee’s supervisor.

If you are still not satisfied, you can file a service complaint by filling out Form RC193, Service Related Complaint. For more information, go to Make a service complaint.

If the CRA has not resolved your service-related complaint, you can submit a complaint with the Office of the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman.

Formal disputes (objections and appeals)

If you disagree with an assessment, determination, or decision, you have the right to register a formal dispute.

Reprisal complaint

If you have previously submitted a service-related complaint or requested a formal review of a CRA decision and feel that, as a result, you were treated unfairly by a CRA employee, you can submit a reprisal complaint by filling out form RC459, Reprisal Complaint.

For more information about reprisal complaints, go to Reprisal Complaints.

Due dates

When the due date falls on a Saturday, a Sunday, or a public holiday recognized by the CRA, we consider your payment to be on time if we receive it on the next business day. Your return is considered on time if we receive it or if it is postmarked on or before the next business day.

For more information, go to Important Dates for Individuals.

Cancel or waive penalties or interest

The CRA administers legislation, commonly called the taxpayer relief provisions, that gives the CRA discretion to cancel or waive penalties or interest when taxpayers are unable to meet their tax obligations due to circumstances beyond their control.

The CRA’s discretion to grant relief is limited to any period that ended within 10 calendar years before the year in which a request is made.

For penalties, the CRA will consider your request only if it relates to a tax year or fiscal period ending in any of the 10 calendar years before the year in which you make your request. For example, your request made in 2017 must relate to a penalty for a tax year or fiscal period ending in 2007 or later.

For interest on a balance owing for any tax year or fiscal period, the CRA will consider only the amounts that accrued during the 10 calendar years before the year in which you make your request. For example, your request made in 2017 must relate to interest that accrued in 2007 or later.

To make a request, fill out Form RC4288, Request for Taxpayer Relief – Cancel or Waive Penalties or Interest. For more information about relief from penalties or interest and how to submit your request, go to Taxpayer relief provisions.

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