Federal Income Tax and Benefit Guide - 2018 - Provincial or territorial, refund or balance owing, and other information

Step 6 – Provincial or territorial tax

If you were not a resident of Quebec on December 31, 2018, complete Form 428 to calculate your provincial or territorial tax.

If you were a resident of Quebec on December 31, 2018, this line applies to you only if you had income from a business (including income you received as a limited or non-active partner) and the business has a permanent establishment outside Quebec. In that case, use Form T2203, Provincial and Territorial Taxes for 2018 – Multiple Jurisdictions, to calculate your tax for provinces and territories other than Quebec. To calculate your tax for Quebec, you will have to file a provincial income tax return for Quebec.

Step 7 – Refund or balance owing

Claim the amounts that apply to you on lines 420 to 482 using your information slips along with the instructions provided in Step 7 of your return, and on any applicable worksheet, schedule, and form. In this section, you will find information you may need to supplement the instructions on the return.

This section does not provide supplementary information for lines 420, 421, 422, 430, 432, 448, 450, 453, 454, and 456, as the instructions on the return provide the information you need.

Line 437 – Total income tax deducted

Find your situation and follow the instructions that apply to you.

Resident of a province other than Quebec on December 31, 2018 Resident of the province of Quebec on December 31, 2018

Claim the total of the amounts shown in the “Income tax deducted” box of all your Canadian information slips.
If you had Quebec provincial income tax withheld from your income, include those amounts on this line.

Claim the total of the amounts shown in the “Income tax deducted” box of all your Canadian information slips.
Do not include on this return any of your Quebec provincial income tax deducted. Instead, claim it on your provincial income tax return for Quebec.

Line 438 – Tax transfer for residents of Quebec

If you were a resident of Quebec on December 31, 2018, and you earned income, such as employment income, outside Quebec during the year, tax may have been deducted for a province or territory other than Quebec. Enter on line 438 of your federal return the transfer amount (up to the maximum) and claim the same amount on line 454 of your provincial income tax return for Quebec.

You can transfer to the Province of Quebec up to 45% of the income tax shown on information slips issued to you by payers outside Quebec.

Notes

If you and your spouse or common-law partner elected to split pension income and you are the one receiving the transfer (amount reported on line 116 of your return), you may be able to include in the calculation of the transfer for line 438 the part of the income tax added on line 437 of your return relating to the split-pension amount.

If you are the one doing the transfer (claiming a deduction on line 210 of your return), do not include in the calculation of the transfer for line 438, the corresponding part of the income tax transferred to your spouse or common-law partner on line 437 of their return.

Line 440 – Refundable Quebec abatement

If you were a resident of Quebec on December 31, 2018, and you did not have a business with a permanent establishment outside Quebec, calculate your abatement.

If one of the following applies to you, get and complete Form T2203, Provincial and Territorial Taxes for 2018 – Multiple Jurisdictions, to calculate your abatement:

  • you had income from a business (including income you received as a limited or non-active partner) and the business has a permanent establishment outside Quebec
  • you were not a resident of Quebec on December 31, 2018, and the business has a permanent establishment in Quebec

Line 452 – Refundable medical expense supplement

You may be able to claim a credit of up to $1,222 if all the following apply:

  • you have an amount on line 215 of your return or on line 332 of your Schedule 1
  • you were resident in Canada throughout the year
  • you were 18 years of age or older at the end of 2018
  • the total of the following two amounts is $3,566 or more:
    • your employment income on lines 101 and 104 of your return (other than amounts received from a wage-loss replacement plan), minus the amounts on lines 207, 212, 229, and 231 of your return (but if the result is negative, use “0”)
    • your net self-employment income (not including losses) from lines 135 to 143 of your return

Line 457 – Employee and partner GST/HST rebate

If you deducted expenses from your income as an employee (line 212 or 229 of your return) or as a partner (lines 135 to 143 of your return), you may be eligible for a rebate of the GST/HST you paid on those expenses.

Generally, you can claim this rebate if one of the following applies:

  • your employer is a GST/HST registrant, other than a listed financial institution
  • you are a member of a GST/HST-registered partnership and you have reported on your return your share of the income from that partnership

For more information, see Guide T4044, Employment Expenses.

Notes

Generally, report any GST/HST rebate received, on line 104 of your return, in the year you received it. For example, you may claim a rebate on your return for 2018. If the CRA allows your claim and assesses that return in 2019, you must report the rebate on your return for 2019.

If you received a GST/HST rebate in 2018 and you were an employee, see line 104. If you are a partner, call the CRA business enquiries line.

Lines 468 and 469 – Eligible educator school supply tax credit

If you were an eligible educator, you can claim up to $1,000 as an eligible supplies expense.

Eligible educator

You are considered an eligible educator if you were employed in Canada at any time during the 2018 tax year and both of the following conditions are met:

  • you were a teacher at an elementary or secondary school, or an early childhood educator at a regulated child care facility
  • you held a teaching certificate, licence, permit or diploma, or a certificate or diploma in early childhood education, which was valid and recognized in the province or territory in which you were employed

Eligible supplies expense

An eligible supplies expense is an amount that you paid in 2018 for teaching supplies that meet all of the following conditions:

  • you bought the teaching supplies for teaching or facilitating students’ learning
  • the teaching supplies were directly consumed or used in an elementary or secondary school or in a regulated child care facility in performing your employment
  • you were not entitled to a reimbursement, allowance, or any other form of assistance for the expense (unless the amount is included in the calculation of your income of any tax year and is not deductible in the calculation of your taxable income)
  • the eligible supplies expense was not deducted from any person’s income for any year or included in calculating a deduction from any person’s tax payable for any year

Teaching supplies are consumable supplies and prescribed durable goods. Prescribed durable goods include:

  • books, games and puzzles
  • containers (such as plastic boxes or banker boxes)
  • educational support software

Note

The CRA may ask you later to provide a written certificate from your employer or a delegated official of the employer (such as the principal of the school or the manager of the child care facility) attesting to the eligibility of your expenses for the year.

Line 476 – Tax paid by instalments

In February 2019, the CRA will issue you Form INNS1, Instalment Reminder, or Form INNS2, Instalment Payment Summary, which shows your total payments for 2018 that the CRA has on record.

If you made an instalment payment for your taxes for 2018 that does not appear on this reminder or summary, also include that amount on line 476 of your return.

Line 479 – Provincial or territorial credits

If you were a resident of Ontario, Manitoba, British Columbia, Yukon, the Northwest Territories, or Nunavut on December 31, 2018, complete Form 479 to calculate your refundable provincial or territorial credits.

If you were a resident of Nova Scotia or Prince Edward Island, complete Form 428 to calculate the Nova Scotia volunteer firefighters and ground search and rescue tax credit or the Prince Edward Island volunteer firefighter tax credit and enter the amount on line 479 of your return.

If you were a resident of Alberta, complete Form 428 to calculate your claim for the Alberta investor tax credit and include the amount on line 479 of your return. To claim the Alberta stock savings plan tax credit, get and complete Form T89, Alberta Stock Savings Plan Tax Credit, and include the amount on line 479 of your return.

To claim the Newfoundland and Labrador research and development tax credit, get and complete Form T1129, Newfoundland and Labrador Research and Development Tax Credit (Individuals).

How to pay your balance owing or to get your refund

Line 484 – Refund

Direct deposit

Direct deposit is a fast, convenient, reliable, and secure way to get your CRA payments directly into your account at a financial institution in Canada.

Complete the “Direct deposit” section on page 4 of your return to ask that all CRA payments you are entitled to be deposited into the same account as your income tax refund. The information you already provided will stay in effect until you update it. For other ways to enrol for direct deposit, update your banking information, or for more information, go to Direct deposit - Canada Revenue Agency.

Line 485 – Balance owing

Your balance owing is due no later than April 30, 2019. Do not mail cash or include cash with your return. The CRA will charge daily compound interest on any outstanding balance starting May 1, 2019, until you pay your balance in full.

You can pay your balance owing using one of the following methods:

  • pay online by using your financial institution’s services
  • pay online by using the CRA’s My Payment service at My Payment
  • pay by setting up a pre-authorized debit agreement using My Account at My Account for Individuals
  • pay by credit card or through PayPal by using a third-party service provider. For more information, go to Payments to the Canada Revenue Agency
  • pay in person, with cash or by debit, at any Canada Post outlet across Canada for a fee. To do so you will need a self-generated quick response (QR) code. For more information, go to Payments to the Canada Revenue Agency
  • pay in person at your financial institution in Canada. To do so, you have to use a remittance voucher, which you can ask for in My Account at My Account for Individuals or by contacting the CRA

If you can’t pay your taxes by April 30, 2019, go to When you owe money – collections at the CRA to learn more about managing your tax debt, or see Information Circular IC98-1R7, Tax Collections Policies.

For more information, go to Payments to the Canada Revenue Agency.

What documents to attach to your paper return

When you are filing your paper return, attach the supporting documents that are requested in the following charts. If you make a claim without the requested supporting document, the CRA may disallow the credit or deduction you claimed. It could also delay the processing of your return.

Did you know

Did you know...

Even if you do not have to attach certain supporting documents to your return, or if you are filing your return electronically, keep your supporting documents for six years in case the CRA selects your return for review. Also, keep a copy of your return, the related notice of assessment, and any notice of reassessment.

Documents required to support reported income
Item or line number Send the following documents with your paper return:
Information slips One copy of each of your information slips, such as T4, T4A, T5, including if applicable, provincial slips such as the Relevé 1 slip
Missing information slips A copy of your pay stubs or statements if you do not have your information slip. Keep the original documents. Also, attach a note stating the payer’s name and address, the type of income involved, and what you are doing to get the slip
Forms and schedules Each form and schedule that mentions to attach it or send it with your return
Line 104 – Other employment income A list of your expenses relating to research grants
Line 114 – CPP or QPP benefits A letter from Service Canada showing the amount of a lump-sum benefit you received that applies to previous years
Line 115 – Other pensions and superannuation A note identifying the type of pension from a foreign country you received and the country it came from
Line 122 – Net partnership income: limited or non-active partners only A copy of the partnership’s financial statement if you did not receive a T5013 slip
Line 126 – Rental income Form T776 or a statement showing your rental income and expenses
Line 130 – Other income   Attach a note:
  • if you have more than one type of income, to specify the type of income you are reporting
  • stating any death benefit (other than CPP or QPP) amount you received but did not include in your income
Lines 135 to 143 – Self-employment income A copy of the applicable self-employment form or the partnership’s financial statement showing your income and expenses
Documents required to support deductions and credits claimed
Item or line number Send the following documents with your paper return:
Information slips One copy of each of your information slips, such as T4, T4A, T5, including if applicable, provincial slips such as the Relevé 1 slip
Missing information slips A copy of your pay stubs or statements if you do not have your information slip. Keep the original documents. Also, attach a note stating the payer’s name and address, the type of income involved, and what you are doing to get the slip.
Forms and schedules Each form and schedule that mentions to attach it or send it with your return
Line 208 Your official receipts for all amounts you contributed from March 2, 2018, to March 1, 2019, including those you are not deducting on your return for 2018 and those you are designating as Home Buyers’ Plan (HBP) or Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) repayments
Line 224 – Exploration and development expenses Information slips such as a T5, T101 or T5013. If you do not have these slips, a statement identifying you as a participant in the venture. The statement has to show your allocation (the number of units you own, the percentage assigned to you, or the ratio of your units to those of the whole partnership) and give the name and address of the fund.
Line 232 – Other deductions A note if you are deducting more than one amount, to specify the deduction you are claiming or to explain it more fully
Form RC4625 or a letter from the Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) issuer
Line 251 – Limited partnership losses of other years A statement showing a breakdown of your total losses, the year of each loss, and the amounts claimed in previous years
Line 256 – Additional deductions A note if you have more than one amount, to specify the deduction you are claiming or to explain it more fully
Step 5 – Federal tax
If you claim an amount for a non-resident dependant
The proof of payments of support showing your name, the amount and the date of the payment, and the dependant’s name and address. If you sent the payments to a guardian, the guardian’s name and address must also be on the proof of payment.
Line 318 – Disability amount transferred from a dependant A note stating the dependant’s name, social insurance number, and relationship to you, if you are not attaching a Form T2201.
If you are splitting the unused part of this amount with another person, attach a note to your paper return that includes the name and social insurance number of the other person who is claiming this amount.
Lines 409 and 410 – Federal political contribution tax credit Attach your official receipts except for those with amounts shown in box 14 of your T5003 slips, in box 184 of your T5013 slips, or on financial statements showing an amount a partnership allocated to you.
Line 457 – Employee and partner GST/HST rebate Form GST370
Line 484 – Refund A note, if you ask the CRA to transfer your refund to your instalment account for 2019

After sending your return

Notice of assessment

You will receive a notice of assessment after the CRA processes your return. The notice gives you a summary of your assessment and explanations of any changes made to your return. The notice will tell you if you have a refund, owe money, or have a zero balance. It also gives you other important information, including but not limited to, your unused RRSP, PRPP and SPP contributions, your RRSP/PRPP deduction limit, and other amounts and balances that you may want to carry forward to a future year.

Processing time

The CRA’s goal is to send you a notice of assessment, as well as any refund, within:

  • two weeks, when you file online
  • eight weeks, when you file a paper return

Note

When the CRA receives your return, it is usually processed and a notice of assessment is sent to you. However, each year the CRA conducts a number of reviews to promote awareness of and compliance with the laws that the CRA administers. 

This means that your return may be selected for a more detailed review before or after assessing it. If you receive a letter or a phone call telling you that your return is being reviewed, don't panic. It’s important to know that a review is not a tax audit. In most cases, it’s simply a routine check to ensure that the information you provided on your return is correct.

If you receive a request from the CRA asking for documents or receipts, you should reply within the timeframe provided. Make sure you include all the information the CRA is asking for, and that the copies of your documents are clear and easy to read.

And remember, the CRA is here to help you. If you can’t get the documents the CRA is asking for, have any questions, or if you need more time to reply, let the CRA know. If you don’t reply to the CRA’s request, the CRA may adjust your return and your claim or deduction might be disallowed.

For more information, go to Income tax review? You’ve got this!.

How to change a return

If you have more information that would change a return you have already sent to the CRA, do not file another paper return for that year. Wait until you receive your notice of assessment before asking for changes.

Generally, you can only request a change to a return for a tax year ending in any of the 10 previous calendar years. For example, a request made in 2019 must relate to the 2009 or a later tax year to be considered.

You can change your return by:

  • using the ReFILE service if your return was filed electronically using a certified software. For more information, see ReFILE: Online adjustments for income tax and benefit returns
  • going online to My Account at My Account for Individuals and using “Change my return”
  • sending a paper Form T1-ADJ, T1 Adjustment Request or a signed letter giving the details of your request (including the years of the returns to be changed), your social insurance number, your address, and a telephone number where the CRA can reach you during the day. Also attach supporting documents for the changes you are asking for and, if you have not sent them before, supporting documents for your original claim

Note

If your return was arbitrarily assessed by the CRA and you would like to make a change, you must file a paper tax return for the year(s) in question.

For more information, go to How to change your return.

What to do if you are not satisfied with the CRA’s service or you have experienced reprisal

You can expect to be treated fairly under clear and established rules, and get a high level of service each time you deal with the CRA. Some complaints and disputes are caused by a lack of information or by a simple miscommunication. That's why the CRA says, "Talk to us”.

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