2017–18 Departmental Results Report - Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians


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Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, 2018
Departmental Results Report, 2017-18
ISSN 2561-9837
Catalogue CP100-2E-PDF


Chair’s message

As Chair of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, it is my pleasure to present the first Departmental Results Report for the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians.

The Committee believes in the responsible, non-partisan review of the departments and agencies of Canada’s security and intelligence apparatus. I believe that our approach will contribute to increased accountability of the institutions charged with ensuring the safety and security of Canadians.

While this report only represents the first few months of operations for the Secretariat, its activities were critical in assisting the Committee to initiate its work and meet its objectives.

As part of our initial engagement with the national security and intelligence community, the Secretariat was instrumental in assisting Committee members to gain an in-depth understanding of the mandates, responsibilities and activities of these core organizations. Its work in the early months of 2018 helped set the foundational pieces for the Committee’s first reviews and Annual Report.

The Honourable David J. McGuinty, Chair of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians
The Honourable David J. McGuinty, P.C., M.P.
Chair
National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians

Executive Director’s message

I am pleased to submit the 2017-18 Departmental Results Report for the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. While this report describes a few months of activities, the Secretariat has started to provide comprehensive support to the Committee and fulfill its mandate.

Following my appointment in December 2017, the Secretariat began to take shape through the recruitment of an expert staff. 

The Secretariat has received support from the Privy Council Office and other departments in order to build the organization, including for the hiring and staffing of employees, security services, accommodations, and corporate support. I am grateful for their ongoing assistance and advice. A permanent state of the art facility is being renovated to house the Secretariat. Upon completion of this work in the fall of 2018, the Secretariat will have all the necessary tools and equipment in place, in accordance with the highest security requirements, to effectively support the Committee. 

The Secretariat has worked to develop a comprehensive briefing approach for the Committee and provided support for an ambitious agenda, all while putting into place the tangible structures of a new organization. In support of the Committee’s independence, we strive to provide expert analysis and strategic advice to the Committee, establish productive working relationships with the security and intelligence community, and engage the community in a timely and effective manner to receive and share information in the conduct of reviews.

While we are just getting started, I am proud of the work accomplished to date.

 

Rennie Marcoux
Executive Director
Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians

Rennie Marcoux, Executive Director

Results at a glance

The National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians and its Secretariat were established in June 2017 through the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians Act.The Prime Minister appointed the Committee’s eleven members, from both Houses of Parliament, on November 6, 2017 and the Secretariat’s Executive Director in December of the same year.

Given that the Committee and Secretariat only began operations in the final months of 2017-18, no Departmental Plan for 2017-18 was developed.As a result, the Secretariat had no benchmarks against which to assess its activities in formalizing its existence during this period. Of note, the Secretariat completed its first Departmental Plan for 2018-19 this past April. It will report on its first full year of activities in the fall of 2019 and will develop formal benchmarks in the coming year.

Nonetheless, the Secretariat accomplished a number of critical steps in both building its organization and supporting the Committee in these few months of operation. Highlights of Secretariat activities from the four months of December 2017 to March 2018 include:

  • Initiated the recruitment of an expert staff;
  • Engaged the core organizations of the national security and intelligence community on the mandate of the Committee, the provision of briefings and site visits;
  • Organized meetings with other departments, experts and academics;
  • Developed proposals and procedures to support the Committee’s execution of its review mandate; and
  • Met with the United Kingdom and Australian parliamentary review counterparts.

For more information on the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians’ plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être, mandate and role

The Secretariat assists the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians in fulfilling its mandate as outlined in Section 8(1) of the NSICOP Act, which is to review:

  • The legislative, regulatory, policy, administrative and financial framework for national security and intelligence;
  • Any activity carried out by a department that relates to national security or intelligence, unless the activity is an ongoing operation and the appropriate Minister determines that the review would be injurious to national security; and
  • Any matter relating to national security or intelligence that a minister of the Crown refers to the Committee.

The Secretariat ensures the Committee receives timely access to relevant, classified information and strategic and expert advice in the exercise of Committee reviews. It assists in the development of Committee reports and provides support to ensure compliance with security requirements.

For more general information about the Secretariat, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

Day-to-day activities

The Secretariat provides support to an independent committee of Parliamentarians charged with reviewing the activities of Canada’s national security and intelligence apparatus. On this basis, the Secretariat serves as the Committee’s interlocutor to engage and communicate with the community, specifically to acquire and share information in the conduct of reviews. The Secretariat also provides expert advice and strategic analysis to the Committee.

From a practical operational perspective, the Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner provided temporary office space for the Secretariat staff from January to March 2018, and a secure meeting facility for the Committee. As the Secretariat recruited employees, it outgrew this temporary space, and in late March moved to a second temporary facility in downtown Ottawa provided by the Privy Council Office.

As a new entity requiring a highly secure permanent facility, the Secretariat, with the support of the Privy Council Office, Public Services and Procurement Canada, the Communications Security Establishment and Shared Services Canada, embarked on a project to renovate an existing federal facility. Upon completion of this work in the fall of 2018, this highly secure facility will provide the Secretariat with a secure workspace, information technology infrastructure, and other tools and equipment to provide timely and effective support to the Committee.

Key risks

While the NSICOP Act specifies the Committee’s right of access to information and specific information limitations in the fulfillment of its mandate, there is a risk that departments and agencies will interpret these elements differently. At a minimum, this risk could create inconsistencies in the provision of information to the Committee; at worst, it could undermine the Committee’s ability to thoroughly conduct its reviews and make appropriate findings and recommendations.

Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the department’s Core Responsibilities
Inconsistent interpretation of information exceptions included in the NSICOP Act by the security and intelligence community. 

To mitigate this risk, the Secretariat engaged members of the community at various levels to clarify the Committee’s statutory right to receive information. The Secretariat and the Committee meet regularly with Deputy- Ministers and officials at all levels to engage on the Committee’s work and activities and its rights of access to information.

The Secretariat expects this risk to diminish as government organizations become accustomed to working with the Committee and its Secretariat.

Reviews

Results: what we achieved

Core Responsibilities

Assist the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians in fulfilling its mandate

Description

The Secretariat’s core responsibility consists of a range of activities to ensure the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians receives timely access to relevant information, strategic and expert advice in the conduct of reviews and development of reports, and support to ensure compliance with security requirements.

Results

Over these initial months of operation, the Executive Director began staffing the Secretariat and hired five full-time employees who have worked in the various organizations of the security and intelligence community. This included the Director of Operations, senior review analysts, a review analyst and an executive assistant. The Secretariat has authorities for a staff complement of ten full time employees, and planned staffing actions in early 2018-19 will fill the remaining positions.

The Secretariat supported a series of site visits and introductory briefings for the Committee as members familiarized themselves with the mandates and activities with five of the core members of the national security and intelligence community. Similarly, the Secretariat organized a series of briefings with key departments, including Public Safety Canada, to discuss their role in national security, and the Treasury Board Secretariat to discuss the funding profile of the security and intelligence community in Canada.

As part of the Secretariat’s program activities to support reviews, it drafted and submitted a number of review proposals for consideration by the Committee, including a special review under section 21 (2) of the NSICOP Act. Based on the Committee’s decisions, the Secretariat initiated its review work shortly thereafter, in April 2018.

The National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians has looked to the United Kingdom’s Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament for many of its practices. The Secretariat engaged its UK counterpart to assist in the development of its own internal practices and procedures. This meeting helped set the footing for a collaborative relationship with the UK Intelligence and Security Committee, and served as a starting point for future international engagements with other parliamentary review bodies and their secretariats.

The Secretariat initiated outreach activities with academics and experts in the areas of national security and intelligence who have all been generous with their time.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
0 0 1,348,591 579,141 579,141
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
0 4.1 4.1

On June 22, 2017, the bill to establish the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians received Royal Assent. Effective October 6, 2017, the Governor in Council, on recommendation of the Prime Minister, established NSICOP with the Order in Council 2017-1236, 2017-1237 and 2017-1238. NSICOP received its funding December 11, 2017. Consequently, NSICOP 2016‑17 actual results and 2017-18 planned results are non-existent.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
0 0 2,913,016 0 0
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
0 0 0

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph
Text version - Departmental spending trend graph
Fiscal year  Sunset Programs – Anticipated
Statutory
Voted Total
2015-16 0 0 0 0
2016-17 0 0 0 0
2017-18 0 65,124
514,017 579,141
2018-19 0 199,081
3,294,747 3,493,828
2019-20 0 199,081
3,271,323 3,470,404
2020-21 0
199,081
3,331,078 3,530,159
Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2017–18 
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016–17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2015–16
Actual spending (authorities used)
1.Reviews 0 0 2,149,549
2,109,624 
1,348,591 
579,141
0 0
Subtotal 0 0 2,149,549
2,109,624 
1,348,591 
579,141
0 0
Internal Services 0 0 1,344,279
1,360,780 
2,913,016 
0 0 0
Total 0 0 3,493,828
3,470,404 
4,261,607
579,141
0 0

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full time equivalents)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services
2015–16
Actual full-time equivalents

2016–17
Actual full-time equivalents

2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents

2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents

2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents

1.Reviews 0 0 0
4.1
9.0 
9.0
Subtotal 0 0 0 4.1
9.0 9.0
Internal Services 0 0 0
0
1.0
1.0
Total 0 0 0
4.1
10.0
10.0

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians’ organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017–2018.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians’ spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians’ financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18
Planned
results
2017–18
  Actual  
 results                 
 2016–17
 Actual
  results                
Difference (2017–18 Actual results minus 2017–18 Planned results) Difference (2017–18 Actual results minus 2016–17 Actual results)
Total expenses 0 598,461 0 598,461
598,461
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 0 598,461 0 598,461
598,461
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as at March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial Information 2017–18 2016–17 Difference
(2017–18 minus
2016–17)
Total net liabilities 503,011 0 503,011
Total net financial assets 503,011 0 503,011
Departmental net debt 0 0 0
Total non‑financial assets 0 0 0
Departmental net financial position 0 0 0

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Reporting framework

The Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians’ Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2017–18 are shown below:

Text version

The Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians Departmental Results Framework for 2017-18 consists of the following:

  • One core responsibility: Assist the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians in fulfilling its mandate.
    • The Secretariat’s core responsibility consists of a range of activities to ensure the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians receives timely access to relevant information, strategic and expert advice in the conduct of reviews and development of reports and support to ensure compliance with security requirements. Results and indicators are under development.
  • One program:
    • Reviews
  • Internal Services

Concordance between the Departmental Results Framework and the Program Inventory, 2018–19, and the Program Alignment Architecture, 2017–18

As the Secretariat was created in 2017-18, no Program Alignment Architecture ever existed for reporting purposes. A Departmental Results Framework and accompanying Program Inventory is under development, to be completed by the 2019-20 fiscal year. 

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians’ website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians
P.O. Box 8015, Station “T”
Ottawa, Ontario
K1G 5A6

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however,
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein) 
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical approach used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The “plus” in GBA+ acknowledges that the gender-based analysis goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. Examples of GBA+ processes include using data disaggregated by sex, gender and other intersecting identity factors in performance analysis, and identifying any impacts of the program on diverse groups of people, with a view to adjusting these initiatives to make them more inclusive.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government;  A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada’s Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates. 
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité) 
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
Program (programme) 
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s Core Responsibilities and Results.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time‑limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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