Protecting National Security in Partnership with all Canadians

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WHAT IS THE THREAT?

  • CSIS has seen a rise in the threat posed by extremism, particularly Ideologically Motivated Violent Extremism (IMVE). This includes the use of online platforms by extremists for recruitment, proselytizing, fundraising, dissemination of hate speech and disinformation, harassment, and incitement of violent extremism. 
  • Extremist narratives are rapidly growing transnationally, both in resonance and reach. Canada is no exception to this trend. In fact, Canadians are active producers and consumers of these narratives. 
  • Violent extremists of all motivations exploit crisis situations, capitalizing on public fear, distrust and unrest to boost radicalization efforts and incite acts of violence. Social media and global connectivity have accelerated the speed and reach of extremist narratives, amplifying false and misleading messages.
  • Violent extremist entities have adopted conspiracy theories about the pandemic in an attempt to rationalize and justify violence. These narratives have contributed to efforts to undermine trust in the integrity of government and confidence in scientific expertise. While aspects of conspiracy theory rhetoric are a legitimate exercise in free expression, online rhetoric that is increasingly violent and calls for the arrest and execution of specific individuals is of increasing concern.
  • The threat is multi-faceted with security, economic, political, social, and technological aspects, requiring a similarly integrated response. 
TYPES OF EXTREMISM

Ideologically Motivated Violent Extremism

Proponents of ideologically motivated violent extremism (IMVE) are driven by a range of influences rather than a singular belief system. IMVE radicalization is more often caused by a combination of ideas and grievances resulting in a personalized worldview that is inspired by a variety of sources. IMVE includes gender-driven, xenophobic, anti-authority, and other grievance-driven violence.

Politically Motivated Violent Extremism

Politically motivated violent extremism (PMVE) encourages the use of violence to establish new political systems, or new structures and norms within existing systems.

Religiously Motivated Violent Extremism

Religiously motivated violent extremism (RMVE) encourages the use of violence as part of a spiritual struggle against a perceived immoral system. Followers believe that salvation can only be achieved through violence.

*None of these categories are necessarily mutually exclusive, as extremist narratives often derive from the personal grievances of the individual. These classifications are derived from the definitions of violent extremism in S. 83.01 of the Canadian Criminal Code as well as S.2(c) of the CSIS Act.

SPOTLIGHT ON IDEOLOGICALLY MOTIVATED VIOLENT EXTREMISM (IMVE)

HOW IS IT IMPACTING COMMUNITIES?

WORDS MATTER

INDICATORS OF RADICALIZATION OR MOBILIZATION

Indicators of Radicalization:

Indicators of Mobilization: 

WHAT IS THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA DOING TO RESPOND?

The National Strategy on Countering Radicalization to Violence outlines three priorities:

  1. Building, sharing and using knowledge; 
  2. Addressing radicalization to violence in the online space; and, 
  3. Supporting interventions. 

WHAT IS THE CSIS ROLE?

THE INTEGRATED TERRORISM ASSESSMENT CENTRE (ITAC)

ITAC is a federal organization responsible for assessing terrorism-related threats to Canada and Canadian interests. It is co-located with the headquarters of CSIS and operates under the provisions and authorities of the CSIS Act.

ITAC develops threat assessments at various classification levels that are based on classified and open-source information. These products are shared with both international and domestic partners, including law enforcement agencies. The assessments in turn support operational and strategic decision-making.

ITAC has three main lines of operation:

  1. Reporting on terrorism threats to Canada; 
  2. Assessing and recommending the National Terrorism Threat Level (NTTL) for Canada; and, 
  3. Assessing and setting terrorism threat levels against Canadian interests worldwide. 

WHAT CAN WE DO TOGETHER?

CSIS AS A TRUSTED PARTNER

CSIS continues to take measures to improve diversity, equity and inclusion within the organization and to address systemic racism, bias and discrimination. Public disclosure of these measures and progress supports transparency, openness and accountability. CSIS is accountable to the public whose security we protect, and we are working to ensure our workforce reflects the diversity of Canada.

CSIS is committed to establishing itself as a trusted partner for Canadian communities and to building those partnerships through dialogue, mutual respect, and reciprocal action. 

CONTACT US

To report non-immediate threat information related to national security, please contact CSIS by phone at 613-993-9620 24/7 or visit our website: Canadian Security Intelligence Service - Canada.ca

CSIS is not a law enforcement agency. To report an immediate threat to national security, please call 911 or your local police department.

To discuss engagement, outreach and dialogue between your community or organization and CSIS, please contact the Academic Outreach & Stakeholder Engagement program at AO-LR@smtp.gc.ca or your local regional CSIS liaison team. 

ISBN: 978-0-660-43844-3
Catalogue number: PS74-18/2022E-PDF
© Images Source: Getty Images
Aussi disponible en français sous le titre : Protéger la sécurité nationale en partenariat avec tous les Canadiens

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