Departmental Performance Report 2014–15

 

Minister's Message

I am pleased to present Shared Services Canada’s (SSC) 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report (DPR) for the period ending March 31, 2015. This report outlines how SSC continues to transform and streamline Information Technology (IT) services to deliver better value for government and better support for services to Canadians.

SSC is operating the IT platform which supports government programs and services, while simultaneously modernizing these systems toward improving the Government IT infrastructure.

SSC made significant progress towards improving the Government’s IT infrastructure over the course of the 2014–15 fiscal year. Some highlights are: the establishment of two new government-wide data centres; the awarding of contracts to Canadian companies for the development of an enterprise-wide secure network; and the start of migration to a single, outsourced email service.

On a national scale, SSC pursued the consolidation of IT infrastructure security services to prevent, detect and recover from cyber threats and to secure and safeguard the integrity of data and technology assets.

These accomplishments were made possible by establishing strong relationships with partner departments and by leveraging IT industry expertise to identify best practices and approaches to IT infrastructure transformation.

The scope and complexity of this IT transformation are unprecedented in Canada. SSC has risen to meet these challenges and will continue to maintain, modernize and secure IT infrastructure services across the Government of Canada to best serve the needs of Canadians, now and in the future.

The Honourable Judy M. Foote, P.C., M.P.
Minister, Public Services and Procurement

 

The Honourable  Judy M. Foote

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Judy Foote, P.C., M.P.
Deputy Head: Ron Parker
Ministerial Portfolio: Public Works and Government Services
Enabling Instrument(s): Shared Services Canada Act Footnote i
Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 2011
Other: Associated Orders in Council include Privy Council Numbers: 2011–0877; 2011 1297; 2012–0958; 2012–0960; 2013–0366; 2013–0367; and 2013–0368.

Organizational Context

Raison d’être

Shared Services Canada (SSC) is a federal department created on August 4, 2011, to transform how the Government of Canada manages its information technology (IT) infrastructure. SSC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and is responsible for delivering mandated email, data centre and network services to partner organizations in a consolidated and standardized manner to support the delivery of Government of Canada programs and services. SSC also provides certain optional technology–related services to government organizations on a cost–recovery basis. With a whole–of–government approach to IT, SSC is creating economies of scale to deliver more efficient, reliable and secure IT infrastructure services to Government of Canada departments. SSC’s mandate was reinforced on June 29, 2012, with the passage of the Shared Services Canada Act by Parliament.

Responsibilities

SSC was created by an Order in Council effective August 4, 2011, and subsequently received the authority to provide services related to email, data centres and networks to specified federal departments. SSC’s focus is to maintain and improve IT services delivery across the Government of Canada, generate and reinvest savings, enhance security, and implement government–wide solutions to transform IT infrastructure to improve services to Canadians.

The Shared Services Canada Act recognizes that the Government of Canada wishes to standardize and streamline, within a single shared services entity, certain administrative services that support government institutions. Through Orders in Council, the Department received specific standardization and consolidation responsibilities in the area of IT infrastructure services. SSC responsibilities include ensuring that approximately 1,517 mission critical systems across government continue to operate effectively.

SSC meets its responsibility to standardize and streamline IT infrastructure through its initiatives, working with the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector to deliver one email system, a government-wide footprint of seven data centres, a single government-wide network and transformed telecommunications services. Budget 2013 further expanded SSC’s mandate, adding the consolidation of government-wide procurement of software and hardware for workplace technology devices

SSC contributes to the achievement of other critically important and transformational Government of Canada initiatives such as strengthening border security, the Transformation of Pay Administration initiative and the vision of the public service of the future as articulated in Blueprint 2020. As an IT security service delivery organization, SSC works collaboratively with other Government of Canada cyber security agencies to support the cyber security strategy.

Strategic Outcome(s) and Program Alignment Architecture

  • 1. Strategic Outcome: Modern, reliable, secure and cost-effective IT infrastructure services to support government priorities and program delivery.
    • 1.1 Program: IT Infrastructure Services
      • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: Distributed Computing Services
        • 1.1.1.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Workstation Services
        • 1.1.1.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Desktop and Office Productivity Suite Services
        • 1.1.1.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Email and Directory Services
        • 1.1.1.4 Sub-Sub-Program: File/Print Services
        • 1.1.1.5 Sub-Sub-Program: Remote Access Services
        • 1.1.1.6 Sub-Sub-Program: Distributed Computing Services Program Management
      • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Production and Operations Computing Services (Data Centre Services)
        • 1.1.2.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Utility Computing Services
        • 1.1.2.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Dedicated Application Hosting and Management Services
        • 1.1.2.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Facilities Management Services
        • 1.1.2.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Production and Operations Computing Services Program Management
      • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: Telecommunications (Data, Voice and Video) Services
        • 1.1.3.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Data Network Infrastructure Services
        • 1.1.3.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Inter and Intra Data Centre Network Services
        • 1.1.3.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Voice Network Services
        • 1.1.3.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Image and Video Communication Services
        • 1.1.3.5 Sub-Sub-Program: Call Centre Services (Data and Voice Network Infrastructure)
        • 1.1.3.6 Sub-Sub-Program: Telecommunications Services Program Management
      • 1.1.4 Sub-Program: Cyber and IT Security Services
        • 1.1.4.1 Sub-Sub-Program: IT Environment Protection Services
        • 1.1.4.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Identification, Authentication, and Authorization Services
        • 1.1.4.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Secure Communication Services
        • 1.1.4.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Perimeter Defence, Detection, Response, Recovery and Audit Services
        • 1.1.4.5 Sub-Sub-Program: Cyber and IT Security Services Program Management
    • Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

This table outlines the Organizational Priorities.
Priority Type Program
Manage and operate newly transformed and existing legacy IT infrastructure using an enterprise approach to implement efficiencies and service standardization. Previously committed IT Infrastructure Services
Summary of Progress
The Department continued to align operations and IT service management with enterprise standards. An on-boarding process to help facilitate partner transition to new end-state enterprise services was developed to achieve service standardization. Additionally, the development of the Operations Service Management Manual supports the optimization of enterprise incident, problem, change and release management processes, thus contributing to improved responsiveness of core service delivery to our partners and Canadians.

In 2014–15, SSC supported service delivery by coordinating cyber protection activities with its partner organizations to effectively track and mitigate thousands of cyber events, including numerous high impact incidents and threats, such as Heartbleed and the cyber attack on the National Research Council networks. The department’s emergency management team also helped facilitate the protection of physical IT infrastructure from natural disasters and physical security threats. SSC also executed an enterprise strategy to optimize contracts with the development of a multi-year roadmap and the consolidation of 14 software contracts that are managed at the enterprise level, realizing cost-avoidance of $39.8 million.

The Department continued to manage and operate existing legacy IT infrastructure while supporting the transformation and migration of applications and services to the new enterprise-oriented infrastructure. SSC successfully closed 57 data centres across Canada, 47 of which were closed in 2014–15 alone, while opening two enterprise-class facilities in Barrie and Borden, in addition to an existing facility in Gatineau. The Department also moved ahead with the migration of telecommunications and network services in 2014–15, migrating 77,000 desktop phones to Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) technology, and expanding the delivery of Wi-Fi service to 6,246 employees.

To support a government-wide commitment to reduce travel costs and improve efficiency, SSC on-boarded 16 departments to its standardized videoconferencing service in 2014–15, bringing the total to 34 partners currently using the 2,000 active virtual meeting rooms available across the government.

This table outlines the IT infrastructure services and summary of progress.
Priority Type Program
Renew the Government of Canada’s IT infrastructure services. Previously committed IT Infrastructure Services
Summary of Progress
In consultation with Government of Canada lead security agencies and industry stakeholders, SSC established a framework for the structuring of cyber and IT security functions, which is composed of four pillars: Prevention, Detection, Recovery and Response. To support this framework, security principles and eight enterprise standard security controls were developed. The Security Operations Centre produced over 200 publications including advisories, targeted alerts, routine cyber briefs and informational cyber flashes, to ensure that employees remain aware of important cyber security events.

The Department migrated 3,441 users and 4,126 accounts within SSC to the new enterprise email system. Migration of partner organizations will continue in 2015–16, using SSC’s experience to enhance the process.

In January 2015, SSC awarded contracts to begin the consolidation of the Government of Canada’s 50 wide area networks into a single, more secure network.

SSC launched procurement processes for a new supply chain for servers and storage and to expand and refurbish the Borden Enterprise Data Centre. The Department awarded a contract to IBM Canada to house one of the Government of Canada’s enterprise data centres at its facility in Barrie, Ontario.

SSC initiated enhanced cyber and IT security services by leading a smart phone for classified proof of service projects and a legacy classified telephony replacement project for ministers, government officials and cyber response teams. SSC also enhanced cyber and IT security services by initiating ongoing supply chain integrity services.

In 2014–15, SSC enabled alignment of partner organizations’ projects with Government of Canada IT infrastructure transformation objectives by providing architecture and design services for 15 partner projects as well as 30 architecture advisory engagements to influence how partner initiatives can leverage enterprise services.

SSC signed an agreement with Microsoft in June 2014 to purchase standardized software and services for departments across the Government of Canada, which will result in savings of more than $13.5 million over three years.

SSC is committed to leveraging the knowledge and experience of Canada’s information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The Department continues to lead the Information Technology Infrastructure Roundtable (ITIR), made up of SSC senior managers and representatives of national and regional ICT sector associations and organizations. Through the ITIR, SSC has collaborated this past year via four IT Infrastructure Roundtable meetings and six Advisory Committee meetings. In addition, SSC’s Telecommunications transformation program engaged 153 suppliers and participated in 32 engagement events with partners, hosted nine industry days, and 43 bilateral meetings with industry stakeholders.

SSC implemented change management practices by holding 52 workshops for senior leaders to support them in their role of leading transformation priorities. To further support transformation priorities, SSC developed an organizational change management methodology, set up a collaborative network, and created an Extranet website with tools for employees and managers.

This table explains the engage with partners and summary of progress.
Priority Type Program
Engage with partners through governance mechanisms and effective client relationship management. Previously committed IT Infrastructure Services
Summary of Progress
In 2014–15, SSC enhanced enterprise-wide IT planning capability through the evolution of tools and business processes, including the implementation of departmental roadmaps, Government of Canada IT integrated plan views and Government of Canada IT enterprise business solutions, such as My GCHR and Systems Applications and Products, the Government of Canada’s Enterprise Resource Planning system standard. The key benefits resulting from these solutions as part of the Integrated IT Planning process are that their expanded use consolidates GoC IT infrastructure requirements, creates a point of leverage for SSC-delivered GoC IT infrastructure services, and reduces government operating costs.

In support of ongoing effective relationship management, SSC introduced a partner communications framework that includes formal procedures as to how and when partners are notified by SSC for incident, problem, change and release management. This framework improved collaborative planning and responsiveness to partner program delivery by promoting clearer lines of communication.

In 2014–15, SSC held 16 bilateral Deputy Minister-level meetings, two Chief Information Officer (CIO) Forums, 324 partner CIO-level bilateral meetings as well as 13 CIO Roundtable meetings in order to continue partner engagement efforts. These meetings enhanced client relationship management, allowing SSC to strengthen partner planning and develop awareness of the Department’s transformation plan. Implementation of this plan supports the delivery of services to Canadians as well as the Blueprint 2020 vision of a modern and efficient workplace. SSC plays a lead role in implementing the following Blueprint 2020 initiatives throughout the government: Government Electronic Directory Services (GEDS) 2.0; expanded availability of Wi-Fi; development of tools to support a mobile workforce; and provision of desktop videoconferencing capability.

SSC continues to align its project management practices with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) project management policies. SSC uses a project management system for reporting and tracking project status and risks, so that issues are promptly addressed at the appropriate organizational level. The Department also approved a plan for improving project management that focuses on enhancing the management of change within SSC and for its partners in collaboration with key project management stakeholders. This Project Management Continuous Improvement Plan contains four areas of focus: revise project management governance; increase project financial control and monitoring; standardize the management of partner projects; and strengthen overall portfolio management.

This table outlines horizontal management and summary of progress.
Priority Type Program
Advance horizontal management and execution through the effective and efficient delivery of a full range of business services aligned with SSC’s business model. Previously committed Internal Services
Summary of Progress
SSC improved the management and delivery of internal services by enhancing its Extranet site and launching its Serving Government site, which made client-centric information more readily available and easy to find, thus allowing employees, managers and partners to standardize their planning activities. The Department also enhanced the integration of performance and risk management to a greater degree into departmental practices by developing an Organizational Risk Profile and risk guides to increase understanding of performance measures that complement the government’s results-based management approach.

In 2014–15, SSC further standardized and increased the oversight of departmental internal policy instruments by implementing its internal policy instrument framework and delivering a three-year internal policy development plan that manages compliance with Treasury Board requirements.

The Department enhanced the Workforce Management Strategy (WMS) by focusing on organizational agility, leadership alignment and workforce enablement. To help implement the WMS, a human resources training curriculum for managers was developed, the My Career page was launched on the Academy website and a roadmap for the professional development of executives was introduced.

To address long-term accommodations, SSC completed the second year of its Accommodation Strategy in 2014–15 by finalizing office space transfer negotiations with 13 partner organizations.

SSC delivered on its oversight commitments slated for 2014-2015 in the departmental rolling Risk-based Audit and Evaluation Plan. The Office of Audit and Evaluation (OAE) completed six internal audits, in response to which Management Action Plans (MAPs) were developed and implemented by program management. The OAE also coordinated activities related to external audits undertaken by the Offices of the Auditor General of Canada and the Comptroller General of Canada. In 2014-2015, the department was responsible for implementing 36 MAPs, including eight in response to internal audit recommendations and 28 in response to external audits.

In 2014–15 SSC deployed business solutions to enhance the delivery of internal services by making GCDOCS, a single-source information management system, available to all employees. The Department also promoted necessary information management practices to prepare employees for GCDOCS implementation.

Risk Analysis

In 2014–15 SSC continued to strengthen its risk management culture, by establishing its first, formal Organizational Risk Profile (ORP) and identifying organizational risks and associated mitigation strategies. In addition, the Department provided introductory risk management training for employees and developed key documents, such as the Risk Management Guide and the Integrated Risk Management Framework.

To mitigate partnership management risks, enhanced levels of engagement were undertaken through CIO forums, bilateral CIO-level meetings, CIO roundtable meetings, Deputy Minister bilateral meetings and other fora with partners. At the same time, renewed efforts were placed on further aligning SSC and partners’ plans in order to successfully deliver on the transformation agenda. To ensure alignment with Government of Canada IT modernization priorities and broader IT planning across the federal government, SSC works closely with both the TBS and Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC). IT planning was further informed by ongoing engagement with the ICT industry through such mechanisms as the ITIR and its sub-committees, as well as bargaining agents through ongoing labour-management meetings.

With regard to human resources capacity, SSC launched the Learning Academy, as part of the implementation of the Learning@SSC Strategy, to upgrade employees’ skills, including risk management skills. Mobility tools such as the Gateway to Mobility were refined to better account for the skills of employees. Through refinement of the workforce management strategy and ongoing use of the Departmental Vacancy Management Committee, SSC continues to reinforce its commitment to enabling employees’ contributions to the success of SSC’s transformation plan. These activities helped employees to take advantage of available opportunities, and reduced the assessed level of risk relative to human resources capacity.

Given SSC’s unique financial requirements, specifically the need to fund ongoing transformation through savings achieved, financial management continues to be a risk for the Department’s transformation agenda. In order to meet this self-funding requirement, timely financial information is crucial. In that regard, SSC began the implementation of a financial business intelligence tool, which will be further developed in 2015–16. SSC also supported a robust system of financial management by ensuring financial controls are in place throughout the organization, including the implementation of a framework which enables SSC to provide assurance over internal controls. Given that SSC’s transformation agenda is ongoing, oversight will continue and the financial management risk will be closely monitored.

In the future, SSC will continue to work closely with internal and external stakeholders in order to manage and mitigate risks, as well as identify emerging risks.

Key Risk

This table outlines the Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Stategy Link to Program
Alignment Architecture
Partnership Management

There is a risk that the Department’s delivery of its transformation agenda with partner organizations, industry and bargaining agents will face challenges as transformation advances and creates the anticipated disruption to established systems and processes.
  • Integrate and align partner organizations’ planning with SSC enterprise planning.
  • Implement partnership engagement models.
  • Establish effective outreach to Government of Canada IT communities and external stakeholders.
  • Continue the development of Client Relationship Manager (CRM) and Portfolio Lead roles into ‘on the ground’, trusted SSC advocates.
  • Further develop strategic relationships and complementary governance with partner organizations to support program operations and business transformation.
1.1 Program: IT Infrastructure Services,
Internal Services
Human Resources (HR) Capacity

There is a risk that the Department will not have the right people with the proper skills to deliver on its mandate.
  • Refine the Workforce Management Strategy to address current and future HR needs.
  • Refine Gateway to Mobility to facilitate internal employee movement.
  • Implement the Learning@SSC Strategy.
  • Continue to operate the Departmental Vacancy Management Committee to support effective workforce management.
1.1 Program: IT Infrastructure Services,
Internal Services
Financial Management

There are risks concerning the Department’s abilities to manage the challenges and achieve the self–funding requirement for SSC’s transformation agenda.
  • Ensure financial controls are in place at the organizational level.
  • Expand financial controls to management levels.
  • Ensure that internal financial information is readily available.
  • Develop additional processes and procedures as required based on continuous internal and external monitoring and analysis.
  • Ensure managers are equipped with the necessary training and tools to exercise their financial stewardship role.
1.1 Program: IT Infrastructure Services,
Internal Services

 

Actual Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross Expenditures 1,663,296,568 1,663,296 568 2,091,131,401 2,015,710,009 352,413,441
Less Respendable Revenue (189,972,991) (189,972 991) (413,731,367) (393,328,154) (203,355,163)
Net Expenditures 1,473,323,577 1,473,323,577 1,677,400,034 1,622,381,855 149,058,278

 

Human Resources (Full–Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
6,400 5,887 (513)

As part of SSC’s recent restructuring, a new organization structure was developed in 2014−15 and implemented in 2015−16. The new structure and mapping of employees to the new business lines will allow for a review of FTEs and use of professional services to determine steady state FTE baseline requirements aligned to the department’s transformation plan.

Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcome(s) and Program(s) (dollars)
Strategic Outcome(s), Program(s) and Internal Services 2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2014–15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014–15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Strategic Outcome: Modern, reliable, secure and cost-effective IT infrastructure services to support government priorities and program delivery
IT Infrastructure Services
Gross Expenditures 1,478,632,168 1,478,632,168 1,285,297,140 1,257,836,915 1,930,577,350 1,858,089,117 1,860,268,470 1,637,435,300
Less: Respendable Revenue (189,972,991) (189,972,991) (325,000) - (413,731,367) (393,328,154) (350,999,820) (369,298,905)
Subtotal 1,288,659,177 1,288,659,177 1,284,972,140 1,257,836,915 1,516,845,983 1,464,760,963 1,509,268,650 1,268,136,395
Internal Services Subtotal 184,664,400 184,664,400 159,071,885 159,009,860 160,554,051 157,620,892 143,969,155 113,012,700
Total 1,473,323,577 1,473,323,577 1,444,044,025 1,416,846,775 1,677,400,034 1,622,381,855 1,653,237,805 1,381,149,095

SSC's year-end results (Total Authorities Available for use less Actual Spending) reflects a surplus of $55 million, which can be explained by delays in the advancement of certain projects and initiatives, such as Carling Campus and IT Infrastructure for the National Research Council of Canada (NRC).

The Department's planned spending reflects the funding approved by the Treasury Board to support the departmental Strategic Outcome and Program. The majority of the increase of $204.1 million in the 2014−15 Total Authorities Available for use over the 2014−15 Planned Spending is explained by the additional funding received through Supplementary Estimates and Treasury Board Central Votes such as: 2013−14 Operating and Capital Budget Carry Forward to 2014−15 ($82.9M), the additional funding received for different projects and initiatives ($57.4M), adjustments with partner organizations as a result of the creation of the department ($41.1M) and an increase in the Employee Benefit Plan contribution mostly related to the Vote-Netted Revenue (VNR) authority ($22.7M).

The respendable revenue increase of $203.4 million (actual minus planned) is attributed to the additional VNR authority approved in late March 2014 for core and optional services, workplace technology procurement, and projects with partners and clients. At year-end, the actual revenues related to the offered services were less than forecasted by $20M (actual minus available authority).

For Internal Services, the decrease in the 2014–15 actual spending over the 2014–15 planned spending, is mainly due to the transfer of funds from Internal Services to IT Infrastructure Services.

The decrease in actual spending of $30.9M between 2013–14 and 2014–15 is mostly attributed to an increase in revenues for core and optional services offered to clients and partner organizations and to an increase in Internal Services.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole–of–Government Framework

Alignment of 2014–15 Actual Spending With the Whole–of–Government FrameworkFootnote ii (dollars)

Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014–15
Actual Spending
Modern, reliable, secure and cost-effective IT infrastructure services to support government priorities and program delivery IT Infrastructure Services Government Affairs Well–managed and efficient government operations 1,464,760,963

Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic affairs - -
Social affairs - -
International affairs - -
Government affairs 1,288,659,177 1,464,760,963

Note: These figures are net of respendable revenues

Departmental Spending Trend

Text Version of Figure 1 - Expenses

This bar graph shows the Department’s past, actual, forecasted and planned spending from 2012–2013 to 2017–2018. The graph shows the following spending trend: in 2012–2013, the Department spent $1,381,149,095, including $1,300,540,279 in voted spending and $80,608,816 in statutory spending; in 2013–2014, the Department spent $1,653,237,805, including $1,562,674,592 in voted spending and $90,563,213 in statutory spending; in 2014–2015, the Department spent $1,622,381,855, including $1,534,706,413 in voted spending and $87,675,442 in statutory spending; in 2015–2016, the Department’s planned spending is $1,444,044,025, including $1,373,052,506 in voted spending and $70,991,519 in statutory spending; in 2016–2017, the Department’s planned spending is $1,416,846,775, including $1,346,029,234 in voted spending and $70,817,541 in statutory spending; and finally, in 2017–2018, the Department’s planned spending is $1,407,484,811, including $1,336,611,656 in voted spending and $70,873,155 in statutory spending.

Graph 1 - Departemental Spending Trend

Note: These figures are net of respendable revenues. The statutory amounts represent the contribution to the employee benefit plans.

For the period of 2012–13, 2013–14 and 2014–15, the actual spending represents the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts.

The decrease in the 2016–17 and 2017–18 Planned Spending from 2015–16 is primarily due to time-limited projects that do not have ongoing funding.

Estimates by Vote

For information on Shared Services Canada’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2015, Footnote iii which is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.Footnote iv

Section II: Analysis of Program by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Modern, reliable, secure and cost-effective IT infrastructure services to support government priorities and program delivery.

Program 1.1: IT Infrastructure Services

Description

This program delivers IT infrastructure services to federal government departments to enable and support the management, coordination and delivery of government programs to Canadians and the achievement of Government of Canada priorities. The IT infrastructure services consist of four main IT service groups: (a) Distributed Computing; (b) Production and Operations Computing; (c) Telecommunications (Data, Voice and Video); and (d) Cyber and IT Security. This program establishes a centralized common IT infrastructure service leading to consolidation and standardization in the management and delivery of IT services across the mandated 43 partner organizations. This consolidation and standardization contributes to greater operational efficiencies and economies of scale resulting in forecasted cost-savings, enhanced reliability and security of the IT services, reduction in duplication of effort and managerial oversight, and development of harmonized responses to partner organizations’ business requirements.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross Expenditures 1,478,632,168 1,478,632,168 1,930,577,350 1,858,089,117 379,456,949
Less Respendable Revenue (189,972,991) (189,972,991) (413,731,367) (393,328,154) (203,355,163)
Net Expenditures 1,288,659,177 1,288,659,177 1,516,845,983 1,464,760,963 176,101,786

 

Human Resources (Full–Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
5,500 5,001 (499)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Sound stewardship of public funds. Total savings generated ($) Establish baseline The department’s transformation plan sets the baseline for savings at $400 million in annual ongoing savings to be achieved by 2020.
As of 2014–15, SSC’s IT infrastructure Services program has generated $158.68M in annual ongoing savings compared to 2011-12.
Ability to anticipate and respond to partner organizations’ IT business requirements. Partner satisfaction Establish baseline SSC has begun to collect partner satisfaction data.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, SSC provided IT infrastructure services to partner organizations by managing over 530,000 email accounts, more than 400 data centres, 50 wide area networks, enterprise cyber and IT security services and more than 14,000 applications hosted on government servers.

In 2014–15, implementation of the Department’s Transformation Plan across the enterprise began to take shape: the first Government of Canada employees were moved to the new email system, with the migration of 4,126 mailboxes; the Department established two enterprise data centres, and began migrating partner applications, while continuing the planned closure and transformation of existing data centres across the government; SSC awarded three contracts to industry service providers to consolidate the Government of Canada’s wide area network; and the Department handled several high-impact security incidents, including a major incursion into National Research Council networks.

SSC has learned from the early stages of the implementation of the email project and will use this knowledge to increase efficiency in future transitions to enterprise products and services for partners. SSC engaged partner CIOs to ensure that government priorities were understood and that partner considerations and priorities were effectively incorporated into enterprise decision-making. In addition, the implementation of SSC’s Transformation Program Office is providing a specialized monitoring function to ensure that measurable benefits are achieved, while developing the capacity to effectively implement and monitor future enterprise transformation.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Distributed Computing Services

Description

This program includes the provision and support that provides users with local and remote access to enterprise email applications and functionality including file/print and directory services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
186,039,959 155,659,983 (30,379,976)

Note: These figures are net of respendable revenues.

Human Resources (Full–Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
460 633 173

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Consolidated and standardized Government of Canada-wide distributed computing services are cost-effective. Total savings generated ($) Establish baseline The department’s transformation plan sets the baseline for savings.

As of 2014–15, SSC’s Distributed Computing Services sub-program has generated $14.68 M in annual ongoing savings compared to 2011-12.
Consolidated and standardized Government of Canada-wide distributed computing services support partner organizations in the delivery of programs and services to Canadians. Partner satisfaction Establish baseline SSC has begun to collect partner satisfaction data.
Availability (%) Establish baseline The availability target for email services is 99.90%.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, SSC continued to deliver existing email services to partner organizations, while working with its industry service providers to implement an enterprise email solution for the Government of Canada. The consolidation of the Government of Canada’s email systems from 63 systems to a single standardized and secure system will deliver annual savings of $67 million dollars to taxpayers once all accounts will be migrated. The contract for the Email Transformation Initiative was awarded in June 2013 to Bell Canada in partnership with CGI Information Systems and Management Consultants Inc. and Microsoft Canada. In 2014, our industry service providers experienced significant challenges in meeting the government’s security requirements resulting in an implementation delay. In February 2015, SSC began migrating its own employees to the new email system, and at year end had migrated 4,126 SSC mailboxes to Canada.ca accounts. The lessons learned by first implementing the email solution at SSC will help guide the roll-out in other departments.

SSC awarded a contract to Microsoft to provide consolidated desktop software and related workplace technology devices for the Government of Canada. The contract is three years in length with an anticipated yearly savings of over $4.5 million beginning in 2014–15, and streamlines the procurement of Microsoft products for SSC's partner organizations. The agreement is aligned with SSC's strategy to standardize commonly used software and to simplify the purchasing and management of such software throughout government.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Production and Operations Computing Services (Data Centre Services)

Description

This program includes the provision, technical support and certification for the hosting of the enterprise's day-to-day operations and production applications and database computing environments, including Web application environments, regardless of where they reside in the virtualized data centre or within the business unit (in a server room). Included in this service group is the execution of business resumption plans and disaster recovery plans developed under Security Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
492,519,365 578,703,022 86,183,657

Note: These figures are net of respendable revenues.

Human Resources (Full–Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2731 2240 (491)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Consolidated, standardized and streamlined Government of Canada operations and production applications and database computing services (data centres) are cost-effective. Total savings generated ($) Establish baseline The department’s transformation plan sets the baseline for savings.

As of 2014–15, SSC’s Production and Operations Computing Services sub-program has generated savings of $14.5 M in annual ongoing savings compared to 2011–12.
Consolidated and standardized Government of Canada-wide distributed computing services support partner organizations in the delivery of programs and services to Canadians. Partner satisfaction Establish baseline SSC has begun to collect partner satisfaction data.
% workload migrated to new data centres Accordance to project schedule SSC migrated 100 applications to enterprise data centres, which represents 10% of the target for 2014 – 15.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, SSC maintained the operations of data centres and related services for partners and Canadians. These systems included 21 mainframes to support mission critical applications, such as the Canada Revenue Agency’s tax system, Employment and Social Development Canada’s Old Age Security and Canada Pension Plan, and Public Works and Government Services Canada’s pay and pension systems. As of March 31, 2015, SSC has closed 57 legacy data centres and has reduced the data centre footprint from 600,000 to 529,000 square feet.

In December 2014, Treasury Board approved the award of a contract for mainframe hardware and software to IBM, allowing SSC to begin consolidating the government’s 21 mainframes into eight upgraded mainframes.

Through a competitive procurement process, IBM Canada Ltd. was awarded a multi-year contract to provide and manage Enterprise Data Centre (EDC) Barrie, which serves as a backup for EDC Borden. The Department also launched a procurement process to expand and refurbish EDC Borden.

In 2014–15, SSC’s workload migration strategy required partner organizations to use SSC’s new standard infrastructure in enterprise data centres for their applications. However, as a lesson learned from the slow pace of migration in 2014–15, SSC has adopted a more flexible workload migration strategy to better enable departments to migrate applications to enterprise data centres on infrastructure that more closely matches their current environment. SSC’s expectation is that workload migrations will now accelerate over the next year and beyond. In 2014–15, SSC also drafted a facilities end-state transition plan and a set of guiding principles for the maintenance of SSC end-state infrastructure and facilities.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Telecommunications (Data, Voice and Video) Services

Description

This program includes the transmission of data, voice and video within and across the enterprise. Data network services include the provision and ongoing support of multi-platform, multi-protocol electronic data and communications networks, which includes all software as well as wiring, switches, hubs, routers and all other hardware required to support data communications between computing devices. The voice communication services include provision of local and long-distance services globally, as well as fax services, voice mail, videoconferencing, secure voice and other related services, which include all carrier software and hardware environments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
538,196,715 645,885,357 107,688,642

Note: These figures are net of respendable revenues.

Human Resources (Full–Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1913 1629 (284)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Consolidated and standardized telecommunications services are cost-effective and support Government of Canada priorities. Total savings generated ($) Establish baseline The department’s transformation plan sets the baseline for savings.

The department’s transformation plan sets the baseline for savings.

As of 2014–15, SSC’s Telecommunications sub-program has generated savings of $103 M in 2014–15 in annual ongoing savings compared to 2011-12.
Consolidated and standardized transmission of data, voice and image/video to support partner organizations in the delivery of programs and services to Canadians. Partner satisfaction Establish baseline SSC has begun to collect partner satisfaction data.
Number of services which have met uptime target Establish baseline SSC has established availability objectives for 16 data network services.

13 out of 16 Data Network Services met their availability objectives within the 12-month period ending on March 31, 2015.

SSC has established availability objectives for four voice network services.

All four Voice Network Services met their availability objectives within the 12-month period ending on March 31, 2015.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The continued operation of the Government of Canada’s telecommunications infrastructure provides the capabilities of all voice and data traffic on the network, in support of government program delivery for Canadians. These services include maintaining networks within 3,580 separate buildings, and running 50 wide area networks (WANs).

In January 2015, SSC awarded contracts to TELUS and Allstream to begin the consolidation of the WANs, which will allow a greater volume of enterprise data to be maintained and exchanged. Shared Services Canada worked extensively with its partners and the telecommunications industry during the procurement of the Government of Canada’s enterprise WAN. SSC hosted industry engagement conferences, Information Technology Infrastructure Roundtable meetings, Advisory Committee meetings and bilateral meetings involving industry stakeholders, SSC managers and partners so that participants could learn about best practices in the procurement of enterprise WANs.

Shared Services Canada is increasing the Government of Canada’s network bandwidth capacity in order to meet the growing demand for videoconferencing as a viable alternative to travel. In 2014–15, SSC replaced legacy equipment and ensured that partner organizations and regional offices had access to equipment with the ability to host multi-party videoconferences. The Department leveraged its lessons learned in previous implementations to successfully on-board an additional 16 departments to its standardized videoconferencing service. There are currently 34 partner organizations that now have access to more than 2,000 active virtual meeting rooms, thus helping the government to reduce travel costs and maximize its savings and security in IT. SSC also disconnected 23,000 unused telephone lines and migrated more than 77,000 outdated and costly desktop telephones to VoIP technology. The number of Data Network Services that met their availability objectives within 2014–15 was limited to 13 out of 16 due to a supplier that suffered a loss of a number of satellites. However service availability has improved and stabilized, meeting the contracted target availability, with the replacement of failed satellites.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Cyber and IT Security Services

Description

Cyber and IT Security Services is the application of “safeguards to preserve the confidentiality, integrity, availability, intended use and value of electronically stored, processed or transmitted information” (Policy on Government Security, Operational Security Standard: Management of Information Technology Security (MITS)).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
71,903,138 84,512,601 12,609,463

Note: These figures are net of respendable revenues.

Human Resources (Full–Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
396 499 103

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Improved safeguarded and preserved confidentiality, integrity, availability, intended use and value of electronically stored, processed or transmitted data and information within and across the Government of Canada and externally with Canadians. Availability (%) Establish baseline Internal Credential Management and External Credential Management services met their availability objectives of 99.5% and 99.8% respectively within the 12-month period ending on March 31, 2015.
Number of partner organizations with 24/7/365 Network Operations Centre (NOC) / Security Operations Centre (SOC) Establish baseline SSC has assumed responsibility for seven NOCs that originated from the partner organizations, of which five have been consolidated within the Enterprise Command Centre. SSC has established a 24/7/365 SOC, monitoring 43 partner organizations and providing IT security services.
% of patches installed Establish baseline SSC has continued to manage the deployment of security patches following existing processes and tools.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Department plays a major role in preventing, detecting and responding to cyber intrusions and ensuring the recovery of IT systems. Consolidating and modernizing the government’s IT infrastructure will address the underlying causes of the vast majority of cyber incidents.

In 2014–15, SSC improved the protection of IT infrastructure and associated data in transit, storage and use through the Security Operations Centre (SOC). During its first full year of operation, the new centre, which is now providing 24/7 coverage, successfully coordinated cyber protection activities and prioritized remedial activities related to security incidents. Learning from these situations, ongoing improvements were made across the government to enhance the communication of cyber events, mitigation and recovery plans.

Design considerations for security and privacy have also been incorporated into the Department’s business lines, by implementing and verifying safeguards.

SSC continued to work on the development of timelines for the implementation of the cyber and IT security program, which will be under full review in 2015-16. After consulting with federal security agencies and industry stakeholders, SSC developed a cyber and IT security framework to maintain the confidentiality, integrity and availability of government information, services and infrastructure.

In 2014–15, over 1,200 supply chain integrity procurement reviews were completed by the departmental cyber threat assessment team to examine vendors’ sourcing practices. In addition, a process was established for the recall of equipment, software and services identified as having increased risk as a result of threat assessments done in consultation with security partners.

To address the current IT security skills gap, SSC partnered with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, the Communications Security Establishment and the Canada School of Public Service to develop a new competency based learning framework as a core discipline under SSC’s learning academy initiative.

SSC is implementing a standardized, consolidated enterprise approach to the procurement of security software. In 2014–15, the approach was realigned based on industry feedback obtained in three Architecture Framework Advisory Committee consultations. As a result, IT Security was included in the Network Solutions Supply Chain procurement vehicle, for which the target contract award date is in 2015-16.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are Management and Oversight Services, Communications Services, Legal Services, Human Resources Management Services, Financial Management Services, Information Management Services, Information Technology Services, Real Property Services, Materiel Services, Acquisition Services, and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not those provided to a specific program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Gross Expenditures 184,664,400 184,664,400 160,554,051 157,620,892 (27,043,508)
Less Respendable Revenue - - - - -
Net Expenditures 184,664,400 184,664,400 160,554,051 157,620,892 (27,043,508)
Human Resources (Full–Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference (actual minus planned)
900 886 (14)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–2015, SSC reviewed and refined its Program Alignment Architecture and associated Performance Measurement Framework. The Department also developed an Organizational Risk Profile, a framework and a guide for risk management to support the integration of risk management practices. Risk management training was provided for SSC employees across Canada.

In support of organizational change management and the broader culture shift needed to support transformation initiatives, the Department implemented culture development efforts in order to achieve departmental Blueprint 2020 activities, and took action in response to the Public Service Employee Survey results. The Workforce Management Strategy was developed to promote employee skill development, mobility and leadership capacity building in order to meet the future competency needs of the organization.

SSC enhanced its financial management instruments and controls by developing guidelines and documentation with respect to the Chart of Accounts to improve its ability to record, analyze and report on financial data. SSC also developed an Internal Control Management Framework that provides policy directions for maintaining an effective system of financial internal control. The Office of Audit and Evaluation (OAE) continued to carry out its audits and evaluations in accordance with the 20142017 Risk-based Audit Plan and the 20142019 Evaluation Plan. The OAE reorganized its resources in order to increase its audit capacity and focus evaluations on operational requirements. The OAE completed six internal audit engagements and coordinated 22 external oversight activities that involved SSC.

As planned, SSC completed a long-term office accommodation strategy and began implementing office transfer activities to consolidate office space. SSC initiated the implementation of Government of Canada information management solutions by making GCDOCS available to all employees. The implementation of the Electronic Procurement to Payment tool will be completed in 2015–16 with the launch of its first services, and will improve efficiency of IT goods and services procurement based on an end-to-end process.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

The financial highlights presented within this Departmental Performance Report are intended to serve as a general overview of SSC’s Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and its Statement of Financial Position. More detailed information is provided in SSC’s 2014–15 financial statements. These unaudited statements have been prepared using Government of Canada accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards.

The unaudited financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles and are therefore different from the information published in the Public Accounts of Canada, which are prepared on an appropriation basis. Sections I and II of this report contain financial information based on parliamentary authorities, which reflect cash flow requirements. Items recognized in the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and in the Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through parliamentary authorities in prior, current or future years. A reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year authorities used is presented in Note 3 to SSC’s 2014–15 financial statements on its website.

The tables below illustrate the March 31, 2015 ending balances for each major grouping in the financial statements, along with the corresponding change from the previous fiscal year.

This table outlines a Condensed Statement of operations and departmental net financial position
Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position
(unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2015 (dollars)
Financial Information 2014–15
Planned
Results
2014–15
Actual
2013–14
Actual
Difference
(2014–15
actual minus
2014–15
planned)
Difference
(2014–15
actual minus
2013–14
actual)
Total expenses 1,829,828,096 1,974,520,312 2,034,425,332 144,692,216 (59,905,020)
Total revenues 418,371,049 398,062,600 334,802,005 (20,308,449) 63,260,595
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,411,457,047 1,576,457,712 1,699,623,327 165,000,665 (123,165,615)
Departmental net financial position N/A 360,332,308 293,090,502 N/A 67,241,806

SSC’s total expenses for 2014–15 were $1,974.5 million, a decrease of $59.9 million from the previous year’s total expenses of $2,034.4 million. In 2014–15, salaries and employee benefits accounted for the largest portion of expenses (33%) at $652.2 million ($714.9 million and 35% in 2013–14), followed by telecommunications expenses (23%) at $453.8 million ($463.3 million and 23% in 2013–14). Salaries and employee benefits decreased by $62.7 million in 2014–15, mainly due to the decrease of $41.6 million related to severance settlements paid in 2013–14 and to the decrease of $16.7 million related to the implementation of the salary payments in arrears in 2014–15. Operating expenses (excluding salaries and employee benefits) increased by $2.8 million in 2014–15 (from $1,319.5 million in 2013–14 to $1,322.3 million in 2014–15).

The Financial Statement's Note 15 Segmented Information provides detailed information broken down by major object of expenses and by program.

Text Version of Figure 1 - Expenses

This pie chart shows the Department’s expenses in percentage and in dollars. The graph shows the following expenses for 2014–15: Salaries and employee benefits ($652.2M) represents 33% of expenses. Telecommunications ($453.8M) represents 23% of expenses. Rentals ($246.5M) represents 13% of expenses. Professional and special services ($202.9M) represents 10% of expenses. Machinery and equipment ($142.3M) represents 7% of expenses. Amortization ($137.3M) represents 7% of expenses and, finally, other operating expenses ($139.5M) represents 7% of expenses.

Figure 1 - Expenses

SSC’s total revenues for 2014–15 were $398.1 million, an increase of $63.3 million over the previous year’s total revenues of $334.8 million. Of these revenues, the majority are respendable revenues related to IT infrastructure services provided to partnering organizations and other Government of Canada departments and agencies on a cost recoverable basis. SSC’s revenues, net of $13.9 million in non-respendable revenues earned on behalf of the government, consist of 99.97% in sale of goods and services and 0.03% in miscellaneous revenues.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
As at March 31, 2015
(dollars)
Financial Information 2014–15 2013–14 Difference
(2014–15
minus
2013–14)
Total liabilities 597,404,899 533,716,536 63,688,363
Total net financial assets 447,603,788 469,145,122 (21,541,334)
Departmental net debt 149,801,111 64,571,414 85,229,697
Total non-financial assets 510,133,419 357,661,916 152,471,503
Departmental net financial position 360,332,308 293,090,502 67,241,806

Total liabilities were $597.4 million at the end of 2014–15, an increase of $63.7 million (12%) over the previous year’s total liabilities of $533.7 million. In 2014–15, accounts payable and accrued liabilities accounted for the largest portion of liabilities (69%) at $412.5 million ($431.0 million and 81% in 2013–14), followed by lease obligations for tangible capital assets (19%) at $113.2 million ($29.3 million and 5% in 2013–14).

Text Version of Figure 2

This pie chart shows the Department’s liabilities in percentage and in dollars. The graph shows the following liabilities for 2014–15: Accounts payable and accrued liabilities ($412.5M) represents 69% of liabilities. Employee future benefits ($35.1M) represents 6% of liabilities. Vacation pay and compensatory leave ($28.5M) represents 5% of liabilities. Lease obligations for tangible capital assets ($113.2M) represents 19% of liabilities and, finally, deferred revenue ($8.1M) represents 1% of liabilities.

Figure 2 - Liabilities

Total net financial assets were $447.6 million at the end of 2014–15, a decrease of $21.5 million (5%) from the previous year’s total net financial assets of $469.1 million. In 2014–15, the amount due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) represented the largest portion (79%) of the net financial assets of $353.6 million ($333.0 million and 71% in 2013–14).

Text Version of Figure 3

This pie chart shows the Department’s financial assets in percentage and in dollars. The graph shows the following financial assets for 2014–15: Assets due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund ($353.6M) represents 79% of financial assets and Accounts receivable and advances ($94.0M) represents 21% of financial assets.

Figure 3 - Assets

Total non-financial assets were $510.1 million at the end of 2014–15, an increase of $152.5 million (43%) over the previous year’s total non-financial assets of $357.6 million. This net increase is due to an increase of $164.2 million in tangible capital assets (from $329.9 million in 2013–14 to $494.1 million in 2014–15) and to a decrease of $11.7 million in prepaid expenses (from $27.7 million in 2013–14 to $16.0 million in 2014–15). The increase in tangible capital assets is mainly due to new acquisitions of leased capital assets, assets under construction and computer hardware. The decrease in prepaid expenses is mostly attributable to the amortization of the previous year’s prepaid expenses.

Text Version of Figure 4

This pie chart shows the Department’s non-financial assets in percentage and in dollars. The graph shows the following non-financial assets for 2014-15: Tangible capital assets ($494.1M) represents 97% of non-financial assets and Prepaid expenses ($16.0M) represents 3% of non-financial assets.

Figure 4 - Assets

Financial Statements

The Department’s financial statements can be found on Shared Services Canada Departmental Financial Statements websiteFootnote v

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report can be found on SSC’s .Supplementary Information Tables websiteFootnote vi.

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy - Greening Government Operations;
  • Internal Audits and Evaluations.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Government of Canada Tax ExpendituresFootnote vii publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

General inquiries

Please direct your inquiries to:
Media@spc-ssc.gc.ca
613-947-6276

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation (crédit): Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires): Includes operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report (rapport ministériel sur le rendement): Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Report on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

Full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein): Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes (résultats du gouvernement du Canada): A set of 16 high‑level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats): A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

Non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires): Includes net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Performance (rendement): What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

Performance indicator (indicateur de rendement): A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement): The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

Planned spending (dépenses prévues): For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

Plan (plan): The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

Priorities (priorité): Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

Program (programme): A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes): A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities (rapport sur les plans et les priorités): Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Respendable revenues (revenus disponibles): Revenues for which the department has specific authority from Parliament to respend.

Result (résultat): An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

Statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives): Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique): A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

Sunset program (programme temporisé): A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

Target (cible): A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

Voted expenditures (dépenses votées): Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Whole-of-government framework (cadre pangouvernemental): Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Endnotes

Free PDF download

To access the Portable Document Format (PDF) version you must have a PDF reader installed. If you do not already have such a reader, there are numerous PDF readers available for free download or for purchase on the Internet:

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: