Book Two – Shared Services Canada Ministerial Transition 2021

1. Parliamentary Reporting

A. Departmental Fees Report for the 2020-21 fiscal year for Shared Services Canada

Issue

Approval of Shared Services Canada’s Departmental Fees Report for the 2020 to 2021 fiscal year in accordance with the Service Fees Act.

Background and key developments

Under section 20 of the Service Fees Act, in each fiscal year, the Minister of every government institution is required to table an annual report in the House of Commons and the Senate in accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat’s annual reporting instructions. Subsequent to receipt of these departmental reports, the President of the Treasury Board must table a summary of all of the reports by March 31 of the following fiscal year.

Considerations

Failure to table Shared Services Canada’s Departmental Fees Report for the 2020 to 2021 fiscal year in the fall of 2021 may result in a delay in the President of the Treasury Board’s annual report to Parliament.

Next steps

Approval by the Minister responsible for Shared Services Canada before the second sitting day of Parliament will allow for tabling of the report in a timely manner.

Office of primary interest

Samantha Hazen
Chief Financial Officer and Assistant Deputy Minister
Chief Financial Officer Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-513-3847

B. Annual Reports on the Administration of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act for the 2020-21 fiscal year for Shared Services Canada

Issue

Approval of Shared Services Canada’s annual reports on the administration of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act for the 2020 to 2021 fiscal year.

Background and key developments

Under section 94 of the Access to Information Act and section 72 of the Privacy Act, the head of every government institution is required to prepare and table annual reports in the House of Commons and Senate on the administration of these Acts.

Under access to information and privacy legislation, the annual reports must be tabled in each House of Parliament on any of the first 15 days on which that House is sitting after September 1 of the year in which the report is prepared.

Considerations

Failure to table the reports by the 15th sitting day would result in non-compliance with the legislation.

Next steps

Approval by the Minister responsible for Shared Services Canada before the 15th sitting day will allow for tabling of the reports by the legislative due date.

Office of primary interest

Paule Labbé
Assistant Deputy Minister
Strategy and Engagement Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-513-9151

C. Departmental Results Report for the 2020-21 fiscal year for Shared Services Canada

Issue

Approval by the Minister responsible for Shared Services Canada of the Departmental Results Report for the 2020-2021 fiscal year.

Background and key developments

Departmental Results Reports inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved and resources used by departments and agencies during the most recent fiscal year. They are part of the Parliamentary Estimates process and are typically tabled in Parliament in the fall.

The Departmental Results Report for the 2020-2021 fiscal year reports on progress against performance targets set in the respective Departmental Plans for the 2020-2021 fiscal year.

As the Minister responsible for Shared Services Canada, approval of its Departmental Results Report for the 2020-2021 fiscal year is required this fall.

Considerations

Timely approval by the Minister will be required to meet tabling dates.

Next steps

Approval by the Minister responsible for Shared Services Canada will be required in November 2021.

Offices of primary interest

Paule Labbé
Assistant Deputy Minister
Strategy and Engagement Branch Shared Services Canada
613-513-9151

D. Departmental Plan for the 2022-23 fiscal year for Shared Services Canada

Issue

Approval by the Minister responsible for Shared Services Canada of the Departmental Plan for the 2022-2023 fiscal year.

Background and key developments

The Departmental Plans are annual reports tabled in Parliament each spring to provide parliamentarians and Canadians with a high-level summary of the organization’s plans and priorities for the next fiscal year. They are part of the Parliamentary Estimates process and are typically tabled in Parliament in the winter.

The Departmental Plans for the 2022-2023 fiscal year reports on departmental priorities, strategic outcomes, programs, expected results and the associated resource requirements.

As the Minister responsible for Shared Services Canada, approval of its Departmental Plan for the 2022-2023 fiscal year is required in early 2022.

Considerations

Timely approval from Minister will be required to meet tabling dates.

Next steps

Approval by the Minister responsible for Shared Services Canada will be required as early as January 2022.

Office of primary interest

Paule Labbé
Assistant Deputy Minister
Strategy and Engagement Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-513-9151

2. Key Operational Files

E. Next Generation Human Resources and Pay

Issue

Shared Services Canada is testing human resources and pay systems to replace 34 human resources systems across government and the current pay system. This high-profile initiative will produce options and recommendations for a future enterprise-wide next generation human resources and pay system for the Government of Canada.

Background and key developments

The current mix of software results in inconsistent data, manual workarounds, and an inability to obtain key information required to manage a modern workforce in a timely manner. In addition, the end-to-end process is varied, non-standardized, and does not allow for enterprise portfolio management.

In response, the government is working towards a fully integrated system that would comprise digital solutions for 42 human resources and pay business capabilities, meet the equirements for 250 plus organizations, and 30 plus collective agreements. The goal is also to enable more robust workforce analysis and decision-making. Such a system will move the government from its current dispersed system to one that provides a single human resources and pay experience, for each employee, regardless of where they work in government.

As the department responsible for providing enterprise information technology solutions to the Government of Canada, Shared Services Canada is both the sponsor organization and technical lead for the Next Generation human resources and Pay initiative and is responsible for the exploration of potential solutions in consultation with industry experts. Shared Services Canada works with the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer as the Enterprise Design Authority in light with its role of supporting the Treasury Board as the government’s employer.

Shared Services Canada has funding through March 31, 2023, for targeted pilot testing and information gathering activities, using an agile methodology, to provide informed, appropriate recommendations for enterprise-wide human resources and pay systems. If a viable solution is identified and the recommendations accepted, further authorities and funding will be required for implementation of the investment and operationalization of the program.

The agile and flexible methodology for testing and experimentation enables Shared Services Canada to conduct pilot testing with partner organizations such as Canadian Heritage, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard, and Indigenous Services Canada and Crown- Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada. Shared Services Canada is also working with parallel initiatives, including a high-security cluster led by the Communications Security Establishment, which enables the sharing of lessons learned and best practices, while ensuring alignment from a data strategy perspective.

Through an agile competitive procurement process, Next Generation Human Resources and Pay established an umbrella contract with three pre-qualified suppliers (SAP, Workday, and Ceridian) for software-as-a-service cloud-based solutions. This contracting approach provides the government with more flexibility in contracting.

While the Shared Services Canada President is ultimately accountable for the Next Generation initiative, Next Generation has a multidisciplinary and interdepartmental governance structure. This includes a multidisciplinary Deputy Minister Board and an External Advisory Committee of leaders across different industries and backgrounds who provide advice to the Shared Services Canada President, in addition to various other cross-functional and pan-governmental governance and oversight bodies.

Considerations

If pilots are unsuccessful, our approach would ensure failure occurs within a controlled environment and generates a better understanding of how to proceed and if successful, it informs the way forward with recommendations for the adoption and implementation strategy of an enterprise solution.

Next steps

Next Generation Human Resources and Pay initiative is finalizing the initial test plans with Ceridian’s Dayforce software for Canadian Heritage aimed at testing basic pay functionality in the Design and Experimentation phase. The plan is to test and assess all the human resources and pay capabilities starting with those that are critical to producing accurate pay, and adding other capabilities incrementally such as talent management and recruitment. This will help clarify areas where the government may need to be prepared to adapt current policies and processes to be able to adopt world-class solutions.

Office of primary interest

Shereen Benzvy Miller
Assistant Deputy Minister
Next Generation Human Resources and Pay
Shared Services Canada
613-298-6205

F. Government of Canada Return to Workplace Network Support

Issue

Shared Services Canada’s network modernization activities will need to accelerate over the fall of 2021 to support a return to the workplace by Government of Canada workers. Shared Services Canada must ensure in-building networks can sustain the increased bandwidth requirements from new communication and collaboration tools, such as Microsoft Teams.

Background and key developments

Microsoft Teams became a critical digital communication and collaboration tool for the public service during the pandemic, creating an exponential increase in the demand for network capacity. With public servants working from home, Shared Services Canada was able to both increase of operational reliance on Microsoft Teams videoconferencing and meet the bandwidth requirements by diverting traffic away from the departmental networks through a process called “split tunneling”. With the expected return to the worksite by public servants usage of Microsoft Teams is expected to remain a key method of communication.

A return to the workplace will move the traffic back to the departmental networks. These do not currently have the capacity to meet a demand increase associated with these new collaboration tools, which use approximately twenty times more bandwidth than previous digital collaboration tools (e.g. email). This is the case even with a potential hybrid working model where not all public servants return to the worksite full time.

Decades of siloed decision-making and uncoordinated approaches to information technology management have created an unnecessarily complex, inconsistent and non-standardized Government of Canada network infrastructure which hinders efficient digital service delivery. As a result, Government of Canada networks are not designed for current and emerging computing requirements. This creates challenges for upgrading the network to meet growing needs.

Shared Services Canada is assessing bandwidth requirements, expected user return, and working with partners to make upgrades where necessary. It has worked with departments and assessed approximately 3,100 government sites across Canada, with over 45 percent requiring network remediation and upgrades to meet bandwidth demands. The work Shared Services Canada is doing to modernize the network will accommodate increasing demand for higher bandwidth, reduce single points of failure, and promote readiness to adopt emerging technology.

Further, Shared Services Canada is exploring the expanded use of public and commercial networks and wireless technologies and will continue to stabilize secure remote access capacity for non-secret networks, enabling Government of Canada users to continue to work remotely with higher resiliency. This will ensure we are able to fully leverage and solidify the Government of Canada’s remote access capabilities.

Next steps

Shared Services Canada will continue to work with partners on network bandwidth assessments based on partner identified priorities to upgrade departmental networks, ensure redundancy in the existing infrastructure and enhance connectivity capacity for departmental networks. Shared Services Canada is working to develop a costing model for these upgrades.

In parallel, Network Modernization and Implementation funding will be used for other upgrades, standardization and modernization of the broader Government of Canada network to support digital delivery of services to Canadian.

Office of primary interest

Patrice Nadeau
Assistant Deputy Minister
Networks and Security Services Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-868-9656

G. Email Migration and the @Canada.ca Email Address

Issue

As part of its ongoing mandate to consolidate and standardize the Government of Canada email, Shared Services Canada is migrating departmental email systems to a consolidated cloud-based email solution using the Microsoft 365 platform. This platform provides public servants with the modern collaboration tools to work efficiently in a remote work environment.

Migration of 23 departments off an expiring contract for Bell email services will be completed by the end of October 2021. However, the Microsoft 365 platform does not currently support the ability for these government organizations to use the email domain “@Canada.ca” to send email. As a result, some organizations are temporarily reverting to “@Department.gc.ca” email addresses.

Background and key developments

Following the 2019 Microsoft Enterprise Agreement, Shared Services Canada began providing all federal departments with Microsoft 365. Microsoft 365 provides modern, cloud-based collaboration tools which enable employees to work efficiently in a remote work environment. This initiative supports the Government of Canada Digital Operations Strategic Plan and broader Government of Canada digital priorities, and aligns with Shared Services Canada ’s enterprise approach to information technology management. Accelerated deployment of Microsoft 365 during the COVID-19 pandemic equipped public servants with the digital tools to continue serving Canadians.

In 2012, a contract awarded to Bell Canada was to modernize Government of Canada email services, present Canadians with a “single face” for government services (the @Canada.ca domain), and assign Government of Canada workers an @Canada.ca email address for use throughout their careers. Challenges came with this effort, and the Government of Canada ’s contract with Bell will expire in December 2021. The 23 partner organizations currently under this contract will be migrated from Bell’s email service to the Microsoft 365-enabled enterprise email solution by the end of October 2021.

During the accelerated deployment of Microsoft 365 early in the COVID-19 pandemic, the Government of Canada was aware that using the @Canada.ca domain may not be possible with Microsoft 365 because Microsoft does not support a single email domain like @Canada.ca for use across multiple departments. While it was determined that the benefits of migrating to the new platform outweighed the benefits of maintaining the previous @Canada.ca domain, the result is that @Canada.ca for outgoing email is not currently possible for those Government of Canada departments using Bell’s email service. Organizations can still receive incoming @Canada.ca emails, but outgoing emails will appear from @Department.gc.ca until the new solution is established.

Shared Services Canada will implement a technical solution, based on Microsoft 365 functionality, to route outgoing email from @Canada.ca. This solution is targeted for release in calendar year 2022. Until this solution is in place, all outgoing email will use their @Department.gc.ca email address.

Considerations

The implementation of Microsoft 365 represents a significant step towards modernizing Government of Canada digital communications, moving from siloed and fragmented legacy systems towards consolidated enterprise platforms. The @Canada.ca email domain represented a significant step in delivering coherent services and communications with Canadians interacting with government workers and services. The interim return to @Department.gc.ca is a temporary setback.

Government of Canada organizations invest significantly in communication material that contains email contact information, and must ensure that delivery to those addresses is maintained. Shared Services Canada will continue to support the successful delivery to existing email addresses in order to ensure critical Government of Canada business lines are not negatively impacted. Shared Services Canada is working towards to the permanent use of @Canada.ca for all Government of Canada email users while allowing departments to leverage the full functionality of Microsoft 365.

Next steps

To ensure continuity, Shared Services Canada has developed a technical solution to ensure the continued delivery to those email addresses in alignment with the decommissioning of the Bell- managed email service. Shared Services Canada ’s solution is expected to launch in 2022. Until then, continued engagements with partner organizations to communicate progress updates will be required and undertaken.

Office of primary interest

Mélanie Scott
Assistant Deputy Minister
Digital Services Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-240-9036

H. Workload Modernization and Migration

Issue

The Workload Modernization and Migration program supports the Government of Canada’s efforts to reduce the risk of system outages and information technology infrastructure failures. It provides the services for departments to assess and move their software applications and data from legacy data centres to modern hosting solutions (e.g. Cloud).

Although the program is successfully moving software applications to modern infrastructure solutions where appropriate, the Government of Canada as a whole continues to struggle to apply a consistent and prioritized approach to the modernization of applications. This has slowed overall modernization efforts and delayed necessary improvements. Ultimately, this hinders digital transformation efforts and limits modern digital service delivery to Canadians. Currently, the program faces significant funding challenges which will impact planned migration activities.

Background and key developments

Decades of under-investment in Government of Canada information technology has resulted in the accrual of significant “technical debt” as information technology infrastructure ages faster than the pace of repairs or replacements. Approximately two-thirds of the Government of Canada information technology ecosystem -- including both hardware infrastructure and software -- is considered antiquated and past its useful lifespan. Not only is it inherently costly to maintain, older applications and infrastructure often perform poorly and can be more prone to service interruptions.

The Workload Modernization and Migration program supports Government of Canada efforts to address the issue of technical debt in two important ways. First, it works with departments to consolidate infrastructure hosting software applications (e.g. data centres) and move those applications and data off outdated and fragmented smaller legacy data centers onto either cloud solutions or modern Government of Canada enterprise data centers. Second, as part of this migration work, the program aims to support and incentivize departments to review their application portfolios, identify critical risks and modernize and replace outdated software solutions. By modernizing software applications and moving them out of antiquated, sometimes failing, legacy data centres to new hosting solutions, overall Government of Canada risks associated with technical debt are reduced – ultimately supporting more stable service delivery to Canadians.

Led by Shared Services Canada, the Workload Modernization and Migration program provides critical services to Government of Canada departments to support their assessment of applications and data (together referred to as workloads) to determine whether they should be moved from older legacy data centers to either the Cloud or enterprise data centres. This helps reduce the risk of system outages and information technology infrastructure failures while considering Government of Canada departments’ readiness to move those workloads to the Cloud or enterprise data centres. Budget 2021 earmarked an additional $215 million for the Workload Migration and Modernization program led by Shared Services Canada.

To support the Workload Modernization and Migration program, Treasury Board Secretariat’s Office of the Chief Information Officer established the Application Modernization Fund in February 2019 as a centrally-administered fund to stabilize the Government of Canada application portfolio’s health and security posture. The fund supports and accelerates the application modernization and cloud adoption efforts of departments, whether they work with Shared Services under Workload Modernization and Migration or not.

Considerations

Modernization of Government of Canada legacy information technology is essential for modern, secure and reliable digital service delivery. However application modernization progress varies department by department, as the work to inventory, analyse and ultimately decommission or replace aging applications falls to each departmental Chief Information Office.

The 15 Workload Modernization and Migration projects include departments responsible for critical client-facing program and services that directly affect Canadians such as taxation, border services, social, economic, innovation and scientific development. Simply moving their critical business applications in their current states to reliable and secure hosting solutions will not result in the modernization that is necessary to deliver the kinds of online interactions Canadians want to have with their government.

Other initiatives such as improvements to the Government of Canada network and the acceleration of cloud adoption have interdependencies with the Workload Modernization and Migration program. Lack of long-term funding for modernization is a significant issue and will likely lead to delays in other digital modernization projects.

In the first 100 days of the new government, Shared Services Canada will be engaging the Minister on the policy and fiscal imperatives necessary to sustain and accelerate the modernization agenda. ███████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████

Next steps

█████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████ the Workload Modernization and Migration program will be finalizing its Proactive Engagement and Intake Model to assess both the urgency and readiness of partner departments to begin the planning process for future workload modernization and migration projects.

Over the next 18 months, the Shared Services Canada’s Workload Modernization and Migration program will focus on: completing the 14 active projects; continuing to close older, redundant data centres; working with partners to determine the scope, timing and required investments for future modernization and migration projects; and, promoting the use of enterprise platforms and services to support Government of Canada-wide business functions, all of which support the Government of Canada’s Digital Vision.

Office of primary interest

Louis-Paul Normand
Senior Assistant Deputy Minister
Project Management and Delivery Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-698-9105

Jacquie Manchevsky
Assistant Deputy Minister
Data Centre Services Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-882-1082

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Offices of primary interest

Patrice Nadeau
Assistant Deputy Minister
Networks and Security Services Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-668-9263

Louis-Paul Normand
Senior Assistant Deputy Minister
Project Management and Delivery Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-670-1674

Jacquie Manchevsky
Assistant Deputy Minister
Data Centre Services Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-882-1082

Melanie Scott
Assistant Deputy Minister
Digital Services Branch
Shared Services Canada
613-240-9036

Samantha Hazen
Chief Financial Officer and Assistant Deputy Minister
Chief Financial Officer Branch
Shared Services Canada
613 513 3847

3. Key Vendors, Stakeholders and Thought Leaders

Key Vendors

The following is a list of key vendors that Shared Services Canada has contracts with, including total business volume with each organization, as of August 23, 2021.

Amazon Web Services Canada (AWS)

Amazon Web Services Canada provides cloud and platform services for Shared Services Canada, including cloud infrastructure, databases, and online storage. Shared Services Canada has, since its inception, inherited from other departments and/or awarded 12 contracts to Amazon Web Services Canada with an approximate value of $1.4 million CAD, before contract extension options. The company ranks as Shared Services Canada’s two hundred and seventy-seventh largest supplier.

Rejean Bourgault, Country Manager

Bell Canada Enterprises (BCE)

Bell Canada Enterprises Inc. is Canada’s largest communications company, providing a comprehensive suite of broadband communications and content services. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 1361 contracts since April 2012 to Bell Canada Enterprises with an approximate value of $6.7 billion CAD, before contract extension options. Bell Canada Enterprises ranks as Shared Services Canada’s first largest supplier.

Mirko Bibic, President and Chief Executive Officer of Bell Canada Enterprises and Bell Canada

Tom Little, President of Bell Business Markets of Bell Canada Enterprises Inc.

BlackBerry Limited (BB)

BlackBerry sells a variety of telecommunication mobility solutions, including collaboration tools, voice encryption tools, and cybersecurity service. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 31 contracts to BlackBerry Limited with an approximate value of $44.4 million CAD, before contract extension options. BlackBerry Limited ranks as Shared Services Canada’s sixty-fourth largest supplier.

John Chen, Chief Executive Officer

Ceridian

Ceridian has recently been awarded a contract to deliver the design and experimentation phase of the Next Generation Human Resources and Pay (NextGen) pilot by the Government of Canada. Ceridian will work with the Government of Canada to co-design and deliver intelligent human resources and pay solutions for the federal public service. Specifically, Ceridian is tasked with testing their proposed solution against the complexities of the Government of Canada’s human resources and pay requirements. Ceridian will seek clarity of business process redesign, change management activities, and training required to adopt a new solution. The Government of Canada will determine if a viable long term working relationships with Ceridian is desirable.

Gianluca Cairo, Industry Principal - Public Sector

Cisco Systems Canada Inc

Cisco manufactures internet routing equipment. Cisco products and service acquisitions are difficult to track, as Cisco has chosen to operate primarily through a network of authorized third-party resellers with the Government of Canada. Cisco Canada has qualified on some Shared Services Canada supply arrangements as the Original Equipment Manufacturer or Service Provider, but has identified their authorized Canadian resellers for the processing of call-ups against those supply arrangements. Shared Services Canada currently has no active direct contracts with Cisco or Cisco Canada.

Shannon Leininger, President

Google (parent is Alphabet Inc)

Google provides internet-related services and products ranging from search to mapping to cloud. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded six contracts to Google with an approximate value of $72.7 thousand CAD, before contract extension options. Google ranks as Shared Services Canada’s eight hundred and twenty-fourth largest supplier.

Robert Enslin, President of Global Customer Operations

Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE) Canada Co

Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Canada provides a range of enterprise information technology solutions, such as building data centres, cloud and network solutions. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 37 direct contracts since inception to Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Canada with an approximate value of $1.2 billion CAD, before contract extension options. Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Canada ranks as Shared Services Canada’s sixth largest supplier in terms of value of contracts since the department’s inception.

Mike Hilton, President

IBM Canada Ltd

IBM manufactures and markets computer hardware and software and offers infrastructure, hosting and consulting services. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 456 contracts since April 2012 to IBM Canada with an approximate value of $4.4 billion CAD, before contract extension options. IBM Canada ranks as Shared Services Canada’s second largest supplier in terms of value of contracts.

Claude Guay, President & General Manager

Microsoft Canada Inc

Microsoft is a worldwide leader in software, services and solutions. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 81 contracts since April 2012 to Microsoft Canada with an approximate value of $1.8 billion CAD, before contract extension options. Microsoft Canada ranks as Shared Services Canada’s fourth largest supplier.

Kevin Peesker, President

Oracle Canada ULC

Oracle sells database management systems, cloud infrastructure, and enterprise software. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 92 contracts since April 2012 to Oracle with an approximate value of $125.3 million CAD, before contract extension options. Oracle ranks as Shared Services Canada’s thirty-first largest supplier.

Walter Dann, Regional Vice President, Federal Government and Quebec

Randy Whitecroft, Regional Vice President, Federal Government and Canada East

SAP Canada Inc

SAP is enterprise application software providing analytics and business intelligence. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 25 contracts since April 2012 to SAP Canada with an approximate value of $7.7 million CAD, before contract extension options. SAP Canada ranks as Shared Services Canada’s one hundred and thirty-sixth largest supplier.

Andy Canham, President

TELUS Corporation

Telus Corporation is a Canadian telecommunications company that provides a wide range of telecommunications products and services. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 929 contracts since April 2012 to Telus with an approximate value of $2.6 billion CAD, before contract extension options. Telus ranks as Shared Services Canada’s third largest supplier.

Navin Arora, Executive Vice-President

VMware

VMware provides data centre virtualization and digital workspace services. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 60 contracts since April 2012 to VMWare with an approximate value of $75.8 million CAD, before contract extension options. VMWare ranks as Shared Services Canada’s forty-second largest supplier.

Pat Gelsinger, Chief Executive Officer

Zayo Canada Inc

Zayo provides communications infrastructure services. Shared Services Canada has inherited from other departments and/or awarded 184 contracts since April 2012 to Zayo with an approximate value of $227.8 million CAD, before contract extension options. Zayo ranks as Shared Services Canada’s seventy-first largest supplier.

Steve Smith, Chief Executive Officer

Key Stakeholders

The following list of key stakeholders for Shared Services Canada, with a short description of the relationship with the Department.

Technation

Technation has a membership of approximately 340 Canadian companies and represents the Canadian information and communications technology sector. It is a not-for-profit membership-driven organization. Membership is open to Canadian companies and organizations involved in the information and communications technology sector. Technation works to help its members achieve greater success through advocacy, public policy work, education, networking, and engagement in professional development, events, and business development opportunities in both domestic and foreign markets.

Angela Mondou
President and Chief Executive Officer
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███████@technationcanada.ca

Michele Lajeunesse
Senior Vice President Government Relations and Policy
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███████████@technationcanada.ca

Canadian Information Technology Providers Association (CITPA)

The Canadian Information Technology Providers Association is an affiliation of Canadian-owned vendor-authorized solution providers that deliver information technology solutions to the Government of Canada.

Nagwa Koressa
President
613-447-7649
nkoressa@integranetworks.com

Canadian Business Information Technology Network (CABiNET)

The Canadian Business Information Technology Network is a member driven industry association for small and medium enterprises on federal government procurement initiatives. It is an association that consists of companies that provide information technology resources and solutions to the Government of Canada.

Barry Dowdall
Executive in Residence
████████████@Donnacona.com

Council of Canadian Innovators (CCI)

The Council of Canadian Innovators is non-profit organization focused on helping high-growth Canadian technology firms to scale up globally. The council’s mandate is to optimize the growth of Canada’s innovation-based sector by ensuring Canadian technology and public policy leaders are working together to improve Canada’s innovation outputs.

Patrick Searle
Director Communications
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███████@canadianinnovators.org

Canadian Black Chamber of Commerce (CBCC)

The Canadian Black Chamber of Commerce is a non-profit organization established as an initiative of the National African Canadian Association (NACA) to enhance commerce and economic development within the Black community. The Canadian Black Chamber of Commerce platform promotes black business and creates a supportive network for its members and the Black diaspora in Canada.

Christelle Francois
President
█████████@blackchamber.ca

Canadian Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (CGLCC)

Canadian Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce is a not-for-profit organization that works to foster economic growth by supporting and nurturing LGBT+ businesses, entrepreneurs, students, and allies by helping Canada’s corporate world connect with the LGBT+ community. The Canadian Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce is a leader in supplier diversity, and is the certifying body in Canada for LGBT+ businesses.

Darrell Schuurman
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder
███████████
███████@cglcc.ca

Canadian Aboriginal Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)

The Canadian Aboriginal Minority Supplier Council is a nationally respected not-for-profit organization that advocates business relationships and economic growth of the Canadian supply chain through the inclusion of Aboriginals and Minority suppliers.

Cassandra Dorrington
President
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███████████@camsc.ca

Women Business Enterprises Canada (WBE Canada)

Women Business Enterprises Canada is a non-profit organization, led by corporate members that aims to open doors for Canadian women-owned businesses to supply chains across North America. Women Business Enterprises Canada’s mandate is to build connections between Canadian women-owned businesses and corporate/government buyers across North America.

Silvia Pencak
President
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███████@wbecanada.ca

Key Thought Leaders

The following is a list of public intellectuals and organizations that Shared Services Canada and other government of Canada departments, including the Privy Council Office, have engaged with over the years for advice on digital matters. It may be worth consulting with these individuals later on.

Ed Greenspon

Ed Greenspon is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Public Policy Forum. The Public Policy Forum is a non-partisan organization hosting regular public fora on a range of public policy issues – including those related to digital government and information technology. Members are drawn from private, public, and non-profit organizations.

Connecting Canada - Public Policy Forum (ppforum.ca)
613-238-7858 ████

Jim Balsillie

Jim Balsillie is Chair of the Council of Canadian Innovators. The council is composed of business leaders and Chief Executive Officers of Canadian technology firms, emphasizing cooperation between technology and public policy sectors.

███████@canadianinnovators.org

Kristin Gordon

Kristin Gordon is the Client Manager for Shared Services Canada’s contract with Gartner, Inc. Gartner is a global consulting firm providing services ranging from business management to information technology analysis to research on important trends in the public domain.

239-900-8469
██████████████@gartner.com

Leigh Harris

Leigh Harris is Partner at KPMG Canada LLP. KPMG is a tax auditing and consulting firm with a global presence. They have offices around the world and have contracts with several Government of Canada departments.

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███████████@kpmg.ca

Michael Geist

Dr. Michael Geist is a Canadian academic, the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E- Commerce Law at the University of Ottawa, and a member of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society.

613-562-5800 █████
██████@uottawa.ca

Ron Deibert

Dr. Ron Deibert is Director of the Citizen Lab, an interdisciplinary laboratory based at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto, focusing on research, development, and high-level strategic policy and legal engagement.

████████████
███@citizenlab.ca

Taylor Owen

Dr. Taylor Owen is Director for the Centre for Media, Technology and Democracy. The Centre collaborates with a network of academics, and produces research exploring topics pertaining to emerging digital media in democratic societies.

████████████
███████████@gmail.com

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