Chief Information Officer Transition Binder - July 21, 2021

On this page

About the Government of Canada

In this section

Introduction

Three branches work together to govern Canada: the executive, legislative and judicial branches. The executive branch (also called the Government) is the decision-making branch, made up of the Monarch represented by the Governor General, the Prime Minister, and the Cabinet. The legislative branch is the law-making branch, made up of the appointed Senate and the elected House of Commons. The judicial branch is a series of independent courts that interpret the laws passed by the other two branches. Canada is a constitutional monarchy, which means that we recognize the Queen as the Head of State, while the Prime Minister is the Head of Government.

Structure

The Canadian government has three main levels of government: federal, provincial and municipal. The federal government makes decisions that affect Canadians every day. This level of government deals with areas of law listed in the Constitution Act, 1867 and that generally affect the whole country. The federal government has powers that are different from those of provincial governments, including: national defence, foreign affairs, employment insurance, banking, federal taxes, the post office, fisheries, shipping, railways, telephones and pipelines, Aboriginal lands and rights and criminal law. The federal government tries to make things fairer among the provinces. Through equalization payments (extra money) given to provinces that are less wealthy, the federal government tries to make sure that the standards of health, education and welfare are the same for every Canadian.

In the same way that it lists the powers of the federal government, the Constitution Act, 1867 lists the powers of the provinces, including: direct taxes, hospitals, prisons, education, marriage, property and civil rights.

Canada is also a constitutional monarchy, in that its executive authority is vested formally in the Queen through the Constitution. Every act of government is carried out in the name of the Crown, but the authority for those acts flows from the Canadian people. The executive function belongs to the Governor General acting with, and on the advice of, the Prime Minister and the Cabinet.

Cabinet committee membership

Canada’s Cabinet—by constitutional convention—is the body of advisors that sets the federal government’s policies and priorities for the country. Together they act in the name of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada.

The Governor General appoints the members of Cabinet on the advice of the Prime Minister. Cabinet members are generally selected from the House of Commons, however, from time to time, a Senator may be included to ensure all parts of the country are represented. The Governor General almost always acts on Cabinet’s advice.

These are the current Cabinet committees under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau:

Cabinet’s role

In Canada, the Cabinet system performs several key functions:

The collective and individual roles and responsibilities of Ministers in Canada’s parliamentary system are outlined in Open and Accountable Government (2015). This document addresses a range of administrative, procedural and institutional matters. It also outlines standards of conduct expected of Ministers and provides guidance to ministerial exempt staff.

TBS introductory briefing for the Government of Canada Chief Information Officer

In this section

1. Roles of the President of the Treasury Board

In this section

The President of the Treasury Board

Overview of roles as President of the Treasury Board

Treasury Board

The President of the Treasury Board chairs Treasury Board meetings and:

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

The President is responsible for the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat:

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Portfolio

The President of the Treasury Board is the Minister responsible for a portfolio of four organizations:

  1. Canada School of Public Service
  2. Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada
  3. Public Sector Integrity Commissioner
  4. Public Sector Pension Investment Board

The roles of the Treasury Board and its Secretariat

Treasury Board
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Treasury Board

The President of the Treasury Board chairs the Treasury Board, a Cabinet committee with responsibilities for the following:

Spending oversight
Employer
Administrative leadership
Regulatory oversight

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

The President is responsible for the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat as a department and sets the strategic direction of the organization.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat key facts
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat core responsibilities

As the administrative arm of the Treasury Board, the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat provides leadership to help departments effectively implement government priorities and meet citizens’ evolving expectations of government.

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s four core responsibilities mirror those of the Treasury Board, which are:

  1. spending oversight
  2. administrative leadership
  3. employer
  4. regulatory oversight
Responsibilities as Minister of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Portfolio

The President has oversight responsibilities for four portfolio agencies. This includes responsibility for the legislation governing these bodies and tabling any amendments in Parliament.

Canada School of Public Service: departmental corporation

Taki Sarantakis, President

Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada: Agent of Parliament (arm’s length)

Nancy Bélanger, Commissioner

Public Sector Integrity Commissioner: Agent of Parliament (arm’s length)

Joe Friday, Commissioner

Public Sector Pension Investment Board: Crown corporation (arm’s length)

Neil Cunningham, President and Chief Executive Officer

2. Treasury Board at a glance

In this section

About the Treasury Board

Established in 1867, the Treasury Board is the only statutory Cabinet Committee. It has two distinct functions:

Part A: management board

Makes decisions about:

Treasury Board responsibilities are delegated by the Financial Administration Act, which creates the Board’s public service support:

Chief Human Resources Officer

Chief Information Officer

Part B: Governor in Council

Since 2003, the Treasury Board has been designated as the Cabinet Committee responsible for considering Governor in Council matters.

Makes recommendations to the Governor General about:

In addition to the Financial Administration Act, over 20 other statutes establish the Treasury Board’s roles and authorities. Powers and responsibilities are also set out in regulations, orders in council, policies, guidelines and practices.

Where the Treasury Board fits

Between the genesis of a policy idea and its implementation by a department, Ministers must secure certain approvals to ensure policy alignment, affordability and feasibility.

Figure 1
Figure 1 - Text version xxx

Combined, these key decisions help ensure the government can deliver its agenda effectively.

How the Treasury Board helps implement the government’s agenda

Cabinet focuses on the what

For example:

The Treasury Board focuses on the how

For example:

Treasury Board lenses

Key features of the Treasury Board

The Treasury Board ensures financial and Treasury Board policy suite compliance at the program design stage.

Ministers play a corporate role as opposed to representing their own departmental priorities.

High-volume Cabinet committee with a wide scope of decision-making authority: the Treasury Board takes approximately 1,400 decisions per year.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat officials present proposals, unlike at Cabinet, where Ministers present their proposals: officials’ advice is provided to all Treasury Board Ministers, not just the Chair.

The roles of the Treasury Board

Part A
Expenditure manager
Management board
Employer
Part B
Regulatory oversight

Role 1: expenditure manager

Top three major statutory spending items: Main Estimates 2019–20
Top three major non-statutory spending items: Main Estimates 2019–20

Role 2: management board

Treasury Board policies and decisions have a significant impact on how the government is managed. The majority of proposals reviewed by the Treasury Board fall within the following categories:

What we own: assets
What we buy: procurement
What we support: transfer payments

Role 2: management board and the Treasury Board policy suite

In addition to assets, procurement and transfer payments, Treasury Board policies cover other areas of government:

Through its policy suite (31 policies), the Treasury Board has a number of levers to promote management excellence and strong stewardship.

Role 3: employer

The Treasury Board, as the employer, has an overarching responsibility for the human resources management and financial compensation of the core public administration, which comprises over 287,000 federal public service employees.

As Employer, the Treasury Board is responsible for:

Role 4: regulatory oversight

The Treasury Board (Part B) is responsible for considering Governor in Council matters: regulations and non-appointment orders in council

Regulations

Approximately 100 to 200 per year:

Orders in council

Approximately 200 to 300 per year:

Conclusion

The Treasury Board exercises four roles within two distinct functions:

Part A
  1. Expenditure manager
  2. Management board
  3. Employer
Part B
  1. Regulatory oversight (including Governor in Council matters)

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat officials support the process by presenting cases to the Board, and providing integrated advice and administrative support.

Annex A: how the Treasury Board works

Due diligence

Submissions reviewed for:

Secretariat provides advice

Treasury Board Ministers receive a [redacted] in advance of the meeting that contains:

Cases are presented at the Treasury Board

Process:

Treasury Board Ministers challenge and decide

For Part A, members either:

For Part B, members:

Annex B: Examples of Treasury Board business

3. Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat at a glance

In this section

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat has approximately 2,276 employees and plays a central coordinating function for the Government of Canada, promoting coherence across programs and services.

Central agency
Department

Central agency and departmental functions

Central agency

The central agency function supports the Treasury Board’s mandate. This role is generally carried out by the following groups:

Department

Enabling functions support the smooth operation of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. These functions are carried out mainly by the following groups:

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Peter Wallace, Secretary of the Treasury Board

Deputy Head of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Supported by an Associate Secretary and four other deputy ministers

Erin O’Gorman, Associate Secretary

Works with the Secretary, providing leadership on the management of the Treasury Board Cabinet Committee

The Secretary and Associate Secretary lead the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, which is divided into six thematic areas:

  1. Human resources
  2. Comptrollership
  3. Information (including digital)
  4. Accessibility
  5. Direct support to the Treasury Board
  6. Enabling functions

Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer

Christine Donoghue, Chief Human Resources Officer

The Chief Human Resources Officer is responsible for government-wide direction and leadership on people management to support a competent, inclusive and healthy public service.

The Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer supports the Treasury Board’s mandate by:

Key policies

Office of the Comptroller General

Roch Huppé, Comptroller General

The Comptroller General is responsible for government-wide direction and leadership on comptrollership, including in the areas of financial management, internal audit, public accounts, liaison with the Auditor General and acquired services and assets.

The Office of the Comptroller General supports the Treasury Board’s mandate by:

Key policies

Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO)

Marc Brouillard, Chief Information Officer (acting)

The Chief Information Officer is responsible for the planning and management of technology and the stewardship of information and data for the Government of Canada.

The OCIO supports Treasury Board’s mandate by:

Key policies

Office for Public Service Accessibility

Yazmine Laroche, Deputy Minister, Public Service Accessibility

The Deputy Minister of Public Service Accessibility is responsible for supporting the Canadian public service in meeting the requirements of the Accessible Canada Act.

The Office for Public Service Accessibility supports the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s mandate by providing strategic advice to government departments and agencies regarding issues related to accessibility and inclusion through:

Supporting the Treasury Board directly

Expenditure Management Sector

The Expenditure Management Sector plays a central role in the planning and coordination of federal spending.

The Expenditure Management Sector supports the Treasury Board by:

Program sectors

Program sectors are the interface with departments preparing proposals for the Treasury Board

There are four program sectors:

  1. Government Operations
  2. Social and Cultural
  3. Economic
  4. International Affairs, Security and Justice

Program sectors support the Treasury Board by:

Regulatory Affairs Sector

The Regulatory Affairs Sector establishes policies and strategies to support the federal regulatory system by:

The Regulatory Affairs Sector supports the Treasury Board in its role as a Committee of the Privy Council by providing advice on and presenting regulatory submissions and non-appointment orders in council to Treasury Board Ministers.

Enabling functions

Enabling functions support the internal operations of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. In some cases, they may also work with other departments to advance the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s mandate for good management.

Strategic Communications and Ministerial Affairs

Manages and provides support for Treasury Board meetings, parliamentary affairs, Cabinet business and dealings with other government departments. It is also responsible for developing internal and external communications products and for the development of policies to oversee government communications, including advertising.

Human Resources

Provides human resources advice and services to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Departmental Legal Services

Provides legal advice to the Treasury Board and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Corporate Services and Chief Financial Officer

Assists the Secretary of the Treasury Board in the internal administration of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, including in financial management, security, IM/IT, and facilities and material management.

Internal Audit and Evaluation

Provides independent, objective assurance and evaluation services that are designed to improve the management of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s programs and operations.

Priorities and Planning

Works with other sectors to ensure that departmental policy advice is coordinated and consistent. It also leads key activities supporting government-wide management excellence as well as corporate governance within the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Functions supporting other departments
Centre for Greening Government

Provides leadership toward low-carbon, climate-resilient and green operations across the Government of Canada.

Canadian Digital Service

Works with departments to improve service delivery.

Supply 101

By law, Parliament must approve all government spending.

The “business of supply” is the process by which the government asks Parliament to authorize its intended expenditures through legislation, that is, the appropriation acts.

The Estimates are a series of reports that provide supporting detail to supply legislation by setting out the government’s spending plans.

The Treasury Board President, supported by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, has a number of roles and responsibilities in supply:

Required authorities for government spending

Roles and responsibilities in seeking supply

The Treasury Board:

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat supports the Treasury Board in its roles and responsibilities noted above, which involves:

Key steps in securing supply

Treasury Board approval of Treasury Board submissions / “Aide-mémoire”

The approval by Treasury Board allows inclusion of approved funding/authorities into the Estimates.

Tabling of the Estimates document

In the House of Commons during each of three supply periods, usually three or more weeks before introducing the appropriation legislation.

Committee appearances

In the weeks after tabling, the President appears on behalf of the government before parliamentary committees; other Ministers and officials may also be called to appear.

Introduction of appropriation acts

After Committee review, Estimates are introduced, voted in the House of Commons on the last allotted day of the supply period, and the Senate (likely) the following week.

Royal Assent

Usually formalized within a week or so after the bill has passed the House of Commons, followed by the release of supply to departments.

Reports tabled in Parliament as part of the business of supply

The President typically tables four different documents each year related to the supply process:

The public and parliamentarians can access the information presented across these various reports in GC InfoBase.

Current supply cycle at a glance

Treasury Board approvals

Departments and agencies receive supply.

OCIO 101: introductory briefing

In this section

OCIO: at a glance

OCIO provides leadership for the management of IT, IM, service, and digital transformation within the Government of Canada by:

Chief Information Officer Branch

Marc Brouillard, Acting Chief Information Officer of Canada

Paul N. Wagner, Interim Chief Technology Officer for the Government of Canada

Sonya Read, Acting Assistant Secretary, Digital Policy and Services

Denis Skinner, Executive Director, Digital Change

OCIO: senior executive organizational structure

Chief Technology Officer Sector

Paul N. Wagner, Interim Chief Technology Officer for the Government of Canada

The Chief Technology Officer Sector is comprised of four divisions that are responsible for: 

Digital Policy and Services Sector

Sonya Read, Acting Assistant Secretary

The Digital Policy and Services Sector is comprised of five divisions that are responsible for:

Digital Change Sector

Denis Skinner, Executive Director

The Digital Change Sector is comprised of four teams that are responsible for:

The role of the Chief Information Officer

In this section

The Chief Information Officer provides overall leadership for the management of IT, IM, service and digital transformation within the Government of Canada.

The Chief Information Officer does this by:

Governance touch points

Ongoing OCIO policy guidance, strategic advice and support:

Apply lessons learned.

Reviewing submissions and investment plans

The OCIO:

Supporting administration of legislation

The OCIO supports the administration of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act:

Oversight role for major information technology projects

The OCIO provides ongoing oversight for 18 major IT-enabled projects to encourage sound stewardship and value for money.

Some of the more significant projects include:

Developing policies, plans and standards

The OCIO develops policies, plans and standards related to: access to information, security, IM/IT, privacy and service for the Government of Canada.

Key policies:

Strategic government-wide plans and standards:

Providing leadership on digital government

The OCIO leads whole of government initiatives and projects related to IT, IM, service and digital transformation:

Internal activities

External activities

Digital Government in the Government of Canada

In addition to the Treasury Board, other key federal partners support digital government:

Government operations and services

Economy

Data

Privacy and cyber security

Note: This list is illustrative, not exhaustive.

Deputy committee landscape for a digital era

Digitization of services

Enterprise Priorities and Planning
Core Services

Governance in a digital age

Strategic procurement

Deputy Minister Committee on Core Services and Core Services Enablement Team

Annex: Digital Standards

The Digital Standards form the foundation of the Government of Canada’s shift to becoming more user-focused, open and agile.

They are a set of guiding principles to show what good digital service delivery looks like, across government.

Regular review of services against the Digital Standards supports the aim of delivering digital services in a way that best serves Canadians.

The Government of Canada’s Digital Standards

OCIO divisional mandates

In this section

Office of the Chief Technology Officer

Cyber Security

People
Financial summary
Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

The Cyber Security Division provides leadership, direction and oversight for cyber security and digital identity for the Government of Canada enterprise at large, providing a whole-of-government approach to enable the trusted delivery of secure and reliable services to Canadians. Specifically, this division has core mandate to support the Government of Canada Chief Information Officer in the implementation of the following requirements under the Policy on Service and Digital:

4.4.1.8 Defining cyber security requirements to ensure that Government of Canada and departmental information and data, applications, systems, and networks are secure, reliable and trusted.

4.4.1.9 Executing decisions on the management of cyber security risks on behalf of the Government of Canada and directing a deputy head to implement a specific response to cyber security events, including assessing whether there has been a privacy breach, implementing security controls, and ensuring that systems that put the Government of Canada at risk are disconnected or removed, when warranted.

4.4.1.10 Providing direction and defining enterprise-wide requirements for the management of identities, credentials, and access for the Government of Canada and departments.

Digital identity
Strategy and design
Engagement and oversight

Enterprise Strategic Planning

People
Financial summary
Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

The Enterprise Strategic Planning division provides strategic advice, leadership and policy direction to departments for IT, enterprise architecture, data governance, management, and standardization, and responsible AI for the Government of Canada, and manages forward planning, prioritization, and reporting for Government of Canada–wide integrated management of service, information, data, IT, and cyber security.

The Enterprise Strategic Planning division has core mandate to support the Government of Canada Chief Information Officer in the implementation of the Policy on Service and Digital, including:

4.1.2.1.2 Prioritizing Government of Canada demand for IT shared services and assets

4.1.2.3 Prescribing expectations with regard to enterprise architecture.

4.1.2.5 Establishing priorities for IT investments that are enterprise-wide in nature or that require the support of Shared Services Canada.

4.3.1.1 Prescribing enterprise-wide information and data standards for quality, accessibility, and data interoperability, including common architecture taxonomies and classifications, quality requirements, and life-cycle management direction.

4.4.1.1 Prescribing the use of specific IT business processes, technologies, applications and IT resource management approaches, including direction for their life-cycle management as defined in the Policy on Management of Materiel.

The Enterprise Strategic Planning division supports digital governance as program lead for several enterprise-wide senior level committees (Deputy Minister Committee on Enterprise Priorities and Planning, ADM Service and Enterprise Priorities, Chief Information Officer Council, GC EARB, ADM Service and Enterprise Priorities Data and Information Working Group) and through regular due diligence reviews and assessments (for example, memoranda to Cabinet, Concept Cases, Treasury Board submissions, enterprise architecture assessments).

The Enterprise Strategic Planning division supports TBS’s core responsibility for administrative oversight through the GC IT Enterprise Portfolio Management program (Integrated Planning, Application Portfolio Management, and IT Expenditure).

The Enterprise Strategic Planning division manages the GC Workload Migration and Cloud Enablement investment fund to support departments in their application modernization efforts.

The Enterprise Strategic Planning division engages with and consults departments through the management of multiple networks and forums for practitioners and departmental leaders (for example, Enterprise Architecture, Artificial Intelligence and Enterprise Data Communities of Practice, Departmental Planners Network).

Core Services Enabling Team

People
Financial summary
Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

In 2020–21, the Clerk of the Privy Council restructured deputy minister committees to advance the Government of Canada agenda. Specifically, the Deputy Minister Committee on Core Services (the Committee) was created to provide targeted deputy-level support to the transformation of core IT services and systems (Core Services initiatives) for three key initiatives:

The Committee enhances existing oversight, supports deputy head accountability, and benefits departments by providing enterprise leadership, perspective, and guidance, which enables departments to be more successful in their high-risk, digitally enabled transformation initiatives. Furthermore, in support of recent Budget decisions, the Committee provides recommendations on the release of funds for some Core Services initiatives based upon the achievement of outcomes.

As outlined in the Committee Terms of Reference, a dedicated, multidisciplinary team provides focused support to the Committee and departments in enabling successful implementation of Core Services initiatives. Though situated within the OCIO, this Core Services Enabling Team does not participate in typical business of the Secretariat in terms of providing Treasury Board policy advice and review of Treasury Board submissions; rather, the Core Services Enabling Team:

External expert advice is also sought, as required to supplement Government of Canada expertise in transformation.

Digital Investment Oversight Division

People
Financial summary
Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

The Digital Investment Oversight Division oversees and guides digitally enabled business project/programme investments across the Government of Canada on behalf of the Treasury Board from concept to benefits realization. The Ongoing Project/Programme Oversight program supports the Policy on the Planning and Management of Investments and Directive on Planning and Management of Investment, requiring the Government of Canada Chief Information Officer to establish a digital investment oversight program, and commission independent reviews of projects under oversight. The program oversees 15 to 20 of the highest risk digitally enabled projects/programmes in the Government of Canada using a defined, adaptable, transparent approach with a strong emphasis on enabling departments and developing project/programme management and governance capacity. It fulfills TBS’s core mandate to provide oversight on complex horizontal issues and reporting to Parliament and the Minister of Digital Government’s mandate to work with departments to develop solutions that will benefit Canadians and enhance the capacity to use modern tools and methodologies across government, transition to a more digital government, and implement lessons learned from previous IT project challenges and failures.

The Business Intelligence and Investment Advice function provides:

The policy and enablement function:

The Treasury Board Submission Reviews and ministerial briefings function:

The Performance Analytics and Reporting function:

Information and Privacy Policy Division

People
Financial summary

The Information and Privacy Policy Division’s budget for fiscal year 2021–22 is $6,010,258, including Budget 2021 funding of $2,489,000 and program integrity funding of $1,215,000.

Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

The Information and Privacy Policy Division consists of 44 full-time equivalents (FTEs), and is responsible for supporting the President’s role as designated Minister for the administration of the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act and their regulations, proactive publication, as well as the protection of privacy across approximately 265 institutions. The division’s responsibilities include:

Digital Policy Directorate

People
Financial summary

The Digital Policy Division’s budget for fiscal year 2021–22 is $2,571,481, including program integrity funding ($96,563).

Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

The Digital Policy Directorate’s division consists of 24 FTEs and three students; the mandate flows from several pieces of legislation:

The Digital Policy Directorate also supports the Minister of Digital Government’s mandate to “lead work across government to transition to a more digital government to improve citizen service.” This includes analyzing, providing guidance and reporting functions in key areas of the Government of Canada’s digital transformation. As such, the Digital Policy Directorate:

Open Government

People
Financial summary

The division’s budget for 2021–22 is $6.6 million. This includes the A Base of $4,370,379 and funding from Budget 2021 of $2,266,960.

Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

The Open Government Division consists of 36.2 FTEs and is funded through Budget 2021 with an additional 11 FTEs. The division is responsible for driving efforts to open government and support public trust in government through greater transparency, open data, accountability, integrity and citizen participation. It does this through the provision of policy leadership and toolsets to support the implementation and mainstreaming of open government principles and practices across government.

Core responsibilities of the division include:

Security Policy Division

People
Financial summary

The division’s budget for 2021–22 is $2,134,138. This includes program integrity funding of $411,000 for 2021–22.

FTEs: 22

Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

The Policy on Government Security, anchored in the Financial Administration Act applies to 110 organizations (including security and intelligence agencies) and sets out deputy head accountabilities for eight intersecting core security controls including, IT security, IM security (security categorization of information) business continuity planning, physical security, security event management, security awareness and training, security in contracts and other arrangements and security screening (employees and contract personnel). Mature security policy implementation is foundational to the integrity and trusted delivery of Government of Canada programs and services and enables protection of the Government of Canada’s information (including sensitive client data), individuals, and assets. Its nexus with emergency management and national security is significant, as shown with high-profile security events (for example, cyber attacks, intelligence leaks, insider threats). Assurance that Canada effectively manages all aspects of security risk underpins the Government of Canada’s reputation and trusted relationships with partners (including allies), oversight bodies, and Canadians.

The core mandate of the Security Policy Division is to:

The Security Policy Division’s key responsibilities include:

Strategic Policy and Planning Division

People

Michael Taylor, Director, Strategic Policy and Planning

Financial summary

The Strategic Policy and Planning Division budget for 2021–22 is $1,291,907. Program integrity funding of which $292,071 will be directed at goods and services to support governance.

Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

The mandate of the Strategic Policy and Planning Division is to support the development of strategic policy direction for digital government and provide horizontal coordination of planning and governance priorities. The Strategic Policy and Planning Division is divided into three teams, carrying out the following responsibilities:

DM/ADM governance support: The Committees Secretariat is responsible for the implementation, management and logistical support for 12 senior interdepartmental committees, including two DM committees, which coordinate digital priorities across government, including two DM-level committees. The effective operation and support of these various committees are fundamental to enabling horizontal government-wide engagement and governance in support of OCIO responsibilities. Over the last year, the OCIO Committee Secretariat has coordinated over 222 individual meetings (over 500 hours) with over 50 departments and agencies in support of addressing enterprise priorities and managing the CIO communities’ response to the COVID‑19 pandemic. Committee Secretariat also coordinates and distributes government-wide communiques on behalf of the Government of Canada Chief Information Officer, the Chief Technology Officer, and to ADM committees (this includes 24-hour support to provide emergency communications on cyber security). 

Strategic policy: Horizontal coordination of policy priorities for the CIO and Minister of Digital Government. This team works across the branch to deliver on policy priorities, including the development and coordination of presentations and documents for Cabinet consideration (including memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions), as well as to support senior governance tables, either driven by the group or through the provision of support to other areas within OCIO. This includes the development of strategic policy direction and the provision of advice to senior management and senior horizontal governance tables in respect to governance, legislation, coordination of the finance/budget process and policy issues related to digital government transformation, the Minister’s digital vision, and service delivery, as well as other strategic policy initiatives within the responsibilities of OCIO.

Corporate planning and priorities: Management of the corporate planning functions of OCIO. This includes the development and coordination of integrated and coherent OCIO input to support departmental planning and reporting documents, including parliamentary mandated planning and reporting exercise (departmental plans, departmental reports, sector-wide logic models and performance reporting). The team also supports the development of long-term approaches to corporate performance reporting.

Digital Change Sector

People

Denis Skinner, Executive Director, Digital Change Sector

Anna Wong, Director, Digital Community Management Office [redacted]

Financial summary

Group Total funding
from memoranda
of understanding
(included in budget)
Budget Forecast Employee Benefits Plan Surplus/deficit
Digital enablement

5,534,708

5,697,142

5,260,482

-719,691

-283,031

Digital change

3,591,250

4,635,924

4,003,939

-697,499

-65,514

Total

$9,125,958

$10,333,066

$9,264,421

-$1,417,190

-$348,545

Program / core mandate summary (includes division responsibilities)

The Digital Change Sector’s mission is to realize the full potential of the government’s digital talent by mainstreaming the Digital Standards. The Sector manages a broad range of interlinked files that advance the Government of Canada’s digital agenda. These range from managing partnerships—within the government, across Canada and internationally; guiding and elaborating the Digital Standards; working with the digital government community (through both policy and technology); and exercising whole-of-government leadership to ensure digital platforms are in place to facilitate both internal public service operations as well as service delivery to Canadians. As the business owner, and Technical Authority for several enterprise IM/IT programs and services, the sector establishes the strategic direction, sets priorities, and oversees the delivery of enterprise products providing departments and agencies with the enabling functionality required to meet business and service outcomes.

The work of the Digital Change Sector focuses on Pillars 3 and 4 of Canada’s Digital Government Strategy: Taking a coordinated approach to digital operations and transforming how we work. As elaborated in the Digital Operations Strategic Plan, Pillar 3 focuses on enterprise-wide coordination and action. The Sector is leading on several aspects of deploying modern and accessible workplace tools and devices, an integral part of this pillar. The Digital Community Management Office, the partnerships team and the Digital Standards teams are all core components of the transformation the strategy commits to fulfilling. Through strengthening the Digital Standards, collaborating with leading international and Canadian provincial and territorial governments, and influencing the recruitment, retention and career progress of the digital community across the government, the Sector is at the cutting edge of reshaping the digital landscape of the federal government.

Digital Government Partnerships Team

Digital Change Sector manages Canada’s relationships with multiple international and pan-Canadian partners including the Digital Nations, United Nations, the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), the Joint Councils, and the Chief Information Officer Strategy Council. These forums are particularly for sharing best practices and organizing collective action, which are increasingly critical to national governments’ efforts to maintain pace with digital change, and to balance the power of the global digital platform companies. The team also manages cross-cutting work on emerging technology issues. First, it is leading government efforts on greening government IT and supporting a sustainable economic recovery, a key ministerial priority and a government priority in the most recent Speech from the Throne, or to establish any additional international and domestic partnerships with regularly interested parties. It is also working closely with the Community Management Office on issues related to gender, inclusivity and technology. This includes the Government of Canada’s efforts to address under-representation of diverse communities in the Government of Canada technology community. OCIO also leads a development program called the Dr. Roberta Bondar Career Development Program for Women in Science and Technology and supports the Government of Canada chief information officers in meeting their talent management performance objectives to address these gender and diversity structural deficiencies in their workforce. The team also provides ongoing leadership of the annual Digital Government Leaders Summit, which is an annual gathering of government CIOs and the annual Digital Government Awards. The team also supports—often in collaboration with Strategic Communications and Ministerial Affairs (SCMA)—event support and speaking notes for the CIO and for the Minister of Digital Government.

Digital Standards and Culture Team

The expansion and adoption of the Digital Standards across the Government of Canada is a critical component of the Sector’s work, as digital solutions and ways of working have proven critical precursors to resilience and response, particularly in the current pandemic context. This team is the Digital Standards lead for the Government of Canada, charged with addressing this adoption gap through awareness-raising, upskilling, toolkit co-development, and Cabinet document and concept case review. Further, this team leads efforts to map systemic barriers to digital delivery and support government in anticipating and responding to emerging changes in its operating environment, supporting the Government of Canada in maintaining its position as a leading public service.

Key service departments have already staffed well-resourced teams to work on the Digital Standards, some of which have already developed competing digital-related standards, tools and guidance. OCIO is working with these departments and with other to provide government-wide guidance and expectations for the Digital Standards. The team also assesses Cabinet documents and concept cases for Digital Standards alignment and advise on initiative redesign and/or funding reallocations, helping to coordinate Government of Canada–wide service design, investments, and digital adoption.

The team is also doing some innovative work on re-imaging priority-setting and funding in a digital world called Digitopia, which asks the question: “What if we could redesign government?” A white paper and presentation are available.

Digital Community Management Office (CMO)

The CMO directly supports the CIO of Canada as head of government’s largest functional community of public servants, working across the Government of Canada to attract, develop, retain, and recognize its digital talent. The CMO delivers significant cost and process efficiencies, including opportunities for efficiencies in members’ organizations. This happens at both the working and executive levels. For instance, CMO manages continually refreshed central pools of pre-qualified candidates for common and emerging needs, and is building strengthened capacity to deliver high-quality ecosystem data and business intelligence to help CIOs address capacity gaps and facilitate talent mobility in response to emerging crises, budgetary pressures, or changes in Government of Canada priorities. This includes central capacity to identify, retain and upskill digital talent, support talent management, set government-wide corporate priorities for CIO performance management agreement, and coordinate employee upskilling and tailored support for digital leaders. The CMO also maintains a continually refreshed standard suite of human resources and organizational products, and liaises with OCHRO on the community’s behalf.

The CMO is funded by a series of memoranda of understanding with almost all Government of Canada departments and agencies totalling $3,485,350. These memoranda of understanding have just been refreshed for a three-year period (2021–24): the amount of each memorandum of understanding is tied to the number of CS (Computer Systems) classification employees in each department. While many organizations have had to redirect funding in past months to address pandemic-related priorities, the track record of the CMO has resulted in having almost every department on board. The costs to maintain the CMO were also previously under-estimated, and the new series of memoranda of understanding addresses this issue.

Talent Cloud and Digital Enablement (collaboration platforms)

Talent Cloud was an experimental project that explored digital age concepts for modernizing the government’s approach to talent and recruitment (talent.canada.ca). It was a partner-funded initiative, built in-house by a multidisciplinary team, and was hosted out of the Digital Change Sector in the OCIO. Talent Cloud, as a project, has officially concluded. The result of these development efforts over the last three years has led to numerous insights on ways to improve recruitment, and a fully operational staffing platform that has delivered a hiring timeline dramatically faster than the Government of Canada average, all of which has been outlined in a comprehensive 230-page report.

In 2021–22, the project team is shifting to collaborate with the Digital CMO to develop a talent platform for the digital community. The new platform will deliver an interoperable talent repository, with a focus on manager-searchable talent pools. The project team will also be working with partners across the Government of Canada to advance work on an Indigenous Talent Portal. The team remains committed to advancing digital talent solutions that advance equity and serve Canadians.

Gcxchange

Gcxchange is the Government of Canada’s new intranet, a modern platform that supports the future of work by bringing departmental and Government of Canada–wide information, announcements, collaboration and productivity tools to one central location. Employees can share, communicate and collaborate with colleagues across government, and in the future, with partners beyond the Government of Canada. It is the new generation of the legacy GCTools—GCconnex, GCcollab, GCpedia, GCwiki, and GCpedia, GCmessage, and GCintranet—rolling key functionalities of the tools onto one platform. Gcxchange is maximizing the Government of Canada’s current investment of Microsoft 365 by leveraging Microsoft Teams and SharePoint.

OCIO is the business owner of Gcxchange and has developed various partnerships with other TBS units (Strategic Communications and Ministerial Affairs and the Information Management and Technology Division) to deliver and maintain the platform. Although OCIO has also secured Chief Information Officer Council funding for three years (2021–22 to 2023–24) totalling $11 million (approximately $3.6 million per year), a more permanent funding model needs to be explored to support the product long-term. The platform has launched and is currently following a phased approach to onboard 48 Government of Canada departments.

Strategy and Engagement Team

Strategy and engagement enable digital government by ensuring the appropriate digital platforms are in place to facilitate both internal public service operations as well as service delivery to Canadians. This is accomplished through exercising leadership as business owner and technical authority over enterprise platforms, managing platform governance, applying product management practices, and building the tools, standards and guidance to facilitate system interoperability across the Government of Canada. Key platforms include:

July 2021

Digital government

In this section

What is digital?

The fourth industrial revolution has arrived

The first industrial revolution used water and steam power to mechanize production.

The second used electric power to create mass production.

The third used electronics and IT to automate production.

Today, a fourth industrial revolution.

The digital revolution is building on the third, fusing technologies and blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres.

Exponential advances in digital technologies like artificial intelligence and the proliferation of data are radically transforming society and citizens’ expectations.

Computers and smartphones are now ubiquitous, enabling real-time connectivity and driving expectations for information and services to be available anytime, anywhere, from any device.

Figure 2
Figure 2 - Text version xxx

Meanwhile, the rate at which data are generated is rising exponentially.

Approximately 90% of the digital data ever created in the world was generated in the past two years alone, of which only 1% has been analyzed.

Around 2,500,000,000,000,000,000 bytes of data are created every day.

Figure 3
Figure 3 - Text version xxx

Digital, however, is ultimately not about technology or data.

Digital is “applying the culture, processes, business models and technologies of the internet era to respond to people’s raised expectations.”

Tom Loosemore
Partner at Public Digital, co-founder of the United Kingdom’s Government Digital Service

The digital government vision

This focus is reflected in the government’s vision for its digital future—

The Government of Canada is an open and service-oriented organization that operates and delivers programs and services to people and businesses in simple, modern and effective ways that are optimized for digital and available anytime, anywhere and from any device.

Digitally, the Government of Canada must operate as one to benefit all Canadians.

—and in its 10 Digital Standards that form the foundation of the government’s shift to becoming more user-focused, open and agile:

In addition to the Treasury Board, other key federal partners support digital government:

Government operations and services

Economy

Data

Privacy and Cyber Security

Note: This list is illustrative, not exhaustive.

The Government of Canada digital landscape

Policy centre

Office of the Government of Canada Chief Information Officer

Enterprise service providers

Shared Services Canada

Enterprise service provider of:

Supports the Government of Canada in procuring IT infrastructure goods and services

Works with Public Safety, Communications Security Establishment, and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to improve cyber and IT security government-wide

Public Services and Procurement Canada

Enterprise service provider of:

Cyber security

Communications Security Establishment

Service delivery

Canadian Digital Service

Human-centred service design:

Departments and agencies

Service delivery across the Government of Canada

Service delivery to Canadians is the responsibility of federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, sometimes jointly or in coordination

Federal service delivery focuses primarily on:

While almost every federal organization is mandated with service delivery responsibilities, most public-facing services are delivered by eight core service organizations:

  1. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
  2. Canada Border Services Agency
  3. Employment and Social Development Canada
  4. Innovation Science and Economic Development
  5. Veterans Affairs Canada
  6. Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
  7. Canada Revenue Agency
  8. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency

These organizations collectively processed over 314 million transitions in 2017–18, and delivered billions in public benefits.

Figure 4
Figure 4 - Text version xxx
The Government of Canada’s current information technology spend profile

The government currently spends approximately 20% on front-office systems and 80% on back-office systems and IT infrastructure:Footnote 8

Ongoing international and national collaboration

Delivering on the digital agenda requires continued and increased collaboration and integration with other jurisdictions and stakeholders, both at home and abroad.

Canada plays a global leadership role on digital issues, and can benefit from ongoing collaboration and lessons learned from its digital peers:

Delivering on the digital agenda requires continued and increased collaboration and integration with other jurisdictions and stakeholders, both at home and abroad.

Considerations for advancing the digital agenda

Delivering on digital will require the Government of Canada to:

  1. address the government’s aging IT infrastructure and legacy IT spending
  2. modernize how government delivers services
  3. solidify the government’s enterprise capacity, including deploying common platforms that support seamless service delivery

Governance Reference Guide

In this section

OCIO-managed committees the DM sits on

Decision-making

Consultation and situational awareness

OCIO: July 2021

OCIO-managed committees the DM sits on (written description)

Committees (alphabetical) Membership status Coordination Frequency Mandate
Chief Information Officer Council

Chair

OCIO Committee Secretariat

Monthly

The Chief Information Officer Council is a forum for consultation and information exchange on matters relating to the management and use of information and technology in support of program and service delivery in the Government of Canada.

Chief Information Officer Strategy Council

Co-Chair

Chief Information Officer Strategy Council Secretariat

Monthly

The Chief Information Officer Strategy Council is Canada’s national forum for Chief Information Officers and Executive Technology Leaders to mobilize on common digital priorities.

Digital Nations

Canada’s Senior Official

Digital Nations Secretariat

Yearly, plus yearly Ministerial Summit

The Digital Nations is a forum of the world’s digital governments that aims to use technology to improve citizens’ services.

Members include Estonia, Israel, Korea, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Canada, Uruguay, Mexico, Portugal, Denmark.

Deputy Minister Committee on Enterprise Priorities and Planning

Ex-Officio

OCIO Committee Secretariat

Monthly

Focuses on an integrated approach to IT strategies across the enterprise.

Deputy Minister Committee on Core Services

Ex-Officio

OCIO Committee Secretariat

Monthly

Focuses on the transformation of core services. Currently, there are four in scope:

  1. Employment and Social Development Canada Benefits Delivery Modernization
  2. Employment and Social Development Canada Technical Debt Remediation
  3. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada Digital Platform Modernization
  4. Shared Services Canada Next Generation: HR and Pay
ICA: International Council for IT in Government Administration

Member

ICA Secretariat

Quarterly

The International Council for IT in Government Administration is an international non-profit association that is an information-sharing forum on management and the use of information and communications technologies.

OECD E-Leaders: OECD Working Party of Senior Digital Government Officials

Member

OECD Secretariat

Yearly

OECD E-Leaders meet once per year with individuals from the private sector and academic to discuss topics such as digital transformation of the public sector.

* List of all committees the DM sits on is included as an annex.

OCIO: July 2021

OCIO committee structure

Deputy minister (DM) level

Assistant deputy minister (ADM) level

Committees that the DM does not sit on
Standalone committees
Committees the DM does not generally attend

OCIO-managed committees (written description)

Committees (alphabetical) Coordination Frequency Mandate
Assistant Deputy Minister Access to Information and Privacy

OCIO Committee Secretariat

Bimonthly

A Government of Canada committee on policy and operational matters relating to access to information and privacy (ATIP).

ADM QUAD

Chief Technology Officer Sector, OCIO

Monthly

Provide advice and guidance on IT strategic priorities and ensure alignment with the enterprise direction established by deputy minister (DM)–level committees.

Assistant Deputy Minister Security Committee

OCIO Committee Secretariat

Bimonthly

Provides strategic leadership regarding the development, implementation and ongoing evaluation of the Policy on Government Security and operational readiness activities across the Government of Canada.

Assistant Deputy Minister Service and Enterprise Priorities

OCIO Committee Secretariat

Monthly

To improve the Government of Canada’s client service experience and government operations through the strategic management of enterprise services, information, data, IT, and cybersecurity.

Assistant Deputy Minister Service and Enterprise Priorities Working Group for Data and Information

Chief Technology Officer Sector, OCIO

Monthly

Beginning in July 2021, this working group is anticipated to run for six months to support ADM Service and Enterprise Priorities in addressing its mandate for leadership and direction in enterprise data and information.

CIOC (Chief Information Officer Council) Express: Chief Information Officer Council Express

Chief Technology Officer Sector, OCIO

Weekly

CIOC Express is an information-sharing forum that originally focused on the quickly evolving IT issues related to the pandemic facing all of us. This forum is now being used to share information and discuss the issues related to managing the return to the workplace.

Joint Council

Digital Change, OCIO

Monthly

The Public Sector Chief Information Officer Council and the Public Sector Service Delivery Council (also known as the Joint Councils) are pan-Canadian interjurisdictional Councils focused on citizens-centred service delivery.

GC EARB: Government of Canada Enterprise Architecture Review Board

OCIO Committee Secretariat

Bi-weekly

To further the Government of Canada Enterprise Vision by validating, recommending and approving IM/IT solutions that will further the “Whole of Government agenda as one Enterprise.” The EARB will achieve this by setting Government of Canada Enterprise priorities in cooperation with its constituent Government of Canada departments.

Government of Canada Secret Infrastructure Strategic Management Committee

Chief Technology Officer Sector, OCIO

Quarterly

The Government of Canada Secret Infrastructure Strategic Management Committee provides senior-level decision-making, advice and guidance for the development, prioritization, implementation, and ongoing operations of the Government of Canada Secret Infrastructure enterprise capabilities that meets the Government of Canada needs.

SOC: Service Officials Council

OCIO Committee Secretariat

Bimonthly

The SOC supports improved service management across the GC and enables client-centric service design and delivery. The SOC will act as an interactive forum for information sharing and discussion of key issues related to the management of Government of Canada service, particularly for external and internal enterprise services.

*The DM can but does not generally attend the ADM-level meetings.

OCIO: July 2021

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