2015-2016 Annual report: reducing regulatory administrative burden and improving service and predictability

Table of Contents

Minister’s message

As the Minister responsible for federal regulatory policy, I am pleased to provide Canadians with an update on the implementation of federal government initiatives to reduce regulatory administrative burden and improve service and predictability. Overall, Canada’s federal regulatory regime is now more open and transparent, which benefits everyone.

The Cabinet Directive on Regulatory Management, the cornerstone of Canada’s regulatory regime, is undergoing a review, and this process presents a unique opportunity to consider improvements to the federal regulatory policy framework that advance and protect the public interest. We are starting from a strong foundation as noted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which scores Canada as above the OECD average for all OECD indicators of regulatory policy and governance.Footnote 1

This is an ambitious and challenging agenda but one that I am confident will realize benefits for all Canadians.

Original signed by:

 

The Honourable Scott Brison
President of the Treasury Board

Introduction

This is the fourth annual report on reducing regulatory administrative burden and improving service and predictability; the previous three annual reports were referred to as the Annual Scorecard Report. This report also meets the legislative annual reporting requirement of the Red Tape Reduction Act. It covers six initiatives that have been implemented over the years:

One-for-One Rule

The One-for-One Rule (the Rule) seeks to control the growth of administrative burden on business arising from regulations. When a new or amended regulation increases the administrative burden on business, the Rule requires regulators to offset an equal amount of administrative burden cost. As well, the Rule also requires regulators to remove an existing regulation each time they introduce a new regulation that imposes new administrative burden on business.

The Rule applies to all regulatory changes that impose new administrative burden costs on business. There are, however, three circumstances where the Treasury Board may exempt regulations from the application of the Rule:

  1. regulations related to tax or tax administration
  2. regulations where Her Majesty in right of Canada has no discretion regarding the requirements that must be included in the regulation due to international or legal obligations, including the imposition of international sanctions or the implementation of Supreme Court of Canada decisions
  3. regulations in emergency, unique or exceptional circumstances, including if compliance with the Rule’s requirements would compromise public health, public safety or the Canadian economy

In 2014, the Red Tape Reduction Act gave the One-for-One Rule the force of law. The act and its associated regulations also require that an annual report on the application of the One-for-One Rule be published.

The main findings on changes in administrative regulatory burden and the overall number of regulations for the current reporting year (2015 to 2016) are as follows:

  • 88% of final regulatory changes that were approved by the Governor in Council and non-Governor in Council authorities published in the Canada Gazette either reduced or did not impose any new administrative burden on business
  • annual net administrative burden to business was reduced by approximately $6.3 million
  • 13 regulations were repealed, resulting in a total net reduction of 12 regulations from the stock of federal regulations

Since the 2012 to 2013 fiscal year, the year the One-for-One Rule was introduced, there are 32 fewer net regulations and approximately a $30 million decrease in net administrative burden.

Although the statistics cover the period that the Rule has been in place (that is, since the 2012 to 2013 fiscal year), it is difficult to determine what proportion of the savings realized and the net reduction in regulations can be directly attributed to the Rule’s application. This is because departments and agencies were already engaging in burden and/or regulatory title reduction efforts.

Details of the findings on the application of the One-for-One Rule in the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year are provided in Appendix A. A one-page summary of the findings is found in Appendix B.

Other reforms

In addition to the One-for-One Rule, the following reform areas are assessed annually. An overview of the results achieved for each reform area for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year are provided in snapshot format in Appendices C to G. Assessment results by federal portfolio or entity are provided in Appendix H.

Small business lens

The purpose of the small business lens is to require sensitivity to small business impacts in the regulatory development process. Consultation and analysis help develop a clear understanding of business realities at the earliest stages of regulatory design.

The lens applies to regulatory proposals that impact small business and have nationwide cost impacts of over $1 million annually. The key statistical summary findings are in Appendix C.

Service standards for high-volume regulatory authorizations

Service standards provide businesses with a clear indication of how long it will normally take to obtain a decision from a regulator, allowing stakeholders to factor these timelines into their planning. Departments and agencies are required to post service standards and service performance for high-volume regulatory authorizations on their acts and regulations web pages.

In addition to timeliness standards and service targets, regulators are required to establish a feedback mechanism so that Canadians can raise service issues if expectations have not been met. Providing feedback on the service that businesses receive when they apply for an authorization can help regulators improve service and recalibrate their timeliness commitments over time.

Over the years, the threshold for developing and publishing service standards has shifted. It now requires that regulators publish service standards for a much larger number of regulatory authorizations. Departments and agencies must also keep their public lists of service standards up to date. The key statistical summary findings are in Appendix D.

Administrative Burden Baseline

The Administrative Burden Baseline (ABB) provides Canadians with a metric on the total number of requirements in federal regulations and associated forms that impose administrative burden on business. The baseline is to be updated annually, contributing to the openness and transparency of the federal regulatory system.

The ABB was introduced in the 2014 to 2015 fiscal year and now provides Canadians with information on 38 departments and agencies. The key statistical summary findings are in Appendix E.

Forward regulatory plans

Forward regulatory plans describe anticipated regulatory changes or proposals that a department or agency intends to bring forward over the next 24-month period. Federal departments and agencies make their forward regulatory plans publicly available on their acts and regulations web pages, giving businesses and other stakeholders a notice of upcoming regulations that impact them and an opportunity to engage regulators on regulatory design and plan for implementation.

This information is updated by departments and agencies every six months. The key statistical summary findings are in Appendix F.

Interpretation policies

Interpretation policies help make regulations and compliance requirements easier to understand by outlining the commitments, practices and tools to be applied by regulators when providing Canadians and businesses with information and guidance on regulatory obligations to be met. This helps reduce administrative burden on Canadians and businesses in particular, who might otherwise expend additional time and resources to interpret regulatory requirements.

As of , departments and agencies have been required to post improvement priorities, based on consultations with their stakeholders. This year, departments and agencies were assessed on their state of readiness to meet the deadline of , which requires them to update Canadians on progress achieved in implementing improvement priorities. The key statistical summary findings are in Appendix G.

Appendix A: detailed findings on the application of the One-for-One Rule

Table A: list of final regulatory changes with administrative burden implications under the One-for-One Rule published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

Portfolio

Regulation

Publication date

Net in ($)

Net out ($)

Employment and Social Development

Policy Committees, Work Place Committees and Health and Safety Representatives Regulations, SOR/2015-164

N/A

$756,532

Employment and Social Development

Regulations Amending the On Board Trains Occupational Safety and Health Regulations, SOR/2015-143

$72,304

N/A

Environment and Climate Change

Regulations Amending the On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations and Other Regulations Made Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, SOR/2015-186

$5,534

N/A

Environment and Climate Change

Regulations Amending the Sulphur in Gasoline Regulations, SOR/2015-187

$67,698

N/A

Fisheries and Oceans

Aquaculture Activities Regulations, SOR/2015-177 (ministerial regulation)

$409,513

N/A

Health

Regulations Amending the Narcotic Control Regulations and the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (Communication of Information), SOR/2015-132

$1,465

N/A

Health

Potable Water on Board Trains, Vessels, Aircraft and Buses Regulations, SOR/2016-43

$29,000

N/A

Health

Order Amending Schedule I to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (Tapentadol), SOR/2015-190

$4,787

N/A

Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Regulations Amending the Canada Small Business Financing Regulations, SOR/2016-018

N/A

$19,087

Natural Resources

Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015, SOR/2015-145

N/A

$33,973

Public Safety

Regulations Amending Certain Regulations Made Under the Customs Act, SOR/2015-90

N/A

$8,000,000

Public Safety

Regulations Amending the Passenger Information (Customs) Regulations, SOR/2016-035

$2,293,297

N/A

Public Safety

Regulations Amending the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, SOR/2016-037

$224,311

N/A

Transport

Regulations Amending the Canadian Aviation Security Regulations, 2012 (Enhanced Access Controls), SOR/2016-039

$2,869

N/A

Transport

Regulations Amending the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Parts I, VI and VII: Flight Attendants and Emergency Evacuation), SOR/2015-127

$2,688

N/A

Transport

Regulations Amending the Vessels Registry Fees Tariff and the Vessel Registration and Tonnage Regulations, SOR/2015-99

N/A

$572,046

Total

$3,113,466

$9,381,638

Administrative burden balance for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

-$ 6,268,172

Table B: new regulatory titles and repealed regulations in the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

Portfolio

Regulation

Net impact on regulatory stock

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note 1

This is a ministerial regulation made by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, pursuant to sections 14 and 55 of the Health of Animals Act.

Return to table 1 note 1 referrer

Table 1 Note 2

This regulation was repealed by the Regulations Amending Certain Regulations Made Under the First Nations Fiscal Management Act (SOR/2016-29).

Return to table 1 note 2 referrer

New regulatory titles that have administrative burden

Fisheries and Oceans

Aquaculture Activities Regulations (SOR/2015-177)

1

Subtotal

1

Repealed regulations

Agriculture and Agri-Food

The Regulations Amending and Repealing Certain Regulations Made Under the Health of Animals Act (SOR/2015-142)table 1 note 1 repealed the following regulations:

  • The Prairie Dog and Certain Other Rodents Importation Prohibition Regulations
  • The Honeybee Importation Prohibition Regulations, 2004

The Regulations Repealing Certain Regulations Made Under the Farm Income Protection Act (Miscellaneous Program) (SOR/2015-72) repealed the following regulations:

  • The 1985 Potatoes Stabilization Regulations
  • The Apple Stabilization 1977 Regulations
  • The Apple Stabilization Regulations, 1980
  • The Apple Stabilization Regulations, 1982-83
  • The Apple Stabilization Regulations, 1983 and 1984
  • The Apricot Stabilization Regulations, 1977
  • The Apricot Stabilization Regulations, 1982
  • The Barley 1987 Period Stabilization Regulations
  • The Barley Stabilization Regulations, 1977-78
  • The Beef Calf Stabilization Regulations

(12)

Indigenous and Northern Affairs

The First Nations Rates and Expenditure Laws Timing Regulationstable 1 note 2

(1)

Subtotal

(13)

Total net impact on regulatory stock for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

(12)

New regulations that simultaneously repealed and replaced existing regulations

Health

The Potable Water on Board Trains, Aircrafts and Buses Regulations (SOR/2016-043) replaced the Potable Water Regulations for Common Carriers

0

Employment and Social Development

The Policy Committees, Work Place Committees and Health and Safety Representatives Regulations (SOR/2015-164) replaced the Safety and Health Committees Regulations.

0

Natural Resources

The Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2014 (SOR-2014-145) replaced the Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations

0

Total net impact on regulatory stock for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

0

Table C: regulatory changes exempted from the One-for-One Rule and published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

Portfolio

Regulations

Statutory orders and regulations number

Publication date

Exemption type

Canada Revenue Agency

Regulations Amending the Income Tax Regulations (Mandatory Electronic Filing: Prescribed Information Returns)

SOR/2015-140

Tax or tax administration

Canada Revenue Agency

Regulations Amending the Income Tax Regulations (Withholding of Income Tax on Payments from Registered Disability Savings Plans)

SOR/2016-30

Tax or tax administration

Environment and Climate Change

Regulations Amending the Wild Animal and Plant Trade Regulations

SOR/2015-81

Non-discretionary obligations

Finance

Regulations Amending the Income Tax Regulations (Accelerated Capital Cost Allowance for Facilities Used to Liquefy Natural Gas)

SOR/2015-117

Tax or tax administration

Global Affairs

Regulations Amending the Freezing Assets of Corrupt Foreign Officials (Tunisia and Egypt) Regulations

SOR/2015-152

Unique, exceptional circumstances

Global Affairs

Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Ukraine) Regulations

SOR/2015-179

Unique, exceptional circumstances

Global Affairs

Regulations Implementing the United Nations Resolution on South Sudan

SOR/2015-165

Non-discretionary obligations

Global Affairs

Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Russia) Regulations

SOR/2015-178

Unique, exceptional circumstances

Global Affairs

Regulations Amending the Regulations Implementing the United Nations Resolutions on Iran

SOR/2016-14

Non-discretionary obligations

Global Affairs

Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations

SOR/2016-15

Unique, exceptional circumstances

Public Safety

Regulations Amending the Regulations Establishing a List of Entities

SOR/2015-175

Unique, exceptional circumstances

Appendix B: summary findings on the One-for-One Rule

Appendix B: summary findings on the One-for-One Rule. Text version below:
Appendix B: summary findings on the One-for-One Rule - Text version

This chart summarizes the assessment findings for the One-for-One Rule

Title:

Snapshot of the One-for-One Rule for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

First row:

Scope

Assessment of the One-for-One Rule: 11 portfolios, 43 regulations

  • Canada Revenue Agency
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada
  • Employment and Social Development Canada
  • Finance Portfolio
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Transport Canada

Second row:

Regulatory activities

12 fewer regulations in the regulatory stock

11 exemptions to the One-for-One RuleFootnote *

11 regulations increased burden

5 regulations decreased burden

Repeals/new regulations

13 regulations repealed

1 new regulation added

Types of exemptions

5 exceptional circumstances

3 tax and tax administration

3 non-discretionary obligations

Net reduction in administrative burden costs: $6,268,172

Burden increase (Ins): $3,113,466

Burden decrease (Outs): $9,381,638

Third row:

Assessment results

[green light rating]

10 out of 11 (91%) of portfolios were in full compliance

Key findings

  • general compliance with the One-for-One reporting and reconciliation requirements
  • compliance with reconciliation requirements: one case of non-compliance since 2012
  • issues: stating assumptions and describing consultation activities on burden cost estimates

[yellow with green up-arrow rating]

Generally in compliance; minor corrective actions are required:

Transport Canada

Appendix C: summary findings on the small business lens

Appendix C: summary findings on the small business lens. Text version below:
Appendix C: summary findings on the small business lens - Text version

This chart summarizes the assessment findings for the small business lens

Title:

Snapshot of the small business lens for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

First row:

Scope

Small business lens assessment: 4 federal portfolios were evaluated on 11 proposed and final regulations

  • Employment and Social Development Portfolio
  • Health Portfolio
  • Public Safety Portfolio
  • Transport Portfolio

Second row:

Regulatory activities

181 regulations in-scope for application of the small business lens

89% did not result in increased administrative or compliance costs for small business

Of those regulations that did not result increased administrative or compliance costs for small business:

41% were not directly related to business operations

20% were cost-neutral

14% resulted in cost savings for business

13% impacted only medium or large businesses

11% resulted in increased administrative or compliance costs for small business

Of those that did result in increased administrative or compliance costs for small business

7% expected to impose annual national costs of less than $1 million

4% applied the small business lens

Third row:

Assessment results

[green light rating]

Full compliance with requirements:

  • Employment and Social Development
  • Health
  • Public Safety

Key findings

  • The small business lens was applied 6 times for 7 final regulations.Footnote *
  • One third of those applications implemented flexible options that resulted in cost reductions for small business
  • Approximately $15 million in net annualized costs were avoided by using flexible options
  • 100% of small business lens applications consulted small business prior to publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, and all final regulations took their concerns into account

[yellow with up green arrow rating]

Generally in compliance; minor corrective actions are required:

Transport Canada

Appendix D: summary findings on service standards for high-volume regulatory authorizations

Appendix D: summary findings on service standards for high-volume regulatory authorizations. Text version below:
Appendix D: summary findings on service standards for high-volume regulatory authorizations - Text version

This chart summarizes the assessment findings for service standards for high-volume regulatory authorizations

Title:

Snapshot of service standards for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

First row:

Scope

Service standards assessment: 18 portfolios

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food
  • Atlantic Pilotage Authority
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  • Canadian Heritage
  • Canadian Transportation Agency
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada
  • Finance Portfolio
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Health Portfolio
  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
  • Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Parks Canada
  • Public Safety
  • Public Services and Procurement
  • Transport Canada

Second row:

Regulatory activities

Approximately 500 service standards are publicly available

14 new service standards for 11 high-volume authorizations were added during the previous fiscal year

The new requirement to post performance on all service standards (including previously existing ones that were not posted) resulted in the posting and assessment of over 450 standards for 185 regulatory authorizations

Third row:

Assessment results

[green light rating]

72% of portfolios were in full compliance

Key findings

  • 80% of publicly available service standards have a business impact
  • 78% of all service standards posted by , also reported on performance in meeting the service standard
  • Of those, 86% met or exceeded performance targets

[yellow with up green arrow rating]

28% of portfolios had some compliance; moderate corrective actions are required

Appendix E: summary findings on the Administrative Burden Baseline

Appendix E: summary findings on the Administrative Burden Baseline. Text version below:
Appendix E: summary findings on the Administrative Burden Baseline - Text version

This chart summarizes the assessment findings for the administrative burden baseline

Title:

Snapshot of the Administrative Burden Baseline for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

First row:

Scope

The Administrative Burden Baseline (ABB) assessment: 38 departments/agencies reporting under 21 portfolios

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food
  • Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  • Canadian Heritage
  • Canada Revenue Agency
  • Canadian Transportation Agency
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada
  • Employment and Social Development Portfolio
  • Finance Portfolio
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Health Portfolio
  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
  • Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Parks Canada
  • Public Services and Procurement
  • Public Safety
  • Transport Canada
  • Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Second row:

Regulatory activities

Top 5 changes in ABB

  • Transport Canada: an increase of 563 requirements (mostly changes to various safety-related railway regulations)
  • Employment and Social Development Canada: an increase of 465 requirements (mostly changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program)
  • Health Portfolio: an increase of  296 requirements (mostly new forms included in the Blood Regulations)
  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development: an increase of 211 (changes to the Investment Canada Regulations)
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada: an increase of 114 (2 new regulations, amendments to 5 regulations and repeal of 2 regulations)

Third row:

Assessment results

[green light rating]

100% of portfolios were in full compliance with the reporting requirements

24 out of 38 departments/agencies reported no change in their ABB from the previous year’s count

Key results

574 regulations with administrative burden

Total number of requirements in 2014: 129,860

Total number of requirements in 2015: 131,754

Net increase in number of requirements: 1,894

Appendix F: summary findings on forward regulatory plans

Appendix F: summary findings on forward regulatory plans. Text version below:
Appendix F: summary findings on forward regulatory plans - Text version

This chart summarizes the assessment findings for forward regulatory plans

Title:

Snapshot of forward regulatory planning for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

First row:

Scope

Forward regulatory plan assessment: 25 portfolios, 39 forward regulatory plans, almost 500 regulatory initiatives

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food
  • Atlantic Pilotage Authority
  • Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  • Canadian Heritage
  • Canada Revenue Agency
  • Canadian Transportation Agency
  • Justice Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada
  • Employment and Social Development Portfolio
  • Finance Portfolio
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Health Portfolio
  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
  • Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Parks Canada
  • Public Services and Procurement
  • Public Safety
  • Public Service Commission
  • Transport Canada
  • Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
  • Veterans Affairs

Second row:

Regulatory activities

Since the 2012 to 2013 fiscal year, amendments to existing regulations have consistently made up the majority of initiatives listed in departmental and agency forward regulatory plans.

Over 70% of initiatives are not likely to have business impacts.

Approximately 55% of regulatory initiatives on forward regulatory plans were posted prior to pre-publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I.

Pre-publication had been completed in almost 10% of initiatives.

The remainder of the initiatives did not specify Canada Gazette pre-publication or indicated that the proposal will go directly to the Canada Gazette, Part II, in many cases following publication of a notice to stakeholders or some alternative form of consultation.

Third row:

Assessment results

[green light rating]

87% of portfolios were in full compliance

Excellent compliance overall

Suggested areas for improvement:

  • increased use of plain language to describe the initiatives
  • greater clarity on the approach to upcoming consultations, including anticipated timelines
  • better compliance with deadlines specified in guidance

[yellow with up green arrow rating]

12% of portfolios were generally compliant

Appendix G: summary findings on interpretation policies

Appendix G: summary findings on interpretation policies. Text version below:
Appendix G: summary findings on interpretation policies - Text version

This chart summarizes the assessment findings for interpretation policies

Title:

Snapshot of interpretation policies for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year

First row:

Scope

Entities assessed (number in parentheses indicates number of interpretation policies assessed for that portfolio)

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food (4)
  • Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  • Canadian Heritage
  • Canada Revenue Agency
  • Canadian Transportation Agency
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada
  • Employment and Social Development Portfolio (2)
  • Finance Portfolio (1)
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Health Portfolio (3)
  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
  • Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development (3)
  • Natural Resources Canada (3)
  • Parks Canada
  • Public Safety (2)
  • Public Services and Procurement
  • Transport Canada
  • Veterans Affairs

Second row:

Assessment process

Readiness assessment process

Objective: monitor status of departmental interpretation policies and degree of readiness in meeting the , deadline

Requirement: by , departments and agencies are to post their update to Canadians on outcomes in implementing the priorities against the identified metrics on their website, with a link from their Interpretation Policy page

Readiness assessment questionnaire

Q1: Has your department or agency posted improvement priorities?

Q2: Has your department or agency posted metrics related to the implementation of your improvement priorities?

Q3: Has your department or agency established accountability for implementation of improvement priorities?

Q4: What stages have your department or agency completed with respect to addressing improvement priorities?

Third row:

Assessment results

Posted improvement priorities?

90% did

10% did not

Posted metrics?

75% did

25% did not

Established accountability?

97% did

3% did not

Overall assessment ratings

Low readiness: 1 portfolio

Medium readiness: 4 portfolios

High readiness: 16 portfolios

Appendix H: portfolio ratings (all reform areas)

Rating explanation
Green circle

Full compliance demonstrated for most or all commitments and guidance requirements

Yellow circle with green arrow

Generally in compliance with commitments and guidance requirements; minor corrective actions are required

Yellow circle

Some compliance demonstrated with commitments and guidance requirements; moderate corrective actions are required

Yellow circle with red arrow

Significant compliance issues evident with commitments and guidance requirements; major corrective actions are required

Red circle

Inadequate compliance demonstrated with commitments and guidance requirements

Regulatory portfolio/ entity assessed

Regulatory reforms: ratings

One-for-One Rule

Small business lens

Forward regulatory plan

Service standards

Administrative Burden Baseline

Interpretation policies

Table 2 Notes

Table 2 Note 1

Denotes a Government of Canada institution that was assessed separately from its governing organization and was assigned its own rating, at the request of the pertinent minister.

Return to table 2 note * referrer

Agriculture and Agri-Food Portfolio

N/A

N/A

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

High

Canada Revenue Agency

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

High

Canadian Heritage

N/A

N/A

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

High

Public Service Commission of Canadatable 2 note *

N/A

N/A

Green circle

N/A

N/A

N/A

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Green circle

N/A

Yellow circle with green arrow

Green circle

Green circle

High

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agencytable 2 note *

N/A

N/A

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

High

Parks Canada

N/A

N/A

Yellow circle with green arrow

Green circle

Green circle

High

Department of Justice Canada

N/A

N/A

Yellow circle with green arrow

N/A

N/A

N/A

Finance Portfolio

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

Yellow circle

Green circle

High

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

High

Global Affairs Canada

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

High

Health Portfolio

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

High

Canadian Food Inspection Agencytable 2 note *

N/A

N/A

Green circle

Yellow circle

Green circle

Medium

Employment and Social Development Portfolio

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

High

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

N/A

N/A

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

High

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

N/A

N/A

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

Low

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

Yellow circle

Green circle

High

Natural Resources Portfolio

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

Medium

Public Safety Portfolio

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

Green circle

Medium

Public Services and Procurement Canada

N/A

N/A

Green circle

Yellow circle

Green circle

High

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

N/A

N/A

Green circle

N/A

Green circle

N/A

Transport Canada

Yellow circle with green arrow

Yellow circle with green arrow

Green circle

Yellow circle

Green circle

Medium

Atlantic Pilotage Authority Canadatable 2 note *

N/A

N/A

Green circle

Green circle

N/A

N/A

Canadian Transportation Agencytable 2 note *

N/A

N/A

N/A

Green circle

Green circle

High

Veterans Affairs Canada

N/A

N/A

Green circle

N/A

N/A

High

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