Demographic Snapshot of the Federal Public Service, 2014

The information presented includes key demographics for the Federal Public Service, comparing the current workforce to that from previous years (e.g. ).

The Federal Public Service consists of two population segments: the Core Public Administration and separate agencies.

The term "Core Public Administration" refers to more than 80 departments and agencies for which the Treasury Board is the employer. These organizations are named in Schedules I and IV of the Financial Administration Act.

The term "separate agencies" refers to those listed in Schedule V of the Act. Separate agencies conduct their own negotiations or set their own classification and compensation levels for their employees.

The demographic information below supplements the Clerk of the Privy Council's Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada: Twenty-Second Annual Report.

The data is current as of , unless otherwise indicated.

Table of Contents

Introduction

This document presents key demographics for the federal public service (FPS)Footnote 1. Part I covers the entire FPS, while Part II focuses on executives.

Demographic Profile of the Federal Public Service of Canada

  • 257,138 employees (250,882 in )
  • 54.9% of employees are women (41.8% in )
  • 45.3% of executives are women (5.2% in )
  • 58.3% of employees are in the regions; 41.7% are in the National Capital Region
  • 86.6% are indeterminate employees, 8.3% are term employees, and 5.1% are casuals and students
  • 71.1% of employees declared English to be their first official language; 28.9% declared French to be their first
  • Average age of employees: 44.9 years (39.3 in )
  • Average age of executives: 50.4 years (48.1 in )
  • The federal public service represents 0.73% of the Canadian population (0.99% in )

Part I – Demographic Profile of the Federal Public Service

1. Context – Relative Size and Spending

Between and , the population of Canada grew from 25.3 million to 35.4 million (40.0%)Footnote 2, while the number of federal public servants increased from 250,822 to 257,138 (2.5%). The federal public service (FPS) currently comprises 0.73% of the Canadian population. This is well below the ratios from the s and early s, which were very close to one percent.

Between and , the real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) increased by 116.2%, and real federal program spending increased by 52.4% (in constant dollars). However, over the last year there has been an increase of 2.0% in real GDP and a slight increase of 0.1% in federal program spending, as shown in Figure 1.

Government priorities have had a significant influence on the size of the FPS workforce over the years. The focus in recent years has been on streamlining activities, outsourcing non-critical services and cost reductions. As a result, the FPS workforce decreased by approximately 2.2% over the last fiscal year ().

Figure 1: Trends in the Economy, the Canadian Population, Federal Program Spending and the Size of the Federal Public Service, to
Trends in the Economy, the Canadian Population, Federal Program Spending and the Size of the Federal Public Service, 1983–84 to 2013–14. Text version below:
Figure 1 - Text version
Fiscal Year Canadian Population Index Federal Public Service Workforce Index Real GDP Index 
(in constant dollars – )
Real Program Expenses Index
(in constant dollars – )
100 100 100 100
101 101 106 105
102 101 111 100
103 100 113 101
104 99 118 104
105 98 123 104
107 99 126 104
109 100 126 104
110 101 123 104
112 101 125 109
113 101 128 108
114 98 134 108
115 96 137 104
117 88 140 94
118 83 146 96
119 81 152 96
120 81 159 96
121 84 167 103
122 89 170 105
124 95 175 110
125 97 178 114
126 97 184 128
127 97 190 125
128 100 195 132
130 101 198 137
131 105 201 140
132 109 195 163
134 113 202 157
135 113 208 153
137 111 212 152
138 105 216 152

Sources: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat; Statistics Canada; Department of Finance Canada (Fiscal Reference Tables).

Notes: The Canadian Population Index is based on the data of each year. The Federal Public Service Workforce Index is for active employees and is based on data at the start of each fiscal year.

The Real Program Expenses Index is based on fiscal year data, while the Real GDP Index is based on calendar year data.

Program expenses include transfers and were deflated using the Consumer Price Index.

2. Federal Public Service Diversity

a) Gender

In , 54.9% of federal public servants were women, a significant increase since when women comprised only 41.8% of the workforce.

Figure 2: Proportion of Men and Women in the Federal Public Service (FPS) – Select Years, to
Proportion of Men and Women in the Federal Public Service (FPS) – Select Years, 1983 to 2014. Text version below:
Figure 2 - Text version
 
Men 58.2% 55.7% 52.9% 49.6% 46.7% 45.1% 45.1%
Women 41.8% 44.3% 47.1% 50.4% 53.3% 54.9% 54.9%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Note: Figure 2 includes all employment tenures and active employees only (i.e. employees on Leave Without Pay are excluded). The information provided is based on data.

b) Employment Equity Designated Groups

Representation

Figure 3 shows that there have been modest increases in the representation levels of three out of the four employment equity designated groups in the FPS since . The representation rates for Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and visible minority employees were the same or higher than the previous year, and these groups continue to exceed their respective workforce availability (WFA).Footnote 3 However, the representation of women in the FPS decreased slightly from 55.0% in to 54.9% in , but this group still remains above its workforce availability of 52.8%.

Figure 3: Representation of Employment Equity Designated Groups in the Federal Public Service, to , With Estimated Workforce Availability (WFA) Based on the Census
Representation of Employment Equity Designated Groups in the Federal Public Service, 2008–09 to 2013–14, With Estimated Workforce Availability (WFA) Based on the 2006 Census. Text version below:
Figure 3 - Text version
Employment Equity Designated Group WFA ()
Women 55.1% 55.1% 55.3% 55.3% 55.0% 54.9% 52.8%
Aboriginal Peoples 4.2% 4.2% 4.3% 4.5% 4.6% 4.6% 2.9%
Persons with Disabilities 5.6% 5.6% 5.6% 5.7% 5.8% 5.8% 4.0%
Members of a Visible Minority Group 11.1% 11.6% 12.6% 13.3% 14.0% 14.6% 13.0%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Population: Indeterminate population and term population of three months or more, excluding employees on Leave Without Pay, in the core public administration (CPA) and employees of separate agencies. Some small separate agencies were not included because of missing information.

Notes: Workforce availability estimates for the federal public service are based on the Census.

The source of the representation data is the CPA Employment Equity Data Bank, which is populated with self-identification information provided by employees, plus the data from separate agencies' reports to Parliament.

Hiring

Figure 4 shows that the level of new hires for indeterminate and term positions of three months or more remains above the current workforce availability of all employment equity designated groups except for persons with disabilities, which remains below this group's current workforce availability.

Figure 4: Appointments to the Public Service to Indeterminate and Specified Term Positions of Three Months or More by Employment Equity Designated Group, With Estimated Workforce Availability (WFA) Based on the Census
Appointments to the Public Service to Indeterminate and Specified Term Positions of Three Months or More by Employment Equity Designated Group, With Estimated Workforce Availability (WFA) Based on the 2006 Census. Text version below:
Figure 4 - Text version
Employment Equity Designated Group WFA ()
Women 52.9% 55.2% 52.3%
Aboriginal Peoples 4.9% 4.6% 3.0%
Persons with Disabilities 3.5% 3.3% 4.0%
Members of a Visible Minority Group 14.7% 16.0% 12.4%

Sources: The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (Secretariat) Employment Equity Data Bank (EEDB), Public Service Commission (PSC) hiring and staffing activities files and the Public Service Resourcing System.

Population: Indeterminate population and term population of three months or more in the public service.

Notes: In a PSC context, “the public service" refers to organizations under the Public Service Employment Act (PSEA) and is approximately equivalent to the core public administration.

For appointments to the public service, the percentages for Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of a visible minority group are based on the Secretariat’s EEDB and PSC hiring and staffing activities files covering the current fiscal year, where a match was found. This data captures all appointment processes—both advertised and non-advertised.

Due to changes in methodology, figures from fiscal year and beyond are not comparable with previous fiscal years.

The workforce availability for the public service was provided by the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. Workforce availability estimates are based on the Census and are for the core public administration only.

All appointment figures exclude specified term appointments of less than three months and appointments to separate agencies.

The figures for women appointed to the public service are extracted from PSC hiring and staffing activities files.

c) Language

As shown in Figure 5, the proportions of federal public servants identifying either English or French as their first official language (FOL) have remained relatively stable since . In , French was identified as the first official language by 28.9% of federal public servants, and English was identified by 71.1%.

Figure 5: First Official Language (FOL) Profile of the Federal Public Service (FPS) – Select Years, to
First Official Language (FOL) Profile of the Federal Public Service (FPS) – Select Years, 1983 to 2014. Text version below:
Figure 5 - Text version
 
English 72.7% 71.8% 71.1% 70.7% 70.5% 70.6% 71.1%
French 27.3% 28.2% 28.9% 29.3% 29.5% 29.4% 28.9%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Note: Figure 5 includes all employment tenures and active employees only (i.e. employees on Leave Without Pay are excluded). The information provided is based on March 31 data.

3. Age Profile of the Federal Public Service

Figure 6 compares the age distribution of federal public servants for and . Over this five-year period, the age distribution of federal public servants has changed slightly, with a minor shift toward older age groups. There has been a decline in the proportion of employees under 35, and an increase in those 50 and over. However, the 40–54 age group still accounts for almost 50% of the entire FPS workforce.

The average age of federal public servants has increased slightly from 43.9 years in to 44.9 years in .

Figure 6: Federal Public Service (FPS) Population by Age Band for and
Federal Public Service (FPS) Population by Age Band for 2009 and 2014. Text version below:
Figure 6 - Text version
Age Band
Under 20 0.3% 0.2%
20–24 4.2% 2.9%
25–29 8.8% 6.9%
30–34 11.1% 11.0%
35–39 11.8% 13.5%
40–44 13.6% 14.0%
45–49 16.8% 15.2%
50–54 16.9% 17.5%
55–59 11.1% 11.8%
60–64 4.2% 5.2%
65 and over 1.2% 1.9%
Total 100.0% 100.0%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Note: Figure 6 includes all employment tenures and active employees only (i.e. employees on Leave Without Pay are excluded). The information provided is based on data.

Figure 7 shows the distribution of federal public servants by age for selected years between and . The baby boomer generation (bars marked by forward slashes) can be seen moving through the age bands. The baby boomer generation used to comprise the highest proportion of the FPS population. However, the fact that the employees of this group now fall within the upper three age categories (45–54, 55–64, 65+) indicates that they are being replaced by employees of Generations X and Y.

Figure 7: Distribution of Federal Public Service (FPS) Employees by Age – Select Years, to
Distribution of Federal Public Service (FPS) Employees by Age – Select Years, 1983 to 2014. Text version below:
Figure 7 - Text version
Age Category Age

Table 7 Notes

Table 7 Note 1

indicates Baby Boomers generation - also distinguished by colour and font weight

Return to table 7 note 1 * referrer

Under 25 Under 17 351 12 31 2
17–18 916table 7 note 1 * 77 160 99
19–20 4,373table 7 note 1 * 1,209 1,165 1,311
21–22 8,610table 7 note 1 * 3,402 3,396 2,741
23–24 12,235table 7 note 1 * 5,686 5,302 3,796
25–34 25–26 14,779table 7 note 1 * 8,253 7,336 5,390
27–28 16,586table 7 note 1 * 10,915table 7 note 1 * 8,443 7,661
29–30 17,305table 7 note 1 * 13,131table 7 note 1 * 8,652 9,613
31–32 17,783table 7 note 1 * 14,968table 7 note 1 * 9,415 10,832
33–34 17,139table 7 note 1 * 16,491table 7 note 1 * 10,053 12,445
35–44 35–36 16,746table 7 note 1 * 17,928table 7 note 1 * 10,771 13,336
37–38 12,488table 7 note 1 * 19,039table 7 note 1 * 12,935table 7 note 1 * 14,233
39–40 11,669 19,530table 7 note 1 * 14,910table 7 note 1 * 14,096
41–42 10,552 19,453table 7 note 1 * 16,287table 7 note 1 * 14,210
43–44 9,478 18,428table 7 note 1 * 17,607table 7 note 1 * 14,803
45–54 45–46 9,188 18,071table 7 note 1 * 18,032table 7 note 1 * 14,674
47–48 9,113 13,036table 7 note 1 * 18,327table 7 note 1 * 15,672table 7 note 1 *
49–50 9,218 12,033 18,187table 7 note 1 * 17,685table 7 note 1 *
51–52 9,468 10,330 17,268table 7 note 1 * 17,964table 7 note 1 *
53–54 8,741 8,492 15,407table 7 note 1 * 18,111table 7 note 1 *
55–64 55–56 8,197 6,778 11,589table 7 note 1 * 14,314table 7 note 1 *
57–58 8,251 5,317 6,751table 7 note 1 * 11,280table 7 note 1 *
59–60 7,354 4,026 4,743 8,640table 7 note 1 *
61–62 5,992 2,665 2,694 5,619table 7 note 1 *
63–64 3,700 1,678 1,580 3,807table 7 note 1 *
65 and over 65–66 375 800 737 2,286table 7 note 1 *
67–68 119 390 406 1,218table 7 note 1 *
Over 69 156 428 553 1,300
Total 250,882 252,566 242,737 257,138

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Notes: Figure 7 includes all employment tenures and active employees only (i.e. employees on Leave Without Pay are excluded). The information provided is based on data.

Each vertical bar represents two years of age, except for the first and last bar. The first bar includes all individuals under 17 years of age, and the last bar includes all individuals over 68 years of age.

Traditionalists were born in or earlier. Baby boomers were born between and . Generation X was born between and . Generation Y was born between and . Generation Z was born in and later.

4. Federal Public Service Retirements

As shown in Figure 8, the retirement rate increased slightly between and (from 3.1% to 3.3%) followed by a gradual decrease to 2.9% in and an increase to 3.1% in . There were approximately 7,700 retirements in the FPS during .

As a result of Budget decisions, many employees who planned to retire during and , left the FPS by accepting one of the Workforce Adjustment or Career Transition (for executives) measures. This trend may have an impact on retirement rates, as shown in Figure 8.

The percentage of federal public servants eligible to retire as of , was 9.8%, up slightly from 9.7% in . Current retirees were recruited at a young age and had a long career in the FPS. In , 48.0% of retired employees had 30 or more pensionable years of service, compared with only 28.0% in .

Figure 8: Historical and Projected Retirement Rates for Federal Public Servants, to
Historical and Projected Retirement Rates for Federal Public Servants, 2009–10 to 2018–19. Text version below:
Figure 8 - Text version
  Fiscal Year Retirement Rates
Historical 3.1%
3.3%
3.2%
2.9%
3.1%
Estimate 3.2%
Projected 3.1%
3.3%
3.3%
3.4%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Population: Indeterminate federal public servants, including employees who retire while on Leave Without Pay.

Note: Projected retirement rates assume a stable population for the projected period. If the overall population increases or decreases in the future, the rate will be affected.

Retirement eligibility: Employees are eligible to retire once they have reached the appropriate combination of pensionable years of service and age.

5. Federal Public Service Years of Experience

Figure 9 shows the distribution of federal public servants by experience level. Between and , employees with 5–14 years of experience had the largest increase (45.3% to 48.7%), whereas employees with 0–4 years of experience had the largest decrease (17.2% to 13.2%).

For , the proportion of employees with 0–4 and 25+ years of experience is estimated to decrease to 12.1% and 16.1%, respectively, whereas the proportion of employees with 5–14 and 15–24 years of experience is estimated to increase to 49.4% and 22.4%, respectively.

Figure 9: Years of Experience Bands for Indeterminate Federal Public Servants from March to (Projected)
Years of Experience Bands for Indeterminate Federal Public Servants from March 1983 to March 2019 (Projected). Text version below:
Figure 9 - Text version
Population Distribution (%)
  Year 0–4 Years of Experience 5–14 Years of Experience 15–24 Years of Experience 25+ Years of Experience Total
Historical 30.3% 44.5% 16.6% 8.6% 100.0%
29.6% 45.3% 16.5% 8.6% 100.0%
29.5% 45.5% 16.6% 8.5% 100.0%
26.6% 47.7% 17.4% 8.3% 100.0%
20.9% 51.0% 19.6% 8.5% 100.0%
18.9% 50.8% 22.3% 8.0% 100.0%
18.9% 48.2% 25.2% 7.6% 100.0%
19.4% 45.2% 27.8% 7.6% 100.0%
19.0% 40.9% 29.7% 10.4% 100.0%
19.8% 39.0% 30.5% 10.6% 100.0%
20.2% 37.9% 30.7% 11.1% 100.0%
18.0% 38.8% 31.8% 11.5% 100.0%
15.2% 40.5% 32.6% 11.7% 100.0%
11.6% 41.8% 35.3% 11.3% 100.0%
9.2% 41.0% 37.6% 12.3% 100.0%
8.7% 39.9% 37.7% 13.8% 100.0%
10.3% 38.0% 36.2% 15.5% 100.0%
13.1% 35.3% 34.1% 17.5% 100.0%
16.8% 32.5% 31.9% 18.8% 100.0%
21.4% 30.1% 29.0% 19.5% 100.0%
23.8% 29.1% 27.4% 19.8% 100.0%
23.7% 29.2% 27.1% 20.0% 100.0%
21.5% 30.6% 27.8% 20.0% 100.0%
19.7% 32.1% 27.4% 20.7% 100.0%
18.0% 35.0% 26.0% 21.0% 100.0%
18.8% 36.0% 24.8% 20.4% 100.0%
22.1% 35.7% 23.1% 19.2% 100.0%
24.0% 36.3% 21.3% 18.4% 100.0%
23.7% 38.4% 20.3% 17.6% 100.0%
21.7% 41.2% 20.2% 17.0% 100.0%
17.2% 45.3% 21.0% 16.6% 100.0%
13.2% 48.7% 21.6% 16.4% 100.0%
Estimated for 12.1% 49.4% 22.4% 16.1% 100.0%
Projected 11.9% 47.9% 23.8% 16.5% 100.0%
12.6% 44.8% 26.4% 16.2% 100.0%
14.1% 41.4% 28.4% 16.0% 100.0%
15.6% 39.7% 29.4% 15.2% 100.0%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Note: The forecasted distribution is based on the decline in population for and a stable population for the remaining years. This population includes employees on Leave Without Pay.

6. A Knowledge-Intensive Workforce in the Core Public Administration

Since , employees undertaking more knowledge-intensive work comprise an ever-increasing share of the employee population in the core public administration (CPA). The cadre of knowledge workers is highly skilled, with significant expertise gained through a combination of education and experience, and these workers have strong abilities in strategic thinking and communications. The transformation in work has been in response to an increasingly demanding environment, new challenges, and technological advances over this period.

As shown in Figure 10, the five largest knowledge-intensive occupational groups in the CPA (Administrative Services, Program Administration, Computer Systems, Economics and Social Science Services, and Executive) increased or remained almost the same compared with the previous years. In , these occupational groups represented 43.1% of the CPA workforce, while they represented only 16.0% in .

Figure 10: Share of Key Occupations in the Core Public Administration (CPA) Population – Select Years, to
Share of Key Occupations in the Core Public Administration (CPA) Population – Select Years, 1983 to 2014. Text version below:
Figure 10 - Text version
Occupational Group
AS (Administrative Services) 4.5% 5.0% 7.1% 8.5% 11.7% 13.6% 15.1%
PM (Program Administration) 7.3% 7.1% 8.7% 10.1% 9.9% 11.5% 11.3%
CS (Computer Systems) 1.2% 1.6% 2.6% 4.4% 6.5% 6.6% 7.2%
EC (Economics and Social Science Services) 2.0% 2.2% 2.6% 3.9% 5.2% 6.2% 6.8%
EX (Executive Group) 0.9% 1.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.4% 2.6% 2.7%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Notes: The information provided is for the CPA only. Figure 10 includes all employment tenures and active employees only (i.e. employees on Leave Without Pay are excluded), based on effective employment classification (i.e. acting appointments included). The information provided is based on data.

To provide a true picture of the growth and share of occupations historically, the analysis excludes the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), all CRA's predecessors and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). The CRA was a part of the CPA until , after which it became a separate agency. The CBSA was created in as part of the CPA; a majority of its employees were transferred from the CRA.

The occupational groups are Administrative Services (AS); Program Administration (PM); Computer Systems (CS); Economics and Social Science Services (EC); and Executive (EX).

On , the Economics, Sociology and Statistics (ES) and the Social Science Support (SI) occupational groups were combined to form the Economics and Social Science Services (EC) occupational group. For consistency, all ES, SI and EC numbers have been combined each year to create the EC occupational group.

Part II – Demographic Profile of Executives

This section provides demographic information for the federal public service (FPS) executive cadre.

Typically, assistant deputy ministers (classified as EX 05 and EX 04) fulfill the senior leadership function (i.e. they provide strategic direction and oversight); while directors general, executive directors and directors (classified as EX 03 to EX 01) fulfill the executive function and are responsible for managing employees.

1. Population Size of the Executive Group

There were 6,397 executives in the FPS as of . More than one half (52.2%) of executives were EX 01s, and only 6.2% were EX 04s and EX 05s.

Between and , the FPS executive population grew by 75.1%; during the same period, the FPS grew by 2.5%. Compared with last year (), there was a 2.5% decrease in the number of FPS executives, while the FPS decreased overall by 2.2%. Executives accounted for only 2.5% of the entire FPS population in , up from 2.2% in .

2. Executive Diversity

a) Employment Equity Designated Groups Among Core Public Administration (CPA) Executives

Figure 11 illustrates the CPA executive representation levels for all four employment equity groups in and in .

Figure 11: Representation of Employment Equity (EE) Designated Groups Among Core Public Administration (CPA) Executives in and , With Estimated Workforce Availability (WFA) Based on the Census
Representation of Employment Equity (EE) Designated Groups Among Core Public Administration (CPA) Executives in 2003 and 2014, With Estimated Workforce Availability (WFA) Based on the 2006 Census. Text version below:
Figure 11 - Text version
Employment Equity Designated Group WFA ()
Women 34.9% 46.1% 44.7%
Aboriginal Peoples 2.9% 3.7% 4.4%
Persons with Disabilities 4.9% 5.4% 4.0%
Members of a Visible Minority Group 4.8% 8.5% 7.3%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Population: Indeterminate employees and terms of three months or more in the CPA (departments and agencies for which the Treasury Board is the employer), excluding employees on Leave Without Pay.

Notes: Workforce availability estimates are based on the Census.

The source of the representation data is the CPA Employment Equity Data Bank, which is populated with self-identification information provided by employees.

March representation and WFA numbers include EX, GX (General Executive) and LC (Law Management) classifications, whereas March representation excludes LCs; therefore, the two years cannot be directly compared.

As of , the CPA representation levels for all designated groups in the executive category, except for Aboriginal peoples, exceeded their respective workforce availability (WFA), as shown in Figure 11.

Compared with last year (), the representation levels of executives of all designated groups in the CPA increased or remained the same.

b) Language of Executives

Figure 12 shows that between and , a growing proportion of executives in the FPS identify French as their first official language (increasing from 20.4% to 30.3%). The current ratio in the executive cadre reflects the ratio in the overall FPS (71.1% identifying English versus 28.9% identifying French).

Figure 12: Proportion of Federal Public Service (FPS) Executives by First Official Language (FOL) – Select Years, to
Proportion of Federal Public Service (FPS) Executives by First Official Language (FOL) – Select Years, 1983 to 2014. Text version below:
Figure 12 - Text version
 
English 79.6% 79.3% 76.7% 75.1% 72.8% 70.2% 69.7%
French 20.4% 20.7% 23.3% 24.9% 27.2% 29.8% 30.3%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Population: Includes all federal public service executives, specifically, CPA executives and their equivalents in separate agencies (such as Executive Group (EX) and Management Group (MG) classifications) in all tenures (indeterminate, term and casual). It does not include executives on Leave Without Pay. The information provided is based on data.

3. Age of Executives in the Federal Public Service

The age distributions of FPS executives for and are shown in Figure 13. The proportion of executives under 50 years of age increased from 45.3% in to 46.2% in . In , the percentage was 45.8%. The proportion of FPS executives over 50 during this period decreased from 54.7% in to 53.8% in .

The average age of executives in the FPS increased slightly between and (from 50.3 years in to 50.4 years in ).

Figure 13: Federal Public Service (FPS) Executive Population Distribution by Age Band for and
Federal Public Service (FPS) Executive Population Distribution by Age Band for 2009 and 2014. Text version below:
Figure 13 - Text version
Year Age Band
25–29 30–34 35–39 40–44 45–49 50–54 55–59 60–64 65+ Total
0.0% 1.4% 7.2% 14.9% 21.7% 28.7% 19.5% 5.8% 0.9% 100.0%
0.0% 0.9% 6.3% 15.3% 23.7% 28.0% 18.9% 5.9% 1.0% 100.0%

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Population: Includes all federal public service executives, specifically, CPA executives and their equivalents in separate agencies (such as Executive Group (EX) and Management Group (MG) classifications) in all tenures (indeterminate, term and casual). It does not include executives on Leave Without Pay. The information provided is based on data.

Figure 14 shows that the average age for all executives in the FPS has increased; however, since , there has been relative stability in the average age of executives at both the EX 01 to EX 03 levels and the EX 04 to EX 05 levels.

Figure 14: Average Age of Federal Public Service (FPS) Executives and Assistant Deputy Ministers – Select Years, to
Average Age of Federal Public Service (FPS) Executives and Assistant Deputy Ministers – Select Years, 1983 to 2014. Text version below:
Figure 14 - Text version
 
EX 01 to EX 03 48.0 48.0 48.4 49.5 50.3 50.2 50.2
EX 04 and EX 05 50.6 49.8 50.9 52.0 53.6 53.4 53.8

Source: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Population: Includes all federal public service executives, specifically, CPA executives and their equivalents in separate agencies (such as Executive Group (EX) and Management Group (MG) classifications) in all tenures (indeterminate, term and casual). It does not include executives on Leave Without Pay. The information provided is based on data.

The average ages in for the various employee populations described in this document are summarized below:

  • Federal Public Service: 44.9 years
  • Executives (FPS): 50.4 years
  • EX 01 to EX 03 (FPS): 50.2 years
  • EX 04 to EX 05 (FPS): 53.8 years
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