Focus on Workplace Well-Being

The Focus series is a collection of reports that present the results of the 2017 Public Service Employee Annual Survey (PSEAS), broken down by theme. Focus on Workplace Well-Being looks at results in the area of workplace well-being and examines how they relate to results for other aspects of the workplace.

On this page

Background

According to the 2016 Federal Public Service Workplace Mental Health Strategy, “a healthy workplace is essential to the physical and psychological health of all public service employees, as it enables them to bring the best of their diverse talents, skills and energy as they deliver services to Canadians.”

Overall results

The 2017 PSEAS contained 6 questions about workplace well-being. Table 1 shows the results for these questions. All these questions were new, so comparison of the results over time is not possible.

Table 1: results for questions about workplace well-being

Question number

Question

Result

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

79%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

79%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

60%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

65%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “very high” and “high” responses)

34%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

33%

Key observations

The following observations do not necessarily indicate relationships of cause and effect, but they may provide a better understanding of the connections between different aspects of the workplace and employee well-being.

Aspects of workplace and psychological health of workplace

Respect

Perceptions of respect are linked to perceptions of a psychologically healthy workplace. 75% of employees who felt that their organization treats them with respect described their workplace as being psychologically healthy, compared with 11% for employees who did not feel their organization treats them with respect.

Awareness of mental health

Perceptions of organizations’ efforts to raise awareness of mental health in the workplace are closely related to perceptions of the psychological health of the workplace. In fact, 78% of employees who believed their organization does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace described their workplace as being psychologically healthy, compared with only 13% for employees who did not believe their organization does a good job of raising awareness.

Immediate supervisor

Employees who expressed positive opinions about their immediate supervisor tended to describe their workplace as being psychologically healthy.

72% of employees who agreed that their immediate supervisor seems to care about them as a person described their workplace as being psychologically healthy, compared with only 7% for employees who disagreed that their supervisor seems to care about them as a person.

In addition, 72% of employees who felt that their immediate supervisor creates an environment where they feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect their well-being at work described their workplace as psychologically healthy, compared with only 8% for those who did not believe their immediate supervisor creates such an environment.

Support for innovation

Employees who felt that they have support to be innovative were more likely to describe their workplace as being psychologically healthy.

For example, 76% of employees who felt that they are encouraged to be innovative or to take initiative in their work described their workplace as being psychologically healthy, compared with only 18% for employees who did not feel they are encouraged to be innovative or to take initiative.

In addition, 79% of employees who believed they would be supported if they proposed a new idea, even though it might not work, described their workplace as being psychologically healthy, compared with 21% for employees who did not believe they would be supported if they proposed a new idea.

Support for work-life balance

Employees’ perceptions of support for work-life balance were also linked to their perceptions of the psychological health of their workplace. 74% of employees who agreed that they have support at work to balance their work and personal life described their workplace as being psychologically healthy, compared with 17% for those who disagreed that they have support at work to achieve work-life balance.

Diversity

Support for diversity was also linked to perceptions of a psychologically healthy workplace. For example, 68% of employees who agreed that their organization implements activities and practices that support a diverse workplace described their workplace as being psychologically healthy, compared with 16% for employees who disagreed that their organization implements such activities and practices.

Harassment and discrimination

Employees who indicated that they had been the victim of harassment or discrimination on the job in the past 2 years were less likely to view their workplace as being psychologically healthy.

29% of employees who indicated that they had been the victim of harassment in the past 2 years described their workplace as being psychologically healthy, compared with 68% for employees who indicated that they had not been the victim of harassment.

Similarly, 25% of employees who indicated that they had been the victim of discrimination in the past 2 years described their workplace as being psychologically healthy, compared with 65% for employees who indicated that they had not been the victim of discrimination.

Stress and emotional exhaustion

Not surprisingly, the higher their level of work-related stress, the more likely employees were to report feeling emotionally drained at the end of their workday.

Specifically, 73% of employees who indicated that their work-related stress is “high” or “very high” also indicated that they “always/almost always” or “often” feel emotionally drained after their workday, compared with only 4% for employees who reported that their work-related stress is “low” or “very low.”

Workplace well-being and satisfaction with organization

Employees who had positive perceptions of well-being in their workplace tended to report higher levels of satisfaction with their organization.

For example, 87% of employees who described their workplace as being psychologically healthy were satisfied with their organization, compared with only 23% for employees who did not describe their workplace as psychologically healthy.

Similarly, 75% of employees who felt that their immediate supervisor creates an environment where they feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect their well-being at work were satisfied with their organization, compared with 21% of employees who did not feel their supervisor creates such an environment.

Demographic results

Employment equity group

Women

Women tended to express slightly more positive opinions than men on a number of aspects of workplace well-being. In particular, women were more likely than men to describe their workplace as being psychologically healthy and to believe that their organization does a good job of raising awareness about mental health in the workplace.

Interestingly, although women were slightly less likely than men to report having high levels of work-related stress, they were slightly more likely than men to feel emotionally drained after their workday.

Table 2 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being for women and for men.

Table 2: workplace well-being, women and men

Question number

Question

Women

Men

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

80%

79%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

80%

78%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

62%

58%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

68%

61%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “high” and “very” responses)

33%

35%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

34%

31%

Visible minorities

Overall, there were few differences in perceptions between visible minority employees and other employees in relation to workplace well-being. However, visible minority employees were slightly less likely than other employees to feel emotionally drained after their workday.

Table 3 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being for visible minority employees.

Table 3: workplace well-being, visible minority employees and other employees

Question number

Question

Visible minority employees

Other employees

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

78%

80%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

78%

79%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

62%

60%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

66%

65%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “very high” and “high” responses)

32%

34%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

30%

34%

Aboriginal employees

Overall, Aboriginal employees expressed less positive opinions than other employees about workplace well-being.

Table 4 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being for Aboriginal employees and other employees.

Table 4: workplace well-being, Aboriginal employees and other employees

Question number

Question

Aboriginal employees

Other employees

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

74%

80%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

74%

79%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

53%

60%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

61%

65%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “very high” and “high” responses)

38%

34%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

39%

33%

Employees with a disability

Employees with a disability tended to express less positive opinions about workplace well-being than other employees. For example, employees with a disability tended to report much higher levels of work-related stress and emotional exhaustion.

Table 5 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being for employees with a disability and other employees.

Table 5: workplace well-being, employees with a disability and other employees

Question number

Question

Employees with a disability

Other employees

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

70%

80%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

70%

80%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

45%

61%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

54%

66%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “very high” and “high” responses)

47%

33%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

49%

32%

Age

A pattern emerged in employees’ perceptions of workplace well-being by age. In general, younger employees, especially those aged 24 and under, had more positive perceptions of workplace well-being than older employees. For example, younger employees were less likely to say that they have high levels of stress and that they feel emotionally drained at the end of their workday.

Table 6 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being by age.

Table 6: workplace well-being by age

Question number

Question

Age groups

24 years and under

25 to 29 years

30 to 34 years

35 to 39 years

40 to 44 years

45 to 49 years

50 to 54 years

55 to 59 years

60 years and over

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

86%

83%

81%

80%

79%

78%

77%

78%

80%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

88%

85%

82%

80%

79%

78%

76%

76%

78%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

78%

67%

60%

59%

58%

58%

58%

59%

63%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

71%

66%

63%

64%

64%

66%

65%

65%

67%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “very high” and “high” responses)

13%

22%

29%

34%

37%

38%

38%

36%

30%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

16%

24%

30%

32%

35%

36%

37%

35%

29%

Figure 1 shows the results for the question about work related stress (Q12) by age.

Figure 1: Results for Q12 (Overall, my level of work-related stress is…high or very high) by age groups
Figure 1 illustrates the proportion of employees who responded high or very high to Q12 (Overall, my level of work-related stress is…) by age group. Text version below:
Figure 1 - Text version

Figure 1 illustrates the proportion of employees who responded "high" or "very high" to Q12 (Overall, my level of work-related stress is…) by age group.

24 years and under 25–29 years 30–34 years 35–39 years 40–44 years 45–49 years 50–54 years 55–59 years 60 years and over
13% 22% 29% 34% 37% 38% 38% 36% 30%

Years of service

For the most part, the pattern observed in employees’ perceptions of workplace well-being by years of service mirrors the pattern observed in their perceptions by age.

For example, employees with fewer than 3 years of service in the federal public service or in their current organization tended to respond more positively to questions about workplace well-being than employees with more years of service. Because years of service and age are closely related, this pattern was not surprising.

Table 7 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being by years of service.

Table 7: workplace well-being by years of service

Question number

Question

Years in federal public service

Years in current organization

Less than 3 years

3 to 10 years

11 to 20 years

More than 20 years

Less than 3 years

3 to 10 years

11 to 20 years

More than 20 years

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

87%

79%

77%

78%

85%

78%

77%

78%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

87%

79%

77%

77%

85%

78%

76%

76%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

77%

59%

56%

58%

73%

56%

54%

58%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

72%

63%

63%

66%

72%

62%

63%

66%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “very high” and “high” responses)

16%

32%

39%

40%

22%

36%

40%

40%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

17%

31%

38%

38%

22%

35%

38%

37%

Figure 2 shows the results for the question about work related stress (Q12) by years of service.

Figure 2: Results for Q12 (Overall, my level of work-related stress is…high or very high) by years of service
Figure 2 illustrates the proportion of employees who responded high or very high to Q12 (Overall, my level of work-related stress is…) by years of service. Text version below:
Figure 2 - Text version

Figure 2 illustrates the proportion of employees who responded "high" or "very high" to Q12 (Overall, my level of work-related stress is…) by years of service.

Years of Service Less than 3 year 3 to 10 years 11 to 20 years More than 20 years
In public service 16% 32% 39% 40%
In organization 22% 36% 40% 40%

Occupational category

Employees in the Executive category generally expressed the most positive opinions about aspects of workplace well-being, and employees in the Operational category generally expressed the least positive opinions. For example, employees in the Executive category were almost twice as likely as employees in the Operational category to describe their workplace as being psychologically healthy.

However, employees in the Executive category reported the highest levels of work-related stress. Employees in the Administrative Support category reported the lowest levels.

Employees in the Executive category and those in the Operational category were the most likely to feel emotionally drained after their workday. Employees in the Administrative support category were the least likely to indicate feeling this way.

Table 8 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being by occupational category. Please see Appendix 1 for a listing of occupational groups in each occupational category.

Table 8: workplace well-being by occupational category

Question number

Question

Executive

Scientific and Professional

Administration and Foreign Services

Technical

Administrative Support

Operational

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

84%

80%

82%

77%

80%

68%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

83%

80%

81%

76%

80%

65%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

74%

62%

62%

57%

65%

38%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

83%

66%

68%

55%

67%

48%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “very high” and “high” responses)

52%

35%

34%

32%

22%

40%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

41%

31%

34%

30%

26%

40%

Supervisory status

Supervisors tended to have more positive perceptions of workplace well-being than non-supervisors. For example, supervisors were more likely than non-supervisors to describe their workplace as being psychologically healthy. However, supervisors were more likely than non-supervisors to report having high levels of stress and to feel emotionally drained at the end of their workday.

Table 9 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being by supervisory status.

Table 9 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being by supervisory status.

Question number

Question

Supervisor

Non-supervisor

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

81%

79%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

80%

79%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

63%

59%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

70%

64%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “very high” and “high” responses)

47%

30%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

42%

30%

Community

The survey asked employees to indicate the community with which they most closely identify. Important differences emerged in the perceptions of employees who identified with different communities. For example, employees who identified with the security community tended to have the least positive opinions on all aspects of workplace well-being. Employees who identified with the data sciences, human resources and internal audit communities tended to have the most positive opinions.

Size of organization

Employees in smaller organizations tended to express more positive opinions about aspects of workplace well-being than employees in larger organizations. For example, employees in smaller organizations were more likely than those in larger organizations to describe their organization as being psychologically healthy.

Table 10 shows the results for the questions about workplace well-being by size of organization. Please see Appendix 2 for a listing of departments and agencies by size of organization.

Table 10: workplace well-being by size of organization

Question number

Question

Size of organizationtable 10 note *

Micro

Very small

Small

Medium

Large

Very large

Q8

My immediate supervisor creates an environment where I feel free to discuss with him or her matters that affect my well-being at work.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

83%

82%

82%

79%

81%

78%

Q9

My immediate supervisor seems to care about me as a person.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

83%

83%

81%

80%

80%

77%

Q10

I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

70%

67%

66%

62%

63%

57%

Q11

My department or agency does a good job of raising awareness of mental health in the workplace.
(Sum of “strongly agree” and “somewhat agree” responses)

69%

72%

66%

63%

65%

65%

Q12

Overall, my level of work-related stress is…
(Sum of “very high” and “high” responses)

26%

32%

34%

35%

31%

35%

Q13

After my workday, I feel emotionally drained.
(Sum of “always/almost always” and “often” responses)

23%

29%

29%

33%

30%

35%

Table 10 Notes

Table 10 Note 1

Micro
fewer than 150 employees

Very small
150 to 499 employees

Small
500 to 999 employees

Medium
1,000 to 4,999 employees

Large
5,000 to 9,999 employees

Very large
10,000 employees or more

Return to table 10 note * referrer

Figure 3 shows the results for the question about the psychological health of the workplace (Q10) by size of organization.

Figure 3: Results for Q10 (I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy) by size of organization
Figure 3 illustrates the proportion of employees who responded affirmatively to Q10 (I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy) by size of organization. Text version below:
Figure 3 - Text version

Figure 3 illustrates the proportion of employees who responded affirmatively to Q10 (I would describe my workplace as being psychologically healthy) by size of organization.

Micro (fewer than 150 employees) Very Small (150 to 499 employees) Small (500 to 999 employees) Medium (1,000 to 4,999 employees) Large (5,000 to 9,999 employees) Very Large (10,000 employees or more)
70% 67% 66% 62% 63% 57%

Methodological notes

Throughout this report, the totals used to calculate the percentages are based on the following and do not include the responses “Don’t know” and “Not applicable”:

  • the sum of “Strongly agree” and “Somewhat agree” responses
  • the sum of “Always / Almost always” and “Often” responses
  • the sum of “Very high” and “High” responses

For additional results, consult the Public service employee surveys website.

Appendix 1: Occupational categories

Occupational category

Occupational group

Executive

CIEXC, DE (NFB), DM, EC (CRA), EX, EXPCX, GR-EX, MGT (CNSC), MGT (NRC), REX, RLE

Scientific and Professional

AC, AG, AR, AU, BI, CH, CISPC, DE, DS, EC, ED, EN, ES, FO, HR, LC, LIB, LP, LS, MA, MD, MT, ND, NU, OP, PC, PH, PM-MCO, PS, RCO, RO (NRC), SE, SG, SI, SP (NFB), SW, UT, VM

Administration and Foreign Services

AD (NFB), AS, CO, CS, FI, FS, HR/RH (CRA), IS, OM, PE, PG, PM, SP (CRA), TR, WP

Technical

AI, AO, CIPTC, DD, EG, EL, EU, GT, PI, PY, RO, SO, TC, TI, TO

Administrative Support

AD (NRC), AS (NFB), CIASC, CM, CR, DA, OE, ST

Operational

CX, FB, FR, GL, GS, HP, HS, LI, OP (NFB), OP (NRC), PO-IMA, PO-TCO, PR, SC, SR

Other

AB, CIPTC, Governor in Council Appointees, GR, IM, MG, Other, RE, REG, Students

Appendix 2: Organizations by size

Micro (fewer than 150 employees)
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP
Copyright Board Canada
The Correctional Investigator Canada
Farm Products Council of Canada
Financial Consumer Agency of Canada
Indian Oil and Gas Canada
International Joint Commission
Military Grievances External Review Committee
Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada
Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada
Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada
Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada
Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board
Polar Knowledge Canada
RCMP External Review Committee
Status of Women Canada
Veterans Review and Appeal Board

Very small (150 to 499 employees)
Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
Canadian Grain Commission
Canadian Human Rights Commission
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
Canadian Transportation Agency
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
Infrastructure Canada
National Film Board
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
Office of the Secretary to the Governor General
Parole Board of Canada
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
Transportation Safety Board of Canada

Small (500 to 999 employees)
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Canada School of Public Service
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
Canadian Space Agency
Courts Administration Service
Department of Finance Canada
Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Library and Archives Canada
Privy Council Office
Public Prosecution Service of Canada
Public Service Commission of Canada

Medium (1,000 to 4,999 employees)
Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
National Research Council Canada
Natural Resources Canada
Parks Canada
Public Health Agency of Canada
Public Safety Canada
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Veterans Affairs Canada

Large (5,000 to 9,999 employees)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Department of Justice Canada
Environment and Climate Change Canada
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Health Canada
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Shared Services Canada
Statistics Canada
Transport Canada

Very large (10,000 employees or more)
Canada Border Services Agency
Canada Revenue Agency
Correctional Service Canada
Department of National Defence
Employment and Social Development Canada
Public Services and Procurement Canada

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the President of the Treasury Board, 2017,
ISBN: 978-0-660-24227-9

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