Employment Equity in the Public Service of Canada 2014-15

ISSN: 1926-2485
Catalogue No. BT1-28E-PDF

Table of Contents

President’s Message

The Honourable Scott Brison

The Honourable Scott Brison
President of the Treasury Board

As the President of the Treasury Board of Canada, I am pleased to present the 23rd Annual Report to Parliament on Employment Equity in the Public Service of Canada.

I firmly believe that our country is stronger, and our government more effective, when the people who make decisions reflect the diversity of Canada’s population. This report, Employment Equity in the Public Service of Canada 2014–15: Annual Report to Parliament, shows the progress made by the federal public service in achieving that goal.

The four groups designated under the Employment Equity Act—women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and members of a visible minority group—have increased in representation in the federal public service since the Act came into force in 1996. In fact, over the last three years, the representation of all four groups has continued to surpass their workforce availability, except for the executive levels where more representation is needed. We recognize the value of diversity, and the interest of all Canadians in being reflected in our public service, to ensure they play a significant role in shaping our country’s future.

Our gender-equal and diverse Cabinet, appointed last year, clearly demonstrates our commitment. The progress made provides a foundation to build a truly inclusive public service that reflects the diversity of the population we serve.

I invite parliamentarians and all Canadians to read this report with optimism.

Original signed by

The Honourable Scott Brison
President of the Treasury Board

Introduction

The Employment Equity Act requires the President of the Treasury Board to submit a report to Parliament on the state of employment equity in the core public administration for each fiscal year. This report outlines results and progress with respect to the representation of employment equity designated groups for fiscal year 2014–15.

The Government of Canada remains committed to a diverse public service that reflects today’s society. The Clerk of the Privy Council, in the Twenty-Second Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada, stated that “a strong, merit-based, non-partisan and representative Public Service that reflects the diversity of Canadian society is essential to this country’s success.”

As at , all four employment equity designated groups continue to exceed their workforce availability for a third year in a row, as determined from the recently released 2011 Census data and 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability:

  • Representation of women increased slightly from 54.1 per cent to 54.3 per cent, surpassing their workforce availability of 52.5 per cent;
  • Representation of members of a visible minority group increased from 13.2 per cent to 13.8 per cent, surpassing their workforce availability of 13.0 per cent;
  • Representation of Aboriginal peoples continued to maintain their level at 5.1 per cent, surpassing their workforce availability of 3.4 per cent; and
  • Representation of persons with disabilities decreased marginally from 5.7 per cent to 5.6 per cent, continuing to surpass their workforce availability of 4.4 per cent.Footnote 1

Within the Executive Group, representation rates did not meet workforce availability for three of the four designated groups:

  • Women increased their representation from 46.1 per cent to 46.4 per cent, below their workforce availability of 47.8 per cent;
  • Members of a visible minority group increased their representation from 8.5 per cent to 8.8 per cent, below their workforce availability of 9.5 per cent;
  • Representation of Aboriginal peoples decreased from 3.7 per cent to 3.4 per cent, below their workforce availability of 5.2 per cent; and
  • Representation of persons with disabilities decreased marginally from 5.4 per cent to 5.3 per cent, which continued to surpass their workforce availability of 2.3 per cent.Footnote 2
  • Appendix A provides statistical tables. Technical notes in Appendix B provide an explanation of the core public administration workforceFootnote 3 information on the data for persons in the designated groups, along with definitions of terms used in this report.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Activities

Collaboration and Outreach

The Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat works closely with the Public Service Commission of Canada on employment equity issues and continues to collaborate on their common methodology for data collection and reporting.

The Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer has developed tools for people who are interested in working for the Government of Canada, such as guidance material available in braille, on what their rights are regarding the duty to accommodate and their right to non-discrimination. Such tools are part of a follow-up to the pilot outreach workshop launched in 2013–14 with Public Service Commission and Employment and Social Development Canada at Carleton University in Ottawa.

The Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer continues to provide support to various forums and other groups such as the Interdepartmental Network on Employment Equity, the National Staffing Council and the Human Resources Council on various employment equity and diversity issues. The following summarizes other activities undertaken by the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, key stakeholders and bargaining agents in working toward employment equity goals in the federal public service.

Employment Equity Champions and Chairs Committees and Circle

The three Employment Equity Champions and the Visible Minorities Champions and Chairs Committee, the Persons with Disabilities Champions and Chairs Committee, and the Champions and Chairs Circle for Aboriginal Peoples have explored a wide range of issues, contributed to Blueprint 2020, helped shape key government initiatives, and shared and promoted best practices and tools on issues such as recruitment and leadership development. As consultative bodies, they have identified emerging issues for further examination, such as the use of technology to increase accessibility, and have ensured that initiatives reflect the needs and perspectives of their communities.

In 2013-14, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer consulted members of the three employment equity committees on the questions for the 2014 Public Service Employee Survey. Committee and Circle members provided input on the survey’s questions on harassment and discrimination.

Each Employment Equity Deputy Minister Champion reported to the Clerk on the current priorities, progress and challenges of their respective committee.

The use of electronic platforms such as GCpedia and GCconnex continued to be promoted at the meetings as useful mechanisms for consultation and for sharing information and best practices among the departments participating on the three committees.

Joint Employment Equity Committee

The Joint Employment Equity Committee, a National Joint Council committee, provides a forum for the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, the Public Service Commission, departments and bargaining agents to consult and collaborate on developing, implementing and reviewing public service–wide policies and practices that affect employment equity designated groups.

During 2014–15, the Joint Employment Equity Committee focused on the need to redefine its purpose. With the success of the three Employment Equity Champions and Chairs Committees, work underway at the Interdepartmental Network on Employment Equity, and the ongoing efforts at departments and agencies, the Joint Employment Equity Committee has decided to reflect on how it can better respond to the changing focus of employment equity in the government today, while respecting the principles of the Employment Equity Act. The Joint Employment Equity Committee will develop a strategic forward outlook to be presented to the National Joint Council’s Executive Committee.

Conclusion

Overall employment equity goals for the public service of Canada have been met for a third year in a row. The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, through the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, will continue to collaborate with key stakeholders and provide support and guidance to departments on matters related to employment equity.

Appendix A: Statistical Tables

Table 1

Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group According to Department or Agency
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as of )

Department or Agency All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Table 1 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“All Employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 1 Note 1

Civilian staff only (data for members of the Canadian Armed Forces are not included because Treasury Board is not the employer).

Return to table 1 note § referrer

Table 1 Note 2

Fisheries and Oceans Canada data include data for the Canadian Coast Guard.

Return to table 1 notereferrer

Table 1 Note 3

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada data include data for the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration.

Return to table 1 notereferrer

Table 1 Note 4

Information for small numbers is suppressed.

Return to table 1 note * referrer

National Defencetable 1 note § 21,507 8,485 39.5 705 3.3 1,427 6.6 1,652 7.7
Employment and Social Development Canada 20,037 13,926 69.5 923 4.6 1,296 6.5 3,746 18.7
Correctional Service Canada 17,416 8,256 47.4 1,727 9.9 947 5.4 1,658 9.5
Canada Border Services Agency 13,426 6,534 48.7 491 3.7 601 4.5 2,057 15.3
Public Works and Government Services Canada 11,313 6,619 58.5 362 3.2 679 6.0 1,419 12.5
Fisheries and Oceans Canadatable 1 note 8,938 3,211 35.9 416 4.7 477 5.3 521 5.8
Health Canada 8,660 5,744 66.3 722 8.3 528 6.1 1,826 21.1
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (Civilian Staff) 6,181 4,850 78.5 373 6.0 297 4.8 759 12.3
Environment Canada 5,971 2,885 48.3 172 2.9 257 4.3 840 14.1
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada 5,511 3,021 54.8 133 2.4 183 3.3 792 14.4
Citizenship and Immigration Canada 5,169 3,431 66.4 186 3.6 268 5.2 1,266 24.5
Shared Services Canada 5,032 1,604 31.9 169 3.4 327 6.5 721 14.3
Transport Canada 4,837 2,177 45.0 167 3.5 224 4.6 699 14.5
Statistics Canada 4,570 2,316 50.7 105 2.3 287 6.3 939 20.5
Industry Canada 4,535 2,295 50.6 139 3.1 218 4.8 758 16.7
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canadatable 1 note 4,381 2,147 49.0 138 3.1 185 4.2 551 12.6
Justice Canada 4,307 2,926 67.9 159 3.7 269 6.2 724 16.8
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada 4,159 2,694 64.8 1,221 29.4 245 5.9 497 11.9
Natural Resources Canada 3,676 1,633 44.4 99 2.7 174 4.7 465 12.6
Veterans Affairs Canada 2,864 2,093 73.1 92 3.2 216 7.5 362 12.6
Public Health Agency of Canada 1,991 1,360 68.3 66 3.3 131 6.6 382 19.2
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat 1,634 1,021 62.5 55 3.4 114 7.0 274 16.8
Canadian Heritage 1,581 1,063 67.2 64 4.0 79 5.0 186 11.8
Public Prosecution Service of Canada 945 633 67.0 55 5.8 60 6.3 119 12.6
Library and Archives Canada 900 544 60.4 67 7.4 58 6.4 79 8.8
Public Safety Canada 860 512 59.5 43 5.0 55 6.4 99 11.5
Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada 773 493 63.8 30 3.9 51 6.6 235 30.4
Department of Finance Canada 713 335 47.0 16 2.2 25 3.5 113 15.8
Public Service Commission of Canada 690 449 65.1 28 4.1 58 8.4 100 14.5
Privy Council Office 656 360 54.9 29 4.4 35 5.3 85 13.0
Canada School of Public Service 572 383 67.0 22 3.8 31 5.4 81 14.2
Office of the Chief Electoral Officer 568 290 51.1 20 3.5 40 7.0 80 14.1
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency 568 368 64.8 17 3.0 31 5.5 25 4.4
Canadian Space Agency 557 234 42.0 9 1.6 28 5.0 78 14.0
Courts Administration Service 553 356 64.4 17 3.1 32 5.8 93 16.8
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission 423 231 54.6 12 2.8 23 5.4 53 12.5
Parole Board of Canada 394 314 79.7 21 5.3 25 6.3 42 10.7
Canadian Grain Commission 384 167 43.5 23 6.0 23 6.0 68 17.7
Infrastructure Canada 318 186 58.5 10 3.1 14 4.4 47 14.8
Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada 287 196 68.3 6 2.1 10 3.5 17 5.9
Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions 274 160 58.4 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * 33 12.0
Western Economic Diversification Canada 271 170 62.7 21 7.7 16 5.9 52 19.2
Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada 251 147 58.6 13 5.2 11 4.4 26 10.4
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency 204 142 69.6 13 6.4 10 4.9 20 9.8
Canadian Transportation Agency 203 123 60.6 table 1 note * table 1 note * 13 6.4 29 14.3
Transportation Safety Board of Canada 203 63 31.0 table 1 note * table 1 note * 7 3.4 16 7.9
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario 190 123 64.7 table 1 note * table 1 note * 17 8.9 46 24.2
Canadian Human Rights Commission 183 123 67.2 11 6.0 27 14.8 26 14.2
Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada 182 105 57.7 8 4.4 14 7.7 8 4.4
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages 159 110 69.2 table 1 note * table 1 note * 10 6.3 14 8.8
Office of the Secretary to the Governor General 140 82 58.6 table 1 note * table 1 note * 11 7.9 16 11.4
Status of Women Canada 86 75 87.2 table 1 note * table 1 note * 8 9.3 11 12.8
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency 67 41 61.2 18 26.9 table 1 note * table 1 note * 8 11.9
Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP 56 36 64.3 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * 8 14.3
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board Canada 53 31 58.5 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * 8 15.1
Canadian Dairy Commission 53 34 64.2 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * 7 13.2
Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada 49 33 67.3 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Military Grievances External Review Committee 38 24 63.2 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
International Joint Commission 28 12 42.9 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada 25 10 40.0 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada 25 19 76.0 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat 21 9 42.9 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada 19 14 73.7 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Farm Products Council of Canada 18 11 61.1 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Copyright Board Canada 16 9 56.3 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
RCMP External Review Committee 5 2 40.0 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission 5 1 20.0 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Total 180,681 98,051 54.3 9,232 5.1 10,204 5.6 24,849 13.8

Table 2

Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group and Region of Work
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as at )

Region of Work All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Table 2 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“All Employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 2 Note 1

NCR: National Capital Region.

Return to table 2 notereferrer

Table 2 Note 2

NCR includes NCR (Quebec) and NCR (Ontario).

Return to table 2 notereferrer

Newfoundland and Labrador 2,771 1,176 42.4 184 6.6 148 5.3 55 2.0
Prince Edward Island 1,521 959 63.1 42 2.8 106 7.0 36 2.4
Nova Scotia 8,181 3,568 43.6 415 5.1 596 7.3 491 6.0
New Brunswick 6,664 3,778 56.7 237 3.6 356 5.3 168 2.5
Quebec (without the NCR)table 2 note 20,068 10,468 52.2 423 2.1 656 3.3 2,099 10.5
NCR (Quebec)table 2 note 25,285 14,607 57.8 1,293 5.1 1,379 5.5 3,392 13.4
NCR (Ontario)table 2 note 54,564 30,325 55.6 1,763 3.2 3,192 5.9 8,601 15.8
NCRtable 2 note (Total) 79,849 44,932 56.3 3,056 3.8 4,571 5.7 11,993 15.0
Ontario (without the NCR)table 2 note 23,337 12,822 54.9 1,218 5.2 1,550 6.6 4,294 18.4
Manitoba 6,472 3,664 56.6 959 14.8 407 6.3 633 9.8
Saskatchewan 4,499 2,599 57.8 752 16.7 249 5.5 316 7.0
Alberta 9,135 5,147 56.3 767 8.4 601 6.6 1,157 12.7
British Columbia 15,856 7,747 48.9 954 6.0 859 5.4 3,339 21.1
Yukon 286 175 61.2 49 17.1 22 7.7 13 4.5
Northwest Territories 378 229 60.6 72 19.0 25 6.6 22 5.8
Nunavut 231 127 55.0 78 33.8 14 6.1 18 7.8
Outside Canada 1,433 660 46.1 26 1.8 44 3.1 215 15.0
Total 180,681 98,051 54.3 9,232 5.1 10,204 5.6 24,849 13.8

Table 3

Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group According to Occupational Group
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as at )

Occupational Group All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Table 3 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“All Employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 3 Note 1

LCs have been included in the Executive Group since 2011–12.

Return to table 3 notereferrer

Table 3 Note 2

Information for small numbers is suppressed.

Return to table 3 note * referrer

Executives 5,228 2,426 46.4 179 3.4 279 5.3 461 8.8
EX (Executive) 4,928 2,252 45.7 171 3.5 256 5.2 444 9.0
LC (Law Management)table 3 note 300 174 58.0 8 2.7 23 7.7 17 5.7
Scientific and Professional 31,974 16,635 52.0 1,030 3.2 1,417 4.4 5,670 17.7
Administrative and Foreign Service 82,802 52,182 63.0 4,405 5.3 5,142 6.2 12,189 14.7
Technical 12,569 3,201 25.5 548 4.4 568 4.5 1,020 8.1
Administrative Support 19,144 15,060 78.7 1,299 6.8 1,480 7.7 2,914 15.2
Operational 28,889 8,502 29.4 1,767 6.1 1,312 4.5 2,583 8.9
Undetermined 75 45 60.0 table 3 note * table 3 note * 6 8.0 12 16.0
Total 180,681 98,051 54.3 9,232 5.1 10,204 5.6 24,849 13.8

Table 4

Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group and Salary Range
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as at )

Salary Range
($)
All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number % of All Employees Number % of Salary Range % of EEtable 4 note Group Number % of Salary Range % of EEtable 4 note Group Number % of Salary Range % of EEtable 4 note Group Number % of Salary Range % of EEtable 4 note Group

Table 4 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“All Employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 4 Note 1

EE: Employment equity

Return to table 4 notereferrer

Table 4 Note 2

Information for small numbers is suppressed.

Return to table 4 note * referrer

Under 5,000 48 0.0 10 20.8 0.0 table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note *
5,000 to 9,999 115 0.1 35 30.4 0.0 table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * 7 6.1 0.1 table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note *
10,000 to 14,999 62 0.0 44 71.0 0.0 table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * 6 9.7 0.0
15,000 to 19,999 155 0.1 111 71.6 0.1 6 3.9 0.1 10 6.5 0.1 19 12.3 0.1
20,000 to 24,999 251 0.1 195 77.7 0.2 19 7.6 0.2 14 5.6 0.1 38 15.1 0.2
25,000 to 29,999 370 0.2 292 78.9 0.3 24 6.5 0.3 28 7.6 0.3 62 16.8 0.2
30,000 to 34,999 378 0.2 325 86.0 0.3 12 3.2 0.1 17 4.5 0.2 59 15.6 0.2
35,000 to 39,999 1,676 0.9 1,286 76.7 1.3 90 5.4 1.0 89 5.3 0.9 164 9.8 0.7
40,000 to 44,999 3,804 2.1 2,669 70.2 2.7 238 6.3 2.6 311 8.2 3.0 578 15.2 2.3
45,000 to 49,999 14,764 8.2 10,368 70.2 10.6 961 6.5 10.4 1,077 7.3 10.6 2,048 13.9 8.2
50,000 to 54,999 19,778 10.9 13,573 68.6 13.8 1,183 6.0 12.8 1,230 6.2 12.1 2,948 14.9 11.9
55,000 to 59,999 16,888 9.3 10,981 65.0 11.2 898 5.3 9.7 946 5.6 9.3 2,367 14.0 9.5
60,000 to 64,999 14,209 7.9 8,257 58.1 8.4 742 5.2 8.0 814 5.7 8.0 1,771 12.5 7.1
65,000 to 69,999 13,903 7.7 7,288 52.4 7.4 774 5.6 8.4 822 5.9 8.1 1,827 13.1 7.4
70,000 to 74,999 18,067 10.0 6,828 37.8 7.0 1,236 6.8 13.4 751 4.2 7.4 2,223 12.3 8.9
75,000 to 79,999 9,845 5.4 5,214 53.0 5.3 412 4.2 4.5 481 4.9 4.7 1,443 14.7 5.8
80,000 to 84,999 17,598 9.7 8,348 47.4 8.5 993 5.6 10.8 1,090 6.2 10.7 2,282 13.0 9.2
85,000 to 89,999 7,357 4.1 3,911 53.2 4.0 329 4.5 3.6 371 5.0 3.6 1,304 17.7 5.2
90,000 to 94,999 7,782 4.3 3,804 48.9 3.9 251 3.2 2.7 373 4.8 3.7 1,053 13.5 4.2
95,000 to 99,999 8,235 4.6 3,374 41.0 3.4 245 3.0 2.7 426 5.2 4.2 1,378 16.7 5.5
100,000 and over 25,396 14.1 11,138 43.9 11.4 815 3.2 8.8 1,341 5.3 13.1 3,269 12.9 13.2
Total 180,681 100.0 98,051 54.3 100.0 9,232 5.1 100.0 10,204 5.6 100.0 24,849 13.8 100.0

Table 5

Hirings Into and Promotions Within the Public Service of Canada by Designated Group, and Separations From the Public Service of Canada by Designated Group
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (, to )

Action Type All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“All Employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

“Hirings” refers to the number of staffing actions that added employees to the public service of Canada payroll between and .

Data on promotions are obtained from the Public Service Commission of Canada and include information from departments and agencies that fall under both the Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV, and the Public Service Employment Act.

“Separations” refers to employees who left the public service of Canada payroll between , and .

Percentages are that designated group’s share of all actions of the given type.

See the definitions of “hirings,” “promotions” and “separations” in Appendix B.

Hirings 10,018 5,669 56.6 385 3.8 347 3.5 1,610 16.1
Promotions 10,920 6,239 57.1 442 4.0 450 4.1 1,558 14.3
Separations 12,974 7,202 55.5 668 5.1 1,025 7.9 1,289 9.9

Table 6

Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group and Age Range
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as at )

Age Range All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number % of All Employees Number % of Age Range % of EEtable 6 note Group Number % of Age Range % of EEtable 6 note Group Number % of Age Range % of EEtable 6 note Group Number % of Age Range % of EEtable 6 note Group

Table 6 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“All Employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 6 Note 1

EE: Employment equity

Return to table 6 notereferrer

Table 6 Note 2

Information for small numbers is suppressed.

Return to table 6 note * referrer

Under 20 36 0.0 13 36.1 0.0 table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note *
20 to 24 1,822 1.0 1,029 56.5 1.0 82 4.5 0.9 25 1.4 0.2 306 16.8 1.2
25 to 29 10,422 5.8 5,911 56.7 6.0 454 4.4 4.9 207 2.0 2.0 1,896 18.2 7.6
30 to 34 20,252 11.2 11,136 55.0 11.4 935 4.6 10.1 589 2.9 5.8 3,370 16.6 13.6
35 to 39 26,510 14.7 14,919 56.3 15.2 1,295 4.9 14.0 971 3.7 9.5 4,385 16.5 17.6
40 to 44 27,384 15.2 15,357 56.1 15.7 1,596 5.8 17.3 1,312 4.8 12.9 4,140 15.1 16.7
45 to 49 27,953 15.5 15,431 55.2 15.7 1,714 6.1 18.6 1,685 6.0 16.5 3,863 13.8 15.5
50 to 54 32,372 17.9 17,464 53.9 17.8 1,644 5.1 17.8 2,386 7.4 23.4 3,261 10.1 13.1
55 to 59 21,918 12.1 11,236 51.3 11.5 975 4.4 10.6 1,865 8.5 18.3 2,138 9.8 8.6
60 to 64 9,077 5.0 4,348 47.9 4.4 422 4.6 4.6 878 9.7 8.6 987 10.9 4.0
65 to 69 2,445 1.4 1,034 42.3 1.1 102 4.2 1.1 245 10.0 2.4 402 16.4 1.6
70 and over 490 0.3 173 35.3 0.2 table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note *
Total 180,681 100.0 98,051 54.3 100.0 9,232 5.1 100.0 10,204 5.6 100.0 24,849 13.8 100.0

Appendix B: Technical Notes

Core public administration

The Employment Equity Act requires that this report cover the portions of the public service of Canada set out in Schedules I and IV of the Financial Administration Act. Sixty-sevenFootnote 4 departments, agencies and commissions comprise the core public administration, for which the Treasury Board is the employer (see Table 1). The statistics in this report include only employees working for these organizations, which numbered 180,681 on .

This report includes information on indeterminate employees, term employees of three months or more and seasonal employees, with the exception of seasonal employees who are on leave without pay at the end of March for each fiscal year. No information is reported on students or casual workers, except in cases where they were subsequently hired as indeterminate employees, for terms of three months or more, or as seasonal employees before the end of the fiscal year. Employees on leave without pay, such as those on care and nurturing leave and educational leave, are not included in these tables.

Statistics in this document also exclude Governor in Council appointees, ministerial staff, federal judges and deputy ministers, who are also on the public service payroll. As required under the Employment Equity Act, annual reports to Parliament present information for the fiscal year beginning April 1 and ending March 31.

The statistics of separate employers, covered under Schedule V of the Financial Administration Act, are not included in this report. Under the Employment Equity Act, separate employers that have more than 100 employees (e.g., the Canada Revenue Agency and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency) are required to provide their reports to the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat only for the purposes of tabling in Parliament at the same time as this report. To view the employment equity reports of such organizations, readers should visit their websites or contact them directly.

Reports on employment equity in the Canadian Armed Forces and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police are prepared by those organizations and are also tabled in Parliament at the same time as those of separate employers.

Data on persons in designated groups

To ensure the consistency of data presented in this report, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer uses information on all employees for whom the Treasury Board is the employer, in accordance with Schedules I and IV of the Financial Administration Act. Since 2011–12, the executive category includes data on the LC Group (Law Management Occupational Group) in its total workforce, which must be taken into consideration when comparing data historically.

All tabulations, other than those for women, contain data obtained through self-identification. This data is provided voluntarily by employees and maintained separately and confidentially in the Employment Equity Data Bank by the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer and, where applicable, through the self-declaration of individuals applying to the public service through the Public Service Commission of Canada’s Public Service Resourcing System. A reconciliation process is carried out each year by the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, the Public Service Commission and the departments of the core public administration to ensure that information derived from the Public Service Resourcing System, the Employment Equity Data Bank, and incumbent files harmonizes with the information from departmental sources.

The completeness and accuracy of employment equity data for the core public administration depend on the willingness of employees to self-identify and on departments providing opportunities for them to do so. Employees, including those engaged as students or casual workers, are given an opportunity to provide this information when they are hired and during departmental self-identification surveys or other campaigns. They may also complete a self-identification form, available from their departmental employment equity coordinator, at any time.

Definitions

Aboriginal peoples:
Persons who are Indians, Inuit or Métis.
casual workers:
People hired for a specified period of no more than 90 days by any one department or agency during the calendar year. Casual workers are not included in the representation figures.
designated groups:
Women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and members of a visible minority group.
hirings:
The number of staffing actions that added to the employee population in the past fiscal year. This includes indeterminate and seasonal employees; those with terms of three months or more; and students and casual workers whose employment status has changed to indeterminate, terms of three months or more, or seasonal. Hirings measure the flow of employees into the public service and may include more than one staffing action per person per year.
indeterminate employees:
People appointed to the public service for an unspecified duration.
members of a visible minority group:
Persons other than Aboriginal peoples who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.
persons with disabilities:

Persons who have a long-term or recurring physical, mental, sensory, psychiatric or learning impairment and who:

  • Consider themselves to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment; or
  • Believe that an employer or potential employer is likely to consider them to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment.

Included are persons whose functional limitations owing to their impairment have been accommodated in their current job or workplace.

promotions:
The number of appointments to positions at higher maximum pay levels in the past fiscal year, either within the same occupational group or subgroup or in another group or subgroup.
seasonal employees:
People hired to work cyclically for a season or portion of each year.
self-declaration:
Voluntary information provided by applicants in appointment processes for statistical purposes related to appointments and, in the case of processes that target employment equity groups, to determine eligibility.
self-identification:
A collection of employment equity information, voluntarily provided by employees, for statistical purposes in analyzing and monitoring the progress of employment equity groups in the federal public service and for reporting workforce representation.
separations:
The number of employees (i.e., indeterminate, terms of three months or more, and seasonal) removed from the public service payroll, which may include more than one action per person per year. Separations include employees who retired or resigned, or employees whose specified employment period (term) ended.
tenure:
The period of time for which a person is employed.
women:
An employment equity designated group under the Employment Equity Act.
workforce availability:
For the core public administration, refers to the estimated availability of people in designated groups as a percentage of the workforce population. For the core public administration, workforce availability is based on the population of Canadian citizens who are active in the workforce and who work in those occupations that correspond to the occupations in the core public administration. Availability is estimated from 2011 Census data, and estimates for persons with disabilities are derived from data, also collected by Statistics Canada, in the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability.
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