Employment Equity in the Public Service of Canada 2015–2016

ISSN: 1926-2485
Catalogue No. BT1-28E-PDF

Table of contents

Message from the President of the Treasury Board

The Honourable Scott Brison

The Honourable Scott Brison
President of the Treasury Board

As the President of the Treasury Board of Canada, I am pleased to present the Treasury Board Secretariat’s 24th Annual Report to Parliament on Employment Equity in the Public Service of Canada.

This issue remains a Government priority as we mark the 30th anniversary of the first Employment Equity Act.  We must have a diverse public service that is representative of the population it serves, so that all Canadians can see themselves in their government.

This report describes the ongoing progress made by federal departments and agencies in achieving this goal. It shows, for example, that overall, the designated groups under the Act — women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and visible minorities — exceed estimates of their workforce availability within the core public administration.

While we have made progress, we still have work to do. In particular, we need to address the representation of these groups in the senior ranks of the public service and harness the enormous potential of Indigenous youth — our largest and fastest-growing demographic.

We know that diversity and inclusiveness are fundamental to a high-performing public service. That’s why, last November, I officially launched the Joint Union/Management Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion to recommend measures for moving forward. New thinking, innovative approaches, and keeping up with the evolving expectations of our citizens are fundamental to a successful working environment. But above all, diversity and inclusion can lead to better decision-making and better results for Canadians.

I want to thank those who are working across the public service on this priority.

I invite all parliamentarians and all Canadians to read this report.

Original signed by

The Honourable Scott Brison
President of the Treasury Board

Introduction

Reporting to Parliament

The Employment Equity Act (1996) requires that the President of the Treasury Board report to Parliament on the state of employment equity in the core public administration. The purpose of the Employment Equity Act is to achieve equity in the workplace by correcting conditions of disadvantage in employment by identifying and removing barriers to employment experienced by members of the four designated groups:

  • women
  • Aboriginal peoples
  • persons with disabilities
  • members of visible minorities

This report outlines employment equity results and progress achieved for the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year.

Governance and accountability

Accountability for employment equity is a shared responsibility across all levels and sectors of the public service. The Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat works closely with key stakeholders to achieve success. Stakeholders are as follows:

  • Employment and Social Development Canada
    • responsible for the Employment Equity Act
    • responsible for monitoring compliance and submitting a report to Parliament on the status of employment equity in the federally regulated private sector
    • responsible for assessing compliance of federal contractors
  • Public Service Commission of Canada
    • responsible for identifying and eliminating barriers in recruitment and staffing
    • responsible for developing policies and practices that will continue to help ensure that equity group members are well represented in the federal public service
    • reports annually to Parliament on its employment equity activities, including progress on employment equity in staffing and recruitment
  • Canadian Human Rights Commission
    • responsible for conducting compliance audits of all organizations subject to the Employment Equity Act
  • bargaining agents
    • work with each federal organization to develop and implement an employment equity plan
    • ensure that the collective agreement does not negatively impact on members of the four designated groups

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

On behalf of Treasury Board as the employer, the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer are responsible for the administration of the Employment Equity Policy, as it applies to the core public administration, as defined below. The Secretariat monitors and reports on the representation levels of the four designated groups in the public service and is the centre of expertise on employment equity, leading or partnering on initiatives to address specific issues for the designated groups.

Core public administration

The Employment Equity Act prescribes that this report cover the portions of the public service of Canada set out in Schedules I and IV of the Financial Administration Act. There are 66 departments, agencies and commissions that comprise the core public administration and for which the Treasury Board is the employer (see Table 1 in Appendix A). The statistics in this report include only employees working for these organizations, which totalled 181,674 on .

Data on persons in designated groups

To ensure the consistency of data presented in this report, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer uses information on all employees for whom the Treasury Board is the employer, in accordance with Schedules I and IV of the Financial Administration Act. Since the 2011 to 2012 fiscal year, the executive category includes data on the LC Group (Law Management Occupational Group) in its total workforce, which must be taken into consideration when comparing data historically.

All tabulations, other than those for women, contain data obtained through self-identification. The completeness and accuracy of employment equity data for the core public administration depend on the willingness of employees to self-identify and on federal organizations providing opportunities for them to do so. This data is provided voluntarily by employees and maintained separately and confidentially in the Employment Equity Data Bank by the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer and, where applicable, through the self-declaration of individuals applying to the public service through the Public Service Commission of Canada’s Public Service Resourcing System.

A reconciliation process is carried out each year by the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer, the Public Service Commission of Canada and the core public administration to ensure that information derived from the Public Service Resourcing System, the Employment Equity Data Bank, and incumbents’ files harmonizes with the information from departmental sources. It is important to note that employees, including those hired as students or as casual workers, are given an opportunity to provide this information when they are hired and during departmental self-identification surveys or other campaigns. Employees may also complete a self-identification form, available from their departmental employment equity coordinator or available in an online human resource management system, at any time.

Advancing employment equity: a collaborative approach

Collaboration is key to promoting and supporting employment equity efforts. In addition to working with organizations that have a legislated role in employment equity, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer maintains a broad range of complementary partnerships with various stakeholders, including the Canada School of Public Service.

Building on these partnerships, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer continues to share information and collaborate through various forums and other groups, such as the Interdepartmental Network on Employment Equity, the National Staffing Council and the Human Resources Council, to leverage knowledge and activities toward employment equity objectives in the federal public service.

Employment Equity Champions and Chairs Committees and Circle

The Employment Equity Champions and Chairs Committees and Circle were established in 2011 by the Clerk of the Privy Council to support public service employment equity objectives, by serving as a forum for networking and sharing of employment equity best practices among departments and agencies.

Committee composition

The Employment Equity Committees are composed of Champions and Employee Network Chairs from departments and agencies from across the public service of Canada. Each Committee is chaired by the respective Employment Equity Deputy Minister Champion, appointed by the Clerk of the Privy Council.

Where federal organizations do not have employee network chairs, they may select a chair or working-level representative.

Committee activities

In the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year, the Champions and Chairs Circle for Aboriginal Peoples, the Persons with Disabilities Champions and Chairs Committee, and the Visible Minorities Champions and Chairs Committee explored a wide range of issues, such as the results of the 2014 Public Service Employee Survey, the sharing and promoting of best practices in employment equity, and leadership development.

The year was a transitional period with the appointment of new Deputy Minister Champions for both the Champions and Chairs Circle for Aboriginal Peoples and for the Persons with Disabilities Champions and Chairs Committee.

Each Deputy Minister Champion reported on the priorities, progress and emerging issues of their committee and circle to senior management and in letters to the Clerk of the Privy Council.

Champions and Chairs Circle for Aboriginal Peoples

In the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year, the Champions and Chairs Circle for Aboriginal Peoples focused on creating a healthy workplace for Aboriginal peoples by working on three key areas: recruitment, retention and development. As a result, a consensus was reached on the main recommendations for a shared path forward that established Aboriginal leadership development, mentoring, and improving the dissemination and communication of best practices as key priorities. In line with these priorities, the Champions and Chairs Circle for Aboriginal Peoples hosted presentations on departmental initiatives such as the Aboriginal Leadership Development Initiative at Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada and the Aboriginal Mentoring Pilot Project at National Defence, and provided opportunities for members of the Champions and Chairs Circle for Aboriginal Peoples to share best practices in employment equity.

Persons with Disabilities Champions and Chairs Committee

In the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year, the Persons with Disabilities Champions and Chairs Committee continued its contribution to the implementation of Blueprint 2020 by sharing and promoting best practices, exploring issues regarding mental health, and identifying potential tools for federal organizations. Committee members participated in and were consulted on issues and initiatives with respect to access to technology, such as mobile applications and devices available for persons with disabilities, and the inclusion of accessibility considerations when procuring goods, services and facilities. The Committee supported the celebration of the International Day for Persons with Disabilities by taking part in a national panel conference on .

Visible Minorities Champions and Chairs Committee

In the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year, the Visible Minorities Champions and Chairs Committee identified two priorities for the next two years: fostering an inclusive and respectful workplace and encouraging career development. The objective of fostering an inclusive and respectful workplace is to promote an inclusive workplace culture that embraces diversity and is free of harassment and discrimination. The objective of encouraging career development is to examine ongoing issues concerning the lack of developmental opportunities and access to language training opportunities for members of visible minority groups.

Joint Employment Equity Committee

The Joint Employment Equity Committee provides a national forum that includes the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, the Public Service Commission of Canada, bargaining agents and departmental representatives. Other partners that have employment equity and diversity responsibilities or expertise, including youth representatives, may be invited to collaborate on the development, implementation and revision of policies and practices throughout the public service that may impact on designated groups under the Employment Equity Act.

The Joint Employment Equity Committee acts as the National Joint Council’s vehicle for employment equity and diversity analysis, and provides the National Joint Council with input on employment equity and diversity, as well as advice and recommendations on emerging policies and practices in the federal public service.

During the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year, the Joint Employment Equity Committee spent time redefining its mandate. Under the redefined mandate, set to be released in the 2016 to 2017 fiscal year, the Committee will focus its work on establishing employment equity and diversity as a cultural cornerstone within the federal public service. The Committee also provided input into the Public Service Employee Survey and on a new direction in staffing, which is the Public Service Commission of Canada’s revised Appointment Delegation and Accountability Instrument. It also diligently worked on developing an Employment Equity Flow Chart, which will map the lay of the land for employment equity in the federal public service.

Results and analysis

As shown in Figure 1, as of , all four employment equity groups exceeded workforce availability. This level of participation has occurred for the fourth year in a row. Although some gaps remain in executive positions for women, members of visible minorities and Aboriginal peoples, strategies to improve recruitment, development and retention in senior leadership programs are currently underway.

Figure 1 shows that overall, the public service is representative, but that a gap remains in executive positions for three of the groups.

Figure 1: portrait of the public service in the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year, overall and for the executive category
Figure 1: portrait of the public service in the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year, overall and for the executive category. Text version below:
Figure 1 - Text version

The portrait of the public service in the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year is summarized as follows:

  • Representation of women increased slightly from 54.3% to 54.4%, surpassing their workforce availability of 52.5%.
  • Representation of members of visible minorities increased from 13.8% to 14.5%, surpassing their workforce availability of 13.0%.
  • Representation of Aboriginal peoples increased slightly from 5.1% to 5.2%, surpassing their workforce availability of 3.4%.
  • Representation of persons with disabilities continued to maintain their representation at 5.6%, surpassing their workforce availability of 4.4%.

Within the Executive Group, progress was made, but representation rates still did not meet workforce availability for three of the four designated groups:

  • Women increased their representation from 46.4% to 47.3%, slightly below their workforce availability of 47.8%.
  • Members of visible minorities increased their representation from 8.8% to 9.4%, almost matching their workforce availability of 9.5%.
  • Representation of Aboriginal peoples increased their representation from 3.4% to 3.7% but remains below their workforce availability of 5.2%.
  • Representation of persons with disabilities decreased from 5.3% to 5.1%, which continued to surpass their workforce availability of 2.3%.

Public service renewal

In the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year, 12,557 new employees joined the public service of Canada and 13,358 employees were promoted:

  • three of the four designated groups showed an increase in hiring. The proportion of employees hired in the fourth group, persons with disabilities, decreased from 3.5% to 3.3%
  • all designated groups showed an increase in promotions, the largest increase being among visibility minorities, who made up 15.7% of the employees promoted, up from 14.3%

Employees under 35

The representation of members of employment equity groups among younger employees (those under 35) differs from their representation in the public service as a whole:

  • representation of women under 35 is 56.1%, which is higher than the representation of the designated group in the public service as a whole (54.4%)
  • members of visible minorities under 35 account for 18.3% of all employees under 35, higher than the representation of the designated group in the public service (14.5%)
  • representation of Aboriginal peoples under 35 is 4.4%, lower than the representation of Aboriginal peoples in the public service (5.2%)
  • representation of persons with disabilities under 35 is 2.6%, lower than the representation of the designated group in the public service (5.6%) of all employees

Highlights by employment equity group

Refer to Appendix A for detailed statistical tables. The technical notes in Appendix B provide further workforceFootnote 1 information on the data for persons in the designated groups, along with definitions of terms used in this report. Figures 2 to 5 show a snapshot of the status for each of the designated groups.

Figure 2: representation of women
Figure 2: representation of women. Text version below:
Figure 2 - Text version

The following observations are made regarding the representation of women in the public service:

  • Representation of women has increased from 53.8% to 54.4% in the past 10 years and is quite stable.
  • For women, there are still gaps in the executive, technical, administrative support and operational categories.
  • Women are over-represented in salary levels below 65,000 dollars and under-represented above 90,000 dollars.
  • Women’s recruitment numbers are good, but their separation rate is higher than their representation in the core public administration.
  • Women’s age distribution and regional distribution correspond to the total distribution.
Figure 3: representation of Aboriginal peoples
Figure 3: representation of Aboriginal peoples. Text version below:
Figure 3 - Text version

The following observations are made regarding the representation of Aboriginal peoples in the public service:

  • Representation of Aboriginal peoples has increased by approximately 25% in the past 10 years, but they remain under-represented in executive positions.
  • In the public service, Aboriginal peoples tend to earn a bit less than average.
  • Although the recruitment rate of Aboriginal peoples reflects the labour market, their promotion rate remains lower and their separation rate is higher.
  • The age distribution of Aboriginal peoples reflects that of the public service.
  • The regional distribution of Aboriginal peoples does not reflect the labour market availability in Northwest Territories and in Nunavut.
Figure 4: representation of persons with disabilities
Figure 4: representation of persons with disabilities. Text version below:
Figure 4 - Text version

The following observations are made regarding the representation of persons with disabilities in the public service:

  • Representation of persons with disabilities has decreased from 5.8% to 5.6% in the past 10 years but continues to exceed workforce availability.
  • Persons with disabilities face representation challenges in the technical and operational categories.
  • The salary level of persons with disabilities overall is comparable to the rest of the public service.
  • Even though the representation of persons with disabilities surpasses workforce availability, persons with disabilities still face recruitment and promotion issues, and their separation rate is higher than their representation rate.
  • The age distribution of persons with disabilities mirrors the public service.
  • The regional distribution of persons with disabilities is equitable.
Figure 5: representation of members of visible minorities
Figure 5: representation of members of visible minorities. Text version below:
Figure 5 - Text version

The following observations are made regarding the representation of members of visible minorities in the public service:

  • Representation of members of visible minorities has increased by nearly 75% in the past 10 years, and their salary levels are comparable to other public servants.
  • Gaps remain in four employment categories for members of visible minorities: executives, scientific and professional, technical, and administrative support.
  • Recruitment and promotion of members of visible minorities are going well, but their separation rate is still relatively high compared with their representation.
  • Members of visible minorities in the public service tend to be younger than the average, and they are distributed equitably across regions.

Conclusion

Overall, employment equity representation levels in the public service have exceeded workforce availability for the fourth year in a row, but more can be done.

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat will continue to respond to barriers and develop strategies to improve the development and retention of members of the designated groups, as it has done through initiatives such as the Indigenous Youth Summer Employment Opportunity, which provides Indigenous youth with access to public service jobs and support measures to improve retention.

Looking ahead, in order to build on our successes and move forward, employment equity analysis should go beyond general representation rates to uncover and address gaps in specific areas.

A focus on improving the integration of data from different sources, including information gathered from the annual assessment of management practices and performance in the public service and the Public Service Employee Survey, can provide a more comprehensive picture of employment equity in the public service and help identify further barriers to employment.

As we pursue objectives in employment equity, we also recognize that there is also a broader discussion taking place on diversity and inclusion. The decision to create a Joint Union/Management Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion was made in . This Task Force will:

  • define diversity and inclusion in the public service
  • establish the case for diversity and inclusion in the public service
  • recommend a framework and action plan for diversity and inclusion in the public service

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat will continue to collaborate with partners to ensure that appropriate governance and resources are in place to provide support and guidance to federal organizations on matters related to the designated employment equity groups, to achieve an equitable and diverse workforce.

Appendix A: statistical tables

Table 1

Distribution of public service of Canada employees by designated group according to department or agency
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV indeterminates, terms of three months or more, and seasonal employees (as at )

Department or agency All employees Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of a visible minority group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Table 1 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“all employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 1 Note 1

Civilian staff only (data for members of the Canadian Forces are not included because Treasury Board is not the employer).

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Table 1 Note 2

Fisheries and Oceans Canada data include data for the Canadian Coast Guard.

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Table 1 Note 3

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada data include data for the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration.

Return to table 1 note § referrer

Table 1 Note 4

Information for small numbers is suppressed.

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National Defencetable 1 note 21,575 8,566 39.7 726 3.4 1,375 6.4 1,702 7.9
Employment and Social Development Canada 20,695 14,248 68.8 896 4.3 1,296 6.3 4,145 20.0
Correctional Service Canada 16,856 7,988 47.4 1,687 10.0 949 5.6 1,635 9.7
Canada Border Services Agency 13,423 6,522 48.6 482 3.6 564 4.2 2,098 15.6
Public Works and Government Services Canada 11,158 6,522 58.5 382 3.4 685 6.1 1,479 13.3
Fisheries and Oceans Canadatable 1 note 9,061 3,368 37.2 422 4.7 472 5.2 542 6.0
Health Canada 8,620 5,737 66.6 715 8.3 517 6.0 1,864 21.6
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (Civilian Staff) 6,309 4,920 78.0 373 5.9 277 4.4 774 12.3
Environment and Climate Change Canada 5,851 2,784 47.6 168 2.9 265 4.5 842 14.4
Global Affairs Canada 5,456 3,013 55.2 234 4.3 216 4.0 1,044 19.1
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada 5,418 3,582 66.1 204 3.8 264 4.9 1,353 25.0
Statistics Canada 5,321 2,801 52.6 149 2.8 302 5.7 1,116 21.0
Transport Canada 5,033 2,275 45.2 192 3.8 228 4.5 767 15.2
Shared Services Canada 4,888 1,535 31.4 163 3.3 318 6.5 739 15.1
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 4,506 2,284 50.7 139 3.1 207 4.6 811 18.0
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canadatable 1 note § 4,285 2,115 49.4 125 2.9 173 4.0 554 12.9
Department of Justice Canada 4,285 2,933 68.4 162 3.8 261 6.1 755 17.6
Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada 4,025 2,590 64.3 1,206 30.0 250 6.2 502 12.5
Natural Resources Canada 3,722 1,661 44.6 97 2.6 161 4.3 488 13.1
Veterans Affairs Canada 2,988 2,195 73.5 101 3.4 214 7.2 394 13.2
Public Health Agency of Canada 1,999 1,372 68.6 62 3.1 131 6.6 386 19.3
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat 1,610 990 61.5 52 3.2 113 7.0 284 17.6
Canadian Heritage 1,589 1,059 66.6 67 4.2 75 4.7 187 11.8
Public Prosecution Service of Canada 956 641 67.1 60 6.3 56 5.9 121 12.7
Public Safety Canada 943 569 60.3 43 4.6 58 6.2 116 12.3
Library and Archives Canada 856 520 60.7 63 7.4 53 6.2 75 8.8
Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada 806 510 63.3 28 3.5 51 6.3 258 32.0
Department of Finance Canada 702 327 46.6 16 2.3 22 3.1 121 17.2
Public Service Commission of Canada 688 453 65.8 29 4.2 60 8.7 105 15.3
Privy Council Office 639 356 55.7 29 4.5 36 5.6 90 14.1
Courts Administration Service 598 386 64.5 21 3.5 34 5.7 96 16.1
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency 574 372 64.8 17 3.0 35 6.1 27 4.7
Canadian Space Agency 571 243 42.6 7 1.2 33 5.8 81 14.2
Canada School of Public Service 561 372 66.3 23 4.1 36 6.4 86 15.3
Elections Canada 499 255 51.1 19 3.8 38 7.6 81 16.2
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission 417 226 54.2 16 3.8 18 4.3 59 14.1
Canadian Grain Commission 390 172 44.1 24 6.2 21 5.4 76 19.5
Parole Board of Canada 366 296 80.9 21 5.7 19 5.2 41 11.2
Infrastructure Canada 315 178 56.5 10 3.2 13 4.1 51 16.2
Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada 302 201 66.6 8 2.6 13 4.3 28 9.3
Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions 289 171 59.2 5 1.7 7 2.4 39 13.5
Western Economic Diversification Canada 265 155 58.5 15 5.7 18 6.8 53 20.0
Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada 227 139 61.2 11 4.8 9 4.0 26 11.5
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency 218 157 72.0 16 7.3 9 4.1 22 10.1
Transportation Safety Board of Canada 206 64 31.1 table 1 note * table 1 note * 5 2.4 19 9.2
Canadian Transportation Agency 199 120 60.3 table 1 note * table 1 note * 13 6.5 25 12.6
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario 187 121 64.7 table 1 note * table 1 note * 19 10.2 45 24.1
Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada 186 115 61.8 7 3.8 14 7.5 15 8.1
Canadian Human Rights Commission 177 121 68.4 10 5.6 34 19.2 30 16.9
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages 150 100 66.7 5 3.3 10 6.7 13 8.7
Office of the Secretary to the Governor General 146 89 61.0 table 1 note * table 1 note * 12 8.2 17 11.6
Status of Women Canada 81 68 84.0 table 1 note * table 1 note * 7 8.6 7 8.6
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency 71 41 57.7 18 25.4 5 7.0 9 12.7
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board Canada 66 40 60.6 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * 10 15.2
Canadian Dairy Commission 57 36 63.2 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * 8 14.0
Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP 56 33 58.9 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * 6 10.7
Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada 50 34 68.0 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * 7 14.0
Military Grievances External Review Committee 34 21 61.8 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
International Joint Commission 27 12 44.4 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada 24 11 45.8 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada 23 17 73.9 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada 23 17 73.9 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat 20 10 50.0 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Farm Products Council of Canada 17 9 52.9 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Copyright Board Canada 13 6 46.2 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
RCMP External Review Committee 6 2 33.3 table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note * table 1 note *
Total 181,674 98,846 54.4 9,358 5.2 10,092 5.6 26,336 14.5

Table 2

Distribution of public service of Canada employees by designated group and region of work
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV indeterminates, terms of three months or more, and seasonal employees (as at )

Region of work All employees Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of a visible minority group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Table 2 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“all employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 2 Note 1

NCR: National Capital Region

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Table 2 Note 2

NCR includes NCR (Quebec) and NCR (Ontario).

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Table 2 Note 3

A portion of the 2016 geographic data is not available due to changes in the central data systems.

Return to table 2 note * referrer

Newfoundland and Labrador 2,800 1,227 43.8 186 6.6 139 5.0 60 2.1
Prince Edward Island 1,461 922 63.1 37 2.5 100 6.8 36 2.5
Nova Scotia 8,046 3,564 44.3 437 5.4 585 7.3 490 6.1
New Brunswick 6,674 3,777 56.6 246 3.7 367 5.5 181 2.7
Quebec (without the NCR)table 2 note 20,193 10,547 52.2 426 2.1 668 3.3 2,214 11.0
NCR (Quebec)table 2 note 24,702 14,215 57.5 1,319 5.3 1,374 5.6 3,500 14.2
NCR (Ontario)table 2 note 54,844 30,550 55.7 1,831 3.3 3,147 5.7 9,149 16.7
NCRtable 2 note 79,546 44,765 56.3 3,150 4.0 4,521 5.7 12,649 15.9
Ontario (without the NCR)table 2 note 23,594 12,996 55.1 1,205 5.1 1,497 6.3 4,540 19.2
Manitoba 6,448 3,641 56.5 954 14.8 402 6.2 663 10.3
Saskatchewan 4,524 2,634 58.2 764 16.9 254 5.6 345 7.6
Alberta 9,503 5,377 56.6 762 8.0 580 6.1 1,308 13.8
British Columbia 15,957 7,848 49.2 930 5.8 837 5.2 3,452 21.6
Yukon 272 171 62.9 49 18.0 20 7.4 14 5.1
Northwest Territories 391 232 59.3 70 17.9 23 5.9 24 6.1
Nunavut 222 124 55.9 78 35.1 11 5.0 17 7.7
Outside Canada 1,431 671 46.9 32 2.2 51 3.6 260 18.2
Not availabletable 2 note * 612 350 57.2 32 5.2 37 6.0 83 13.6
Total 181,674 98,846 54.4 9,358 5.2 10,092 5.6 26,336 14.5

Table 3

Distribution of public service of Canada employees by designated group and occupational group
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV indeterminates, terms of three months or more, and seasonal employees (as at )

Occupational group All employees Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of a visible minority group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Table 3 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“all employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 3 Note 1

LCs have been included in the Executive Group since the 2011 to 2012 fiscal year.

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Table 3 Note 2

Information for small numbers is suppressed.

Return to table 3 note * referrer

Executives 5,302 2,506 47.3 196 3.7 270 5.1 500 9.4
EX (Executive) 5,001 2,328 46.6 188 3.8 248 5.0 481 9.6
LC (Law Management)table 3 note 301 178 59.1 8 2.7 22 7.3 19 6.3
Scientific and Professional 32,712 17,217 52.6 1,061 3.2 1,442 4.4 5,982 18.3
Administrative and Foreign Service 83,369 52,352 62.8 4,546 5.5 5,139 6.2 13,080 15.7
Technical 12,607 3,283 26.0 555 4.4 578 4.6 1,099 8.7
Administrative Support 19,002 14,907 78.4 1,280 6.7 1,409 7.4 3,062 16.1
Operational 28,650 8,566 29.9 1,719 6.0 1,250 4.4 2,610 9.1
Undetermined 32 15 46.9 table 3 note * table 3 note * table 3 note * table 3 note * table 3 note * table 3 note *
Total 181,674 98,846 54.4 9,358 5.2 10,092 5.6 26,336 14.5

Table 4

Distribution of public service of Canada employees by designated group and salary range
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV indeterminates, terms of three months or more, and seasonal employees (as at )

Salary range
($)
All employees Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of a visible minority group
Number % of all employees Number % of salary range % of EEtable 4 note group Number % of salary range % of EEtable 4 note group Number % of salary range % of EEtable 4 note group Number % of salary range % of EEtable 4 note group

Table 4 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“all employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 4 Note 1

EE: employment equity

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Table 4 Note 2

Information for small numbers is suppressed.

Return to table 4 note * referrer

Under 5,000 52 0.0 19 36.5 0.0 table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * 5 9.6 0.0
5,000 to 9,999 116 0.1 41 35.3 0.0 table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * 5 4.3 0.0
10,000 to 14,999 69 0.0 48 69.6 0.0 table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * 8 11.6 0.1 11 15.9 0.0
15,000 to 19,999 178 0.1 128 71.9 0.1 table 4 note * table 4 note * table 4 note * 7 3.9 0.1 21 11.8 0.1
20,000 to 24,999 252 0.1 197 78.2 0.2 23 9.1 0.2 14 5.6 0.1 37 14.7 0.1
25,000 to 29,999 363 0.2 302 83.2 0.3 26 7.2 0.3 23 6.3 0.2 67 18.5 0.3
30,000 to 34,999 399 0.2 326 81.7 0.3 20 5.0 0.2 22 5.5 0.2 62 15.5 0.2
35,000 to 39,999 1,552 0.9 1,168 75.3 1.2 74 4.8 0.8 85 5.5 0.8 183 11.8 0.7
40,000 to 44,999 3,690 2.0 2,588 70.1 2.6 215 5.8 2.3 304 8.2 3.0 573 15.5 2.2
45,000 to 49,999 15,742 8.7 10,952 69.6 11.1 1,007 6.4 10.8 1,050 6.7 10.4 2,402 15.3 9.1
50,000 to 54,999 19,863 10.9 13,498 68.0 13.7 1,141 5.7 12.2 1,183 6.0 11.7 3,216 16.2 12.2
55,000 to 59,999 16,689 9.2 10,725 64.3 10.9 926 5.5 9.9 951 5.7 9.4 2,348 14.1 8.9
60,000 to 64,999 14,533 8.0 8,511 58.6 8.6 777 5.3 8.3 818 5.6 8.1 1,947 13.4 7.4
65,000 to 69,999 13,260 7.3 6,966 52.5 7.0 764 5.8 8.2 812 6.1 8.0 1,788 13.5 6.8
70,000 to 74,999 18,194 10.0 7,001 38.5 7.1 1,200 6.6 12.8 745 4.1 7.4 2,320 12.8 8.8
75,000 to 79,999 10,126 5.6 5,394 53.3 5.5 465 4.6 5.0 449 4.4 4.4 1,530 15.1 5.8
80,000 to 84,999 17,548 9.7 8,403 47.9 8.5 1,016 5.8 10.9 1,114 6.3 11.0 2,412 13.7 9.2
85,000 to 89,999 7,704 4.2 4,107 53.3 4.2 345 4.5 3.7 392 5.1 3.9 1,467 19.0 5.6
90,000 to 94,999 7,526 4.1 3,749 49.8 3.8 256 3.4 2.7 362 4.8 3.6 1,045 13.9 4.0
95,000 to 99,999 8,446 4.6 3,437 40.7 3.5 246 2.9 2.6 425 5.0 4.2 1,470 17.4 5.6
100,000 and over 25,372 14.0 11,286 44.5 11.4 849 3.3 9.1 1,324 5.2 13.1 3,427 13.5 13.0
Total 181,674 100.0 98,846 54.4 100.0 9,358 5.2 100.0 10,092 5.6 100.0 26,336 14.5 100.0

Table 5

Hirings, promotions into the public service of Canada by designated group and separations from the public service of Canada by designated group
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV indeterminates, terms of three months or more, and seasonal employees (, to )

Action type All employees Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of a visible minority group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“all employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

“Hirings” refers to the number of staffing actions that added employees to the public service of Canada payroll between and .

Data on promotions are obtained from the Public Service Commission of Canada and include information from departments and agencies that fall under both the Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV, and the Public Service Employment Act.

“Separations” refers to employees who left the public service of Canada payroll between , and .

Percentages are that designated group’s share of all actions of the given type.

See the definitions of “hirings,” “promotions” and “separations” in Appendix B.

Hirings 12,557 7,273 57.9 502 4.0 410 3.3 2,175 17.3
Promotions 13,358 7,812 58.5 606 4.5 558 4.2 2,093 15.7
Separations 12,752 7,272 57.0 648 5.1 995 7.8 1,253 9.8

Table 6

Distribution of public service of Canada employees by designated group and age range
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV indeterminates, terms of three months or more, and seasonal employees (as at )

Age range All employees Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of a visible minority group
Number % of all employees Number % of age range % of EEtable 6 note group Number % of age range % of EEtable 6 note group Number % of age range % of EEtable 6 note group Number % of age range % of EEtable 6 note group

Table 6 Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (“all employees”) because employees may have chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group, and men are included in the total.

Table 6 Note 1

EE: employment equity

Return to table 6 notereferrer

Table 6 Note 2

Information for small numbers is suppressed.

Return to table 6 note * referrer

Under 20 50 0.0 21 42.0 0.0 table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note *
20 to 24 2,158 1.2 1,264 58.6 1.3 81 3.8 0.9 table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * 404 18.7 1.5
25 to 29 10,094 5.6 5,752 57.0 5.8 417 4.1 4.5 211 2.1 2.1 1,950 19.3 7.4
30 to 34 19,842 10.9 10,997 55.4 11.1 911 4.6 9.7 598 3.0 5.9 3,521 17.7 13.4
35 to 39 26,531 14.6 14,961 56.4 15.1 1,257 4.7 13.4 946 3.6 9.4 4,535 17.1 17.2
40 to 44 28,059 15.4 15,794 56.3 16.0 1,596 5.7 17.1 1,325 4.7 13.1 4,437 15.8 16.8
45 to 49 27,855 15.3 15,409 55.3 15.6 1,739 6.2 18.6 1,576 5.7 15.6 4,054 14.6 15.4
50 to 54 31,653 17.4 17,072 53.9 17.3 1,725 5.4 18.4 2,337 7.4 23.2 3,437 10.9 13.1
55 to 59 22,645 12.5 11,634 51.4 11.8 1,056 4.7 11.3 1,877 8.3 18.6 2,376 10.5 9.0
60 to 64 9,583 5.3 4,579 47.8 4.6 451 4.7 4.8 906 9.5 9.0 1,071 11.2 4.1
65 to 69 2,638 1.5 1,145 43.4 1.2 110 4.2 1.2 246 9.3 2.4 446 16.9 1.7
70 and over 566 0.3 218 38.5 0.2 table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note * 50 8.8 0.5 table 6 note * table 6 note * table 6 note *
Total 181,674 100.0 98,846 54.4 100.0 9,358 5.2 100.0 10,092 5.6 100.0 26,336 14.5 100.0

Table 7

Representation of public service of Canada employees by designated groups and fiscal year
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV indeterminates, terms of three months or more, and seasonal employees

Public service representation All employees Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of a visible minority group

Table 7 Notes

The data in this and other tables in this report cover employees identified for the purpose of employment equity in the Employment Equity Regulations. The estimates of workforce availability (WFA) are based on information from the 2011 National Household Survey and the 2012 post-Census Canadian Survey on Disability. WFA estimates include only Canadian citizens in those occupations in the Canadian workforce that correspond to occupations in the federal public service.

Internal representation is based on those who have voluntarily chosen to self-identify to date as an Aboriginal person, a person with disability and/or a member of a visible minority.

Table 7 Note 1

Revenue Canada became a separate employer, the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency, on .

Return to table 7 note * referrer

As at 181,674 98,846 54.4 9,358 5.2 10,092 5.6 26,336 14.5
As at 180,681 98,051 54.3 9,232 5.1 10,204 5.6 24,849 13.8
As at 181,356 98,078 54.1 9,239 5.1 10,390 5.7 23,919 13.2
As at 188,342 102,124 54.2 9,491 5.0 10,871 5.8 23,812 12.6
As at 198,793 108,620 54.6 9,785 4.9 11,418 5.7 23,978 12.1
As at 202,631 111,051 54.8 9,486 4.7 11,388 5.6 22,998 11.3
As at 202,386 110,867 54.8 9,307 4.6 11,620 5.7 21,567 10.7
As at 195,667 107,089 54.7 8,892 4.5 11,468 5.9 19,264 9.8
As at 186,754 101,589 54.4 8,190 4.4 11,001 5.9 17,207 9.2
As at 179,540 96,816 53.9 7,610 4.2 10,192 5.7 15,787 8.8
As at 176,630 95,013 53.8 7,381 4.2 10,169 5.8 15,112 8.6
As at 165,856 88,702 53.5 6,886 4.2 9,626 5.8 13,498 8.1
As at 165,976 88,175 53.1 6,723 4.1 9,452 5.7 13,001 7.8
As at 163,314 86,162 52.8 6,426 3.9 9,155 5.6 12,058 7.4
As at 157,510 82,663 52.5 5,980 3.8 8,331 5.3 10,772 6.8
As at 149,339 77,785 52.1 5,316 3.6 7,621 5.1 9,143 6.1
As at (Revenue Canada excluded)table 7 note * 141,253 72,549 51.4 4,639 3.3 6,687 4.7 7,764 5.5
As at (Revenue Canada included) 178,340 91,856 51.5 5,124 2.9 8,137 4.6 10,557 5.9
As at 179,831 90,801 50.5 4,770 2.7 6,943 3.9 9,260 5.1
As at 186,378 92,281 49.5 4,551 2.4 6,227 3.3 8,690 4.7
As at 201,009 96,794 48.2 4,665 2.3 6,291 3.1 8,981 4.5
As at 217,784 103,191 47.4 4,783 2.2 6,935 3.2 8,914 4.1
As at 224,640 105,621 47.0 4,492 2.0 6,623 2.9 8,566 3.8
As at 221,114 102,015 46.1 4,441 2.0 6,755 3.1 8,462 3.8
Workforce availability                  
2011 National Household Survey and the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability     52.5   3.4   4.4   13.0
2006 Census and 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS)     52.3   3.0   4.0   12.4
2001 Census and 2001 PALS     52.2   2.5   3.6   10.4
1996 Census and 1996 Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS)     48.7   1.7   4.8   8.7
1991 Census and 1991 HALS     47.3   2.6   4.8   9.0

Appendix B: Technical Notes

This report includes information on indeterminate employees, term employees of three months or more and seasonal employees, with the exception of seasonal employees who are on leave without pay at the end of March for each fiscal year. No information is reported on students or casual workers, except in cases where they were subsequently hired as indeterminate employees, for terms of three months or more, or as seasonal employees before the end of the fiscal year. Employees on leave without pay, such as those on care and nurturing leave and educational leave, are not included in these tables.

Statistics in this document also exclude Governor in Council appointees, ministerial staff, federal judges and deputy ministers, who are also on the public service payroll.

The statistics of separate employers, covered under Schedule V of the Financial Administration Act, are not included in this report. Under the Employment Equity Act, separate employers that have more than 100 employees (for example, the Canada Revenue Agency and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency) are required to provide their reports to the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat only for the purposes of tabling in Parliament at the same time as this report.

Reports on employment equity in the Canadian Armed Forces and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police are prepared by those organizations and are also tabled in Parliament at the same time as those of separate employers. To view the employment equity reports of these organizations, readers can visit their websites or contact them directly.

Data notes on persons in designated groups

As required under the Employment Equity Act, annual reports to Parliament present information for the fiscal year beginning April 1 and ending March 31. To ensure the consistency of data presented in this report, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer uses information on all employees for whom the Treasury Board is the employer, in accordance with Schedules I and IV of the Financial Administration Act.

Since the 2011 to 2012 fiscal year, the executive category includes data on the LC Group (Law Management Occupational Group) in its total workforce, which must be taken into consideration when comparing data historically.

Definitions

Aboriginal peoples
Persons who are Indians, Inuit or Métis.
casual workers
People hired for a specified period of no more than 90 days by any one department or agency during the calendar year. Casual workers are not included in the representation figures.
designated groups
Women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities.
hirings
The number of staffing actions that added to the employee population in the past fiscal year. This includes indeterminate and seasonal employees; those with terms of three months or more; and students and casual workers whose employment status has changed to indeterminate, terms of three months or more, or seasonal. Hirings measure the flow of employees into the public service and may include more than one staffing action per person per year.
indeterminate employees
People appointed to the public service for an unspecified duration.
members of visible minorities
Persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.
persons with disabilities

Persons who have a long-term or recurring physical, mental, sensory, psychiatric or learning impairment and who:

  • consider themselves to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment or
  • believe that an employer or potential employer is likely to consider them to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment

Included are persons whose functional limitations owing to their impairment have been accommodated in their current job or workplace.

promotions
The number of appointments to positions at higher maximum pay levels in the past fiscal year, either within the same occupational group or subgroup or in another group or subgroup.
seasonal employees
People hired to work cyclically for a season or portion of each year.
self-declaration
Voluntary information provided by applicants in appointment processes for statistical purposes related to appointments and, in the case of processes that target employment equity groups, to determine eligibility.
self-identification
A collection of employment equity information, voluntarily provided by employees, for statistical purposes in analyzing and monitoring the progress of employment equity groups in the federal public service and for reporting workforce representation.
separations
The number of employees (that is, indeterminate, terms of three months or more, and seasonal) removed from the public service payroll, which may include more than one action per person per year. Separations include employees who retired or resigned, or employees whose specified employment period (term) ended.
tenure
The period of time for which a person is employed.
women
An employment equity designated group under the Employment Equity Act.
workforce availability
For the core public administration, refers to the estimated availability of people in designated groups as a percentage of the workforce population. For the core public administration, workforce availability is based on the population of Canadian citizens who are active in the workforce and who work in those occupations that correspond to the occupations in the core public administration. Availability is estimated from 2011 Census data, and estimates for persons with disabilities are derived from data, also collected by Statistics Canada, in the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability.
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