Transcripts

Sports & Fitness

Transcript

TITLE: SPORTS IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

ROY: The Canadian Forces is about physical fitness and keeping people at a high level.

BAUML: Sports is my life. I watch it on TV, I read it on the Internet all the time. I work at it, I train.

KOHANSKI: I can play every single sport that is out there…

CAMPAIGNE: All the sports are available – you just have to know where to look.

CLEMENT: The people that I’m closest to in the military are those that I’ve played sports with.

SZKWAREK: Love putting my cleats on, I love putting my shin-guards on and… just playing.

TITLE: SPORTS IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

MALE NARRATOR: It doesn’t matter what element you belong to, your rank, or where you are in your career, the Forces encourage you to take advantage of great facilities and programs that let you participate in local, regional, national, and international sports.

FEMALE NARRATOR: No matter where you’re posted in the Forces – even on deployment, there are fitness facilities and there’s always a game going on.

SERGEANT STACEY KOHANSKI: I am involved in men’s ball hockey, men’s ice hockey, women’s ice hockey, volleyball, softball... and I do believe that’s it.

PRIVATE AUSTIN PHILLIPS: There’s so many sports available, just on the base level, you can go and play almost any sport.

WARRANT OFFICER DEBBIE CAMPAIGNE: There’s something for everybody. If you just want to come out and play at noon-hour or after working hours, there’s a facility there and people there to help you.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Sports and fitness activities are a part of daily life that you are encouraged to be a part of. Whether it’s a pick-up game at base level or playing on highly competitive teams that compete at national and international levels, almost any sport or activity that you want to participate in is organized in the Forces.

CAPTAIN ANDRIY SZKWAREK: There’s regional and national sports programs for a number of sports, that are available to every member of the Canadian Forces, to try out for their local representative team and compete.

KOHANSKI: I’ve been playing with the military girls for quite a number of years now, and every single year, the calibre gets better and better. Yeah, you know what – the Olympic girls should come and watch us play.

MALE NARRATOR: No matter where you’re posted, the Forces have great sports facilities. The arenas, pools, gyms, and fields are close by and first-rate. Playing sports in the Forces is also a great place to meet people.

COLONEL BRUCE PLOUGHMAN: There’s always the camaraderie, albeit I’m involved in individual sports – I do triathlon. When I show up on the start line and I’m there with folks from the Wing – I’m not Colonel Ploughman, I’m Bruce Ploughman – I’m just another runner.

CAPTAIN ANDREA CLEMENT: And no matter where you get posted to, you’re always running into someone that you’ve played a sport with.

KOHANSKI: Seeing each other, year after year, you get to know their names, and what they do and where they work. Off the ice, everybody’s friends in the dressing room. On the ice, it is just fierce.

FEMALE NARRATOR: The CF encourages its members to stay fit and healthy and because of this, there’s plenty of time allotted to achieve this goal.

MALE NARRATOR: If you’re competing at a high level, the Forces will even grant you extra training time during the workday to enhance your skills.

CLEMENT:  Our bosses afford us ample time to train on a daily basis. You can go to the gym for squadron PT and do stuff as a group.

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GORDON ROY: With my triathlon training, they give me quite a bit of time off to attend camps, to attend competitions. I wouldn’t be at the level I’m at now if I hadn’t joined the military. It provides me not only with the infrastructure facilities of pools and weights, but it also provides me coaches, physiotherapy, medical relief, sponsorship and time off to encourage me to get at the high level.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Competitiveness and leadership are strong values in the Canadian Forces.

SZKWAREK: I think there’s things that I’ve learned on the soccer field – matters of teamwork – that you can directly apply into the workspace.

KOHANSKI: Being in sports is encouraged quite a bit because it enhances your team-building and you get to network all across Canada.

MALE NARRATOR: If you’re the kind of person who’s looking to be among the best in the world, the Canadian Forces offers its members – Regular Force or Reserve – the opportunity to compete in international tournaments organised by the Conseil International du Sport Militaire, or CISM. This is just one step below the Olympics and you’re often competing against other countries’ Olympic athletes.

ROY: I was in Bosnia last year for the Triathlon World Championships. There are World Games in 2011 in Brazil…

SZKWAREK: I’ve been to the UK, Ireland, Germany, Barbados, Trinidad & Tobago, Brazil and the United States, as well as India, in my short time playing for CISM soccer.

ROY: I have opportunities to compete against Olympic athletes, as most European countries have their elite athletes in the military.

PHILLIPS: I had no idea I’d end up playing in an international tournament. There’s definitely opportunities for everybody and anybody.

PRIVATE MIKE BAUML: Just hearing stories from the guys that have been on the team for a while – there’s travelling around the world, just to play soccer, it’s like your dream come true.

KOHANSKI: Just playing every single sport that I love, and do a job, and get paid for it at the same time. It was such an eye-opener.

BAUML: Going from a small town to going international, it’s pretty unbelievable.

PHILLIPS: It’s been great experiences all around, and now it’s led me to this, so how can I not love it?

SZKWAREK: If you want to live a fit lifestyle that includes sports, you have all the opportunity in the world to do so.

ROY: If I didn’t do sports, I wouldn’t be myself.

TITLE: SPORTS IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

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Training & Fitness

Transcript

TITLE: TRAINING AND FITNESS

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I work out every day. My boss gives me an hour a day to go to the gym while I'm at work.

LYNNE PATTERSON: Most places where you work in the military, there's either a gym in your building or a gym close by on the base.

ROSEANNA MANDY: And I enjoy it. It's part of my day. I work out every morning before I start work. I usually run or swim or do some kind of cross-training, CrossFit.

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: I either run or I use the elliptical, and weight training.

CHERYL BUSH: I play hockey inside the military, but outside of the military, actually I play soccer in a women's soccer league, and I also dragon boat.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I work out in the evening, yes. I play soccer, and I do yoga on my own.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: As an athlete, I think women have tremendous opportunities to pursue the sports that they love and have the time to train. Certainly on an army base, every day we're doing physical fitness as a team.

ROSEANNA MANDY: So, we'll have a dedicated activity or time that we train and work together. That just gives you a really great opportunity to see where you're strong, where you may have some weaknesses, and what you need to do to maintain your level of fitness.

KAREN STREEK: I did not find the physical fitness test difficult when I joined the Forces. It's geared towards people who are off the street and not necessarily training as a group, and then once you join and you do that test, then you improve the standards. It's the basic standard. The average person would have no problem passing the physical fitness test.

ROSEANNA MANDY: I also know people that enrolled and joined at the same time as I did. They weren't quite as active as I was, but they also had no problems with it.

KAREN STREEK: Basic training in the military is definitely not what you think before you join. I'm not gonna say it isn't difficult, it isn't challenging, 'cause it's something new; you're learning a lot. You're doing it with people who are also new to it, so you do it together and you get through it, and you take it day by day, and overall, in my 19 years in the military, I think that basic training is probably the most fondest memories I have. Like, it's really an enjoyable experience.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Within the first few weeks, you learn that the most important aspect is teamwork. So, as long as you work as a team, then you can get through, no problem, and it's definitely one of the best memories of my life.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: One of the aspects that you learn is what the Canadian Forces is about, some of the key regulations. And for officers, we focus on leadership.

CHERYL BUSH: I actually found basic training exciting. I enjoyed the camaraderie, and you would show up there as an individual, but you leave as a team player.

LYNNE PATTERSON: We are expected to be able to work in harsh environments, to be able to be responsible not only for ourselves but be responsible for people we work with. They need to be able to depend on us, no matter what kind of situation we're in, to be able to help each other out.

TITLE: TRAINING AND FITNESS

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Travel and adventure

Transcript

TITLE: TRAVEL AND ADVENTURE IN THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES

// Variety of sounds: wind, machines and gears grinding, bells ringing. //

(Title appears on a grey background over a montage of images of airplanes and military equipment.)

// Catchy, upbeat music. //

// Voiceover (man): Where would you really like to work? //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(View through an airplane window as it flies over a tropical mountain range; the mountains are covered in palm trees.)

(Transition: Deck on a military ship. Eight sailors are standing near the ship’s rigging, the ocean is all around and the sun is rising.)

(Transition: A ship is docked in a foreign port. On shore, a herd of camels is under a tent. Two men walk by the camels.)

(Transition: View from the bridge of a ship. A cargo ship passes by about 100 metres from the port.)

// Voiceover (man): How about cruising at 28,000 feet above the ground, as you deliver disaster relief to a community in need? //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Cross-view of a tall control tower in a tropical country.)

(Transition: View from the cockpit. Two military pilots are at the controls of the airplane.)

(Transition: View of mountains through the clouds.)

(Transition: An airborne Hercules is deploying its landing gear.)

// Voiceover (man): Or in the Arabian Gulf, performing exercises with other militaries. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Zoom out to a Red Cross emergency camp in a desert setting. Above, a helicopter is in the air, casting a shadow on the ground.)

(Transition: The military helicopter lands in the sand, creating a cloud of dust. The landscape is desert-like with mountains in the background.)

(Transition: Four soldiers carry a patient on a stretcher to the helicopter.)

// Voiceover (man): Your “office” could even be the inside of an armoured vehicle, patrolling a far-off landscape to protect civilians. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Close-up on a military helicopter on the ground. A Red Cross sign is on its nose, the numbers 6-5-5 are printed on the cross.)

(Transition: Six soldiers are lifting a patient on a stretcher into the helicopter.)

(Transition: View from the ground of a helicopter in flight.)

(Transition: View from a tank going down a road in a desert setting.)

(Transition: View from the interior of the tank where a soldier is at the controls. The bright sun shines directly into the camera’s lens.)

(Transition: A soldier is standing in the open hatch of a parked tank. He looks through binoculars at the surroundings.)

// Voiceover (man): If you want a work experience out of the ordinary, there is no career more challenging or rewarding than serving in the Canadian Armed Forces. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: A tank is moving down a desert road. Close-up on the tank with two soldiers standing in the open hatch; one is driving; the other is looking through the scope of the machine gun. They are wearing helmets and headsets.)

(Transition: Two tanks are moving quickly down the desert road.)

(Transition: A military truck is parked on a road in a foreign country. Two soldiers wearing Red Cross armbands are unloading cargo from the back of the truck. Camera pulls back on the scene. A dozen civilians, including several children, are watching the soldiers at work.)

(Transition: Three military parachutists jump out of an airplane.)

(Transition: A military diver jumps into the water from the ship’s deck. Four soldiers are already in the water, a buoy is nearby. Underwater view of the divers. The divers are inspecting large propellers.)

// Voiceover (man): Along with opportunities for world-class education and training, you’ll have unparalleled occasions for travel and adventure. It’s not your average workplace — not by a long shot! //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: View of a pilot in the cockpit of a fighter jet. He turns his head 180 degrees.)

(Transition: A pilot is walking, his helmet in hand. The jet is parked behind him on the landing strip.)

(Transition: Sign outside The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery School.)

(Transition: A man is teaching in a classroom. Three soldiers are seated at the front of the class.)

(Transition: A soldier is at the head of a classroom detailing a military exercise. Three soldiers are squatting in front of him, their weapons on the ground beside them.)

(Transition: In London, England, a red double-decker tourist bus goes past Canada House. Close-up on two soldiers as they enter the building.)

(Cut: A helicopter flies over a desert area.)

(Cut: A military ship at sea.)

(Cut: Aerial shot of two fighter jets flying over a forest at high altitude.)

// Voiceover (man): Whether you choose to serve in the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army or the Royal Canadian Air Force, there are more than 100 careers with a difference. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Cut: Sunset on the open sea, the sky is orange.)

(Cut: A military ship at sea as seen from a helicopter flying over.)

(Transition: A tank is moving, two soldiers are standing in the open hatch.)

(Cut: View from behind a fighter jet, close up on the engines. A soldier is standing on the plane, which is parked on the tarmac. The camera angle moves 180 degrees into the blazing sun.)

(Transition: Close-up on hands holding an electronic tablet, the Forces website is on screen featuring images of soldiers. Various occupations fade in over the scene.)

(Supers: Vehicle Technician, Medical Officer, Geomatics Technician, Supply Technician, Meteorological Technician, Weapons Engineering Technician, Marine Engineer, Steward, Social Work Officer, Pilot, Avionics Systems Technician, Nursing Officer, Musician, Artillery Soldier, Sonar Operator, Electrical Technician, Military Police, Signals Officer, Dental Officer, Pharmacy Officer, Naval Communicators.)

// Voiceover (man): As part of the crew aboard one of the Navy’s ships, you will learn what it is to be a sailor. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Super: ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY)

(Transition: Two military ships at sea, side-by-side.)

(Transition: Aerial view of the two ships, there are rocky mountains in the distance. Close-up on the bridge of one of the ships.)

(Transition: Close-up on a sailor in profile, he is standing on the side of the ship, speaking into a microphone. There is camera equipment beside him. He is watching the other ship as it passes on his right.)

// Voiceover (man): You will be part of a team ready to respond to conflicts and emergencies around the world. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Three sailors run through the hallway of a ship.)

(Transition: On the bridge, a soldier carries a wounded man. Beside him, two other sailors, a soldier in a white vest and two others carrying yellow helmets.)

(Transition: View from the water of a zodiac alongside a military ship. Seven soldiers are boarding the ship.)

(Cut: In the cabin, a sailor is looking through a porthole with binoculars. Another sailor is doing the same thing. Three sailors stand behind them.)

// Voiceover (man): Royal Canadian Navy ships have deployed to the coast of Africa, South America and the Caribbean. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: A military ship at sea.)

(Transition: View from the bridge of the ship, 10 sailors have gathered. The military ship enters a port in an industrial area. A cargo ship passes on the left.)

(Transition: Close-up on two sailors talking, their elbows are resting on the ledge. In the distance, rocky mountains. The camera angle moves 90 degrees as another boat passes on the left.)

(Transition: Ten soldiers on a military zodiac approach a small commercial boat holding six passengers on two levels. In the background, the military ship is anchored approximately 100 metres away.)

(Transition: Zoom out on a military ship at sea in the daytime.)

(Transition: Zoom out on a military ship sailing along the coast. The sun is setting.)

// Voiceover (man): A career in the Canadian Army will give you the opportunity to help those in need, in times of conflicts or natural disasters. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Super: CANADIAN ARMY)

(Transition: Two tanks move down a desert road. Close-up on a soldier in one of the tanks, his face is covered in camouflage paint.)

(Transition: Two soldiers wearing Red Cross armbands and stethoscopes. They are caring for a child who is accompanied by another adult.)

(Transition: Inside a tent, a member of the medical personnel team listens to a child’s heartbeat. A woman, who is wearing a veil, accompanies him.)

(Transition: At an encampment, five soldiers lift a stretcher from an ambulance. A wounded man is on the stretcher; he is hooked up to a respirator.)

// Voiceover (man): In fact, Forces’ missions have included security and civil-military cooperation projects in post-earthquake Haiti, such as the provision of clean water in neighbourhoods vulnerable to cholera. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Zoom out to an encampment in a desert setting. A group of about 30 civilians and a dozen soldiers stands outside a small cabin. On the left, a small truck is parked at the side of the road.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier wearing a Red Cross armband. She is putting a bandage on the leg of a child who is sitting on a woman’s lap. There is a group of about a dozen civilians and military personnel in the background.)

(Cut: Close-up on a Red Cross flag waving in the wind.)

(Transition: A Red Cross camp in a tropical country; there are mountains in the distance. A Canadian flag is on the side of a military container.)

(Transition: Inside a tent, a young man is sitting on the ground during an eye exam.)

(Transition: Under the same tent, close-up on medical personnel helping a woman who is having trouble walking. In the background, more medical personnel.)

(Transition: Close-up on a child wearing an orthopedic device on his leg. He is lying in a hospital bed with a woman and a soldier at his side.)

(Transition: A group of people is seated at the side of a river in a tropical country; the camera turns to the left to show a group of four soldiers in the river as they repair a bridge.)

(Cut: Close-up on a hand filling a sample jar with water that is flowing from a tap.)

(Transition: A soldier passes a pipe to another soldier, who puts it in the back of a military truck.)

(Transition: A soldier passes a hose to a young man standing on a water tank.)

// Voiceover (man): If you’ve always been fascinated by airplanes, dreamed of flying or working on some of the largest and most sophisticated aircraft in the world, a career in the Royal Canadian Air Force is the perfect match. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Super: ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE)

(Transition: Two aircraft on the landing strip, the one in the front, a Hercules, is moving slowly. Close-up on the cockpit of the one that is moving.)

(Transition: A Globemaster aircraft is taking off.)

(Transition: Aerial view of the side of a Hercules aircraft flying along a coastline.)

(Cut: Aerial view from on top of an Aurora in flight.)

(Transition: A Hercules aircraft is refuelling two fighter jets. View of snowy mountains.)

(Transition: Front view of a fighter jet performing manoeuvres: first it turns 180 degrees then dives to the ground. View of snowy mountains.)

// Voiceover (man): You may serve at home in Canada, overseas or as part of NORAD to defend North America. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: A military helicopter is landing in an arctic landscape, as an air traffic controller guides him to safety.)

(Cut: View from the cockpit of an airplane in flight. View from behind the pilot of a bright orange sunset.)

(Transition: A fighter jet is landing on a rain-soaked tarmac.)

(Transition: A military helicopter is taking off from a landing strip. A soldier in the foreground gives the pilot the thumbs-up.)

// Voiceover (man): A career in the Canadian Armed Forces is a unique combination of service and expertise, camaraderie and commitment, action and adventure. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Aerial view of snow-covered mountains.)

(Transition: Six soldiers standing outside, wearing beige coveralls and posing for the camera.)

(Transition: Inside an airplane, four soldiers are smiling and holding a Canadian flag.)

(Transition: A soldier wearing sunglasses poses outside with a child.)

(Transition: A soldier smiles.)

(Transition: A group of three soldiers seen in profile. One turns and laughs.)

// Voiceover (man): If you’re looking for a career — and a workplace — that’s out of the ordinary, you’ll find what you are looking for here. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Cut: Aerial view of a fighter jet over a coastline. The pilot signals to the photographer.)

(Transition: In a command room, a soldier smiles.)

(Transition: A soldier wearing a cap stands, smiling, in the cabin of a ship.)

(Transition: Close-up on a smiling soldier.)

(Transition: Black and white sequence: a soldier smiles, his arms crossed, as he stands in front of military truck.)

(Cut: Orange sunset on the ocean as seen from the deck of a military ship.)

// Music ends. //

// Voiceover (man): JOIN US //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Two soldiers are standing, another sitting on the bridge at the front of a ship. They are watching a vibrant orange sunset over the ocean.)

(The Forces badge appears followed by FORCES.CA.)

(Super: JOIN US)

// Drum beat. //

(The badge fades to black.)

(Super: Copyright, Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Department of National Defence, 2014.)

(Canada Wordmark)

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Canadian Forces Aboriginal Entry Program

Transcript

TITLE: ABORIGINAL PROGRAMS

MALE

For many generations, thousands of First Nations, Inuit and Métis men and women in Canada have answered the call of duty to join the Canadian Armed Forces. Today’s Aboriginal soldiers have become exceptional leaders in the Forces. Now, you too can discover how rewarding a career in the military can be — with no obligation to join.

FEMALE

Canada’s Aboriginal peoples have a proud military tradition. Aboriginal peoples were valuable allies to the British and Canadian armies during the American Revolution, the War of 1812 and the Boer War. Aboriginal men and women served in uniform during both World Wars, the Korean War, the Gulf War and Afghanistan. Their legendary courage and sacrifice are woven throughout Canadian history.

MALE

If you are considering joining the Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army or Royal Canadian Air Force, there are unique opportunities to find out if military life is for you. Each year, the Forces offer programs that let you experience the Canadian Armed Forces lifestyle, without a commitment to join. Best of all, the Forces cover all your travel, accommodation, food, clothing and equipment costs for these programs. You will even be paid a salary for participating.

FEMALE

There are three different experience programs with varying lengths of time that introduce you to what a military career is all about and help you develop the skills to become a successful leader.

Aboriginal community leaders have helped develop challenging programs that introduce you to life in the Forces.

Bold Eagle, Black Bear and Raven are all six-week-long basic military training courses conducted during the summer months. They are held across Canada, and combine military lifestyle with Aboriginal cultural awareness.

The first component of each program is a culture camp conducted by Elders of different First Nations and Aboriginal groups. This allows you to connect with your Aboriginal roots and ease the transition from a civilian to a military lifestyle.

MALE

Military instructors conduct the basic military training component. You’ll be taught how to handle weapons, fight fires, and navigate with a map and compass, administer first aid and survive in harsh environments. At the end of the course, you will receive the Canadian Armed Forces Army Reserve Basic Military Qualification. At the end of the six-week experience, you have the option to join the Reserve Force.

FEMALE

A shorter-term option to learn about military life is the three-week Canadian Armed Forces Aboriginal Entry Program. In this fast-paced program, you and your team will do drills, weapons and fitness training, and learn about career options through visits to various Navy, Army and Air Force wings and bases. When you finish the course, there is the option – but no obligation – to join the Forces. It’s your opportunity to see if the military lifestyle is for you.

MALE

The Forces are proud to have Aboriginal peoples among their ranks – from engineers and physiotherapists, to technicians and systems specialists. A great way to get a start in these careers is to take advantage of the Aboriginal Leadership Opportunity Year – or ALOY.

As an ALOY candidate, you are enrolled for a year as an Officer Cadet at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario. You will establish a learning plan, take part in tutorials for pre-university and first-year university courses. All tuition, books and materials are provided. The program also includes sports, field trips, leadership development, military training and cultural support activities.

FEMALE

All of these Aboriginal programs are designed to give you a better understanding of the Canadian Armed Forces. You’ll make lasting friendships, challenge yourself physically and mentally, and whatever path you choose to follow, come away feeling more accomplished and informed about your future career options.

MALE

Want to know more about unique opportunities for you in the Canadian Armed Forces? Visit FORCES.CA.

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The Navy Reserve in the Canadian Armed Forces

TITLE: The Navy Reserve in the Canadian Armed Forces

I do it because I love it.  There is an aspect of the Navy that I cannot get as a civilian.

Become part of the rich heritage of the Royal Canadian Navy.

You make a great salary and I love the fact that you get to travel across Canada, but there’s no commitments.

You can choose from many rewarding part-time careers.  You can serve where you want and as much, or as little, as you like.

The Navy has always been an adventure.  I often refer to it as Canada’s best-kept secret.

Push your limits.  Broaden your horizons.  Join an exceptionally trained team who vigilantly protects our coastal waters from sea to sea to sea.

Be a sailor who is ready to ship out and respond to emergencies at home and around the world when called upon.

If someone is looking for something in their life that they feel they’re missing, there’s no better opportunity than to join the Naval Reserve.

The Canadian Armed Forces Reserve.  It’s the best of both worlds.

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The Army Reserve in the Canadian Armed Forces

Transcript

TITLE: The Army Reserve in the Canadian Armed Forces

I’m proud of what I do and I know that what I’m doing is making a difference.  It’s a job that you can go home and you tell people about it and be very, very proud to do it.

Experience the honour and spirit of Canadian soldiers, as you participate in carrying on the defence of Canada and its global mission.

You get to work with a tight knit group of people.  It’s people-based as well as a mental and physical challenge.

You can choose from many challenging and exciting part-time careers.  You can serve where you want and as much, or as little, as you like.

You get different chances as time goes on.  And there’s always the opportunity, whether it’s given to you or you grasp it.

Get out of your comfort zone and into an environment that will exceed your expectations.  Join professional soldiers, devoted to protecting our country and helping people in need, wherever that may be.

Even if you’re a small part you are a part of something that’s bigger.  And it’s important.

Give it a try.  And see what you think of it, and you’ll probably end up surprising yourself.

The Canadian Armed Forces Reserve.  It’s the best of both worlds.

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The Air Reserve in the Canadian Armed Forces

Transcript

TITLE: The Air Reserve in the Canadian Armed Forces

For someone who is interested in pursuing a civilian career the Air Reserve allows for contact with the military, to be a part of the military, have a military trade.

Get airborne and push your talents and skills to the limit in the fast-paced and demanding environment of military aviation.

Outside of my work here on base, I teach piano lessons at home.  And I really enjoy that because it allows me to work in my community where I’ve already been established.

You can choose from many challenging and exciting part-time careers in the air or on the ground.  You can serve where you want and as much, or as little, as you like.

I enjoy the camaraderie of the military, the ability to experience new things.  It’s a dynamic environment with opportunities for travel.

Reach for the clouds and beyond.  Take flight with one of the world’s most respected, diverse and dependable, multi-purpose combat-capable air fleets and see where you land.

I have had quite a few rewarding experiences.  I think it changed me as a person.

The Canadian Armed Forces Reserve.  It’s the best of both worlds.

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Army Life in the Canadian Armed Forces

Transcript

ARMY LIFE IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

MODULE 1 – INTRODUCTION

TITLE: ARMY LIFE IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

MALE NARRATOR: Always ready for tomorrow's challenges in a complex, dangerous world… Canada's professional soldiers are forged in combat – devoted to helping people in need, and proud of their regiments and their traditions. 

FEMALE NARRATOR: At home in Canada, and on deployments overseas, they defend our country’s sovereignty and values with the highest standards of military excellence. Regular Force or Reserve, a career in the Canadian Army is a unique melding of service and skill, camaraderie and commitment, action and adventure.

CAPTAIN RYAN TELFER: I found in civilian life, a lot of people accepted the status quo and said “Good enough” far too often.  In the Army, “good enough” is never good enough.  You always want to strive to ensure that you’re doing the best job possible.

MODULE 2 – TRAINING

MALE NARRATOR : Here’s how an Army career begins.

MALE NARRATOR : After Basic Training, new Army recruits and officers move on to their technical and trade-specific training at one of the Canadian Forces’ specialized training establishments.  In the Combat Arms, it could be one of the Army’s area battle schools in Wainwright, Alberta; Meaford, Ontario; or Valcartier, Quebec; or the Combat Training Centre in Gagetown, New Brunswick.

MALE NARRATOR: Members of the Communications and Electronics Branch go to Kingston, Ontario, for their specialized training -- learning to use the tools that keep information moving in a modern, mobile Army.

MALE NARRATOR:  And finally, soldiers that choose medical, intelligence, military police or one of the support trades like logistics get their occupational training at Borden, Ontario.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Whatever trade you choose as an officer or non-commissioned member, you’ll be mastering the specialized job skills that the Canadian Army needs -- and gaining the expertise, leadership and self-confidence that Canadian employers desire and reward.  The Army provides unique opportunities for people not only to learn valuable technical skills, but also to learn to function effectively as part of a team in a dynamic environment.

CORPORAL CHRISTOPHER SYKES: The best part is working with a bunch of guys, having a good time, getting the job done. You’re serving your country, which is a good feeling in itself. I love my job, I love what I do.

CAPTAIN VARUN VAHAL:  The relationship you build with your men and your peers, your fellow officers – that kind of friendship, you can’t replace with anything.

MODULE 3 – LIFE ON BASE

MALE NARRATOR: If you’re a member of the Regular Force, once your training is complete, you’ll be posted to one of the Canadian Forces bases across the country.

MALE NARRATOR: As a soldier, most of your time will be spent in garrison, working at your home base.  On garrison duty, soldiers enjoy the same basic working hours and holidays as civilian workers.  Your daily routine in garrison usually starts with PT or physical training in the morning.  The rest of the day is filled with maintenance, training and other duties.

PRIVATE CHRIS TIDD: As a new Private, it was pretty intimidating coming to the Regiment, but there are a lot of very experienced people who were there to kind of help me along and show me the ropes, show me my faults, show me my strong points, and just kinda guide me in the right direction.  So it’s a steep learning curve, with a lot of fast and furious things coming at me, so it was very exciting and I was very happy to be there.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Officers spend their time in garrison planning and supervising training, preparing for field operations and carrying out their management and administrative duties. 

LIEUTENANT BRANDON McCOOL: The most challenging part is pretty much the same thing as the most fun part: you’re doing things that you haven’t done before, they’re putting you into a position where you’re definitely out of your comfort zone, and you start using your training and it actually starts forming a decent plan.  And when you get to see it all come together, you realise, like “Wow, I just did that”.

FEMALE NARRATOR: After their trade training, Reserve Force personnel return to their home unit to continue with additional training and professional development.

FEMALE NARRATOR: But base life is only one facet of the Army experience.

MODULE 4 – LIFE IN THE FIELD AND ON DEPLOYMENT

MALE NARRATOR: A deployment can be an intense, 24/7 experience in remote territory under extreme conditions.  But taking part in international deployments is one of the most important missions of our modern Canadian Army -- protecting local populations, clearing land mines, delivering humanitarian assistance and working closely with village residents and schools.  These tours usually last about six months.  It’s something soldiers look forward to and spend the rest of their time training and preparing for.

SYKES: The first time you go overseas, that’s what you trained for your whole life, that’s why you got in the military.  Being able to do your job in a real environment is actually just one of the best feelings.

BOMBARDIER SHARDAE JOHNSON: Honestly, my best experience in the Army so far has been my deployment to Afghanistan.  Your existence in the military is to train for war, you know, that’s our job.  And when you finally get to put everything into play, and all your training comes into play, there’s no better feeling than being over there with everybody that you’ve worked so hard with.  You’re finally put into a situation where you really have to shine.

TELFER: I always took great pride in being Canadian and seeing the contributions that the Canadian military had made worldwide.  I wanted to be part of it.

FEMALE NARRATOR: When your unit is on a field exercise or deployed overseas, the mission takes precedence over the comforts of home.  Soldiers are housed in camps consisting of modular shelters like these and eat their meals in a communal field kitchen. Some units are assigned patrol duties that can take them away from their camp for days at a time – traveling, working, eating and sleeping in the field. 

FEMALE NARRATOR: In camp, there are daily e-mail and telephone links to family and friends back home where possible -- and as an added bonus, you don’t pay any taxes on your income while you’re on deployment in some parts of the world, and your room and board are paid for by the Army.

MODULE 5 – WRAP-UP

CORPORAL GREG HARTWICK: In my short four years, I’ve done everything from being a soldier on the ground in Afghanistan to fighting floods, to doing missions all over the place.

CORPORAL BRYDEN KLEIN: It’s a fast-paced and a hard job.  But there’s a lot of respect and a lot of honour in it.  And if you put everything you have into it, you’ll get everything you want out of it.

CAPTAIN ANDREW McCUISH: Even out here training, something new happens every day, there’s lots of laughs.  Since I’ve joined the Army, I don’t think I’ve laughed so much in my life.  It is hard work, it is rewarding, but as well, you do have quite a bit of fun with it too, which makes it worthwhile.

MASTER CORPORAL AMANDA COLLINS: For me, it’s become the teamwork.  It’s the atmosphere.  The fact is, I can do a 9-to-5 job doing the exact same thing on civvy street, and I’m sure it’s just as gratifying to some people.  But the fact is, I can do it here and maybe tomorrow, I can deploy to Afghanistan or to Alert, and it’s just the fact that we can go a lot of places that most other people don’t even know exist.

MALE NARRATOR: You may have more specific questions about enrolling as a member of the Army and about the many opportunities available to you -- please feel free to ask any of the Canadian Forces personnel at the recruiting centre for help.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Whatever choice you make, rest assured that in choosing the Army, you’ll be joining a team with a proud heritage, carrying on a vital tradition of peacemaking and peacekeeping, and of coming to the aid of people in need, both here at home and around the world.

MALE NARRATOR: It's exciting. It's important and we do make a difference.

McCOOL: You know you’re making a difference at the end of the day, so you’re not really just showing up to work and trying to make money, you’re actually doing something you enjoy and you’re doing something that’s actually worthwhile to the community. 

HARTWICK: Getting in, I was hoping for deployments, I was hoping for some travel and stuff like that.  But I really didn’t have an idea of how much stuff would actually be going on, how busy I would actually be, and it’s definitely gone way above and beyond what I ever expected.  There really is no other lifestyle like it, and I’ve loved it, from Day 1.

TITLE: ARMY LIFE IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

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Air Force Life in the Canadian Armed Forces

Transcript

AIR FORCE LIFE IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

MALE NARRATOR: Aboard fighter jets, long-range patrol or transport aircraft, tactical or search and rescue helicopters, at bases across Canada, and on board ship with our rugged maritime helicopters, the men and women of Canada’s Air Force fly and maintain one of the world’s most diverse and dependable multi-purpose, combat-capable fleets.

FEMALE NARRATOR: The roar of take-off… the relief of a dramatic rescue… the complexity of delivering humanitarian assistance in a remote and hostile environment. For Canadian airmen and airwomen, these are the challenges and rewards of a unique and highly desirable career.

MALE NARRATOR:After Basic Training, new Air Force recruits and officer candidates move on to their technical and trade-specific training at one of the Canadian Forces’ specialized training schools.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Whatever job you select, your training will include intensive classroom and hands-on practical instruction from some of the best teachers in the air and on the ground. For tradespersons, that will be followed by a period of on-the-job training, under the supervision of experienced technicians and operators.

MASTER CORPORAL DANIEL HÉROUX: Well, when you get to your first aircraft, you start learning right away and experienced technicians really show you around. You get to work on new technologies every day; you get to travel and see the world – it’s amazing.

CORPORAL ALEX BARTLETTE: I haven’t been bored yet – they keep you on your toes, always new equipment, lots of things going on, lots of challenges.

MALE NARRATOR: Flight line training is an important part of many Air Force trades: including fuelling, towing, marshalling, de-icing and cleaning aircraft. Every mission depends on the skills and experience of each member of the flight and ground teams.

FEMALE NARRATOR: The goal of this training is to prepare you for your role as a member of a highly skilled Air Force team, dedicated to the defense of Canada, and to the support of Canadian interests at home and abroad

CAPTAIN TYLER LAVIGNE: I was working in the tech industry, private sector. I wanted something that offered an opportunity to work more than just out of a cubicle. Essentially, I wanted the adventure; I wanted the challenge. I wanted to use the expertise I acquired during my years at university and couple it with the leadership potential that the Canadian Forces offer.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Canada's Air Force is at work every day at our 13 air bases spread across the country.

MALE NARRATOR: In Canada’s multi-platform Air Force, every airframe and every mission has its own unique demands.

CAPTAIN DIANE BALDASARO: The flying I’ve done in Afghanistan is certainly the most exciting and most fun that I’ve done so far. It’s also the most challenging: when you’re low-level, you need to have a heightened awareness, the whole crew needs to be on their game, and you really appreciate the training that you’ve done up to that point when you’re actually in the situation.

MALE NARRATOR: Every flight crew, air traffic control, air defence, radar, and maintenance unit includes highly-trained members from many different trades: engineers; pilots and air combat systems officers; aircraft structures, avionics, aviation and air weapons systems technicians; loadmasters; aerospace controllers; and many other vital specialties.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Whether it's defending Canadian airspace, flying search and rescue missions, intercepting aircraft or ships carrying illegal drugs, ferrying soldiers and supplies to an overseas deployment or providing relief during national disasters, we play a direct role in keeping Canada and Canadians safe.

MALE NARRATOR: Most Air Force personnel work a regular, 40-hour week on base. The day is typically split into day and night shifts, because Air Force operations run round the clock, 24-7. They serve out on the flight line, or work inside a hangar, control tower, terminal, operations room or maintenance facility.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Other members, including flight crews, search-and-rescue teams and their support personnel, can be called on at any time, for immediate response to a vessel in trouble, a natural disaster, or a potential threat to our national security.

MALE NARRATOR: In addition to their work here at home, Canadian airmen and airwomen can be based at various locations in the U.S. as part of Canada's contribution to NORAD, the North American Aerospace Defence Command.

Air Force personnel also serve in Europe, as members of Canada’s contingent with NATO’s Airborne Early Warning and Control Force based in Geilenkirchen, Germany.

MALE NARRATOR: Our combat-ready force takes an active role in multinational missions, representing Canada's interests on the world stage and helping to maintain global stability. The Air Force flies peace support missions and conveys relief workers, emergency food and medical supplies to scenes of natural disasters or where armed conflicts devastated the region.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Air Force members who are assigned to our tactical Griffon and Chinook helicopters deploy when needed to support our Army troops on missions at home and abroad.

CAPTAIN PETER CURTIS: Every single flight provides a great deal of fun, just in the freedom and the experience of flying, and that is felt nowhere as greatly as when we’re actually deployed on operations in support of Canadian Forces.

MALE NARRATOR: A deployment can be an intense, 24/7 experience in remote territory under extreme conditions. But taking part in international deployments is one of the most important missions of the Canadian Forces -- protecting local populations, delivering humanitarian assistance and working closely with local residents and schools. These tours usually last about six months.

FEMALE NARRATOR: When squadrons are on a field exercise or deployed overseas, the mission takes precedence over the comforts of home. Personnel are often housed in camps consisting of tents or modular shelters and eat their meals in a communal field kitchen.

MALE NARRATOR: Air Force members working with maritime helicopter squadrons on each coast spend time aboard Canadian Navy frigates and destroyers, as members of the ship’s air detachment, flying and maintaining our ship-based helicopters in support of naval operations. Naval deployments can last from a few weeks to six months or longer.

FEMALE NARRATOR: In addition, many Air Force members take part in international exercises and training missions, exchanging knowledge and experiences with allied air forces around the world.

BARTLETTE: I’ve been all over the place in the last year, down to Florida, Key West, Hawaii, Egypt – I’ve been all the way up to the North Pole. There’s a lot of different cultures, little things that you get to see that you wouldn’t get to see being at home. I’ve met a lot of new people, a lot of really good friends, some that I would call my best friends now.

CAPTAIN JOSH RILEY: A career in the Canadian Forces is extremely unique, it’s unlike anything else. You’re constantly doing different things – your job changes on a regular basis each time you get posted and even within your postings.

CAPTAIN JAMEEL JANJUA: You know, it’s very difficult not to enjoy flying 300 hours a year in a $30 million aircraft at one-and-a-half times the speed of sound. It’s really hard to wake up in the morning and not be excited to go to work.

LAVIGNE: Oh, it’s surpassed all my expectations. I never thought I’d really have the opportunity to go to places I’ve been, to see the things I’ve seen. Every day is something new. You really never know what to expect when you come in.

BARTLETTE: If you enjoy furthering your education and travel, and a touch of discipline, then it’s going to be the right place for you.

MASTER CORPORAL DANIELLE LANGLEY: I have been all over Canada, and all over the world, within a short 10 years, it’s… I can’t even explain how amazing it’s been.

CAPTAIN MARC COMEAU: The adventure is just the career. There’s so many things that are out there that we’re involved in and we’re able to experience. It’s just phenomenal.

FEMALE NARRATOR: You may have more specific questions about enrolling as a member of the Air Force and about the many opportunities available to you -- please feel free to ask any of the Canadian Forces personnel at the recruiting centre for help.

MALE NARRATOR: Whatever choice you make, the Air Force is ready to welcome you -- as it has welcomed thousands of Canada’s finest young men and women before you – with a rich and rewarding heritage of service, adventure, and pride.

AIR FORCE LIFE IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

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Basic military qualification course

Transcript

BASIC MILITARY QUALIFICATION IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

MALE NARRATOR: It’s a 14-week journey to a new career and a new way of life – three-plus demanding months of military education and physical challenges. New skills – new friends - and proud traditions - summed up in just three letters: B M Q.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Whether you choose to serve in the Army, Navy or Air Force, every man and woman who joins the Canadian Forces will go through Basic Military Qualification, or BMQ, at the Leadership and Recruit school in historic Saint-Jean, Quebec.

MALE NARRATOR: Whether you’re joining as an infantry soldier or a musician, an avionics technician or a cook, it all starts here. This is where you’ll develop -- and demonstrate -- the vigour, strength, and stamina you’ll need to be an effective member of your team.

LAURA HAMELIN: It is very hard, yes you do things that you never thought possible in the world that you’d be able to do. But you do it, and you get through the day. And that’s it.

FEMALE NARRATOR: BMQ isn’t easy, but your instructors will inspire you and provide mentorship and coaching to help you achieve each milestone and break through limits you never thought you’d reach. You’ll learn to overcome your weaknesses and build on your strengths.

ISABEL BRUNET: I had no idea what I was getting into.

FETRATALI MOHAD: Pretty challenging in the beginning. But then once you get going and going, it gets the whole body going. It’s awesome.

MALE NARRATOR: Every step of the way, you’ll be following generations of Canadians who have accepted the challenge and served with pride, in one of the world’s elite military forces.

FEMALE NARRATOR: In Saint-Jean, you’ll join other recruits in the megaplex – a self-contained dormitory, gym, cafeteria and school complex. You’ll be outfitted with your basic military kit – uniforms, boots, helmet, rucksack, bedding and pretty much everything else you’ll need here, including your personal firearm.

MALE NARRATOR: Early in your training, you will have to meet the Forces’ minimum standard for push-ups, sit-ups, handgrip strength and aerobic fitness. So it’s a great idea to start watching your weight, quitting smoking and ramping up your workouts NOW, before you head to BMQ. Every kilometer and kilogram you rack up today will make BMQ just that much easier.

FEMALE NARRATOR: During BMQ, you’ll be taught the core values of the Canadian Forces – courage, integrity, loyalty and duty – as well as the basics of military life – standards of dress, discipline and conduct – and the ethical codes of a modern military in a multicultural country that respects diversity and human rights.

MALE NARRATOR: You’ll wear your uniform at all times and visitors will only be allowed -- on weekends and holidays -- AFTER the first five weeks.

FEMALE NARRATOR: You’ll be assigned to a platoon – a group of 60 recruits who will be your teammates throughout your basic training experience. In fact teamwork may be the most important lesson you’ll take away from St. Jean.

BRUNET: You have to work together, ‘cause if you are just caring about yourself, you’re not going anywhere. Teamwork is a huge thing, and my platoon has it – it’s working.

MALE NARRATOR: You’ll do everything together – from eating your meals together at the cafeteria; to sharing responsibility for your common living quarters.

JOSHUA WENSINK: We probably spend at least a few hours a day just cleaning – our own cubicles, our rifles, our boots, everything else.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Your daily routine consists of early mornings – starting with a 5 a.m. wakeup call – long, active days – and late nights, maintaining your personal equipment and living quarters and getting ready for the next day’s challenge.

WENSINK: We’re getting ready for our inspection, so we have to lay out our rifle, all our gear, boots, tac vest. This gets inspected - pretty much everything.

Female recruit : … ready for your inspection, Master Corporal.

Instructor: Staying right there…

Instructor: Even day, it’s even boots.

Instructor: Who’s the Canadian Forces Chief Warrant Officer ?

Instructor: Let’s go, give me 10 push-ups.

Male recruit: …fifteen…

Instructor: That’s good, it’s getting better.

Female recruit: thank you, Master Corporal.

FEMALE NARRATOR: At the core of your BMQ experience is physical conditioning.

MALE NARRATOR: Physical training at BMQ takes many different forms - each one designed for the real world demands you’ll meet during your career.

You’ll meet the Basic Military Swim Standard and you’ll learn to conquer the obstacle course.

MOHAD: The hardest part would be that 6-foot jump over the wall there. Pretty tough. It could take me about 10, maybe 11 tries, but I still didn’t make it. I’m going to work hard on it – it will be awesome.

FEMALE NARRATOR: You’ll do a lot of running, starting with a 3-kilometre run and gradually increasing the distance until you build up your endurance.

WENSINK: It was really fast pace, a little quicker than I thought, so it hurt the legs a bit, but it was fine.

MALE NARRATOR: There’s also a lot of marching. As the weeks progress, you’ll take part in longer and longer marches that will range up to 13 kilometres, with a full rucksack and combat gear.

LAM: When you’re doing it, you feel like you want to give up. Today, I didn’t give up. I took longer than everybody else, but I still did it.

FEMALE NARRATOR: It takes a lot more than muscles to make a successful soldier, sailor, or air force member.

MALE NARRATOR: You’ll be trained in the safe handling and proper use of military weapons; the basics of cross-country navigation; patrolling and reconnaissance; basic first aid; offensive and defensive operations; and how to survive in the field, even under extreme conditions.

CHRISTOPHER EDWARDS: The hardest thing I’ve done is all the physical training, staying awake, doing duties… We have section attacks… it’s very physically and mentally draining. …Now it’s over, you feel great.

WENSINK: Food, shower and bed. That’s it. Those are the only things to think about right now.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Basic Military Qualification is a 14-week life changing experience that will transform you from civilian to soldier.

ORDINARY SEAMAN CHRISTOPHER EDWARDS : It’s mentally hard, physically hard, but once you get through it, it feels great – it’s a great accomplishment.

PRIVATE (RECRUIT) JOSHUA WENSINK: I’ve become a lot more self-reliant, more responsible, and I’ve grown up a lot.

PRIVATE (RECRUIT) LAURA HAMELIN: I have changed drastically. I have a lot more confidence in myself; I know that if I put my mind to something, I can achieve it.

MALE NARRATOR: Physically, and emotionally, it may be the toughest thing you’ve ever done in your life.

But one thing is certain: it will make you physically stronger, mentally sharper, and more confident than you’ve ever been before. Pumped for a great career in the Canadian Forces: fit, strong, and ready to serve.

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Basic Officer Training Course

Transcript

TITLE: BASIC MILITARY OFFICER QUALIFICATION IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

MALE NARRATOR: In the Canadian Forces, the core qualities of professional leadership are forged during Basic Military Officer Qualification – an intensive and physically demanding three-month test of mind, muscle and a candidate’s internal strength.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Here at the Canadian Forces Leadership and Recruit School at Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, officer candidates are transformed from civilian life into a unique and rewarding career as a leader of soldiers, sailors, or air men and air women.

MALE NARRATOR: BMOQ spans the entire range of leadership training – in classroom sessions and field exercises – on overland marches and precision drill, and in the barracks and the gym.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Nothing about BMOQ is easy. Every task will be more demanding than the one before. You’ll need physical and mental resilience to succeed.

AMANDA TRUSWELL: You gotta improvise, you gotta find a way to do it – there’s always a way to do something. And so we just have to find the best way to complete the task.

MALE NARRATOR: At Saint-Jean, you will be taught by some of the best instructors in the world, instilled with the art and science of leadership. When you graduate, you will be ready for a career of pride and service, as a commissioned officer in the Canadian Forces.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Officer candidates are housed in the megaplex – a self-contained dormitory, gym, cafeteria and school complex. You’ll be outfitted with your basic military kit – uniforms, boots, helmet, rucksack, bedding and pretty much everything else you’ll need here, including your personal firearm.

MALE NARRATOR: You’ll wear your uniform at all times and visitors will only be allowed -- on weekends and holidays -- AFTER the first five weeks.

FEMALE NARRATOR: During BMOQ, you’ll be taught the basics of military life – standards of dress, discipline and conduct.

Your daily routine will consist of early mornings – starting with a 5 a.m. wakeup call – long, active days – and late nights, maintaining your personal equipment and living quarters and getting ready for the next day’s challenge. Frequent inspections are an important part of the program.

Every minute of BMOQ is programmed to produce a corps of professional leaders – officers who are proactive and seek out and accept responsibility.

CHRISTOPHER KIRK: University was basically a competition with myself to get the best marks, and here, that really doesn’t matter. It’s really everyone trying to do the same thing to the same standard, and no one gets left behind.

SIMON HARDMAN: They really do emphasise teamwork, I think, even more than I expected them to. A lot of organizations pay lip service to teamwork, and these folks actually put it into action. You do everything as a team, and you’re constantly thinking about the team over youself.

MALE NARRATOR: You’ll learn the core values of the Canadian Forces – courage, integrity, loyalty and duty – as well as the moral and ethical codes of a modern military in a multicultural country that respects diversity and human rights - principles that have made it one of the world’s most respected military forces.

FEMALE NARRATOR: You’ll learn how to handle, load and fire your weapon, as well as how to navigate cross-country, day and night, in challenging weather and unfamiliar topography.

SIMON HARDMAN: One of the hardest things for me has been the physical discomfort of being in the field. I mean, that’s really what’s it’s all about but, you know – and it’s fun – but you spend the whole week tired and dirty and uncomfortable and wet, and often hungry, so it’s very realistic.

MALE NARRATOR: The Canadian Forces expects its officers to be in prime physical condition, ready to lead their units through the toughest challenges of their lives.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Physical training at BMOQ takes many different forms -- all designed for the real world demands you’ll meet during your career.

You’ll meet the Basic Military Swim Standard and you’ll learn to conquer the obstacle course.

Cross-country runs - and marches - build from short jogs to a 13-kilometre endurance test, with full rucksacks and combat gear.

MALE NARRATOR: The Forces have set minimum standards for sit-ups, push-ups, hand grip strength and aerobic fitness. So it’s a great idea to start watching your weight, quitting smoking and ramping up your workouts NOW, before you head to BMOQ. Every kilometer and kilogram you rack up today will make it just that much easier.

The core of an officer’s duty is to complete the mission.

TRUSWELL: Being able to delegate tasks is the most important part, and being a follower as well as a leader is what they’re teaching us here today. So when other people are doing their leadership roles, we have to make sure we kind of take a back seat and just do what they ask us to do.

FEMALE NARRATOR: At BMOQ, your instructors will focus on the building blocks of military leadership, including: field training in unit movement; force cohesion; offensive and defensive operations; survival in the event of chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear attack; mission planning; and writing of reports.

By the end of the course – when you go into the field for a demanding five-day, four-night exercise -- you will be pushed to the limit of your physical strength and stamina, and tested on your readiness to command and inspire a team under difficult and stressful conditions.

GREGORY JOHNSON: It was a lot harder than I expected. There’s a lot more complicated aspects to it that I hadn’t forethought of.

You will be tested frequently and there will be some surprises along the way -- because in the real world of a modern Army, Navy, or Air Force – there are no easy days.

TRUSWELL: To lead a group of my section, it was interesting. I had to secure a vehicle check-point. It didn’t go so well – we actually did not find the car bomb that was in the vehicle, so our instructors said “you’re all dead”.

HARDMAN: There’s a saying that the best-laid plans go astray or awry. I mean, you can spend all the time planning that you want, but at some point, you’re going to have to react on your feet. And that’s what happens, usually sort of halfway through the mission. They change things – a new situation arises and you have to adapt to it very quickly.

TRUSWELL: But that’s the whole process, that’s why they teach you, that’s why we’re learning things here today – to learn to lead, and to make the mistakes here today.

MALE NARRATOR: BMOQ will be the most demanding three months you have ever experienced.

CAPTAIN CHRISTOPHER KIRK: Getting here, at week 1 or week 0, it was like being at the base of a huge mountain, and every day, you just have to climb that mountain.

SECOND LIEUTENANT AMANDA TRUSWELL: Trying to meld with different personalities – not everyone is the same, and so when you’re working with different types of people, they bring different aspects of leadership to the table. And there’s a lot of A+ personalities, so sometimes you’re clashing for leadership and “I wanna do this, no I wanna do this” and that’s where it can be tough, but it’s been an exciting adventure.

ACTING SUB-LIEUTENANT SIMON HARDMAN: I think the most memorable moment for me in BMOQ was returning from my own mission at Vimy, which is the final exercise. So when you have done all your orders and you have spent your four hours getting ready and actually executing the mission – to return with your section and be done with it is a pretty thrilling feeling.

FEMALE NARRATOR: When Graduation Day arrives, you will have achieved one of the great milestones of your life.

MALE NARRATOR: You will be a military officer, instilled with the tools of true leadership: the confidence, the commitment, and the pride - and ready for a great career in the Canadian Forces.

KIRK: I’m just incredibly proud of everything that our whole platoon accomplished. Just really happy to complete the 15 weeks and carry on with the next phase.

TRUSWELL: I am proud, I’m proud to actually be part of the Canadian military now; officially, I can call myself an officer. It’s been 15 long weeks, but I’m now a Second Lieutenant.

HARDMAN: Today represents for me, I think, a mixture of relief that this course is over; sadness that this course is over; and just feeling anxious and wanting to move on with the next phase of the training and the rest of my career.

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Community

Transcript

TITLE: COMMUNITY

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: What I like the most about my job is the people I work with. I've made a lot of great friends in the Forces, and no matter where they're posted and where they're living right now, we keep in contact.

EMELY ALCINA: During my basic training, I had the chance to meet lots of people, and they're still people that are my friends, and every time we're in the same town, it's like we just saw each other yesterday.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: The friends that I've made in the Canadian Forces are different, because you share experiences that you do not share with anybody else. The friendships that you make also rely on trusting each other, and trust is one of those important qualities in a friendship, so those friends that you make, they're very strong.

KAREN STREEK: The friendships that you make in basic training you have for life. I still keep in touch with a lot of them. And then you don't see them for several years, and you run into each other at a military exercise, and it's just like you knew them your whole life, and you just stay and chat, 'cause you go through so much together. You really know each other on a deeper level than you knew any of your friends in high school.

ROSEANNA MANDY: And I know that I can trust the people that I serve with with my life, so I would say that, yeah, some of my friendships are a little different. I do find I've made incredible friendships and some really great bonds with people that I've served with.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I would say that the friends that I've made in the Canadian Forces are closer than my civilian friends, because I think when you go through challenging times with people, that brings you closer together.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: When they do join the Canadian Forces, you do join a family, and the friendships that I've made have lasted my lifetime.

TITLE: COMMUNITY

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Reserve Life in the Canadian Armed Forces

Transcript

TITLE: RESERVE LIFE IN THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES

It’s an environment that allows very unique experiences than any other workforce.  It’s an ability to do it part-time, to have a civilian job as well as participating in your military environment.

In the Canadian Reserve Force you choose your own path.  Your Unit. Your schedule. Go as far as you want to go.

The morale is high, you’re spending time with your friends you’re having fun.  You’re working hard.  It’s good

You choose where and how often you wish to serve.  As little as one night a week, one weekend a month.  You can also serve longer at home or abroad.  The experience of a lifetime is totally up to you.

I have seen many parts of the world, whether it’s Africa, Europe, on the high seas and the ocean sailing around the world, I’ve been there.

Visit more places than most people see in a lifetime.  Enjoy new challenges and experiences.  Develop new skills.  If you’re looking for an opportunity for personal growth that’s definitely out of the ordinary, then the Reserve Force is for you!

Serving my country, being a part of this bigger picture, is something that I find incredibly exciting that you’re not going to get in your everyday job.

The Canadian Armed Forces Reserve.  It’s the best of both worlds.

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The Health Services Reserve in the Canadian Armed Forces

Transcript

TITLE: THE HEALTH SERVICES RESERVE IN THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES

There’s so many different opportunities that you just can’t get in your home environment, which is amazing.  And to be supported by the military, and know you’re totally taken care of is huge.

Put your expertise and experience to the test with state of the art medical equipment and training.  Confront exciting new clinical challenges you wouldn’t see anywhere else, without giving up your full-time medical career.

This is a good fit for me.  I really like to work with the Canadian Forces.  It lets me do things as an emergency specialist that I would otherwise never be able to do.

You can choose from many challenging and exciting part-time medical careers.  You can serve where you want and as much, or as little, as you like.

You’re learning to think outside the box.  You’re learning to be creative and improvise in the types of treatments that you have to deal with a little bit of resources.

Joining the Health Services Reserve is a great way to take your skills to an entirely new level.  Change up your daily routine and add the satisfaction of serving your country, at home or abroad, to your professional achievements.

I really think it’s important to be part of an organization that’s well equipped and works well if you want to go and make a difference in the world.

The Canadian Armed Forces Reserve.  It’s the best of both worlds.

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Regular Officer Training Plan

Transcript

FEMALE NARRATOR: The Canadian Forces' Regular Officer Training Plan is an opportunity of a lifetime. It combines an outstanding university education, unique personal and physical challenges, and a direct pathway to a prestigious military career as a leader of tomorrow’s Canadian Army, Air Force and Navy.

MALE NARRATOR: The advantages of the plan include full paid tuition, salary and benefits while at university, and guaranteed employment during your summer months and after graduation. But there’s an even greater reward: contributing as a commissioned officer to the global mission of the Canadian Forces; taking professional leadership, personal pride, and national service to the highest level.

FEMALE NARRATOR: If your high school grades are good enough, if you meet a high standard of physical fitness, and if you show outstanding potential for leadership, the Forces will cover all of your tuition and other expenses for four years of university, at either The Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario, or at a Canadian university of your choice.

MALE NARRATOR: The ROTP is a great opportunity for anyone interested in serving Canada at home and overseas and getting a first-class university education at the same time.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Since the 1870s, the Royal Military College of Canada has served as a nucleus of Canada's military education system.

MALE NARRATOR: At RMC, core studies and military training go hand in hand – built around four principal components of achievement: academics, leadership, athletics and bilingualism.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Nothing about RMC is easy: even before the first year of courses begins, officer cadets complete a 2-week orientation to the Canadian Forces and an assessment of their physical and personal strengths. And physical challenges continue throughout all four years on campus.

MALE NARRATOR: Like any other modern Canadian university, RMC offers a range of majors in the arts and sciences, with an emphasis on science and engineering, the backbone of many technically-based careers in the modern military. But there are also excellent programs that lead to degrees in Politics, Economics, English, French, History, and Military Psychology and Leadership. In addition to academics, Officer Cadets participate in a wide variety of intramural and varsity sports.

FEMALE NARRATOR: After completing their first year of studies, Officer Cadets undertake their Basic Military Officer Qualification. It’s an 11-week field course with an emphasis on teamwork, “leadership and followership”.

MALE NARRATOR: Military training continues during the summers following the second and third years at RMC. This includes environmental training which introduces cadets to life in the Army, Navy, or Air Force, depending on their chosen occupation; intensive second-language immersion; as well as specific occupational training. Every officer needs to be able to work comfortably and competently in both French and English and this is also a requirement to graduate from RMC.

OFFICER CADET BRIAN NORWICK: I think what stuck out for me was the extra challenge. All through high school, I liked to play my sports, I liked to push hard in my academics – I like to sort of keep myself well-rounded and the ROTP program offered me an opportunity where I could do that.

OFFICER CADET ASHLEY BAYES: The bonds you make – you know when you leave here, you’re going to have connections in all the elements, in all the trades. You’re gonna know someone, and that will help you later on in your career, for sure.

NORWICK: I tell the boys back home, and they’re always envious. It’s the type of life that’s full of speed, adventure, and lots of fun. We work hard and we play harder. And I think that’s the best thing we get out of this school.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Students who complete their high school studies in Quebec, as well as those students outside the province of Quebec who are missing prerequisites for direct admission to RMC of Canada, will complete a Preparatory Year at the Royal Military College – St Jean. Located in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, RMC St-Jean ensures the smooth transition from high school to university, by providing pre-university and college-level programs. Students select either the Social Sciences program (for those pursuing a degree in Arts) or the Science program (for students pursuing a degree in Engineering or Science). Each is offered in both official languages.

MALE NARRATOR: Following successful completion of their Prep Year, students can begin their undergraduate studies at RMC Kingston or they may choose to complete their first year of undergraduate studies at RMC St-Jean. Students who take this route and who meet the academic requirements receive a CEGEP diploma from the province of Quebec. These students continue their undergraduate studies at RMC Kingston, beginning in the Second Year.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Candidates may be able to attend the Canadian university of their choice if a particular program of study is not offered at RMC, or if the number of successful ROTP applicants exceeds classroom and residence capacity at RMC. This is also the case for candidates who have already begun their studies at a Canadian university. Tuition, books, lab fees and student fees are covered, and you receive the same monthly salary and benefits as students at RMC.

MALE NARRATOR: Nursing or Pharmacy are some of the programs that can be completed at Canadian institutions outside the Military College System.

NAVAL CADET SUSANNE ERICKSON: You get paid a salary to go to class, and that’s essentially your job for four years. And then as soon as you’re done, you can start working right away.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Like ROTP students at RMC, officer cadets attending civilian universities will undergo the two-week orientation program at RMC and also spend their following summers doing military training, starting with a 15-week Basic Military Officer Qualification course.

ERICKSON: It was pretty nerve-racking, but it was a great experience. As soon as you get there, you’re surrounded by a bunch of other people in the same position and you work together to get through the course.

MALE NARRATOR: On completion of their studies, all Regular Officer Training Plan graduates begin their commitment to serve Canada in the Army, Navy or Air Force in their chosen occupation. The commitment is 2 months of service for each month of academic subsidization. As a new officer, you'll get to put your academic, military, physical, and language training to the test every day, as a leader in one of the world’s most modern fighting forces.

FEMALE NARRATOR: If you’re looking for unique responsibilities, a meaningful career with excellent opportunities, and the chance to develop your personal strengths, then your first step is the Regular Officer Training Plan.

ERICKSON: A lot of my student friends, they have to worry about finding a summer job and something part-time, and I don’t have to do that. It just seemed like a great chance for me to get my education and serve my country.

NORWICK: The best part for me in the ROTP program is all the doors that it’s opened up for me. Whether it’s through the academics or military training, it’s taken me all across Canada and some parts of the world – also opening up my own boundaries, things that I used to think were impossible, they’re now open to me.

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Non-Commissioned Member Subsidized Education Plan

Transcript

TITLE: NON-COMMISSIONED MEMBER SUBSIDIZED EDUCATION PLAN

MALE NARRATOR: Looking to get into a highly respected and well-paying career? Looking for specialized training in skills that are in demand?

FEMALE NARRATOR: Looking for a way to cover your college expenses? And even collect a full salary and great benefits while you’re going to school?

Then take a look at the educational opportunities offered by the Canadian Forces!

MALE NARRATOR: If you're already attending college, or just getting ready to, and you're interested in a career in a skilled, hands-on trade, you should definitely take a look at the Canadian Forces’ subsidized education plan. It’s available at a number of community colleges and CEGEPS across the country.

FEMALE NARRATOR: If you qualify, the Forces pay for your tuition and your books… and you get paid a salary, plus benefits, while you go to school.

MALE NARRATOR: To qualify, you must meet the basic conditions of enrolment in the Canadian Forces...

FEMALE NARRATOR: ...and you’ll need to enroll in courses in a select number of specialized trades on the military’s current list.

MALE NARRATOR: These are 1 to 3 year programs. When you finish, you'll have earned a diploma in a skilled trade that's in high demand – in the Forces and in private industry.

FEMALE NARRATOR: After you graduate, you begin a commitment to serve Canada in the Army, Navy or Air Force in your chosen occupation. The commitment is 2 months of service for each month of academic subsidization.

MALE NARRATOR: Once you report to your unit, you’ll receive even more specialized training related to the specific trade you’ve chosen. And you’ll be eligible for a promotion and a raise in pay.

FEMALE NARRATOR: If you choose a naval trade, you’ll complete your basic training, and then be assigned to a ship. Naval technicians get to work with state-of-the-art equipment: weapons systems, communication systems, sonar, radar - equipment that's critical in keeping Canada's naval fleet operational and combat-ready.

MALE NARRATOR: The Canadian Army also offers a number of dynamic trades that are eligible for the subsidized education plan. We’re talking about highly specialized fields such as repairing and maintaining armoured vehicles. . . and establishing and securing vital battlefield communications systems.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Or if working on sophisticated aircraft and avionic systems is more your speed, then perhaps a career as a technician in Canada’s Air Force is what you’re looking for.

MALE NARRATOR: The Forces are also seeking members in selected support and health care fields, many of which may qualify for fully subsidized education. So check it out.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Here's the deal. You can take advantage of the Canadian Forces subsidized education plan by enrolling in a qualified program of study in selected Army, Navy, Air Force, health care or support trades... meeting the Forces standard entrance requirements... and following through with more training and a commitment to a brief term of service.

MALE NARRATOR :

When you finish your initial contract, you can choose to stay and continue to build your career with the Forces, or look for employment in the private sector.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Canadian Forces salaries are very competitive, with lots of opportunities for advancement. Plus the benefits package is outstanding.

MALE NARRATOR: And no one gives you a better chance to get out there and see the world!

FEMALE NARRATOR:...and make lasting friendships.

Interested? Great! Want to find out more?

MALE NARRATOR: Visit the Canadian Forces website at www.forces.ca You’ll find informative videos that detail each one of occupations that are currently eligible for the subsidized education plan.

FEMALE NARRATOR: And you’ll get a taste of what life in the Canadian Forces is like.

MALE NARRATOR: Then, go ahead: take the next step.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Contact your local Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre today !

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Paid education

TITLE: PAID EDUCATION IN THE FORCES

NARRATOR: A quality education and a dream career. The Forces have it.

NARRATOR: Debt-free education.
Paid university and college tuition.
Full salary and benefits while you study.
Language training.
A meaningful career.
Skills that last a lifetime.
And a chance to change lives.
The Forces: it’s not just an education. It’s an adventure.
Ask our graduates…

Captain Varun Vahal (REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN)

I studied engineering and working to make money to pay for school or getting a loan or getting anything like that, that puts you in a greater financial debt. The Army option was they'll pay for my school, they'll pay for all my expenses on top of giving me a salary and all I have to do is go to school and be successful.

Major Joseph Franklin (DENTAL OFFICER TRAINING PLAN)

I thought dental school was going to cost about 10,000 dollars a year, unfortunately it cost significantly more. I did the first year working part-time and then I decided I don't think I can carry on with this debt load and looked to the military and realized they can help me out and relieve al to of stress financially but also open my eyes to a lot of opportunities.

Corporal Jaime DeMerchant (NON-COMMISSIONED MEMBER SUBSIDIZED EDUCATION PLAN)

I would say that number one, it was financial just because it was a great opportunity, I had tuition paid for, books paid for, I mean a lot of people these days have to do a part-time job plus they have to still worry about paying student loans so it's a really good opportunity. People worry what am I going to do in the summer and at the end when I finish and in the military it was really nice I didn't' have to worry about that.

Captain Varun Vahal (REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN)

It gave me the opportunity to come out and do training during the summer session when university was off and then come back to school for the following two semesters and then again go back to training and graduate and continue on with my career.

Lieutenant Sean Davies (REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN)

I chose to go through civilian university so I could continue to study at the college I started at. While I was on course in the summer, I was on with RMC students and other civilian university students and we were treated as one and we do our training together and come out of our training together and get posted to regiments together so really it doesn't matter where you go to university as long as you're ready to serve afterwards.

NARRATOR: Paid education in the Forces is available. Your future is waiting.

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Education

Transcript

TITLE: EDUCATION

KAREN STREEK: When I joined the Forces, I went to the Royal Military College of Canada, where I took a degree in mechanical engineering.

EMELY ALCINA: I actually did my undergraduate in psychology, and then I went back for a master's degree in counselling.

ROSEANNA MANDY: I studied journalism at Carleton. The military provided me with the opportunity to attend many different types of courses and really develop skills.

CHERYL BUSH: So, since I've been in the Forces, I have actually pursued secondary education. I'm actually working towards a Bachelor of Arts, and I'm getting that through the Royal Military College. So, the military's actually been paying so far for all my tuition and books, which has been great.

KAREN STREEK: The Forces pay for the full tuition while you're at the Military College, and as well they give you a small salary.

LYNNE PATTERSON: When I went to university, I went as a civilian, so I paid for my own university, but since I've been in, there's lots of paid-education opportunities. The military offered the course, also paid for my lodging and my quarters.

ROSEANNA MANDY: As a member of the Canadian Armed Forces, we are always undergoing training. I endeavour with the support of the Canadian Forces to undergo at least six different courses and qualifications a year. That's my personal goal, and the Canadian Armed Forces has been really supportive in helping me to reach that.

LYNNE PATTERSON: You get a lot of professional development when you're in the military

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Life at RMC Saint-Jean

Transcript

TITLE: LIFE AT RMC SAINT-JEAN

RMC Saint-Jean - a choice for the future

(We see scrolling images of officer cadets engaged in various activities as part of their training at the College: lectures, orienteering, sports and cultural activities, Convocation, etc. The sequence ends with the appearance of the logo of the College under which reads: RMC Saint-Jean, a choice for the future.)

(View of the earth from space and accelerated zoom-in towards the earth ending with an aerial map of the site of the College as seen by satellite Google Earth; then appears an aerial view of the site of the College followed by pictures of its buildings.)

The Royal Military College Saint-Jean offers a complete college program.

(We see a close shot of the narrator in the College Library. A transparent grey board appears in reverse before her. The following image shows the same board right side round on which appears one below the other the name of the four components of the College's curriculum. There is a white circle besides the name of each component. Showing her back to the camera, the narrator presses on the first white circle as though pressing on button, then appears only the word "studies" on the board.)

Education offered at RMC Saint-Jean is based on four components: academics, leadership, sports and bilingualism.

(We see an officer cadet in a classroom and the teacher giving a lecture. Then we see shots of officer cadets working with scientific instruments, a professor teaching a course in a computer lab and shots of the Convocation.)

The key component of the program at RMC Saint-Jean is academics.

Officer cadets follow a college-level study program.

Offered entirely in French or in English, either in Science or Social Science.

Small group classes allow professors to give individualized guidance and supervision to each student.

After two years, officer cadets receive their diploma of college studies from the Quebec Department of Education.

(We see a shot of the Memorial Arch, a landmark of the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston; then we see an aerial shot of the Royal Military College of Canada and a shot of officer cadets marching past a historical building at Royal Military College of Canada.)

They pursue university studies in Arts, Science or Engineering for three more years at the Royal Military College of Canada located in Kingston, Ontario.

They then receive a bachelor’s degree that guarantees them a profitable career in the Canadian Forces.

(We see a sequence of shots showing officer cadets in a classroom, walking on the College site and in a language lab.)

On the magnificent Fort Saint-Jean site, RMC Saint-Jean offers interesting, diversified and fully subsidized studies.

(We see once again the grey board on which appear the four components of the College's curriculum. Showing her back to the camera, the narrator presses the white button next to the "leadership" component.)

The leadership component aims at introducing officer cadets to the principles of leadership early in their career in order for them to better develop the leadership qualities sought in future officers.

(We see shots of officer cadets engaging in various activities that are part of the leadership program: an endurance march along the Richelieu River and orienteering.)

Officer cadets tap into the military profession through command responsibilities with their peers, active participation in military exercises on the field, and learn to display initiative and leadership.

(We see again the transparent grey board on which appear the four components of the College's curriculum. Showing her back to the camera, the narrator presses the white button next to the "sports" component.)

(We see short sequences of officer cadets playing hockey, in a fencing duel and in a taekwondo competition.)

The third component of RMC Saint-Jean's education program is sports.

Officer cadets participate in organized individual and team sports as a means for developing their endurance and team spirit.

(We see the transparent grey board on which appear the four components of the College's curriculum. Showing her back to the camera, the narrator presses the white button next to the "bilingualism" component.)

Bilingualism is integrated to all other components. In addition to second language credit courses,

(We see officer cadets with headphones working in a language lab, and then students having a discussion. Then we see a shot showing officer cadets playing a game of pool, and then students involved in an oral presentation.)

a cultural program is designed to provide Anglophones and Francophones opportunities to familiarize themselves with and share the other’s culture.

(We see the transparent grey board once again on which appears "RMC Saint-Jean." Showing her back to the camera, the narrator presses the white button next to the name of the College.)

Four components, four significant challenges,

(We see a shot of officer cadets walking through the entrance of the Royal Military College Saint-Jean. It is followed by a shot showing three rows of three squares in which scroll images representing various occupations offered by the Canadian Forces.)

but only one mission for the College: train and develop the future leaders of the Canadian Forces to ensure their readiness to take on responsibilities and make decisions while practicing one of the many professions offered to them.

(The addresses of recommended websites appear on screen and then the motto of the College. Then we see a series of images representing the College and activities related to its curriculum. Finally, "RMC Saint-Jean: a choice for the future" appears on screen, then the logo of the College and that of the Government of Canada.)

Visit the following websites to know more about the specifics of the programs and our moto.

Truth, Duty, Valour

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Life at RMCC

Transcript

TITLE: LIFE AT RMCC

NOTE: Some French excerpts are already subtitled in English – no need to close-caption these lines.

NARRATOR: Meet Gregoire Laforce. He is 22 years old, and a fourth year civil engineering student at the Royal Military College of Canada. His friend Rebecca Best is 22 years old as well - she studies military psychology and leadership, and will also graduate this year.

This morning Greg is inspecting the rooms of the squadron’s first-year cadets.

GREG: Grizzly Flight, Attend to! Stand at ease! How’s it going guys?

CADET: I mister Laforce.

GREG: Okay, don’t be so serious with me.

SUBTITLE: There is dust on the desk. The beds look good.

NARRATOR: You are probably wondering why he is the one performing room inspection this morning. It’s because in a few short years, he has acquired sufficient leadership skills to be promoted several times. As Wing Commander, room inspection is now one of his duties.

GREG: Okay, guys. Overall good inspection. There’s dust on the desks. Grizzly flight, attention! Grizzly Flight, have a good morning. Dismissed! Make sure you eat breakfast.

[music]

SUBTITLE: How many exams do you have this year?

SUBTITLE: Only three in Pyschology.

SUBTITLE: Mee too. Usually I have six or seven.

SUBTITLE: But I have my thesis.

GREG: You’re going here, eh?

JESSICA: Yeah.

GREG: Okay. Have a good day.

NARRATOR: RMC offers 19 different under-graduate degrees, in arts, science, or engineering, but they all feature a core curriculum of general and military knowledge. Future leaders are provided with the means and the opportunities to learn how to communicate effectively in both French and English. During the summer, students receive practical training related to their future occupation in the Canadian Forces. Military and practical training are an important part of the officer cadet’s life. Today, Greg’s colleague Jean-Francois Lamarche has his Repel Master’s test.

CADET: Get ready.

CADET: Get ready.

CADET: Yeah.

NARRATOR: Physical activity is part of the lifestyle here. You’ll develop your full potential during physical training and improvised activities, as well as intramural and varsity sports.

There are over 25 clubs at RMC - astronomy, climbing, cycling, horseback riding, flying, and even paint-ball. This is the mess, the perfect place to get together at the end of the day. And on their personal time, all students have ample opportunity to relax, and meet their friends.

Today’s the big day when cadets proudly receive their diploma. Graduation marks the end of their unique training, and the beginning of their career as Canadian Forces officers.

Truth, Duty, Valour : officers are committed to these values, and you can acquire them at the Royal Military College of Canada. Come and experience university life beyond education.

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Episode 1 – The Meeting

Transcript

TITLE: THE CHALLENGE - EPISODE 1

TARA ORAM: Michelle?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Hi, Tara!

TARA ORAM: Hi! I'm Tara. Nice to meet you.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: I'm so excited to meet you.

TARA ORAM: Goodness, it's good to be here. I hope you're prepared. I am going to pick your brain about the military for women, just to get some information.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yeah.

TARA ORAM: So, what exactly is your job title, or your role?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: So, I'm a logistics officer in the Royal Canadian Navy.

TARA ORAM: I'm sorry, what is a logistics officer?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: A logistics officer is someone who works in the area of management, of supply, finance, administration, food services. So, sort of the logistics of a ship. And right now I work just in finance.

TARA ORAM: I would think that, being in the military, you're, you know, out in the front lines, you're in infantry, but that isn't the case. You're in an office.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yeah, that's one of the most exciting things about the Canadian Forces, is that there are so many jobs, and almost any job you can think of in the civilian world...

TARA ORAM: Right.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: ...there's an equivalent job in the Canadian Forces.

TARA ORAM: Really? Thank you so much. Well, cheers.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Cheers.

TARA ORAM: To great conversation. And I hope you don't mind me asking a tonne of questions.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: No, not at all.

TARA ORAM: When you signed up, any misconceptions that you had, or any worries that you had?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI:: I went to the recruiting centre and asked a lot of questions. Like a lot of people, I think I watched a lot of movies that were very infantry-army, and so that, I think, is a reason a lot of people assume that that's what everyone's job is in the Canadian Forces, but there are so many options, and it was really exciting to see them all and to sort of decide which one would be the best fit for me.

TARA ORAM: And what made you want to join the military?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Well, I joined the reserves when I first joined the Canadian Forces, which is, like, a part-time job...

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: ...while I was still in university, and actually that's one of the reasons that I wanted to join, was they paid half my tuition while I was in university.

TARA ORAM: That's awesome.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: And once I finished school, I just loved it so much, I decided to join full time, so then I got posted to the west coast, out to Victoria, BC, and I was out there for four years, and then I just got posted to Ottawa last year.

TARA ORAM: Wow, that's really brave. Such a young girl, and doing all this. That's so awesome!

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: It's so much fun.

TARA ORAM: So, when you signed up, how did your parents feel? Were they a little worried, or...?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yeah, definitely.

TARA ORAM: I mean, knowing now that there are so many different jobs, like...

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Um, my parents were a little concerned when I first joined.

TARA ORAM: Normal.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yeah, totally normal, and I think the more I taught them about the job that I chose in logistics and the fact that I was going Navy, I think it calmed them a bit, and my job is mainly clerical right now, so...

TARA ORAM: So, you enjoy it?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: I love my job, yeah.

TARA ORAM: That's amazing. Good for you.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: I'm really excited to meet you. You're, like, a famous country music singer.

TARA ORAM: Michelle...

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: And I heard that you went overseas to Afghanistan to sing for the troops.

TARA ORAM: I did. Uh, two Thanksgivings. I actually spent one in Kandahar; just recently, we went to Kuwait. And, you know, that's why I'm here today – because I'm so interested in the military.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: I hope I can help.

TARA ORAM: Ah, well, I'm starving. You want to grab some lunch to pick your brain some more?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: That sounds great.

TARA ORAM: Awesome. Chit-chat some more.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Sounds good. I'm hungry. Are you?

TARA ORAM: I'm starving. Oh, perfect, thank you. I loved how you put that right in front of me.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Wow, look at all those veggies. That's fantastic.

TARA ORAM: Michelle, I think my main question is, if I were to join, do I have to go do a written test, or, like, a physical test?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: You would go to a Canadian Forces recruiting centre and do the Canadian Forces aptitude test. Basically, this test determines which occupation would be the best suited for you.

TARA ORAM:: And what about the physical test?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: First of all, you would have to pass a medical test.

TARA ORAM: Oh, OK.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: A little different than a physical test. A Canadian Forces medical officer would assess that you're healthy enough to join. But most people actually ask

about boot camp. Boot camp is about three months long, and--

TARA ORAM: Three months?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yeah, yeah. But it's so much fun. It's a combination of physical training and academic training. You learn all about the Canadian Forces, and, uh, there is an annual physical test that we need to pass.

TARA ORAM: OK, what's that called?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: It's called the Force Test.

TARA ORAM: The Force Test.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Do you exercise?

TARA ORAM: Uh, yeah, watch. I'd like to do the FFF. It's called the French Fry Fitness, and it goes like this. And then I'm gonna put it back down. And I do that several times a day. That's my workout. Do you think I have what it takes? I'd love to try. Might want to give 'er a gander here, Michelle.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: I'll tell you what. How about I start training you, and we put you through that Force Test?

TARA ORAM: Where do we start?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Um...

TARA ORAM: Go easy on me, Michelle. I mean, seriously.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Well, I really like wall climbing, so how about tomorrow we meet at the wall climbing gym at 9 o'clock?

TARA ORAM: Sweet. I'll see you tomorrow night, 9 o'clock.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: No, tomorrow MORNING at 9 o'clock.

TARA ORAM: Nine AM?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Nine AM.

TARA ORAM: OK, it's a deal.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: See you on the wall.

TARA ORAM: See you on the wall.

TITLE: THE CHALLENGE, EPISODE 1

Return to video

Episode 2 – Gauging limits

Transcript

TITLE: GAUGING LIMITS – EPISODE 2

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Hey, Tara. Thanks for joining me here at the gym.

TARA ORAM: Oh, you're so welcome.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: So, uh, we're gonna start out over here. It's a pretty good workout for your arms. I'm telling you, if you can climb this, you can definitely do boot camp.

TARA ORAM: Really? All right, well… you lead the way, Michelle. Yep. There she goes. There she is.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Oh, God.

TARA ORAM: There you go. This is how us musicians climb. Oh, my... It's workin'. Is there a rule?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: OK, OK, you do whatever.

TARA ORAM: Shouldn't have had those cookies last night.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Looks like you've done this before. Good job.

TARA ORAM: Oh, where do I go? Ah!

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: This is just like basic training.

TARA ORAM: What's that red button there?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: It means you're done.

TARA ORAM: I was done yesterday. OK.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Woo!

TARA ORAM: Wedgie!

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: You're ready for anything. Why don't we go have a water break?

TARA ORAM: OK. So, Michelle, I have a couple of friends that are in the military, and is it true that you could actually work out during a regular workday?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yeah, fitness is definitely encouraged in the military, so when possible, your bosses will at least give you time during work to do a workout.

TARA ORAM: Two, one, go, go, go, Michelle! Woo! Was there ever a time during your whole boot-camp process that you were nervous about maybe not passing?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Definitely. I think most people have a feeling of, "Oh, I'm not gonna pass," for sure, because it can be mentally challenging as well as physically. But you work together as a team and you build really great friendships, and in the end, most of the people definitely pass. You can do it.

TARA ORAM: Oh, my god, my legs are so weak.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: One, two, three.

TARA ORAM: Ah! Yeah! We're in the circus! Wah!

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Good job!

TARA ORAM: I thought I was never gonna see you again. I'm so curious to know, what is with the excessiveness of making the beds and shining the shoes? Is there a reason for that?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: It's just a form of discipline in the military, so, um, it's not about, you know, can you iron perfectly or make a bed perfectly, 'cause not everyone can do everything perfectly. But the biggest part of that is learning to work together as a team with the people that you're with. I think this is really gonna help you with you balance.

TARA ORAM: So, what do I do? Just go...

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yeah, you're just gonna climb from one to the next.

TARA ORAM: Is there, like, a trick?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: No. So, what do you like to do in your spare time, Tara?

TARA ORAM: Uh, not this. Did I ever tell you that I'm afraid of heights?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: No.

TARA ORAM: I didn't, eh? Oh, OK.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Well, you're doing a great job so far. Keep going.

TARA ORAM: Thanks.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: One of your roommates is really good at shining shoes, and one of your roommates is good at ironing. You know, you're gonna do each other's stuff for each other to make sure that everything looks as good as possible, and that just develops the team and helps everyone accomplish their goals, so...

TARA ORAM: Yeah. Oh!

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: You're doing a great job. You can do it. There you go! Good job! You're almost at the top.

TARA ORAM: I think this is my last one. You ready?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yep.

TARA ORAM: Weeeeeee! Oh.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: That was a really great job.

TARA ORAM: Thanks. I'll make your bed, you shine my shoes, we'll find somebody else to do our ironing.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Deal.

TARA ORAM: Sweet.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Well, Tara, you've done such a great job so far today.

TARA ORAM: Thank you so much.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: I've decided to set up a little, uh, test here for you, so you can kind of practice and get an idea of one of the activities we have to do as part of our annual fitness exam in the military. So, those are 20kg sandbags.

TARA ORAM: Kilos, not pounds?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: So, it's about 43 pounds.

TARA ORAM: Oh.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: So, I'll just show you what you have to do. So, you do a squat, so you make sure your knees don't pass your toes – you don't want to hurt yourself. And you lift it up and you make sure you're at about 90 degrees.

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: And then you drop it, and then you go to the next one, and you do the same thing.

TARA ORAM: You might as well just keep going and do my set, 'cause...

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Well, I think you should try.

TARA ORAM:...you're already warmed up. Ready?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yes.

TARA ORAM: All right. Like that?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yeah, that's good.

TARA ORAM: Ugh! Are you kidding me?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: You're doing great!

TARA ORAM: Pivot. I feel like it's gonna bust open. Am I at a 90-degree with my--

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Oh, you're doing such a great job.

TARA ORAM: You know, I could keep going, but I won't.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: I have had the opportunity to set up another little simulation of one of the tests we do as part of our military Force Test. And so, that's, um, dragging the equivalent of someone's bodyweight. So, all you have to do is grab the blanket that's he's lying on and drag him backwards.

TARA ORAM: I will do that, OK.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: All right?

TARA ORAM: Yes. Are you ready for me to do this right now?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: I'm ready. I will cheer you on.

TARA ORAM: Here I go.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Yes.

TARA ORAM: Here we go.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Good job! Oh, lookit, you're a pro. All right!

TARA ORAM: I'm gonna keep going!

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Awesome.

TARA ORAM: All right, I'm good.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: Good job!

TARA ORAM: Thanks. What's next?

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: I think I have something in mind. I think we need to go outside for it.

TARA ORAM: OK. I'm just gonna take five.

MICHELLE BARANOVSKI: OK.

TARA ORAM: See you tomorrow.

TITLE: GAUGING LIMITS – EPISODE 2

Return to video

Episode 3 – Mountain rush

Transcript

TITLE: EPISODE 3 – MOUTAIN RUSH

TARA ORAM: This is beautiful, Michelle.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Isn't it gorgeous?

TARA ORAM: This is absolutely stunning. Oh, my gosh! That's amazing. We should do that. That looks awesome.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: So, you did a really great job at the wall-climbing place yesterday.

TARA ORAM: Thanks, Michelle.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: So, you know, I thought it would be a good idea to bring you outdoors. It's a little more rugged.

TARA ORAM: I love it.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: We'll do something a little more thrill-seeking today.

TARA ORAM: Awesome. This is my kind of thing. It reminds me of back home. I'm ready.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: OK, good. Let's go.

TARA ORAM: Oh, yeah.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Kind of icy up here.

TARA ORAM: Wait for me! Who comes up with this stuff?

TARA ORAM: I'm just getting a tan here.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: You're doing great.

TARA ORAM: All right, ready.

TARA ORAM: There she goes. I'm on my way.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: You want me to wait for you?

TARA ORAM: Yes! We're partners!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: You're gonna be OK if I shake it a little?

TARA ORAM: Are you kidding me right now? You are crazy. Seriously? Michelle!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Put your feet up on this one, and then just pull yourself up. Are you all right?

TARA ORAM: There's my workout for the day. OK. Whew!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Look at this beautiful view. This is stunning. What a perfect day.

TARA ORAM: Oh, my goodness, Michelle, this is stunning. You don't get to do this every day.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: No, you definitely don't.

TARA ORAM: I have a question. Now, I heard that some people can have their education paid for by the Forces. Is that true?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, actually, when I first joined, I joined as a reservist, which is like a part-time... So I had half of my tuition paid for. But there's a whole bunch of different programs available to people that want to join and if they want to continue with their education or start going to university or things. There's a whole bunch of different programs.

TARA ORAM: It's different from different jobs?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, different jobs and different trades.

TARA ORAM: What about travel? Do you get to go any cool places?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, I had the opportunity to travel a lot with my job, and it's been one of the things I've enjoyed a lot.

TARA ORAM: That is so awesome. Speaking of travel, do you want to travel down this zip line right now with me?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Hey, sounds good.

TARA ORAM: Let's do it. OK.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: All right.

TARA ORAM: Woooo! You're really putting me through the grind.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I'm glad you're enjoying it.

TARA ORAM: It's awesome. I do have a question, though. What if someone were to fail the fitness test? What would happen?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Well, it doesn't happen that often. Well, if someone fails the fitness test in the Canadian Forces, there's a big support network to help them pass it the next time. You always get another chance. And, you know, there's fitness professionals to help you, and of course your colleagues. They really help you, you know, get to where you would need to be.

TARA ORAM: Right.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: There's a big support network.

TARA ORAM: Well, I'm glad I have you. Do you want to go grab a bite and then go do some more zip-lining?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Absolutely.

TARA ORAM: Oh, yeah! Let's go! This is the best day ever. You're the best coach.

TARA ORAM: Yeah!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Good job!

TARA ORAM: Oh, my gosh! Let's do that again!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: That was awesome.

TARA ORAM: Whew! How awesome was that?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: That was the most fun day ever.

TARA ORAM: The best day ever, hands down, for sure.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Hey, what are you doing tomorrow?

TARA ORAM: Uh... nothing planned. Why?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Um, do you want to come to my place for lunch?

TARA ORAM: That'd be awesome. I'd love to see where you live.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Where are you going now, though?

TARA ORAM: I'm, uh... I've got a couple things to take care of. Going back for some more zip-lining, woman! I'll see you, Michelle!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Bye!

TARA ORAM: See ya!

TITLE: EPISODE 3 – MOUNTAIN RUSH

Return to video

Episode 4 – The crib

Transcript

TITLE : EPISODE 4 – THE CRIB

TARA ORAM: Hi!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Come on in.

TARA ORAM: Michelle...

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: This is my place.

TARA ORAM: I thought everybody lived on, like, the base.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: No, no, no.

TARA ORAM: This is, like, a high-rise condo downtown Ottawa.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Some people on the Forces live on bases, but, uh, I'd say the majority definitely don't.

TARA ORAM: This is beautiful.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Thanks, yeah. I live, like, 10 minutes from work, so I just walk to work. I was thinking we could make a salad. Are you hungry?

TARA ORAM: Honestly, I'm so starving that I could use a fulfilling salad. This is gorgeous!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Thank you. Why don't you grab a seat here and I'll cut some avocado?

TARA ORAM: So, do you have kids or anything? Are you married?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: No, I'm single. A lot of my friends are married and have kids in the military.

TARA ORAM: Yeah? So, what about... Is there any... Do people date each other in the military? Like, are you allowed?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I actually spend a lot of time at the mess. It's a place to go for drinks.

TARA ORAM: Socialize.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, we just go and socialize with other members in the military. The really interesting thing about the military is there is tonnes of different jobs, though.

TARA ORAM: I had such a huge misconception about that. There are so many--

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: So many jobs. Even my job is... it's mostly an office job. But there's everything. Any job that you would have in the civilian world, there's pretty much an equivalent in the Canadian Forces. Hope you're hungry.

TARA ORAM: Starved.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: It looks fantastic.

TARA ORAM: Fork. So where have you been deployed?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I went on ship to the South Pacific.

TARA ORAM: Oh, very cool! So, what about sleeping quarters? Do you sleep... with guys?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: No, um, there's men's quarters and female quarters.

TARA ORAM: Right.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: And, um, for officers they usually have cabins, which are often two people per cabin. But males and females are never bunked in the same room.

TARA ORAM: That must be pretty great, aving, like, that many ood-looking Canadian ilitary guys around. 'm not gonna lie. 'd be, like, "Wow."

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: It's all professional, Tara.

TARA ORAM: Is it Well, you can keep it professiona and I'll keep looking.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: So, you asked to see my uniform. I keep it in here.

TARA ORAM: Excited.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: So, right now, this is what I wear to work every day.

TARA ORAM: That's really cute!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: In the summer, I wear a version that's, like, a white short-sleeve shirt without the sweater, and I can choose to wear black pant or a black skirt with it.

TARA ORAM: Oh, OK. What about shoes? Do you have to wear, like, big clunky boots?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Oh, I'll show you. Well, with the pants I wear these.

TARA ORAM: OK, those are cute.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: And then, with the skirt, heels.

TARA ORAM: No way! You can wear heels?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, yeah.

TARA ORAM: What about makeup? Are you allowed to wear any?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, you just have to apply it conservatively. Like, what we're wearing now is fine.

TARA ORAM: Not, like, to go clubbing.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah.

TARA ORAM: All right, and jewellery?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: You can wear stud earrings, like pearls or gold or silver, diamond.

TARA ORAM: Well, you don't have a shaved head, but do some peopl shave their heads? Like, do you have to have short hair?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: No, no.

TARA ORAM: Can you have your hair long? For women, if you have longer hair, you can just put it in a bun 0r a braid. Or you can cut it sort of shorter above your collar, and then you don't have to put it in a bun or a braid.

TARA ORAM: What about someone that has tattoos?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, that's OK. I mean, tattoos are so popular now.

TARA ORAM: I forgot to ask you about the hat. Do you wear that every day to work?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, so, I wear the hat every day.

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: So, this is the navy bowler. This is what the women in the navy wear...

TARA ORAM: It's really cute.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: ...when they wear that type of uniform that I wear every day.

TARA ORAM: What about undergarments?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: You can wear pretty much anything you want under your uniform. And actually one of the great benefits about being a woma in the Canadian Forces is they reimburse you for your bras up to a certain amount.

TARA ORAM: So, do you like to wear your uniform?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I love wearing the uniform.It makes me really proud to put on my sweater with the Canada flashes on the side every day, and I think even when I'm walking to work, a lot of the people kind of nod at me, like, as a little "Thank you for your service."

TARA ORAM: Do you love that?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, I mean, it's great.

TARA ORAM: That's really cool.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I don't want to put you on the spot or anything, but... can I hear some of your music?

TARA ORAM: OK, well, there so happens to be a guitar here.

There's a full moon

sittin' over that pine tree

And there's a feelin'

welling up inside me

And your mama

and the baby are fast asleep

Well, I've been thinking

bout you all daynd gettin' you alone

o, baby, let's go runnin' barefoot

TARA ORAM: Thank you, Michelle, my #1 fan...

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: That was fantastic, Tara. Oh, my god. That was great. We have a really big day tomorrow - or YOU have a really big day tomorrow, because you're gonna be doing the fitness test for the Forces, so it's gonna be a big day. You're gonna need to go home and get your rest.

TARA ORAM: I will go home tonight, and I promise you I'm gonna do a hundred push-ups in my sleep.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Attagirl! That's what I like to hear.

TARA ORAM: I'm gonna get out of your house now before I get kicked out, but thank you. I appreciate it.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Thanks for coming.

TARA ORAM: Thanks for lunch. It was really, really yummy.

TITLE: EPISODE 4 – THE CRIB

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Episode 5 – The test

Transcript

TITLE: EPISODE 5 – THE TEST

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Hey!

TARA ORAM: Hey, Michelle!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: So, uh, we're here today. I figured it'd be a great idea to put you through some of the components of the Force Evaluation Test, which is the fitness test that we do in the Canadian Armed Forces. We're not gonna be crazy about timing you or anything like that. We're just gonna get you to go through the motions and the steps.

TARA ORAM: Yeah, sounds good. I'm excited. You know what? I've been waiting a long time to do this, so let's see what happens, Michelle!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah! So, Tara, here we have a component of the Force Evaluation Test. So, this is a Sandbag Drag, and that's meant to simulate casualty evacuation. So, you're gonna end up picking up this sandbag here, which weighs 20kg. And you are going to drag it, and it is attached to four other sandbags that each weigh 20kg.

TARA ORAM: Right, right. So, that's 100 kilos.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yes, it is.

TARA ORAM: Over 200 pounds.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yes. So, are you ready to do this, Tara?

TARA ORAM: I am, I really am.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: All right. And... go, whenever you're ready. Use your legs, not your back.

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Good job! Lean back. You're doing great. You're almost at the end. Woo! You did it!

TARA ORAM: Woo!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: That was awesome! In this component of the Force Evaluation Test, you're doing a 20m dash, so this simulates escape and cover. So, you're gonna start from a lying-down prone position. Get up, run 10m, drop down again, get up, run 10m, drop down again, and you're gonna do that for a total of 80m.

TARA ORAM: Eighty metres?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, 80m.

TARA ORAM: I'll try.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Doesn't matter how long it takes you.

TARA ORAM: OK, all right, let's do it.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Ready... go! Drop down! Good job! Yes! Keep going! Come on! Good job! Good job! Turn around! You're over halfway now. Keep going! You're doing great. Keep going, keep going! You're doing great. Go, go, go, go, go! Great job! Come on! Last kick! Go, go, go, go! Yes! Good job! Awesome! That was great!

TARA ORAM: Amazing!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Right on! You did it. Yeah, let's go get some water.

TARA ORAM: OK. All right.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Well, Tara, here we have another component of the Force Evaluation Test.

TARA ORAM: OK!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: And it's called the Sandbag Lift.

TARA ORAM: And what would this be used for in a real-life situation?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Um, this would be used to simulate fortification or damming in domestic operations.

TARA ORAM: Right.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: So, all you're gonna do is lift the sandbag above that red line. And drop it, and then next...

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: ...lift, and above the line.

TARA ORAM: All right.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: And back and forth.

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Emphasis on safe lift, proper squat – you use your legs, not your back.

TARA ORAM: Yep.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: And, uh, you're gonna do that 30 times.

TARA ORAM: Thirty times?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yep.

TARA ORAM: I'm gonna do this 30 times?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: You can do it. I know you can do it.

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: There you go. One. Two. Good job.

Three. Four. Five. Six. Seven. Good job. Ten. Good job.

TARA ORAM: Oh, God. Oh, God. Whew! OK, I'm done.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: You know what? That's OK. You did a great job.

TARA ORAM: Oh, my god, that was hard. That was so hard. You're a great coach.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Should we go get some water?

TARA ORAM: Water and... maybe a lake of it.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: OK, let's get some water.

TARA ORAM: All right. What do you have for me next?

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Well, we are going to be doing the Intermittent Loaded Shuttle.

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: So, this is just simulating transporting of goods.

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Do you remember your good old friend here?

TARA ORAM: Oh, look who it is. Mr. Friendly Sandbag.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Yeah, it's your 20kg sandbag. What you're gonna do is lift him up, do 20m, and back 20m, drop him, and then do one 20m and back without him.

TARA ORAM: Oh.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: And you're gonna do that a total of five times.

TARA ORAM: OK.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Ready... go! All right. Good job. You got this, Tara. Cross the line. All right, now run! Yeah! Go, go, go, go, go! All right, that's one. Safe lifting. You feel the burn? All right, just run now. That's it! Go, go, go, go! All right! Woo! You made me so proud. You are so great.

TARA ORAM: Yay, Coach!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: All right! How's that feel? You gotta catch your breath first, eh? All right, let's walk it off.

TARA ORAM: I am so sore, I can't even tell you.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Are you sore? You did such a great job.

TARA ORAM: Thank you.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: And clearly you have what it takes.

TARA ORAM: You know what I think it is? I think it's I have a really good coach and you were really good on me, and patient, and it was a really added help that you didn't time me.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Oh, yeah.

TARA ORAM: So thank you for being easy on me.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: It was really fun to teach you all about the Canadian Armed Forces, what it's like to be a woman in the Forces, and some of the fitness testing that we do.

TARA ORAM: Well, I learned a lot. I mean, I had a huge appreciation for what you guys did before, but I definitely have an even bigger appreciation for what you guys do and how hard it is. And let's keep in touch.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Oh, yeah, for sure let's keep in touch. Yeah. Maybe you could hook me up with some concert tickets.

TARA ORAM: I could totally do that. And maybe you could hook me up with some more training!

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Any time.

TARA ORAM: All right, well, I'll see you around.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Awesome.

TARA ORAM: Thank you so much, Michelle. We'll see you later.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: Great. Bye.

TARA ORAM: See ya.

TITLE: EPISODE 5 – THE TEST

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Episode 6 – Basic Military Qualifications

Transcript

TITLE: EPISODE 6 – BASIC MILITARY QUALIFICATIONS

MALE NARRATOR: It’s a 14-week journey to a new career and a new way of life – three-plus demanding months of military education and physical challenges. New skills – new friends - and proud traditions - summed up in just three letters: B M Q.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Whether you choose to serve in the Army, Navy or Air Force, every man and woman who joins the Canadian Forces will go through Basic Military Qualification, or BMQ, at the Leadership and Recruit school in historic Saint-Jean, Quebec.

MALE NARRATOR: Whether you’re joining as an infantry soldier or a musician, an avionics technician or a cook, it all starts here. This is where you’ll develop -- and demonstrate -- the vigour, strength, and stamina you’ll need to be an effective member of your team.

LAURA HAMELIN: It is very hard, yes you do things that you never thought possible in the world that you’d be able to do. But you do it, and you get through the day. And that’s it.

FEMALE NARRATOR: BMQ isn’t easy, but your instructors will inspire you and provide mentorship and coaching to help you achieve each milestone and break through limits you never thought you’d reach. You’ll learn to overcome your weaknesses and build on your strengths.

ISABEL BRUNET: I had no idea what I was getting into.

FETRATALI MOHAD: Pretty challenging in the beginning. But then once you get going and going, it gets the whole body going. It’s awesome.

MALE NARRATOR: Every step of the way, you’ll be following generations of Canadians who have accepted the challenge and served with pride, in one of the world’s elite military forces.

FEMALE NARRATOR: In Saint-Jean, you’ll join other recruits in the megaplex – a self-contained dormitory, gym, cafeteria and school complex. You’ll be outfitted with your basic military kit – uniforms, boots, helmet, rucksack, bedding and pretty much everything else you’ll need here, including your personal firearm.

MALE NARRATOR: Early in your training, you will have to meet the Forces’ minimum standard for push-ups, sit-ups, handgrip strength and aerobic fitness. So it’s a great idea to start watching your weight, quitting smoking and ramping up your workouts NOW, before you head to BMQ. Every kilometer and kilogram you rack up today will make BMQ just that much easier.

FEMALE NARRATOR: During BMQ, you’ll be taught the core values of the Canadian Forces – courage, integrity, loyalty and duty – as well as the basics of military life – standards of dress, discipline and conduct – and the ethical codes of a modern military in a multicultural country that respects diversity and human rights.

MALE NARRATOR: You’ll wear your uniform at all times and visitors will only be allowed -- on weekends and holidays -- AFTER the first five weeks.

FEMALE NARRATOR: You’ll be assigned to a platoon – a group of 60 recruits who will be your teammates throughout your basic training experience. In fact teamwork may be the most important lesson you’ll take away from St. Jean.

BRUNET: You have to work together, ‘cause if you are just caring about yourself, you’re not going anywhere. Teamwork is a huge thing, and my platoon has it – it’s working.

MALE NARRATOR: You’ll do everything together – from eating your meals together at the cafeteria; to sharing responsibility for your common living quarters.

JOSHUA WENSINK: We probably spend at least a few hours a day just cleaning – our own cubicles, our rifles, our boots, everything else.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Your daily routine consists of early mornings – starting with a 5 a.m. wakeup call – long, active days – and late nights, maintaining your personal equipment and living quarters and getting ready for the next day’s challenge.

WENSINK: We’re getting ready for our inspection, so we have to lay out our rifle, all our gear, boots, tac vest. This gets inspected - pretty much everything.

Female recruit : … ready for your inspection, Master Corporal.

Instructor: Staying right there…

Instructor: Even day, it’s even boots.

Instructor: Who’s the Canadian Forces Chief Warrant Officer ?

Instructor: Let’s go, give me 10 push-ups.

Male recruit: …fifteen…

Instructor: That’s good, it’s getting better.

Female recruit: thank you, Master Corporal.

FEMALE NARRATOR: At the core of your BMQ experience is physical conditioning.

MALE NARRATOR: Physical training at BMQ takes many different forms - each one designed for the real world demands you’ll meet during your career.

You’ll meet the Basic Military Swim Standard and you’ll learn to conquer the obstacle course.

MOHAD: The hardest part would be that 6-foot jump over the wall there. Pretty tough. It could take me about 10, maybe 11 tries, but I still didn’t make it. I’m going to work hard on it – it will be awesome.

FEMALE NARRATOR: You’ll do a lot of running, starting with a 3-kilometre run and gradually increasing the distance until you build up your endurance.

WENSINK: It was really fast pace, a little quicker than I thought, so it hurt the legs a bit, but it was fine.

MALE NARRATOR: There’s also a lot of marching. As the weeks progress, you’ll take part in longer and longer marches that will range up to 13 kilometres, with a full rucksack and combat gear.

LAM: When you’re doing it, you feel like you want to give up. Today, I didn’t give up. I took longer than everybody else, but I still did it.

FEMALE NARRATOR: It takes a lot more than muscles to make a successful soldier, sailor, or air force member.

MALE NARRATOR: You’ll be trained in the safe handling and proper use of military weapons; the basics of cross-country navigation; patrolling and reconnaissance; basic first aid; offensive and defensive operations; and how to survive in the field, even under extreme conditions.

CHRISTOPHER EDWARDS: The hardest thing I’ve done is all the physical training, staying awake, doing duties… We have section attacks… it’s very physically and mentally draining. …Now it’s over, you feel great.

WENSINK: Food, shower and bed. That’s it. Those are the only things to think about right now.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Basic Military Qualification is a 14-week life changing experience that will transform you from civilian to soldier.

ORDINARY SEAMAN CHRISTOPHER EDWARDS : It’s mentally hard, physically hard, but once you get through it, it feels great – it’s a great accomplishment.

PRIVATE (RECRUIT) JOSHUA WENSINK: I’ve become a lot more self-reliant, more responsible, and I’ve grown up a lot.

PRIVATE (RECRUIT) LAURA HAMELIN: I have changed drastically. I have a lot more confidence in myself; I know that if I put my mind to something, I can achieve it.

MALE NARRATOR: Physically, and emotionally, it may be the toughest thing you’ve ever done in your life.

But one thing is certain: it will make you physically stronger, mentally sharper, and more confident than you’ve ever been before. Pumped for a great career in the Canadian Forces: fit, strong, and ready to serve.

Return to video

Dare to be extraordinary with the Canadian Armed Forces

Transcript

Ever dreamed of being paid to dive?

Think you can handle the heat of cooking for… hundreds of brave troops?

Could you deploy a sophisticated communication network… in some of the remotest corners of the planet?

Do you see yourself delivering essential healthcare … in a state-of-the-art portable clinic?

Would you like to pull off intense workouts … and a paid education?

Or execute a precision landing … just in time to save a life?

Perhaps you’d prefer to master cutting-edge electronics systems … … in the middle of the ocean?

Dare to be extraordinary with the Canadian Armed Forces.

Apply for one of over one hundred full- and part-time careers and acquire sought-after skills and training that will serve you everywhere.

A message from the Government of Canada.

Return to video

Life in the Canadian Armed Forces

Transcript

TITLE: LIFE IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

MALE NARRATOR: Welcome to a life of honour, service, teamwork and pride. Welcome to the Canadian Forces.

FEMALE NARRATOR: More than ninety thousand Canadians serve in our Army, Navy and Air Force in more than 100 trades and professions. They’re men and women just like you who accepted the challenge – and mastered the skills – to prove themselves in one of the world’s most elite military forces.

MALE NARRATOR: Across Canada and around the world, in times of war and national need, the Canadian Forces are always ready to defend, to help and to serve.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Members of the Canadian Forces span a wide range of careers and commitments, from part-time service in the Reserves to full time occupations in the Regular Force.

NARRATOR: At home bases in Canada, aboard ship, or on deployment overseas, all Canadian Forces members enjoy the security of a stable job, many benefits and a great working environment.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Regardless of whether you’re in the Army, Navy or Air Force, every member of the Forces starts their military career with Basic Training. For the Regular Force, this takes place at the Canadian Forces Leadership and Recruit School in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec.

MALE NARRATOR: Basic Training teaches you the basic skills and knowledge common to all trades. It will make you physically and mentally fit and leave you with a great sense of achievement, purpose and confidence.

LAURA HAMELIN: Compared how I was before to now, yes I have changed drastically. I have a lot more confidence in myself; I know that if I put my mind to something, I could achieve it.

FEMALE NARRATOR: For the Reserves, Basic Training may be conducted locally, at your home unit. These courses are held on weekends, spread out over several months.

MALE NARRATOR: For officers and non-commissioned members alike, when you’re done at St-Jean, the next stages of your training will depend on whether you’re in the Army, Navy or Air Force, and on the specific occupation you’ve chosen.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Throughout your training, you’ll be housed in dormitory-style barracks -- you’ll wear your uniform during working hours, and you’ll be fed at the base kitchen.

MALE NARRATOR: Once your training is complete, members of the Regular Force will be posted to one of the Canadian Forces bases across the country.

FEMALE NARRATOR: At work, you’ll wear your uniform at all times. But at home, your dress and your lifestyle will be the same as most Canadians.

MALE NARRATOR: Many members who are single, choose to reside on base, in barracks like these, although you can’t always count on space being available. The rent is reasonable, and meals are offered at the base kitchen, again at a reasonable cost.

RYAN KELLY: The advantages, I guess, would be saving money, and just the convenience of living on base. You have the gym right there, you can stay in shape; there’s lots of guys looking for people to play various sports, whether it be basketball, volleyball, badminton, squash, hockey. I could literally play hockey every day if I wanted. The food is surprisingly good – I’m actually a pretty big fan of it, it’s going to be hard to move out and have to cook for myself afterwards.

MALE NARRATOR: For personnel with a spouse and/or children, there may also be on-base housing available for rent, even if only one of you is a member of the Forces.

FEMALE NARRATOR: But many members choose to live off base in private housing that they rent or own.

REUBEN YADAV: I’d like to think I have a normal life. I have a wife and two kids – we live currently off-base. I think I have the best of both worlds: I have a job that I can play out in the field, be in the sandbox, if you may. At home, I get to be a father and get to see my kids grow up.

MALE NARRATOR: Whether you live on base or off, you’ll find schools, hospitals, sports and recreation facilities, family resource centres, and other community organizations that enhance the quality of military life for both single people, as well as families.

FEMALE NARRATOR: In fact, many Canadian Forces members are actively involved in their local communities.

MALE NARRATOR: Members of the Reserves continue to live at home in their communities, working part-time with their Reserve unit, or full time joining regular units for exercises and deployments -- or serving full-time for limited periods under terms of service that can last from two weeks to three years.

FEMALE NARRATOR: In the Regular Force, you’ll get four weeks off per year -- with pay! -- right from the start. After five years of service, that goes up to five weeks of paid holidays. By then, a commissioned officer’s annual salary could top $70,000 -- and other ranks could be earning over $50,000 a year.

CHRISTOPHER GLIBBERY: Having a good, steady salary was always something in the back of my head. Aside from the travel and patriotic side, to be able to do all that and be paid at the same time, it was a healthy career choice for me, the pay is absolutely fantastic.

BRAD CHAPMAN: I wouldn’t be very honest if I didn’t say that the pay wasn’t an incentive. It’s a great pay structure with the Canadian military, the pension is fantastic, and I can sail away from home knowing that my loved ones are taken care of as well when I’m gone.

MALE NARRATOR: Reserve Force personnel are paid a daily rate for the days they are on duty. They may also be eligible for a Transportation Assistance Allowance depending on the distance between their residence and their unit.

You’ll also receive free medical and dental care as well as prescription drugs. And you can apply to have your dependents covered under the Public Service Health and Dental Care plan. As for your pension plan, it matches the program of other members of the federal public service.

FEMALE NARRATOR: While they’re under contract, Reservists are also entitled to free medical and dental care. And they’re entitled to participate in the Public Service Health and Dental Care plan to provide coverage for their families.

FEMALE NARRATOR: Keeping fit is a big part of the Canadian Forces lifestyle -- whether it’s in team sports like basketball, softball, soccer and hockey, or individual workouts at some of the best-equipped gyms in Canada. Many bases also have swimming pools and arenas and all of these facilities are also available to your spouse and children at a minimum cost.

YADAV: The military fitness centre that is dedicated to the soldiers is also dedicated to the family here. My kids get to use the same facilities that I use in my training.

MALE NARRATOR: Whether you’ve just moved to a new posting across the country or you’re about to leave on a six-month deployment overseas, it’s a stressful time for you and your family. No matter what you or your family needs help with, information and assistance is available through the Military Family Resource Centre located on every Canadian base. You’ll find trained professionals and dedicated volunteers to help you with counselling and referrals, even employment assistance for your spouse.

ERIN ROBERTS: The people here were so friendly, they right away grabbed a bunch of pamphlets on “What do you need to know? Tell me the dynamics of your family. How old are your children? What programs would you want to use?”

MERCY YEBOAH-AMPADU: What the military is trying to do is show that they really are a family and they do take care of their people.

CLINT MACK: The military has been very good to me. I had a daughter who had special needs and required me to be home almost 200 days of the year to take care of her in the hospital. And the military is the only job in the world where they’ll give me the time off and pay me and support me the whole way through.

MALE NARRATOR: A career in the Canadian Forces is so much more than making a living.

STEPHANE LAJEUNESSE: The career in the Canadian Forces allows you to see things that you normally wouldn’t get to see in the civilian world and experience things that you wouldn’t. So you’re part of a much bigger thing when you’re in the Canadian Forces.

CHRIS TIDD: I’ve made some of the best friendships in my life here in the military, whether it be from the training you go through together, or whether it be when you’re overseas – the stuff you go through. You form some really strong friendships.

CHRIS POWER: Since I joined the military, I’ve progressed and I’ve done different jobs. I’ve been very proud of what I’ve been able to accomplish. I’m 28 years old now, and most 28-year-olds that I know, they don’t have the responsibility that I do at this point.

ANDREW ARMSTRONG: There’s other things as well, being part of the military. Things like going on adventure training, the whole camaraderie, esprit de corps, having a team that you’re working with all the time. And then feeling like you’re really making a difference when you get to participate in some of these activities like deployments and things like that.

HESHAN MODARAGAMAGE: I wanted to serve in the Canadian Forces. I was not born in this country, I actually immigrated to this country, so I wanted to give something back.

JESSICA HEWETT: My calling, personally, was definitely to contribute to Canada as a whole. And the experiences that I’ve gone through thus far have really made me the person that I am today and better prepared for anything that comes my way from here on in.

MALE NARRATOR: There is no career more challenging or rewarding: an opportunity to take part in defending our country and participate in world events that will change your life and the lives of the people you are helping.

FEMALE NARRATOR: You’ll obtain world-class qualifications. You’ll gain skills and leadership. You’ll visit more destinations than most people will see in a lifetime and make great friends along the way.

Are you ready to make a difference?

TITLE:

LIFE

IN THE CANADIAN FORCES

Return to video

Diversity

Transcript

// Variety of sounds: wind, machines and gears grinding, bells ringing. //

(Title appears on a grey background over a montage of images representing diversity in the Forces.)

// Voiceover (woman): Equal opportunity is fundamental to the Canadian Armed Forces. //

// Dynamic music. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Close-up on a soldier in front of an airplane.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier in a library.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier wearing a helmet and headset.)

// Voiceover (woman): When you put on the uniform of the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army or the Royal Canadian Air Force, you are seen as a soldier first, regardless of your background, and valued for your work and your character above all else. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Cut: Close-up on an officer in a library.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier in uniform, smiling, in a conference room.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier in front of a military airplane.)

(Cut: Close-up on a sailor, a military ship is in the distance.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier.)

(Cut: On a landing strip, a pilot is walking, his helmet in hand. A fighter jet is parked behind him.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier, she is smiling.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier in uniform. There is machinery on his right and a military aircraft is taking off behind him.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier in front of a military airplane.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier who is smiling. She is at her post.)

(Cut: Close-up on a smiling soldier in a command room.)

(Cut: Close-up on a soldier standing in front of lockers, she is smiling.)

// Voiceover (woman): Canada’s military has a long tradition of diversity and the face of our military has continued to evolve with Canada’s increasing multiculturalism. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Historical tableau illustrating a 19th century battle: at the mouth of a river, several soldiers arriving by canoe attack a village. There are clouds of smoke.)

(Transition: Historical tableau illustrating another 19th century battle: in a forest, a group of soldiers are going into battle. A soldier wields his sword.)

(Transition: Historical black and white photograph depicting a group of soldiers who are marching, bags on their backs, weapons strapped to their sides. They are crossing a bridge.)

(Transition: Black and white video sequence of two soldiers in uniform marching in a field, carrying wooden poles.)

(Transition: Black and white video sequence of a group of soldiers marching in a port near a docked ship. The soldiers are wearing large backpacks, weapons strapped to their side, carrying bags. In the background, four soldiers carrying their caps go down the ramp of the ship.)

// Voiceover (woman): The Forces welcome applicants from all genders, religions, ethnicities and sexual orientations. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Black and white video sequence of a group of soldiers marching in formation in an arid landscape.)

(Transition: Black and white video sequence of soldier looking into the distance through binoculars.)

(Cut: Return to colour shots. A military diver jumps into the water from the ship’s deck. Four soldiers are already in the water, a buoy is nearby. Underwater view of the divers. The divers are inspecting large propellers.)

(Transition: A group of soldiers marches in formation in a parking lot.)

// Voiceover (woman): Today, people of all backgrounds work collaboratively. Forces’ members have the right to be treated fairly, respectfully and with dignity in a workplace free of harassment. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: A group of soldiers in two lines marches down a rural road. Each soldier is wearing a large backpack and a sleeping bag with weapon in hand.)

(Transition: On a landing strip, soldiers form a long line. They march towards a military plane and prepare to board. There is a hangar in the background.)

(Transition: A group of soldiers boards a military plane. Close-up on four of them.)

(Cut: Two soldiers in uniform seen in profile. They are looking at a computer screen in a classroom.)

(Transition: In a classroom, groups of two soldiers are seated at computers.)

(Transition: Standing at a lectern, a soldier is presenting to the class. There are two huge projection screens behind him.)

(Cut: Close-up on profile of a soldier in the classroom.)

(Transition: Zoom out to larger view of the class. The instructor is walking down the centre aisle, as the soldiers pay close attention to what he is saying. The shot narrows and focuses on the instructor as the edges of the scene fade and darken.)

// Voiceover (woman): Operating in an environment where uniform and rank are seen first, the Forces respect individual diversity. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: At Royal Military College in Kingston, Ontario, a group of soldiers holding books walks by.)

(Transition: Zoom in on two of the soldiers.)

(Transition: In an amphitheatre-style classroom, profile shot of soldiers taking notes. Point of view changes to see the class from the front, four rows of students are taking notes.)

(Transition: Two soldiers are seated at the front of the class. They are listening to the lecturer, seen from behind.)

// Voiceover (woman): To help ensure that ranks reflect Canada’s cultural make-up, the Canadian Armed Forces practise Employment Equity,… //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier in a classroom.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier presenting to the class.)

(Transition: Close-up on profile of soldier in classroom.)

(Transition: Close-up on a hand writing on a piece of paper with a pen.)

(Transition: In a cubicle at a recruiting centre an officer is seated at his desk. He is interviewing a young candidate. Close-up on the officer who is explaining something, pan out to include the candidate, who is listening intently.)

// Voiceover (woman): …which means striving for appropriate representation of designated groups at all areas and levels of the institution, including women, Aboriginal peoples and members of visible minorities. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Two soldiers outside at a training exercise, walking a tightrope suspended one metre off the ground.)

(Transition: A group of about 100 soldiers is running outside on a paved course. They are wearing grey sweats and a green toque. The leader is wearing a red and yellow safety vest.)

(Transition: In a gymnasium, a group of soldiers stretches as they listen to their coach. They are wearing numbered bibs.)

(Transition: In a hospital corridor, a soldier is speaking to medical personnel; at that moment a soldier on crutches passes in front of the camera.)

(Transition: An officer is sitting at his desk, working at his computer.)

(Transition: Under a tent, a soldier is standing and comforting a soldier who is seated on a bed.)

(Transition: A soldier is marching, carrying two duffle bags. In the background, other military personnel are inside a tent.)

(Transition: View from the bottom of airstairs attached to a military plane. A member of the security team, wearing a suit and tie and dark glasses is standing at the bottom of the stairs. At the top, a soldier in uniform is disembarking.)

(Transition: In an office, an officer is greeting a young member of the Royal Canadian Air Force. He invites her to sit at a conference table.)

(Transition: In a conference room, three rows of soldiers are seated, another group stands at the back. In the foreground, a soldier is taking notes.)

(Transition: Close-up on the soldier who is explaining something to the group. At the back of the room, two soldiers are taking notes.)

// Voiceover (woman): Whoever you are, when you put on the uniform of the Canadian Armed Forces you will be treated with equal respect. By joining the Forces, you join a long tradition of honourable service that is recognized around the world. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Cut: A military helicopter with a Red Cross sign is taking off in a desert landscape.)

(Cut: Black and white sequence: a soldier smiles, his arms crossed, as he stands in front of military truck.)

(Cut: Three close-ups on soldiers’ name tags sewn onto their uniforms.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier, he is smiling. He is in front of a sophisticated computer screen.)

(Cut: View from the bridge of a military ship. A large Canadian flag is hanging from the side of the ship. There is another military ship in the background.)

(Transition: An Aurora aircraft in flight.)

(Transition: In a desert setting, a smiling Canadian soldier shakes hands with another soldier.)

(Transition: Two Canadian soldiers in front of a group of six civilians wearing long tunics. One of the soldiers is shaking hands with a member of the group. In the background, mountains.)

// Voiceover (woman): You will also enjoy the unique opportunities for education, training, travel and personal excellence that are part of every soldier’s life. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: In a foreign country, a Canadian soldier is speaking with four women wearing veils. Three children are with them.)

(Cut: A military helicopter is landing in an arctic landscape as an air traffic controller guides him to safety.)

(Cut: A Forces encampment in a desert.)

(Transition: Outdoor shot of the camp on a sunny day: two soldiers are playing catch with a football; on the left, four soldiers are reading on lawn chairs; other soldiers are gathered in the background.)

(Transition: A helicopter lands in a desert zone. In the background, mountains.)

(Cut: Cut to the deck of a ship that is docked in an urban setting, four soldiers are pulling the rigging.)

(Cut: A military ship at sea.)

(Cut: View from the cockpit of an airplane in flight. View from behind the pilot of a bright orange sunset.)

(Cut: A military ceremony is taking place in a great hall. Fifty soldiers wearing ceremonial red are lined up in formation. Some of them carry Canadian flags. Another group of soldiers stands on a platform. Three huge Canadian flags are hanging.)

(Cut: Front view of a Hercules aircraft landing.)

(Transition: A military ship at sea.)

(Transition: Orange sunset on the ocean as seen from the deck of a military ship.)

// Voiceover (woman): Thanks to diversity in uniform, the Forces have a strong and unified team that is able to respond to situations quickly and effectively in Canada and around the world. //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Close-up on sepia shot of a soldier.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier.)

(Transition: Close-up of a soldier walking on a landing strip.)

(Transition: A soldier walks through the office holding a file folder and pen.)

(Transition: Medical personnel in the hallway of a hospital.)

(Cut: Aerial view of a military ship at sea. Three images add to the scene one after the other in vertical bands: on the left, a soldier in front of a plane; in the middle, a soldier in a hangar; on the right, a soldier in front of the cockpit of an airplane.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier wearing a toque.)

(Transition: Close-up on an officer in a library.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier in a command room.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier.)

(Transition: Close-up on a soldier; there is medical equipment in the background.)

(Transition: Close-up on a smiling soldier.)

(Cut: A military ship at sea, another ship follows behind.)

(Cut: View of the Earth from a satellite.)

// Music ends. //

// Voiceover (woman): JOIN US //

(Voiceover layers over a quick montage of scenes as described below.)

(Transition: Front view of a pilot in the cockpit of a fighter jet. He is wearing a helmet and mask that covers his face. Two fighter jets follow behind. View from above the clouds. The bright sun shines directly into the camera’s lens.)

(The Forces badge appears followed by FORCES.CA.)

(Super: JOIN US)

// Drum beat. //

(The badge fades to black.)

(Super: Copyright, Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Department of National Defence, 2014.)

(Canada Wordmark)

Return to video

Careers

Transcript

TITLE: CAREERS AND RECRUITMENT

ROSEANNA MANDY: I have the best job ever. In the Canadian Armed Forces, my present job is as a section commander for the ill and injured. My job is currently to provide support to our wounded.

EMELY ALCINA: I'm the training coordinator of the boatswain department at my unit, so it's all the training related to... in order to keep our recruits up to date in their regular training.

LYNNE PATTERSON: I'm a public affairs officer. I'm working as a marketing advisor with the marketing and advertising department in Ottawa.

KAREN STREEK: I command a unit of approximately 150 soldiers who provide all the classified communications for the entire Canadian Armed Forces, including overseas operations.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: As a combat engineer officer, some of the technical jobs that we can do could be working at a base, managing construction and engineering, infrastructure for bases, or we could also go into the technology behind ammunition and explosives. And in my case, I did the technical stream of geospatial engineering.

CHERYL BUSH: Actually, my trade is marine engineering, system operator, so I've been stationed on board various ships in the Royal Canadian Navy, and I'm qualified as a chief engineer.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I work for the naval staff comptroller. The comptroller manages the budget for the Royal Canadian Navy, and I work for her support staff.

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: In the Canadian Armed Forces, I'm a resource management support clerk. Every and anything you can think of administratively in finance, that's what we do.

ROSEANNA MANDY: I've had an extremely diverse military career. I joined as an infantry soldier. I also enjoy resource support management. And I was a civil military cooperation operator also.

LYNNE PATTERSON: One of the reasons I joined the military was that, because it is such a big organization, you can map out your career and go as far as you want to go.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: A recruiter approached me, and she started talking to me about the Canadian Forces, and she explained that they help pay for tuition for students, which was very interesting to me at the time.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: I joined the Canadian Forces to do something different. I joined out of high school, and I wanted to serve my country, and just see what the world was like outside of where I grew up.

KAREN STREEK: A recruiting person came to our school and gave a presentation on the Royal Military College of Canada. I saw this as a great challenge and something exciting, and I knew immediately that's where I wanted to go.

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: When I walked into the recruiting centre, it wasn't about what I looked like, how my hair was, how my dress was, what shoes I wore; it was about: "You think you have what it takes to be a member of the Canadian Forces? Well, sure, come on in."

KAREN STREEK: I absolutely love my job; I always have. I mean, there's been so many different experiences in those 19 years. It's always a new challenge and something to look forward to each day.

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: You have endless opportunities to achieve so much more – education, travel – the list just goes on and on.

ROSEANNA MANDY: It's an incredible job. The opportunity to be able to make a difference and bring about positive change is incredible. That's what I like most about my job.

TITLE: CAREERS AND RECRUITMENT

Return to video

The experience of a lifetime

Transcript

TITLE: THE EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME

- An Air Force engineer leans out of the open hatch of a helicopter flying over the ocean

- Close up of a soldier dropping into tank’s forward hatch

- A Globemaster lands on a runway at dusk

- Close up of soldier in camouflage looking through night-vision binoculars

- Over-the-shoulder shot of an Air Force tech watching a helicopter take off from the deck of a ship

- Close up of a pilot in the cockpit of a CF-18

- Silhouette of an armoured vehicle in the setting sun

- Submarine at sea

SUPER GET MORE FROM YOUR LIFE

- Young woman in jogging clothes leans on a railing by the water and stretches

SUPER GET MORE FROM YOUR JOB

- Close up of joggers’ shoes running past

- Young woman joins the joggers as they pass her ( When you join the Canadian Armed Forces, you’ll set off on a journey that’s more fulfilling than you could ever imagine.)

- Heads and shoulders of a succession of three soldiers

- Silhouette of the young woman by the water

- Silhouette of the young woman stretching by the water

- Close up of the young woman’s head and shoulders

- Head and shoulders of solder in camouflage fatigues (Military Member: I joined the Canadian (Armed) Forces because I was looking for a career that wasn’t about your exterior. It was about what you had inside and what you had to give.)

SUPER MORE TRAINING

- Group of soldiers in grey sweats jogging past with their instructor

- Soldiers stepping through tires on an obstacle course

- Soldier going hand over hand on the obstacle course (You’ll be motivated to reach a new level of physical and mental fitness. And you’ll be inspired by leaders who are dedicated to bringing out your very best.)

- Soldier in white T-shirt lifting weights in a weight room

- Close up of second soldier in white T-shirt lifting weights

- Class of soldiers shot from behind to show instructor and projected text at the front of a classroom

- Close up of soldier looking down to take notes

- Close up of soldier looking at instructor

SUPER MORE SUPPORT

- Close up of a soldier working over a radio set with instructor behind her

- Close up of a soldier setting up field equipment with instructor in the background Military Member: They’re very supportive of your family, of your home life. That’s one of the main things

- they take care of you as a person and your family is a big part of that.

- Head shot of soldier in beret

- Head and shoulders of same soldier

- Row of four soldiers receiving arms instructions from instructor

- Classroom with a small group of soldiers receiving instructions on field equipment from their instructor

- Soldiers in full camouflage with a close up of a smiling soldier in the foreground (The Forces can pay for your way through school and have you working as soon as you graduate. If you already have a career, you’ll soon see why there’s more to gain by doing an equivalent job in the military.)

SUPER MORE BENEFITS

- Row of soldiers sitting at computer terminals receiving instruction

- Room with soldiers relaxing while two soldiers study in the foreground

- Classroom with soldiers receiving small arms instruction from an instructor

- Close up of a sailor in Navy coveralls

- Close up of a firefighter wearing a hard hat and firefighter jacket

- Fire station with fire truck in the foreground

- Soldier operating industrial equipment

- Group of military band members with two smiling members in the foreground carrying their instruments

- Close up of soldier in full face visor handling equipment

- Close up of soldier wearing headset sitting in front of a display

SUPER MORE EXPERIENCE

- Head shot of a soldier sitting at a desk

- Soldiers walking past rows of armoured vehicles in a hangar

- Soldier checking instruments in an aircraft

- Armoured vehicle driving fast in a dirt field Military Member: Being in the military has taught me integrity, honour and strength and how to not let anything deter you, so no matter how big the task, just do your best. You’ll always end up coming out on top.

- Close up of sergeant

- Close up of soldier wearing safety glasses

- Group receiving instruction in a field camp

- Close up of boots under a bunk

- Soldier getting up from her cot in an army tent

- Medic tending to a local woman overseas

- Soldiers placing a stretcher on a helicopter

- Sailor at the wheel of a ship

- Soldier in full camouflage operating a surveying instrument

- Scuba diver plunging from the side of a ship

- Scuba diver entering the water (Canada has one of the only militaries in the world where there are no service barriers to women. More than ever, women are excelling in the Canadian Armed Forces.)

- Canadian flag on the stern of a Navy ship at sea with a second ship in the background

- Close up of soldier wearing a headset looking at two monitors

SUPER MORE OPPORTUNITIES

- Tails and exhausts of three CF-18s in a row

- Chinook lifting pallets of supplies

- Close up of a pair of soldiers assembling field equipment

- Silhouette of soldier in a tent

- SUPER MORE IMPACT

- Group of soldiers dressing in their tent

- Close up of a sailor securing a line around a capstan on a ship

- Frigate at sea

- Paratroopers jumping from the rear door of a Hercules

- Scuba divers under water

- Fleet at sea with a submarine in the foreground

- Silhouette of a Globemaster on the runway

- Two figures being winched from the deck of a ship to a helicopter hovering overhead

- Soldier in a tent parting the flaps and going outside

- FORCES.CA (identifier and Web address) and JOIN US

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Lifestyle

Transcript

TITLE: LIFESTYLE

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I would describe my lifestyle as very similar to my friends that aren't in the Canadian Forces. I'm single, I go out a lot, and I go to work in an office every day, and I go out a lot with my friends in the evenings. I think our lifestyles are very similar, except that I wear a uniform every day.

EMELY ALCINA: My lifestyle is actually pretty active. I have my job in the Navy part time, and I have my full-time job on the civilian side. I do a lot of sports. I'm really busy constantly. I'm still taking a couple classes, so, really, really active.

KAREN STREEK: I would describe my lifestyle as being very busy. I have a busy career that I truly enjoy, I have a big family with three small children, and a lot of extra-curricular activities.

ROSEANNA MANDY: I have a great family life. I'm really happily married. My children are both athletes. I have time to do homework. I think that I have a great work-life balance.

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: I think it's so important that you are a soldier, yes, 24/7, but however, when I take my uniform off, I'm very much a lady.

CHERYL BUSH: So, I have my life with the military, but also a great, awesome civilian life with great friends.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I don't live on a base; I live in an apartment, downtown Ottawa. I've actually never lived on a base, except when I was in training.

KAREN STREEK: I live in a nice family neighbourhood. It's got lots of other little children there. And a nice home, with only minutes to drive to where I work.

LYNNE PATTERSON: I live in a great downtown neighbourhood that's very family-friendly – lots of kids, lots of other families. It's a super-friendly place to live.

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: My neighbourhood is actually very quiet, very family oriented, and it's great.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: I go to and from work with my bicycle. The bike trails are a great way to get around town.

CHERYL BUSH: Everyone in my subdivisions has two acres of land. I have bush, I have a hot tub, a pool, and no one would ever know that I'm actually in the military. I just kind of blend in with the surroundings.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I definitely have a lot of leisure time. I mainly work business hours from 8 to 4. In the evenings, I got to the gym or go to yoga or go out with my friends.

EMELY ALCINA: I love travelling, I love doing activities, new activities, photography.

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: I love to travel, I love to dress up, I love to go out, I like the, you know, the dresses, the heels.

ROSEANNA MANDY: I love to hike and track and travel, and I'm an athlete, so I have tonnes of time to fit those things in. The military is amazing. I have an hour dedicated every day to my physical training, so they even build time in for my recreation.

KAREN STREEK: That's one of the advantages of the military, is that you get to do your leisure during your work, because I'm big into physical fitness, I'm a cyclist – we're currently training to go on a cycling trek from Ottawa to Kingston. So, these are things that I'm able to do with my job, with my soldiers, so I'm fulfilling both my leisure desires and my military occupation at the same time.

TITLE: LIFESTYLE

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Pride

Transcript

TITLE: PRIDE AND UNIFORM

LYNNE PATTERSON: At first, when I told my friends that I was going to join the Forces, they were very skeptical. My mom was a bit worried, to be perfectly honest. But now when they see what I get to do and the opportunities that I have and the career path, they're jealous of what I get to do, and ask me, "How do I get in there?"

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: My family was very surprised, because nobody in my family was a member of the Canadian Forces, and they didn't know a lot about it.

I think the more I made them feel comfortable with it, the more that they really supported my career choice.

CHERYL BUSH: I've been trained as a Navy diver, I've jumped out of helicopters, I've been to Europe on a sailing ship, and people are just in awe of the opportunities I've had, and this is just part of my job.

KAREN STREEK: It was a big surprise for my parents when I told them that I wanted to join the Forces. I'm the first person ever in my entire family history to join the military, so it was a big surprise. My mom's biggest concern was: "Are you going to have to shave your head and get tattoos?" And I was like, "No, that doesn't happen."

So, they've been very, very happy with my military career all along the way, and surprised, of course, that it's not what they expected it to be, but in the end they're very proud.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: So, one of the aspects I'm most proud of in my career in the Canadian Forces is my deployment in Afghanistan and Haiti, and also the ability to do something tangible to help other people.

KAREN STREEK: The thing I'm most proud of in my military career is the many physical accomplishments that I've managed to do. Ten years ago, for example, I was with the military team that cycled across Canada. I've been on marches across Europe, I've done Ironman competitions.

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: I'm most proud of what I've achieved – the experiences I got, the places I got to see, and my husband. I met my husband in the Forces while training to be deployed.

CHERYL BUSH: But the most thing I'll be proud of is actually receiving this medal here, and that's the Order of Military Merit. It's very similar to the Order of Canada, so that's probably one of the most proudest, to be receiving the medal from the Governor General of Canada.

KAREN STREEK: Wearing the uniform means to me a sense of pride, especially in the past decade with all of our activity in Afghanistan and all of the feats that our soldiers have had over there, so I'm very proud to wear the uniform. It's also great that I don't need to decide every day what I need to wear.

ROSEANNA MANDY: I'm just proud of my country. Every day, I wake up and I go to work, and I can't ask for a better job. I love my job every day.

TITLE: PRIDE AND UNIFORM

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Why Join the Forces

Transcript

TITLE: WHY JOIN THE FORCES

CLAIRE BRAMMA: The biggest advantage of being a member of the Canadian Forces is the privilege to serve, defend Canada and defend all the freedoms and the things that make Canada so great.

KAREN STREEK: It has a lot of great benefits. You have a lot of good leave benefits, sick leave, good pay. It also offers career progression, so that you know that if you're gonna do well that you're gonna be promoted and you're gonna move on to new challenges.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: I like the fact that I'm challenged, not only mentally but also professionally, and I like the fact that you meet a lot of people.

ROSEANNA MANDY: You never know what you're gonna come across, but you do know that you've got the skills to deal with it, and if you don't, you can develop them, so it's an amazing job, never boring.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I like the fact that I get to travel for training and operations. I get to see different parts of the world that I wouldn't have necessarily seen if I had a civilian job.

EMELY ALCINA: The biggest advantage for me being part of the reserves has been the opportunity to have my two lives, so almost having that reserve life and that opportunity to go away and travel and learn and train in a completely different level than I do in my civilian side.

ROSEANNA MANDY: What I would say to my female friends looking to join the Canadian Armed Forces is just really that they can make the experience whatever they want it.

CHERYL BUSH: In the Forces, we have over 100 different types of jobs, and so there's always something that's going to match your personality, your skill sets, the opportunity to travel, and learn, and meet new people.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: It's the best job in the world.

ROSEANNA MANDY: It is an absolutely incredible job, and I work with amazing people, and I work for amazing people, so it doesn't get much better than that.

EMELY ALCINA: So, come and join us.

TITLE: WHY JOIN THE FORCES

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Benefits

Transcript

TITLE: BENEFITS

CLAIRE BRAMMA: I feel that I do have a secure job. My current terms of service, it's a 20-year employment.

EMELY ALCINA: In terms of job security, I feel very stable at my job. I have no worries that ever I'm gonna be laid off.

KAREN STREEK: I definitely feel I have a good level of job security with lots of great benefits. That's something I don't need to worry about day to day, is whether or not I'll have a job when I go to work.

LYNNE PATTERSON: After coming from the world of journalism and communications, being with national defence, it feels like it's something that is very secure.

CHERYL BUSH: One of the most secure employers out there that you're gonna find in Canada. I think it's one of the best things about joining the Forces. I've been here for 28 years, and I'm easily gonna do... could do another 10 years if I wanted, no problem.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: The social benefits are fantastic in the Forces.

CHERYL BUSH: You're gonna have excellent dental, medical, for you and your dependents – your spouse or children.

LYNNE PATTERSON: It's one of the main reasons I joined the military. In my previous jobs, I didn't have very good social benefits. I was worried about having a family. A lot of people talk about the military being a family. Not only is it a family, but it makes it easier to have your own family, because your work-life balance is really good.

CHERYL BUSH: As an employer of choice in Canada, I think the military's actually one of the best ones from a benefits perspective.

TITLE: BENEFITS

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Volunteer

Transcript

TITLE: VOLONTEER

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: I am very involved with my community. I volunteer in Toronto at the CDOA, which is the Commonwealth of Dominica Ontario Association, which I'm a very active volunteer.

CLAIRE BRAMMA: Currently in my community, I'm involved in a local church. I like to play music on a weekly basis with them. And we also do some outreach activities. And also, I have volunteered with Habitat for Humanity, and I enjoy the aspect that there are building projects in other countries around the world, and this year I went to Costa Rica for a building project.

MICHELLE BARANOWSKI: I volunteer for a group called the Defence Youth Network. It's basically a group of young people that work for the Department of National Defence, both military and civilian. We get together to discuss issues such as career development, professional development, language training, networking, and it's a lot of fun. I've made a lot of friends through that group as well.

KAREN STREEK: I'm involved in our community. My squadron is an active volunteer group with the Ottawa Missions and the Shepherds of Good Hope here in Ottawa, which are homeless shelters. And we go there during working hours often, about once a month, to help out serving dinners and just help out in general with the community.

TITLE: VOLONTEER

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Family

Transcript

TITLE: FAMILY

ROSEANNA MANDY: My husband had been previously in the Canadian Armed Forces. He was in the Navy, and he was a diver.

CHERYL BUSH: I married my husband – he actually served 29 years in the military. He's retired now.

KAREN STREEK: My partner is also in the military. He's a pilot in the Air Force. Sometimes it makes it challenging for us to be together, but we both understand the nature and the culture, so it also makes it good for our relationship.

AVRIL JEAN-BAPTISTE JONES: Luckily, on my first deployment, he was deployed too, so we'd walk by and say, "Hi."

CLAIRE BRAMMA: Keeping in touch with loved ones is pretty easy when you're deployed. I found that Skype and regular telephone conversations work just fine.

CHERYL BUSH: Nowadays, the easiest way is by Facebook and Skyping and stuff.

KAREN STREEK: I don't think there's been a day in our 17-year relationship that we haven't spoke.

EMELY ALCINA: If you're sailing, sometimes it's tough to keep in touch, but there are also phones, and I have the opportunity to go on a computer once in a while.

ROSEANNA MANDY: I call whenever I can. Sometimes that's not a possibility. I write a lot of letters, and I just make sure that the time that we do spend when I am home, they know how much I love them.

KAREN STREEK: I've managed to balance it really well. I currently have a three-year-old, a four-year-old, and a six-year-old, and I'm also a commanding officer of a unit.

ROSEANNA MANDY: I have two boys, Everest and Ethan, and they're amazing.

KAREN STREEK: I feel that I'm still able to be a good parent at home, 'cause I'm satisfied in my other parts of my life.

CHERYL BUSH: Times that I've had to reach out to the organization called Military Family Resource Centre. The military offered subsidies to help pay for the cost of having a daycare or childcare take care of my son.

KAREN STREEK: I have a caregiver that comes to my home during the day, and that gives me flexibility if I ever need to stay a little bit late.

LYNNE PATTERSON: There are children's programs from age two weeks up to, you know, I think even into the teen years. There's also support for the spouses. When one person is deployed, there's a lot of support for the person who gets left behind with all the family responsibilities.

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Careers

Transcript

Are you ready to dive into action? To go beyond your personal and professional limits?

Do you want to make your voice heard … In the remotest corners of the planet?

Or deliver essential healthcare … in state-of-the-art portable clinics?

Dare to be extraordinary with the Forces. Apply for one of over one hundred exciting careers.

A message from the Government of Canada

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Training

Transcript

Are you ready to exceed your limits … … and jump into the heat of the action?

Would you like to master new skills, in the middle of the ocean?

Or save a life by being at the right place at the right time?

The Forces can help you achieve it. Dare to be extraordinary … … with training that will serve you everywhere.

A message from the Government of Canada.

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CAF Story: Major Melissa Reyes

Transcript

Major Reyes: Everybody loves space. I mean it’s just such a neat thing, you know it’s hard to fathom.

When I was younger, I think I was five, and I wanted to be an astronomer.

Maybe it’s the romantic side of space that people really like, you know, that draws them there. But I think it’s all about the exploring, you know, and discovering new things. There’s so much that we don’t know.

My name is Major Melissa Reyes. I’m a communications and electronics engineer.

When I first started in the military, I wasn’t in space, I never expected to be in a space related position.

When I was coming back from Afghanistan, my career manager phoned and said “Do you want to work at the Canadian Space Agency?” And I was like “Cool, who doesn’t want to work at the Canadian Space Agency, right?”

When I was working at the North Warning System office, we would visit the different North Warning System sites. 

We were in a helicopter and we were flying to one of the sites, and it was a big blanket of white because it was in the winter. And then all of a sudden there was this black dot. You know, I just thought it was like a tree or something like that, but it was so far away. And then the black dot just got bigger and bigger; and it was the radar site.

It was just amazing. I can even still feel it now, it was just this feeling of awe and how small we are. And the Earth is so small in compared to the entire universe.

This is the satellite that we had just launched in June of this year, from India. And this is called the Maritime Monitoring and Messaging Micro Satellite.

This little satellite, which is also in a polar orbit, will pick up these signals, and then send them back down to Earth.

The Navy, our Navy, and not just our Navy but other government departments in Canada, want to know what’s approaching us.

And of course you can say that you can learn something new every day. But I mean, that I think for me, I’ve had that opportunity in the military to do that.

If you think about how vast space actually is, it’s hard to even fathom the distance.

Where I am now I’m really enjoying it, because I’m a space nerd. So when you think about it, when I was five and I wanted to do stuff in space, here I am.

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CAF Story: Major Thackorie

Transcript

Major Thackorie: What is this for again?

Off camera: This is a CAF Story.

Major Thackorie: Oh right, ok.

Off camera: You’re a CAF Story.

Major Thackorie: Cool.

Major Indira Thackorie, Public Affairs Officer for the Canadian Armed Forces Snowbirds. I’m an army Public Affairs Officer, but our trade is so versatile that we can work with any aspect of the military. So being an army officer with the Snowbirds is not a hindrance at all, it’s actually pretty awesome. I did…I am wearing a brown t-shirt so I like to highlight the fact that I am an army officer and so it goes along with the team representing all three elements of the military. I transit with the eleven and ten jet, so my jet is the eleven jet. We arrive two hours ahead of the nine ball, and we coordinate everything the Snowbirds do while they’re in that location. 

So it’s been pretty good, it’s kind of fun being up there in the air chasing the clouds. It’s pretty cool, I’m a bit of a G-Monster myself. At nineteen years old I was a volunteer with the Canadian International Air Show in Toronto. I’m still a volunteer with the Canadian International Air Show. I’m actually also the only female Air Show announcer in North America. So on the side I’m an air show announcer. I’m also the vice-president of the North East Council of Air Shows, which is the governing body for all Air Shows in the eastern seaboard.

I joined the Canadian Army as a reservist when I was seventeen years old back in 1996. So I’ve been in both industries for a really long time. And having been in the Air Show industry for so long, I had the opportunity to work with the Canadian Forces parachute team, the SkyHawks, for two and a half years. And of course the only thing better than being a SkyHawk is being a Snowbird.

My particular goal is actually to get little girls involved in aviation. And so having the opportunity to go out there and meet little girls and tell them that anything they want to do is possible. Even if that means that you want to fly an airplane, then you should definitely do that. The whole goal of the team is to inspire kids to do whatever they want to do. Whether they want to be a doctor or a pilot or they want to fix airplanes. We’ve got a ton of aircraft mechanics on the team that are amazing and if little girls want to fix airplanes, that’s what they should do, and that’s what we’re there to tell them.

My favourite thing is watching the shows with kids at the Air Show. So this is a wonderful opportunity to represent my country and my military and really be out there meeting people and talking about the great work that we do here.

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