Canadian tentative negotiating positions: 17th Conference of the Parties

 

Date Posted: 2016-09-21

17.01 - Delete wood bison from Appendix II

Proponent
Canada
Position
Support

A review of the available biological information against the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) listing criteria and precautionary measures indicates that the subspecies does not meet the criteria for continued listing on CITES Appendix II. Regulations are in place under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), provincial and territorial wildlife Acts and Agriculture Acts to ensure that harvest and trade will not threaten the species. The majority of the species’ range is in Canada. If Canada’s proposal is adopted, trade in wood bison would no longer be subject to CITES controls.

17.02 - Add western tur to Appendix II

Proponent
European Union and Georgia
Position
Undecided

Canada does not support this proposal to list the western tur, a wild goat, on Appendix II as written. The species appears to be more impacted by domestic trade than international trade such that the range States should consider other means to monitor trade.  The proposal also recommends specific conditions for trade in one subspecies of western tur that would be precedent setting and difficult to enforce. Canada’s final position will be informed by more information from all range States and conditional on the modification of conditions on trade in the one subspecies of western turn.

17.03 - Amendment to the CITES annotation of vicuna in Appendix II

Proponent
Peru
Position
Conditional support

This is a technical proposal to harmonize the conditions of trade, as detailed in an annotation to the current Appendix II listing, for all populations of vicuna. Canada conditionally supports the proposed amendment, pending review of the precise wording of the amended annotation.

17.04 - Transfer all African populations of lion to Appendix I

Proponent
Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gabon, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria and Togo
Position
Undecided

Canada does not support this proposal to transfer the African lion, Panthera leo, to Appendix I because the species as a whole does not meet the listing criteria for Appendix I and international trade is not a major threat. The major threats to lions include conflict with humans (and livestock), habitat loss and decline in prey. Trophy hunting is not well managed in part of the lion range but it is not the primary threat to the species. The IUCN has recently (2015) assessed this species as Vulnerable based on solid data. Canada would consider a modified proposal to list the declining populations in Appendix I (populations in western, central and eastern Africa), while maintaining the populations in southern African countries in Appendix II.

17.05 - Transfer of eastern cougar and Florida panther to Appendix II

Proponent
Canada
Position
Support

Canada submitted this proposal, which was developed in collaboration with the United States, to transfer two subspecies of cougar to Appendix II. There is no international trade in these subspecies and the eastern cougar is considered extinct. With this transfer, any international trade in Florida panther (such as exchange of scientific samples) would be controlled under the CITES Appendix II listing of the wild cat family, Felidae.  This transfer underwent critical review by the CITES Animals Committee who agreed that a transfer to Appendix II would be appropriate.

17.06 - Transfer the Cape mountain zebra to Appendix II

Proponent
South Africa
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to transfer the Cape Mountain zebra to Appendix II. It no longer meets the biological criteria for Appendix I and it is not affected by international trade. Management measures are in place to ensure that any trade under an Appendix II listing is sustainable.

17.07 - Amendment to the CITES annotation of white rhino in Appendix II

Proponent
Swaziland
Position
Undecided

Canada does not support this proposal to allow lessening of trade restrictions for the Appendix II Southern White Rhino from Swaziland. Although it is clear that there would be economic and species benefits in Swaziland as a result of the proposal, Swaziland rhinoceros meet the biological criteria for Appendix I listing, and there would be substantive risk to other rhino populations if this proposal were adopted. However, Canada would support a rhinoceros range state consensus for this species if such a consensus can be reached.

17.08- Transfer an Asian pangolin (Manis crassicaudata) to CITES Appendix I

Proponent
Bangladesh
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal (identical to proposal 9) to transfer an Asian pangolin species (Manus crassicaudata) from Appendix II to Appendix I as the species meets the decline criteria for an Appendix I listing, and it is at risk of extinction because of demand in international trade (mostly illegal). Most range States are in support of the suite of proposals for pangolins (Proposals 8-12) with the exception of China, a destination country for seizures. Listing all pangolin species will be beneficial for enforcement as the primary market is for scales used in traditional medicine which are often powdered and thus difficult to differentiate at the species level.

17.09 - Transfer an Asian pangolin (Manis crassicaudata) to CITES Appendix I

Proponent
India, Sri Lanka, and United States of America
Position
Support

Canada supports this propoasl (identical to proposal 8) to transfer an Asian pangolin species (Manus crassicaudata) from Appendix II to Appendix I as the species meets the decline criteria for an Appendix I listing, and it is at risk of extinction because of demand in international trade (mostly illegal). Most range States are in support of the suite of proposals for pangolins (Proposals 8-12) with the exception of China, a destination country for seizures. Listing all pangolin species will be beneficial for enforcement as the primary market is for scales used in traditional medicine which are often powdered and thus difficult to differentiate at the species level.

17.10 - Transfer of an Asian pangolin (Manis culionensis) to CITES Appendix I

Proponent
Philippines and United States of America
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to transfer an Asian pangolin species (Manis culionensis) from Appendix II to Appendix I as the species meets the decline criteria for an Appendix I listing, and it is at risk of extinction because of demand in international trade.

17.11 - Transfer of two Asian pangolins (Manis javanica, M. pentadactyla) to CITES Appendix I

Proponent
United States of America and Viet Nam
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to transfer these Asian pangolin species from Appendix II to Appendix I as the species meet the decline criteria for an Appendix I listing, and are at risk of extinction because of demand in international trade.

17.12 - Transfer of four African pangolins to Appendix I

Proponent
Angola, Botswana, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gabon, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Togo and United States of America 
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to transfer four African pangolin species from Appendix II to Appendix I. The species are at risk of extinction because of a high demand in international trade (mostly illegal). Most range States are in support of the proposals, indicating that populations cannot meet the demand. A zero quota for wild, commercial specimens, established in 2000 for Asian pangolins, has shifted the trade demand to these African species. While the species may not meet the biological criteria for an Appendix I listing, their low productivity, inability to reproduce in captivity and  high threat of trade suggests an Appendix I listing is appropriate.

17.13 - Transfer of Barbary macaque to Appendix I

Proponent
European Union and Morocco 
Position
Support

Canada supports the proposal to transfer the Barbary macaque from Appendix II to Appendix I as it meets the biological criteria for Appendix I and is at risk of extinction due to international trade demand. In addition, under Morocco’s domestic legislation, an Appendix I listing will facilitate enforcement and conservation by allowing penalties much greater than an Appendix II listing.

17.14- Delete the CITES annotation of African elephant in Appendix II for Namibia

Proponent
Namibia
Position
Undecided

This proposal would remove the detailed trade restrictions found in an annotation to the Appendix II listing of Namibian elephants. It is clear that Namibia has been able to sufficiently conserve its elephants to result in a significant increase in their population. Canada would support a consensus amongst all African elephant range States with regards to this proposal and will form a final position once it is known if range States can reach such a range state consensus.

17.15 - Delete the CITES annotation of African elephant in Appendix II for Zimbabwe

Proponent
Zimbabwe
Position
Undecided

This proposal would remove the detailed trade restrictions found in an annotation to the Appendix II listing of Zimbabwean elephants. It is not clear that Zimbabwe has been able to sufficiently conserve or protect their elephants from poaching or that they will be able to in the future. It is unknown whether there would be significant and uncontrollable laundering of ivory through Zimbabwe (or increased illegal trade from other range States that is passed off as legal trade) such that this change would be detrimental for African elephants as a whole or in other range States. Canada would support a consensus amongst all African elephant range States with regards to this proposal and will form a final position once it is known if range States can reach such a range state consensus.

17.16 - Inclusion of all populations of African elephant in Appendix I

Proponent
Benin, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Ethiopia, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sri Lanka and Uganda
Position
Undecided

This proposal recommends a transfer of four populations of African elephant currently on Appendix II (populations of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe) to Appendix I as a measure to protect all African elephant populations. The four countries with Appendix II populations are not proponents of the proposal and are unlikely to support it. Failing a consensus among range States, it is important to note that elephants do not meet biological criteria for listing (as a whole or for the four populations in question) on Appendix I and thus a transfer of the four populations to Appendix I is not supported.

17.17 - Transfer of peregrine falcon to Appendix II

Proponent
Canada
Position
Support

Canada submitted this proposal to reduce the trade restrictions on Peregrine Falcon through a transfer from CITES Appendix I to CITES Appendix II. Current biological information suggests that there is a stable or increasing global population of Peregrine Falcon and current legislative controls of countries engaged in Peregrine Falcon trade are sufficient to ensure continued global protection for the species.  The species clearly does not meet the scientific criteria for continued retention on CITES Appendix I.

17.18 - Transfer of the helmeted honeyeater to Appendix II

Proponent
Australia
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal that is a result of an assessment by the CITES Animals Committee. Although the subspecies is critically endangered due to habitat loss during the 20th century, the species was never at risk from international trade and therefore does not meet the criteria for inclusion in Appendix I.

17.19 - Transfer of African grey parrot to Appendix I

Proponent
Angola, Chad, European Union, Gabon, Guinea, Nigeria, Senegal, Togo and the United States of America.
Position
Undecided

Canada notes the African Grey parrot does not meet the decline criteria for Appendix I, although there is evidence of sufficient declines in several of the range States for one of the two African grey parrot subspecies. Commercial trade in wild specimens of this species is currently very low, and it is not evident that an Appendix I listing would provide additional conservation benefit. Canada will await the views of the range States on the conservation benefit of this proposal to further inform our final position.

17.20 - Transfer of Southern boobook owl to Appendix II

Proponent
Australia
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal that is a result of an assessment by the CITES Animals Committee. This hybrid is well protected and managed for recovery. Although it still meets the biological criteria for Appendix I, there is no trade and therefore no conservation benefit to a continued Appendix I listing. 

17.21 - Transfer of American crocodile from Columbia to Appendix II

Proponent
Colombia
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to transfer Colombia's Cispata Bay population of American crocodile to Appendix II with strict CITES provisions on wild capture given the overall severe depletion of this species in other parts of Colombia. Acceptance of the proposal would allow for sustainable use that supports livelihoods of local people while promoting the recovery of the species. 

17.22 - Amendment to the CITES annotation of Morelet’s crocodile in Appendix II

Proponent
Mexico
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to remove the current restrictions on trade in wild specimens from the Mexican population of Morelet's crocodile. Management and protection protocols are in place to ensure that the Convention is properly implemented.

17.23 - Amendment to the CITES annotation of Nile crocodile in Appendix II

Proponent
Madagascar
Position
Undecided

The proposal does not provide sufficient information to evaluate the merits of the proposed trade controls for this species and it is uncertain if the proposed trade restrictions would be within the scope of CITES. Canada will look to other range States and the IUCN Crocodile Specialist Group for further information in support of this proposal. Canada could support this proposal if information is provided that clearly demonstrates the Nile crocodile population in Madagascar no longer meets the biological criteria for Appendix I. 

17.24 - Transfer of Saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) to Appendix II

Proponent
Malaysia
Position
Support

Canada can support this proposal to transfer the Malaysian population of saltwater crocodile to Appendix II. The population does not meet the biological criteria for listing in Appendix I and precautionary measures are in place to ensure that an Appendix II listing can be implemented and enforced.

17.25 - Add 5 species of alligator lizard to Appendix I and 5 species to Appendix II

Proponent
Guatemala
Position
Conditional support

This proposal submitted by Guatemala and supported by Honduras concerns the listing of 10 Abronia species found in Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. The proposal is to list five Guatemala endemics in Appendix I, and the other five species in Appendix II. Canada supports the proposed Appendix listings based partly on assessment of biological criteria, and, because of the lack of data, based on the recommendations of conservation benefit from the range States.  There is an additional recommendation to annotate these listings to prohibit trade in captive bred specimens originating from outside the species' countries of origin which Canada does not support because the annotation is outside the scope of CITES. Note that Proposal 26 recommends inclusion of all species in Appendix II.

17.26 - Add all 29 species of alligator lizards to Appendix II

Proponent
European Union and Mexico
Position
Support

This proposal submitted by Mexico, and supported by Honduras and El Salvador, proposes listing all 29 species of Abronia on CITES Appendix II. Canada supports this proposal as written, but would also support an amendment to the proposal to allow for listing of five of these species on Appendix I as per proposal 25. All Abronia should be listed on CITES (Appendix I or II) because of their biological status, and actual or possible threats to survival of the species from trade.

17.27 - Add 21 species of pygmy chameleons to Appendix II

Proponent
Central African Republic, Chad, Gabon, Kenya, Nigeria and the United States of America
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to add 21 species of pygmy chameleons to Appendix II as these species are in decline and at risk of extinction due to trade and limited area of distribution. Trade demand has shifted to these African species for pet trade. The following proposal (proposal 28) is essentially the same proposal but submitted by a different proponent.

17.28 - Add 21 species of pygmy chameleons to Appendix II

Proponent
Kenya
Position
Support

As for proposal 27, Canada supports this proposal to add 21 species of pygmy chameleons to Appendix II as these species are in decline and at risk of extinction due to trade and limited area of distribution. Trade demand has shifted to these African species for pet trade.

17.29 - Add of psychedelic rock gecko to Appendix I

Proponent
European Union and Viet Nam
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to list the psychedelic rock gecko on Appendix I. Though there is very little trade data for this species, trade demand seems to be a primary threat. This species meets the criteria for listing on Appendix I of CITES due to the small area of distribution and very small population size. There is increasing evidence of poaching and illegal international trade for commercial pet trade. Any collection for the purpose of trade would be detrimental to the species given the small population size (~500 individuals).

17.30 - Add turquoise dwarf gecko to Appendix I

Proponent
European Union and United Republic of Tanzania
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to list the turquoise dwarf gecko on CITES Appendix I because it is at risk from trade and it has been assessed as critically endangered by IUCN. The species is illegally traded in large numbers out of Tanzania and into the United States and countries in the European Union. The import controls afforded by an Appendix I listing and cessation of commercial trade will be of benefit to the survival of this species.

17.31 - Add Masobe gecko to Appendix II

Proponent
European Union and Madagascar
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to list Masobe gecko on Appendix II because the species is has been assessed as endangered by IUCN and is in demand for international trade. Much of the trade appears to be illegal and Madagascar indicates an Appendix II listing, along with its new national legislation, will provide better monitoring and control. 

17.32 - Add of earless monitor lizard to Appendix I

Proponent
Malaysia
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to add the earless monitor lizard to Appendix I. The species meets the biological criteria for Appendix I and is clearly a very rare species. It is known to be in trade, facilitated by online networks.  It is evident that any trade in this species would be detrimental to the survival of the species in the wild.

17.33 - Transfer of Chinese crocodile lizard to Appendix I

Proponent
China, European Union and Viet Nam
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to transfer the Chinese crocodile lizard from Appendix II to Appendix I. The species is clearly in decline due to over-exploitation for international trade, and the species meets CITES Appendix I criteria. This species is a fraction of its historical population and it is primarily traded illegally. An Appendix I listing can contribute to increased reporting and monitoring of trade.

17.34 - Add Ashe’s bush viper to Appendix II

Proponent
Kenya - None available
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to include Ashe's bush viper in Appendix II. The species is found in international pet trade although there is no information on volumes, but the snake almost certainly has a very small population size and restricted distribution such that even low volumes of trade could be detrimental.

17.35 - Add of Kenya horned viper to Appendix II

Proponent
Kenya
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to list Kenya horned viper on Appendix II. The snake is found in the international pet trade but there is no information on volumes. The species has a small area of occurrence, is rare and there is ongoing destruction of habitat.  This species could be considered to meet, or be close to meeting the Appendix I biological criteria.

17.36 - Add 6 species of African soft-shell turtles to Appendix II

Proponent
Burkina Faso, Chad, Gabon, Guinea, Liberia, Mauritania, Nigeria, Togo and United States of America
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to include six species of soft-shelled turtle in Appendix II. The main market is for consumption in Asia. With the listing of these species, all 'old world' soft-shelled turtles will be listed under CITES, which is important as trade demand shifts between species depending on availability and trade restrictions. Trade volumes, as well as population information, are largely unknown; however, demand is clearly increasing and there is also some evidence of illegal trade.

17.37 - Transfer tomato frog to Appendix II

Proponent
Madagascar
Position
Conditional Support

Canada conditionally supports this proposal to transfer the tomato frog from Appendix I to Appendix II, pending additional information from Madagascar on how the precautionary measures, such as an export quota, are being addressed. IUCN has assessed the species as Near Threatened, which is not consistent with an Appendix I listing. There are currently three species in this genus. The other two are being proposed for listing in Appendix II (proposal 38).

17.38 - Add of two tomato frog species to Appendix II

Proponent
Madagascar
Position
Support

Canada supports the listing of these two false tomato frog species on Appendix II. Both species are in the international pet trade and the trade appears to be increasing. It is not clear whether current trade levels are sustainable over the long term. Although both species are abundant and widely distributed, neither species appears to be tolerant of habitat degradation, which is the primary threat for both species.

17.39 - Add three burrowing frog species to Appendix II

Proponent
Madagascar
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to list on Appendix II three burrowing frog species that are endemic to Madagascar. Two of the species are threatened by trade, while the third species has a similar appearance and an overlapping range with the other two. The burrowing frog species are known to be in trade and permits are required for collection and export of the species. However, importer information suggests that Madagascar records underestimate the level of export and  an Appendix II listing would be beneficial. .

17.40 - Add Titicaca water frog to Appendix I

Proponent
Bolivia and Peru
Position
Conditional Support

Canada conditionally supports this proposal to list Titicaca water frog on CITES Appendix I. According to the proposal and the status in the IUCN Red List, the species has suffered marked declines and is critically endangered, but this information is outdated and there may be newer information available to indicate that the situation is less severe for the species.  There is an unknown amount of international trade but there is evidence that international trade exists. Both of the range States are proponents of this proposal.

17.41 - Add Hong Kong warty newt to Appendix II

Proponent
China
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to list this newt species on Appendix II. The species is in demand for the pet trade and is likely negatively impacted by high levels of (illegal) collection. It meets or nearly meets biological criteria for listing on Appendix I and therefore meets criteria for listing on Appendix II. Regulation of international trade will benefit the species.

17.42 - Add silky shark to Appendix II

Proponent
Bahamas, Bangladesh, Benin, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Comoros, Dominican Republic, Egypt, European Union, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau,  Maldives, Mauritania, Palau, Panama,  Samoa, Senegal, Sri Lanka and Ukraine
Position
Support

Canada supports the proposal to include Silky shark in Appendix II. The Silky shark meets the criteria for Appendix II as regulation of trade is required to ensure that the harvest of wild specimens is not reducing the wild population to unsustainable levels. Retention in directed and bycatch fisheries for international trade has been identified as the primary threat to this species and trade is largely unregulated due to the lack of species specific custom codes. A CITES listing could be complementary to work currently under way in Regional Fisheries Management Organizations and provide a mechanism for tracking products in trade.  

17.43 - Add three thresher shark species to Appendix II

Proponent
Bahamas, Bangladesh, Benin, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Comoros, Dominican Republic, Egypt, European Union, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau,  Kenya, Maldives, Mauritania, Palau, Panama, Samoa, Senegal, Seychelles, Sri Lanka and Ukraine
Position
Oppose

Canada opposes this proposal to include Bigeye, Common and Pelagic threshers on Appendix II. Common threshers are infrequently encountered in Canadian longline fisheries and rarely landed (~3 sharks/year in Atlantic Ocean). The Common and Pelagic thresher sharks do not meet the criteria for an Appendix II listing and there is not enough information available to determine if Bigeye Thresher shark meets the criteria for an Appendix II listing. There are indications that fisheries in some areas may be unsustainable, while in other areas stocks may be relatively stable. Bigeye threshers are a target or bycatch species in various commercial fisheries throughout its range and fins from thresher sharks are highly valued in trade. General shark management measures exist domestically and through Regional Fisheries Management Organizations, but species-specific management is rare. 

17.44 - Add 9 Mobula ray species to Appendix II

Proponent
Bahamas, Bangladesh, Benin, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Comoros, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Egypt, European Union, Fiji, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Maldives, Mauritania, Palau, Panama, Samoa, Senegal, Seychelles, Sri Lanka and the United States of America
Position
Support

Canada supports adding all nine Mobula ray species on Appendix II.  Based on the available information, there is not enough information available to determine if two of the species meet the biological criteria.  However, due to the demand for products in trade and the lack of national and international management, there is benefit to listing. Further, the traded products (dried gill plates) of all Mobula species cannot be distinguished. Mobula gill plates are highly valued in trade and international trade appears to be driving harvest.  Although some range States have implemented domestic management measures such as prohibitions or closed areas, specific management measures to ensure sustainable harvests are generally lacking.  

17.45 - Add Ocellate River Stingray to Appendix II

Proponent
Bolivia
Position
Oppose

Canada opposes the addition of the Ocellate River Stingray on Appendix II. Based on the information available, this species does not meet the biological criteria for listing. The species is widely distributed in some of the major South American river basins and there are no documented declines in the population. The species is valued in international trade and it appears that export is one of the factors driving harvests. However, it is not possible to determine the impact that harvesting for international trade is having on these species.

17.46 - Add Banggai cardinalfish to Appendix II

Proponent
European Union
Position
Conditional Support

Canada conditionally supports this proposal to include the Banggai cardinalfish in Appendix I, noting it does not have the support of the only range State, Indonesia. The Banggai cardinalfish meets the biological criteria for listing on Appendix II. The species has been extirpated from 5 locations and 7 locations have declined by 90%. The distribution is small (23 km2) and very fragmented. There is very little management of the species and current management is not effective. Canada would like to hear from Indonesia regarding the management measures that need to be put in place to protect this species.

17.47 - Add clarion angelfish to Appendix II

Proponent
Mexico
Position
Opposed

Canada opposes the addition of clarion angelfish on Appendix II. The species does not meet the biological criteria for listing nor does it appear it will meet the criteria in the near future as the majority of the population is protected in the Revillagigedo Archipelago and harvest of the species is regulated in Mexico. Management measures are already in place to protect the species and harvesting for trade does not appear to be causing declines in the population. It is unclear what benefit an Appendix II listing will add to the existing conservation measures.

17.48 - Add nautilis to Appendix II

Proponent
Fiji, India, Palau and the United States of America
Position
Support

Canada supports the addition of the family of chambered nautiluses on Appendix II.  These nautilids meet the biological criteria for listing.  Population declines of 70-90% have been documented in 7 out of 8 data sets where fisheries exist or have existed. At one site the species is believed to be extirpated. These species are vulnerable to declines due to the demand for products in trade, current fishing pressure, the intrinsic vulnerability of the species and the lack of management nationally and internationally. 

17.49 - Add Cuban land snails to Appendix I

Proponent
Cuba
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to list all six species of Cuban land snail onAppendix I. The six species are endemic to Cuba, and population trends vary from severe decline (98% reduction in distribution) to 25% decline. The demand for trade (primarily for shells by tourists) seems to vary between the species. International trade is mostly in wild specimens that are often newly killed for their shells, and not just taken from recycled collections. Though the species have been protected in Cuba since 2012 and export has been banned since 1943, they continue to be at risk of extinction due to international trade.

17.50 - Add ponytail palms to Appendix II

Proponent
Mexico
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to list 11 species of ponytail palm in Appendix II. Mexico, the sole range State for the species, reports unsustainable levels of illegal harvesting and export of seeds and whole plants. The species is highly prized by collectors and specimens command very high prices. Listing of the ten additional, closely related species will preempt implementation problems associated with identification by customs authorities.

17.51 - Delete Maury’s tillandsia from Appendix II

Proponent
Mexico
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to remove Maury's tillandsia from the CITES Appendices, noting it is a result of an assessment by the CITES Plants Committee. The species does not appear to be in trade, particularly from the wild. There are no trade records of export from Mexico, which is the only range State for this species.

17.52 - Transfer of fishhook cacti to Appendix I

Proponent
United States of America
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to transfer three species of fishhook cacti to CITES Appendix I as it is a result of an assessment by the CITES Plants Committee. The removal of current trade conditions exempting seeds may be preferable as the majority of the trade is in seeds. However, amending the exemption to include seeds is not considered feasible at this time.

17.53 - Amendment to the CITES annotation of Siamese rosewood in Appendix II

Proponent
Thailand
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal which seeks to amend the current trade conditions for Siamese rosewood (Dalbergia cochinchinensis). The amendment was requested by Thailand (as the principal range State). It aims to address ongoing legal trade in parts and derivatives not regulated under the current annotation.

17.54 - Add 13 timber tree species of rosewood to Appendix II

Proponent
Mexico
Position
Support

This proposal from Mexico seeks to list on Appendix II 13 tree species in the genus Dalbergia (rosewood) which currently are not protected or regulated by CITES. The proposal is presented in response to current unprecedented global demand for rosewood, which is reported to be generating widespread illegal harvest and unsustainable trade.

17.55 - Add all rosewood in the genus Dalbergia to CITES Appendix II

Proponent
Argentina, Brazil, Guatemala and Kenya
Position
Support

Similar but additional to the proposal from Mexico (proposal 54), this proposal seeks to list all species of Dalbergia (rosewood) not already regulated by CITES on Appendix II. Canada supports the proposal, noting that implementation of CITES controls for rosewood species currently listed is impeded by difficulty in identification of individual Dalbergia species. Additionally, rosewood species are at the center of current uncontrolled and unregulated illegal forest harvest and forest product trade globally. A genus-level listing would alleviate these difficulties.

17.56 - Add three African timber tree species to Appendix II

Proponent
The European Union and Gabon
Position
Support

This proposal seeks to list three timber-producing tree species, Guibourtia tessmannii, Guibourtia demeusei and Guibourtia demeusei on CITES Appendix II. These species, which have been exploited in the historical past, are currently experiencing exponential increase in harvest levels as a result of growing demand for any timber which resembles species traditionally used for the Asian Hongmu furniture market. The views of additional range States were not reported.  Canada conditionally supports the proposal pending further comments and information from range States additional to Gabon on the conservation benefits of this proposal.

17.57 - Add African rosewood to Appendix II

Proponent
Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, European Union, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal and Togo
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to list African rosewood (Pterocarpus erinaceus) on Appendix II. The proposal focuses on the extent to which increasing demand for highly valued tropical wood (exported largely to China) is shifting unsustainable harvest pressures to new timber species and regions. The proposal contains extensive evidence of unsustainable, exponential increase in harvest volumes and of widespread illegality associated with international trade in the species.

17.58 - Add baobab to Appendix II

Proponent
Madagascar
Position
Conditional Support

Canada conditionally supports this proposal pending further information or evidence from Madagascar indicating international trade is affecting the sustainability of the species (as opposed to domestic pressure and habitat loss).

17.59 - Add Algerian fir to Appendix I

Proponent
Algeria
Position
Opposed

Canada does not support this proposal to list Algerian fir on CITES Appendix I. While the species has a small range and apparently is experiencing decline, the proposal provides no data that link the condition of the species to international trade.

17.60 -Amendment to the CITES annotation of agarwood in Appendix II

Proponent
South Africa
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to include wild ginger on Appendix II. Populations in the wild in South Africa have been impacted due to trade demand for traditional medicine. Appendix II is needed to avoid trade threatening survival in the wild, especially as the trade is shifting to other countries to meet the demand for the species.

17.61 - Add Natal ginger to Appendix II

Proponent
South Africa
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to include wild ginger on Appendix II. Populations in the wild in South Africa have been impacted due to trade demand for traditional medicine. Appendix II is needed to avoid trade threatening survival in the wild, especially as the trade is shifting to other countries to meet the demand for the species.

17.62 - Amendment to the CITES annotation of holy wood in Appendix II

Proponent
United States of America
Position
Support

Canada supports this proposal to clarify which products of holy wood are regulated under CITES. The modifications will strengthen the implementation of the Convention and simplify the interpretation of CITES annotations by border and customs officials.

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: