Report of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments - Permanent Process (July to November 2016)

The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau
Prime Minister of Canada
80 Wellington Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0A2

December 13, 2016

Dear Prime Minister,

Pursuant to our Terms of Reference, the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments submits to you this report on the first cycle of the permanent process for providing recommendations for appointments to the Senate of Canada. We thank you for your continued confidence and for the opportunity to serve such an important process.

 

Respectfully,

 

 

Signature of Huguette Labelle, Chair

Huguette Labelle
Chair

Federal members:

Daniel Jutras

Indira Samarasekera 

British Columbia members: 

Anne Giardini
Vikram Vij 

Manitoba members:

Heather Bishop
Susan Lewis 

New Brunswick members:

Donald Savoie
Roxanne Tarjan 

Nova Scotia members:

Jennifer Gillivan
Ramona Lumpkin 

Ontario members:

Dawn Lavell Harvard
Murray Segal

Prince Edward Island members:

Jeannette Arsenault
Chief Brian Francis

Québec members:

Sylvie Bernier
Yves Lamontagne

Table of Contents 

1.    Introduction

This report has been prepared pursuant to paragraph 13 of the Terms of Reference (See Annex A) of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments (Advisory Board) which states: 

Reporting 

13 (1) Within three months after submitting the names of qualified candidates to the Prime Minister, under the transitional process and following each subsequent appointment process, the Advisory Board must provide a report, in both official languages, to the Prime Minister that contains information on the process, including on the execution of the terms of reference, the costs relating to the Advisory Board’s activities and statistics relating to the applications received.
(2) In addition, the report may provide recommendations for improvements to the process.
(3) The report must be made public.

This is the second report of the Advisory Board and covers the first cycle of the permanent process.   The Advisory Board’s first report on the transitional process is available on its website

2.     Establishment of the Advisory Board

The Advisory Board is an independent and non-partisan body whose mandate is to provide non-binding merit-based recommendations to the Prime Minister on Senate nominations. It was established by the Governor in Council (GIC) on January 19, 2016 (Order in Council PC 2016-0011). The Terms of Reference (See Annex A) for the Advisory Board were also approved by the GIC and made public through the same Order in Council. Members of the Advisory Board are appointed pursuant to paragraph 127.1(1)(c) of the Public Service Employment Act as special advisers to the Prime Minister.

The Advisory Board consists of three permanent federal members, one of which is appointed as Chairperson, and two members chosen from each of the provinces where a vacancy is to be filled. The federal members participate in deliberations related to all vacancies, whereas the provincial members participate in deliberations related to vacancies in their respective province. The initial appointment duration of the federal members varied to allow the staggering of terms (30 months for Chairperson, 24 months for one member and 18 months for the other). Provincial members were appointed for a period of one year. Members’ terms can be renewed.

Further information on the establishment of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments and the transitional process can be found on our website. Biographical notes for the members can be found in Annex B

3.    Implementation of the new appointments process

The new Senate appointments process was implemented in two phases: the transitional process (January to March 2016) and permanent process. 

Transitional Process

The transitional process was established in January 2016 with the appointment of three (3) federal and six (6) provincial members to the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments (See Annex C): 

  • Huguette Labelle, Chairperson
  • Daniel Jutras, Federal Member
  • Indira Samarasekera, Federal Member
  • Heather Bishop, Manitoba Member
  • Susan Lewis, Manitoba Member
  • Dawn Lavell Harvard, Ontario Member
  • Murray Segal, Ontario Member
  • Sylvie Bernier, Québec Member
  • Yves Lamontagne, Québec Member 

During the transitional phase, the Advisory Board members consulted with organizations in the province of vacancy in order to seek candidates for the Senate. Organizations were asked to consider nominating individuals whom they considered to be potential candidates for appointment and who met the constitutional requirements and merit-based criteria. Applicants could not nominate themselves nor could they apply directly in the transitional phase. This process concluded in March 2016 following the appointment of seven (7) Senators (See Annex D): two (2) from Manitoba, three (3) from Ontario and two (2) from Quebec.

First Cycle of the Permanent Process

The first cycle of the permanent process was launched in July 2016 and included the appointment of eight (8) new provincial members to the Advisory Board (See Annex E): 

  • Anne Giardini, British Columbia Member
  • Vikram Vij, British Columbia Member
  • Donald Savoie, New Brunswick Member
  • Roxanne Tarjan, New Brunswick  Member
  • Jennifer Gillivan, Nova Scotia Member
  • Ramona Lumpkin, Nova Scotia Member
  • Jeannette Arsenault, Prince Edward Island Member
  • Chief Brian Francis, Prince Edward Island Member

In the permanent process, Canadians were invited to apply directly for Senate positions through an online application process. The first cycle of the permanent process concluded in November 2016 with the recommendation of twenty-one (21) Senators (one from British Columbia, three from Manitoba, two from New Brunswick, two from Nova Scotia, six from Ontario, one from Prince Edward Island and six from Québec). More information on the candidates selected for recommendation to the Senate can be found in Annex F.

4.    Applications

The application period was open for four (4) weeks from July 7, 2016 to August 4, 2016.  Canadians could apply directly for consideration by the Advisory Board in the first cycle of the permanent process, which sought to fill the following vacancies: 

  • One from British Columbia;
  • Three from Manitoba1;
  • Two from New Brunswick;
  • Two from Nova Scotia;
  • Six from Ontario;
  • One from Prince Edward Island; and
  • Six from Québec.

The assessment criteria used for the permanent process was the same as for the transitional process, as defined when the Advisory Board was established in January 2016 (See Annex G).

Applicants from the transitional phase were asked to advise the Advisory Board if they wanted their previous applications transferred to the first cycle of the permanent process. Alternatively, they had the option to re-apply using the new online system.  The majority of the applicants from the transitional phase were reconsidered in the first cycle of the permanent process. 

There were four required elements of the application package. Included on the Advisory Board’s website were two mandatory forms for completion: the application form and the Background Check Consent Form. In addition, applicants were required to provide their Curriculum Vitae and three reference letters, which were used to attest to the character and suitability of the individual.

The application forms allowed applicants to confirm that they met the constitutional requirements, as well as demonstrate how they met the assessment criteria (See Annex G). Furthermore, applicants were asked to disclose any political activities, criminal offences and conflicts of interest. Applicants were given an opportunity to include a personal statement, as well as an explanation of how they would contribute to an independent and non-partisan perspective to the Senate.

For the first cycle of the permanent process, bilingual help desk services were available to the general public. Agents provided assistance, responded to inquiries and shared general information with applicants by phone and via e-mail. This service is ongoing and will be available during future processes.

In total, over 1,200 e-mails and more than 2,000 telephone calls were exchanged by help desk staff with applicants and others during the application period for the first cycle of the permanent process, from July 7, 2016 to August 4, 2016. As well, more than 37,000 people visited the Advisory Board’s website during the same period.

The application period was made as long as possible, while also allowing a quick turnaround for the processing and review of the applications, all in compliance with the timeline established by the government.

During the application period, the Advisory Board received 2,757 applications for our consideration. We were very pleased with the number of applications received, as well as with the calibre of individuals who put their names forward as part of the open application process.

Demographic analysis demonstrates that outreach and communications efforts were effective in reaching Indigenous, linguistic and ethnic minority communities, as well as strong engagement from those groups. As such, we will continue our efforts and look at other possible outreach activities moving forward to continue to reach a broad spectrum of communities. 

This bar graph presents data for the distribution of candidacies per province.
  • Text version:
    Distribution of Candidacies
    Province Number of candidacies Percentage
    British Columbia 308 11.17%
    Manitoba 145 5.26%
    New Brunswick 127 4.60%
    Nova Scotia 174 6.31%
    Ontario 1169 42.39%
    Québec 768 27.85%
    Prince Edward Island 66 2.39%

Gender

Of the 2,757 applicants, 39.9% were female, while 60.1% were male.  The percentage of women who applied during the permanent process is below the 2011 national workforce availability estimate (39.9% vs. 48.2%).2

This pie chart presents data for gender. Male: 1658, 60.1%. Female: 1099, 39.9%.

First Official Language

Applicants were asked to identify their first official language. The majority of applicants identified English as their first official language (67.9%), with nearly one-third of applicants (31.3%) identifying French as their first official language. A small portion of applicants (0.8%) did not identify either.  The percentage of applicants identifying French as their first official language is higher than the Canadian population representation (31.3 % vs. 23.2%).3 

This pie chart presents data for first official language. First Official Language - English: 1873, 67.9%. French: 863, 31.3%. Unknown: 21, 0.8%.

Diversity (self-identified)

An optional section regarding diversity was included in the applicant profile. Here, 1,296 applicants self-identified in one or more of the categories provided. Additionally, it should be noted that the ethnic/cultural group was defined by applicants.

This bar graph presents data for diversity representation.
  • Text version:
    Diversity Representation
    Diversity Representation (optional self-identification) Number of candidacies Percentage
    LGBTQ 103 3.74%
    Ethnic/Cultural Group* 540 19.59%
    Indigenous 374 13.57%
    Visible Minority 689 24.99%
    Persons with Disabilities 249 9.03%

Indigenous representation is significantly higher than Canadian workforce population (13.57 % vs. 3.5%)4, as is representation of Persons with Disabilities (9.03% vs. 4.9%).  Visible minority representation is also above that of the Canadian workforce population (24.99% vs. 17.8%). 

Additional details and analysis on the candidacies by province can be found in Annex H.

5.    Meetings of the Advisory Board

The Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments held nine in-person meetings in Ottawa during the first cycle of the permanent process, as well as numerous teleconferences. The first in-person meeting served to introduce new and continuing members of the Advisory Board, to orient new members to their role and mandate, to provide information on the Senate (composition, demographics, etc.), and to discuss the parameters of the first cycle of the permanent process.

Following the closing of the application period, each of the seven provincial committees met to evaluate the Senate applications and prepare their recommendations to the Prime Minister.

A final meeting was held to prepare this report, as well as to discuss possible improvements to the process.

Throughout the process, teleconferences were used to allow members to share updates and engage in discussions regularly in a cost-efficient manner. Members also worked independently supported by technology.

As noted in the Terms of Reference, the Advisory Board is supported by the Privy Council Office (PCO) and the head of the Senior Personnel Secretariat (or his/her delegate) acts as the ex officio secretary to the Advisory Board. 

6.    Communications, Media and Public Affairs

On July 7, 2016, the Minister for Democratic Institutions announced the launch of the first cycle of the permanent process (See Annex E), as well as the appointment of the new provincial members to the Advisory Board for British Columbia, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.

On the same date, the Advisory Board’s new website was launched, which provided information on the new online application system, as well as details on how to apply (See Annex I). Additionally, it provided the templates required for an application, along with frequently asked questions (FAQs), useful resources and background information on the Advisory Board and the Senate. The website content reflected feedback and questions received from Canadians. Efforts were made to ensure the content provided the public with as much information as possible about the application process.

There was a moderate amount of media coverage following the launch of the permanent process and the appointment of new Advisory Board provincial members. Coverage was highest in early July following the launch of the permanent process and in early August around the closing date of the application period.  Media attention included news articles (print and online), radio and television. 

7.    Consultations and Outreach

While paragraph 8 of the Terms of Reference directed us to undertake consultations during the transitional process for appointment of senators for Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec, paragraph 9 stated that subsequent processes must be open to Canadians. Although nominations by organizations were not required for the permanent process, we continued to take advantage of the knowledge and networks of national, provincial and local organizations.

In the first cycle of the permanent process, our outreach list expanded to include organizations from each of the seven provinces where vacancies were to be filled. We undertook significant outreach, with nearly 750 national, provincial and local organizations contacted. These organizations represented Indigenous peoples, women, people with disabilities and LGBTQ groups, linguistic, minority and ethnic communities, service groups, educational and academic organizations, professional and regulatory organizations, the not-for-profit sector, as well as labour and business interests. A full list of the organizations that received a direct email communication from the Advisory Board is included at Annex J.

This outreach was undertaken to ensure that the Board was presented with applications representing a diverse slate of individuals with a variety of backgrounds, skills, knowledge and experience.

Our goal in engaging with national, provincial and local organizations was to ensure that information regarding the launch of the process was shared broadly among Canadians. Organizations were invited to engage with their members and networks, as they were asked to identify strong candidates who met the assessment criteria and encourage them to apply.

When contacted, the organizations were generally pleased to be included in this new, non-partisan, merit-based process to encourage individuals to apply for Senate vacancies. 

8.    Review process

The review process ensured that every application received during the application period was examined individually by the Advisory Board members. Each member performed a comprehensive and detailed review of all applications submitted for their consideration in a fair and consistent manner. The federal members reviewed all 2,757 candidacies, while provincial members reviewed only the applications for the province they represented. Candidacies were not screened prior to being provided to the members for their consideration.

A review was completed to assess the suitability of each of the applicants, in accordance with the Terms of Reference, and members identified a list of priority candidates who they considered best met the merit-based criteria. At all times, the members observed the highest standards of impartiality, integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in consideration of potential candidates.

Following their individual review, each provincial Advisory Board (federal and provincial members) met to review their “shortlists” and to prepare together their recommendations to the Prime Minister. These discussions generally highlighted a strong level of consistency in assessments and in highly-rated candidates.

Throughout the review process, Advisory Board members used the criteria provided for Senate appointments to assess potential candidates, including consideration of the information provided by candidates as to how they met or would meet the constitutional criteria at the time of appointment. Decisions were achieved using a consensus approach.  Each committee carefully considered a number of additional key factors in making its recommendations, such as gender, diversity, language, age, civic involvement and professional background, as well as the candidate’s ability to contribute to the work of the Senate in a non-partisan fashion. The list of proposed candidates was subject to the typical due diligence required for candidates seeking public office to confirm their suitability. 

9.    Recommendation process

In accordance with the Terms of Reference, the Prime Minister set a deadline for the production of recommendations when the Advisory Board was convened on July 7, 2016. For first cycle of the permanent process, the Prime Minister requested that the Advisory Board provide recommendations by September 30, 2016. This timeframe was respected.

We established a list of five (5) qualified candidates for each of twenty (20) vacant positions in the seven provinces. Additional names were provided by the Advisory Board to address an unanticipated vacancy in Manitoba that arose during the process. Recommended candidates were not prioritized; the proposed candidates were listed in alphabetical order. The advice to the Prime Minister included a short synopsis to highlight the merits of each of the recommended candidates, as well as more detailed information from their candidacy submission.  

Additional due diligence was undertaken to confirm candidates’ ability to meet constitutional requirements before their appointment to the Senate.

We were very pleased that the Prime Minister made his recommendations to the Governor General (See Annex F) from the list of candidates that we had provided to him. After the Prime Minister announced his intended recommendations to the Governor General, we appreciated the opportunity to meet with him to discuss the process. 

10.    Costs (January 2016 to November 2016)

Further to our previous report, we are pleased to provide herein the final costs for the transitional phase, as well as an estimate of the costs for the first cycle of the permanent process. We also wish to emphasize that, in both the transitional phase and the first cycle of the permanent process, the Advisory Board made efforts to minimize expenses. 

As indicated in our previous report, given that the Advisory Board was only constituted in mid-January and our report on the transitional process was issued in March, expenses and operational costs were still being received and tabulated when the transitional report was issued. Total costs for the transitional process were $165,824. This includes travel expenditures related to the Advisory Board’s work and members’ per diems (within the range of $550 - $650 for the Chairperson and $375 - $450 for the other members), totaling $70,652. The remainder of the expenses are incremental costs incurred by the Privy Council Office to support the Advisory Board, including salaries and translation costs. Costs were minimized as the transitional process was short-term in nature and, as such, relied heavily on existing staff, support services and infrastructure. It is also recognized that some costs incurred during the transitional period supported the preparations and planning for the permanent process.

Expenses for the first cycle of the permanent process are still being received and processed. Estimated costs are in the range of $740,000. Of that amount, estimated travel expenditures for the Advisory Board’s in-person meetings and per diems for members’ work will total approximately $165,000. To effectively support an open application process with high application volumes, the permanent process required investments for elements such as information technology tools, totalling approximately $113,000 (we note that this amount includes some expenditures made during the 2015-16 fiscal year).  The remainder of the expenses are costs such as salaries and translation incurred by the Privy Council Office to support the Advisory Board.

Some of the expenses incurred during the first cycle of the permanent process will support future cycles of the permanent process as well.  The Advisory Board’s next report will provide final costs relating to the first cycle of the permanent process.

We note that, in accordance with the Advisory Board’s terms of reference, the costs reported in these reports relate to the Advisory Board’s activities.  Additional costs incurred by the Privy Council Office, in particular those related to information technology, are part of the Privy Council Office’s operations and are reported through their usual reporting to Parliament.

11.    Post-announcement

All applicants who were not appointed to the Senate have received messages expressing our appreciation for their participation in the first cycle of the permanent process. Furthermore, applicants were notified that, as new vacancies arise in their province, we will invite them to advise us if they wish to be reconsidered. We will also express our appreciation to the organizations that encouraged individuals to apply and look forward to their continued engagement in future Senate appointment processes. Updates on future opportunities will be posted on the Advisory Board’s website as new information becomes available. 

12.    Confidentiality

In keeping with the Terms of Reference, the Advisory Board’s activities are conducted under strict confidentiality. Information that is brought before the members must be held in confidence and information on candidacies cannot be disclosed, pursuant to the provisions of the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act. Therefore, the Advisory Board will not share publicly any information pertaining to candidates. 

13.    Conclusion and Next Steps

The Advisory Board members appreciate the opportunity to serve their country on such an important initiative and look forward to continuing their work of providing independent advice to the Prime Minister as part of the next cycle of the permanent process.

Annex A: Terms of Reference for the Advisory Board

Mandate

1 The Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments (“Advisory Board”) is an independent and non-partisan body whose mandate is to provide non-binding merit-based recommendations to the Prime Minister on Senate nominations.

Composition of the Advisory Board

2 (1) Members of the Advisory Board are appointed pursuant to paragraph 127.1‍(1)‍(c) of the Public Service Employment Act as special advisers to the Prime Minister.
(2) The Advisory Board is to consist of
(a) three permanent federal members (“federal members”), one of which is to be appointed as Chairperson; and
(b) two ad hoc members chosen from each of the provinces or territories where a vacancy is to be filled (“provincial members”)‍.
(3) The federal members must participate in deliberations relating to all existing and anticipated Senate vacancies.
(4) The provincial members must participate only in deliberations relating to existing and anticipated Senate vacancies in their respective province or territory.

Length of Advisory Board Terms

3 (1) The federal members of the Advisory Board are to be appointed for two-year terms. Provincial members are to be appointed for terms not exceeding one year.
(2) Despite subsection (1), the initial appointments of the federal members will vary in length in order to permit the staggering of terms, as follows:
(a) the term of the first Chairperson is 30 months;
(b) the terms of each of the first two other federal members are 24 months and 18 months respectively.
(3) The terms of Advisory Board members may be renewed.
(4) The Advisory Board is to be convened at the discretion and on the request of the Prime Minister who may establish, revise or extend any of the timelines set out in this mandate.

Support

4 The Advisory Board is to be supported by the Privy Council Office. The head of the Senior Personnel Secretariat, or his or her delegate, acts as an ex officio secretary to the Advisory Board.

Recommendations

5 In accordance with the terms of this mandate, the Advisory Board must provide to the Prime Minister for his consideration, within the time period set by the Prime Minister upon the convening of the Advisory Board, a list of five qualified candidates for each vacancy in the Senate with respect to each province or territory for which there is a vacancy or anticipated vacancy and for which the Advisory Board has been convened. The Prime Minister may take into consideration all of the qualified candidates with respect to all vacancies for that province or territory.

Recommendation Process

6 The members of the Advisory Board must:
(a) at all times, observe the highest standards of impartiality, integrity and objectivity in their consideration of all potential candidates;
(b) meet at appropriate intervals to set out its agenda, assess candidates, and engage in deliberations;
(c) apply fairly and with consistency the criteria provided by the Prime Minister in assessing whether potential candidates meet the qualifications, including those set out in the Constitution Act, 1867, for Senate appointments;
(d) interview potential candidates, at the Advisory Board’s discretion, and verify any references provided by potential candidates;
(e) in establishing a list of qualified candidates, seek to support the Government of Canada’s intent to achieve gender balance and to ensure representation of Indigenous peoples and linguistic, minority and ethnic communities in the Senate; and
(f) comply with the Privacy Act, the Conflict of Interest Act, and the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders.
7 (1) The members of the Advisory Board must declare any direct or indirect personal interest or professional or business relationship in relation to any candidate if such an interest or relationship could reasonably be considered to represent an actual or perceived conflict of interest.
(2) The declaration set out in subsection (1) must include a statement as to any gifts or hospitality received by the member from the candidate.
(3) If such a declaration is made, the Advisory Board must decide, having regard to the nature of the relationship, if the member must withdraw from any deliberation about the candidate.
(4) If the Advisory Board decides that the member must withdraw from any deliberation in relation to a candidate, those deliberations are undertaken by the remaining members of the Advisory Board, provided the number of members is not less than three.

Consultations

8 (1) In this mandate, “transitional process” means the initial recommendations to be made by the Advisory Board in early 2016 for the appointment of five Senators in order to fill two vacancies in Ontario, one in Quebec and two in Manitoba.
(2) Under the transitional process, the Advisory Board must undertake consultations, which could include groups which represent Indigenous peoples and linguistic, minority and ethnic communities, provincial, territorial and municipal organizations, labour organizations, community-based service groups, arts councils, and provincial or territorial chambers of commerce, in order to ensure that a diverse slate of individuals, with a variety of backgrounds, skills, knowledge and experience desirable for a well-functioning Senate are brought forward for the consideration of the Advisory Board.
9 Subsequent to the transitional process, an open application process is to be established to allow Canadians to apply for appointment to the Senate.
10 Advisory Board members may travel for the purpose of performing their functions, including for meeting with candidates and individuals or groups as part of their consultations.

Confidentiality

11 (1) All personal information provided to, and deliberations of, the Advisory Board are confidential and must be treated in accordance with the provisions of the Privacy Act.
(2) Any records created or received by the Advisory Board members that are under the control or will be under the control of the Privy Council Office are subject to the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act.
(3) The members of the Advisory Board must maintain as confidential any information brought before them in the conduct of their work.
(4) Members of the Advisory Board must sign a confidentiality agreement as a precondition of their appointment.
12 No candidate is to be named publicly without their prior written consent.

Reporting

13 (1) Within three months after submitting the names of qualified candidates to the Prime Minister, under the transitional process and following each subsequent appointment process, the Advisory Board must provide a report, in both official languages, to the Prime Minister that contains information on the process, including on the execution of the terms of reference, the costs relating to the Advisory Board’s activities and statistics relating to the applications received.
(2) In addition, the report may provide recommendations for improvements to the process.
(3) The report must be made public. 

Annex B: Biographical notes on the Members of the Advisory Board

Huguette Labelle

Huguette Labelle holds a PhD (education) degree from the University of Ottawa, has honorary degrees from twelve Canadian universities, and from the University of Notre Dame, United States. She is a Companion of the Order of Canada. In addition, she is a recipient of the Order of Ontario, the Vanier Medal of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada, the Outstanding Achievement Award of the Public Service of Canada, the McGill University Management Achievement Award and the Francophonie’s Ordre de la Pléiade.

Ms. Labelle is Emeritus Governor of the University of Ottawa, and was Chancellor of the University of Ottawa from 1994 to 2012. She is currently Chair of the Corporate Reporting Dialogue, Vice-Chair of the Rideau Hall Foundation Board, Vice-Chair of the International Senior Advisory Board of the International Anti-Corruption Academy, member of the Advisory Group to the Asian Development Bank on Climate Change and Sustainable Development, member of the Executive Board of the Africa Capacity Building Foundation, member of the Board of the Global Centre for Pluralism, Board member of Global Financial Integrity, Board member of the Aga Khan Museum, member of the Advisory Committee of the Order of Ontario and Chair of the Selection Committee for Master's Scholarships on Sustainable Energy Development. Ms. Labelle is also a member of the Advisory Group to the Secretary General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on Integrity and Anti-Corruption, the University of Ottawa President’s International Advisory Board, and the University of Ottawa Campaign Cabinet. She is also a former Chair of Transparency International, as well as a former Board member of UN Global Compact.

Ms. Labelle also served for a period of nineteen years as Deputy Minister of different Canadian Government departments including Secretary of State, Transport Canada, the Public Service Commission and the Canadian International Development Agency. 

Daniel Jutras

Daniel Jutras joined the Faculty of Law, McGill University in 1985 after clerking with Chief Justice Antonio Lamer at the Supreme Court of Canada. He was the Dean of the Faculty of Law from 2009 to 2016. Professor Jutras became as Associate Professor in 1991, and was promoted to the rank of Full Professor in 2001. Since 2011, he has held the Arnold Wainwright Chair in Civil Law. He was awarded one of the Mérites du Barreau du Québec in 2016. He is a former Director of the Institute of Comparative Law and has served as Associate Dean (Admissions and Placement), and Associate Dean (Academic) in the Faculty of Law.

From 2002 to 2004, Professor Jutras was on leave from the Faculty of Law, and acted as personal secretary to the Chief Justice of Canada, the Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, in the position of Executive Legal Officer of the Supreme Court of Canada.

Professor Jutras' teaching and research interests are in civil law and comparative law, and he now conducts research in the law of obligations from a comparative and pluralist perspective. He is also pursuing research projects on judicial institutions and civil procedure. Professor Jutras is frequently invited to speak on these issues before judicial and academic audiences in Canada and in Europe.

Professor Jutras is a graduate of Harvard Law School, and of Université de Montréal, where he received the Governor General’s Gold Medal. In 2013, Professor Jutras was appointed by the Supreme Court of Canada to serve as amicus curiæ in the Reference re Senate Reform. The same year, he was awarded a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. In 2014, the Barreau du Québec awarded Dean Jutras the Advocatus Emeritus (Ad. E.) distinction. 

Indira Samarasekera

Indira Samarasekera served as the 12th President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Alberta, from 2005 to 2015. She also served as Vice-President Research at the University of British Columbia from 2000 to 2005. She is currently a Senior Advisor for Bennet Jones LLP and serves on the Board of Directors of the Bank of Nova Scotia, and Magna International. She serves on the boards of TransCanada Corporation, the Asia-Pacific Foundation, the Rideau Hall Foundation, the Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics and the selection panel for Canada’s Outstanding CEO of the Year. She is also a former Distinguished Fellow in Residence at the Liu Institute for Global Issues at the University of British Columbia.

Dr. Samarasekera is internationally recognized as one of Canada’s leading metallurgical engineers for her groundbreaking work on process engineering of materials, especially steel processing. She held the Dofasco Chair in Advanced Steel Processing at the University of British Columbia. She has consulted widely for industry worldwide leading to the implementation of her research discoveries.

Dr. Samarasekera has also devoted her career to advancing innovation in higher education and the private sector, providing national and international leadership through invited lectures and participation on national and international boards and councils.

She was awarded the Order of Canada in 2002 for outstanding contributions to steel process engineering. In 2014, she was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in the United States, the profession’s highest honour. As a Hays Fulbright Scholar, she earned an MSc from the University of California in 1976. In 1980, she was granted a PhD in metallurgical engineering from the University of British Columbia. 

Anne Giardini

Anne Giardini, Q.C., is the 11th Chancellor of Simon Fraser University (SFU). She served on SFU's Board of Governors for five years before being appointed Chancellor in 2014. A director, lawyer and writer, Ms. Giardini was president of Weyerhaeuser Company Limited from 2008 to 2014 after serving as Weyerhaeuser's General Counsel. A long-time leader within Canada’s resource industry, she has served on many related boards including B.C.’s Council of Forest Industries, the Alberta Forest Products Association, the Forest Products Association of Canada, and Sustainable Forestry Initiative, Inc.

She holds a BA in Economics from SFU, LL.B. from UBC, and LL.M. from Cambridge University (Trinity Hall). She is the author of two novels and the editor of a collection of writing advice.

Ms. Giardini is currently a member of the board of WWF-Canada, Senior Vice Chair of the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade, board member of Thompson Creek Metals and an honorary patron of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada.

In 2011, Ms. Giardini received the Robert V.A. Jones Award recognizing leadership in corporate counsel practice, and was named one of Canada’s 25 most influential lawyers. She was honoured with a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal and a Lexpert Zenith Award in 2013. In 2015, she received the Western Canada General Counsel Lifetime Achievement Award. 

Vikram Vij

Vikram Vij is a chef, entrepreneur, author and television personality. He was born in India and lived there until age 20, when he moved to Austria. Mr. Vij came to Canada in 1989 to work at the Banff Springs Hotel in Alberta.

Today, he owns three award-winning restaurants: Vij’s Restaurant, Vij’s Rangoli and My Shanti. He produces a line of gourmet take-home meals – Vij’s At Home– out of his Surrey-based factory, that is available across the country, and his creative Indian cuisine is also sold as take-out. Mr. Vij strives to create new, innovative dishes and has been recognized for his creativity. He has received the BC Food Processors Association Rising Star Award, an Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year award, Drishti Magazine’s Innovation in Gastronomy Award, and a Chevrolet Ingenuity Award for exceptional creativity and skill. Vancouver Magazine named him Chef of the Year in 2015.

Mr. Vij has appeared on Top Chef Canada for 3 seasons, Chopped Canada, Recipe to Riches, and in 2014, debuted as the first Indo-Canadian Dragon on the CBC’s Dragons’ Den. He is also a certified sommelier and recipient of an honorary Doctorate of Law from Simon Fraser University and an honorary Doctorate from the University of British Columbia. Mr. Vij is passionate about sustainability and is involved in several organizations that promote sustainable eating habits, including the Chef’s Table Society of BC, Farm Folk City Folk, Ocean Wise Sustainable Seafood, UBC Farm and the Green Table Society. He is also an active contributor supporting the David Suzuki Foundation’s environmental initiatives.

Mr. Vij is the co-author of Vij’s: Elegant & Inspired Indian Cuisine and Vij’s At Home: Relax, Honey. He is also featured in Goodness: Recipes & Stories, and The Butcher, The Baker, The Wine and Cheese Maker by the Sea, which is a tribute to innovators and culinary leaders. 

Heather Bishop

Heather Bishop is an accomplished musician/singer-songwriter with 14 albums to her credit, along with numerous music industry awards. She is also a keynote speaker, social activist, visual artist, independent recording artist, educator, and entrepreneur who has been running her own music recording company for 40 years. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree with a Fine Arts major from the University of Regina.

Ms. Bishop has served as Chair of the Advisory Council to the Order of Manitoba; Chair of the Manitoba Film Classification Board; Finance Chair and Director of the Manitoba Film & Sound Recording Development Corporation; and Board Chair, Finance Chair and Director of Manitoba Music, a community based non-profit industry association to promote and foster growth in the Manitoba sound recording industry. She has also dedicated her time to innumerable benefits and fundraisers in the community, as well as serving with the Manitoba Cultural Society of the Deaf.

Among her many honours, Ms. Bishop was awarded the Order of Canada in 2005, the Order of Manitoba in 2001, an Honourary Doctorate of Laws in 2011, a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012, the Western Canadian Music Industry Builder Award in 2006, and the YM/YWCA Woman of Distinction Award in 1997.

In 2011 Ms. Bishop released her first book, an edition of her artwork entitled “My Face is a Map of My Time Here”. Her vision is of a socially just, environmentally sound, and spiritually fulfilling world for all. 

Susan Lewis

Susan Lewis worked for over 40 years in various roles with the United Way of Winnipeg, including as President and CEO from 1985 to 2014. She received United Way Centraide Canada’s Excellence Award, United Way’s highest honour.

Over the years, she has served on the boards and committees of a variety of charities and organizations, including: the Winnipeg Poverty Reduction Council, End Homelessness Winnipeg, the St-Boniface Hospital board, University of Manitoba Distinguished Alumni Selection Panel and the Senate Committee on Honorary Degrees.

Nationally she was a board member and Vice Chair of Imagine Canada from 2008 –2012 and continues to sit on the Advisory Council.

Ms. Lewis is a member of the Order of Manitoba and Order of Canada, and a recipient of the Red Cross Humanitarian of the Year Award and the Manitoba Museum Tribute Honouree and the University of Manitoba Distinguished Alumni Award. 

Donald Savoie

Dr. Donald J. Savoie is a leading Canadian expert on public policy, public administration and federalism. Born in New Brunswick, Dr. Savoie is a proud Acadian who has served as an advisor to several federal, provincial and territorial government departments and agencies, private-sector entities, independent associations, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the World Bank, and the United Nations. He currently holds the Canada Research Chair in Public Administration and Governance at the Université de Moncton. He previously held senior positions with the federal government, including Assistant Secretary of the Treasury Board and Deputy Principal of the Canadian Centre for Management Development. Dr. Savoie has also served as a member on several boards of directors for both private and public sector organizations.

A recipient of the Order of Canada and the Order of New Brunswick, Dr. Savoie is also an elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He has received several awards and prizes for his work internationally, notably the Vanier Gold Medal (1999), the Trudeau Fellowships Prize (2004), the Sun Life Public Service Citation Award (2004), the prestigious 2015 Killam Prize in recognition of his exceptional career achievements in social sciences, and the 2016 Donner Prize for best Canadian book on public policy.

He obtained a D.Phil. in 1979 and a D.Litt. in 2000 from Oxford University and has been awarded seven honorary doctorates by Canadian universities. Dr. Savoie was elected a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford in 2006 and named Visiting Professor at the London School of Economics in 2007. He was also a Senior Fulbright Scholar at Harvard University in 2001-2002.

A prolific author, Dr. Savoie has published forty-five books and has written another 200 articles in leading journals of political science, public administration and public policy and in some of the world’s leading newspapers in Canada, the United Kingdom, India and the United States. Averse to cynicism in politics, his extensive knowledge and his experience of great institutions have convinced him of the real possibility that they can be instrumental in furthering the welfare of individuals. 

Roxanne Tarjan

Roxanne Tarjan received a Bachelor of Nursing degree from the University of New Brunswick in 1977. Her career in nursing began in Campbellton, NB, and continued over the next two decades in a variety of positions including: Staff Nurse, Nurse Manager, Assistant Director of Nursing, and Director of Nursing in Bathurst, NB.

Ms. Tarjan joined the Nurses Association of New Brunswick, the professional regulatory organization for registered nurses in that province, in 1998 as a Nursing Practice Consultant, a position she held until being named its Executive Director in 2001. She retired in 2015 after 14 years as Executive Director.

She previously served on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Nurses Protective Society and the Canadian Council of Registered Nurse Regulators, as well as an Advisor to the Board of Directors of the Canadian Nurses Association and a member of the NB2026 Roundtable.

Currently, Ms. Tarjan is a Director with Dialogue NB, an organization that promotes and celebrates understanding, respect, appreciation, and inclusion among the Francophone and Anglophone cultures of New Brunswick. She is also actively involved in the New Brunswick Association for Community Living as a member of its Board of Directors. 

Jennifer Gillivan

Jennifer Gillivan is President and CEO of the IWK Health Centre Foundation, which raises funds to help the IWK Health Centre provide critical and specialized care to women, children, youth and families throughout the Maritime Provinces.

Ms. Gillivan has an extensive background in philanthropy, partnerships, strategy, marketing and leadership. Born and educated in Dublin, Ireland, she immigrated to Canada in 1982. Prior to joining the IWK Foundation, Ms. Gillivan worked with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for 14 years, most recently as Director of Partnerships, Communications, Marketing and Brand for the CBC across Canada. She is an active member of her community, serving on the boards of The Halifax Partnership, the Canadian Children’s Pediatric Hospital Foundations, Children’s Miracle Network CDO Advisory Board and The Sobey School of Business Advisory Board. She is also a past board member of the Nova Scotia Community College Foundation, Churchill Academy, Symphony Nova Scotia, and the Atlantic Film Festival, to name a few.

Ms. Gillivan has received two CBC English Television Awards for her pioneer work with the partnership practice, and has also received the Halifax Ambassador Award and a Progress Halifax Women of Excellence Award. She was listed as one of the top 50 CEO’s of Atlantic Canada for 2014 & 2015. Ms. Gillivan was awarded the RBC Women of Excellence Entrepreneur Award and the BMO Women’s Leadership Award. Ms. Gillivan is an active member of the Rotman School of Business “Judy Project” Advisory Board and enjoys motivational speaking. She also completed the Ivey School of Business KPMG Community Shift program. 

Ramona Lumpkin

Dr. Ramona Lumpkin has been the President and Vice-Chancellor of Mount Saint Vincent University since 2010. She holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Kentucky and is a former Fulbright Scholar to England. She has held important academic and administrative leadership positions at several universities in Canada and the United States, including Principal of Huron University College and Vice-President Academic and Provost of Royal Roads University in Victoria. In July 2014, she was appointed as a member of the Order of Canada in recognition of her leadership in post-secondary education and her promotion of community-based learning initiatives.

Throughout her career, Dr. Lumpkin has been actively engaged in women’s studies, in advocacy on behalf of women’s issues and in promoting the role of women in higher education. At the University of Kentucky, she served on the founding committee of the annual Women Writers Conference. At Wayne State University, Dr. Lumpkin belonged to the President’s Commission on the Status of Women. In her role at Mount Saint Vincent University, Dr. Lumpkin coordinated the development of the Mount’s new five-year strategic plan, Mount 2017: Making a Difference, and the execution of the university’s most ambitious capital campaign to date, Project TWENTY12, which funded the construction of the Margaret Norrie McCain Centre for Teaching, Learning and Research, a building that celebrates the role women have played in shaping our society.

As past Chair of the Association of Atlantic Universities, Dr. Lumpkin has made significant contributions to the Atlantic region and has become a valued contributor to many organizations and initiatives shaping the future of Nova Scotia. She is currently Chair of Engage Nova Scotia.

Dawn Lavell Harvard

Dr. Dawn Lavell Harvard, PhD, is the Director, First Peoples House of Learning at Trent University.  Prior to taking on this role in 2016, she served as President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC), having previously been Vice-President of NWAC for almost three years.

She is a proud member of the Wikwemikong First Nation, the first Aboriginal Trudeau Scholar, and has worked to advance the rights of Aboriginal women as the President of the Ontario Native Women's Association for 11 years.

Dr. Lavell Harvard is a full-time mother of three girls. She has followed in the footsteps of her mother Jeannette Corbiere Lavell, a noted advocate for Indigenous women’s rights. Since joining the Board of the Ontario Native Women’s Association as a youth director in 1994, Dr. Lavell Harvard has been working toward the empowerment of Aboriginal women and their families.

She was co-editor of the original volume on Indigenous Mothering entitled “Until Our Hearts Are on the Ground: Aboriginal Mothering, Oppression, Resistance and Rebirth” and has since released “Mothers of the Nations,” which she co-edited with Kim Anderson, and “Forever Loved: Exposing the Hidden Crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada,” which she co-edited with Jennifer Brant.

Murray Segal

Following a distinguished career with the Ontario government, including eight years as Deputy Attorney General of Ontario and former Deputy Minister Responsible for Aboriginal Affairs, Murray Segal now practices as independent legal counsel and consultant in Toronto. He is also counsel to Henein Hutchinson LLP. His practice includes assisting the public and broader public service in improving the delivery of services.

Mr. Segal was the chief legal advisor to the Government of Ontario and advisor to Cabinet, the Attorney General, other Ministers, and Deputy Ministers. He oversaw all government litigation and is experienced in developing legislation.

Prior to his time as the Deputy Attorney General, Mr. Segal was the Chief Prosecutor for the Province of Ontario, leading the largest prosecution service in Canada.

Mr. Segal is certified as a Criminal Law Specialist by the Law Society of Upper Canada and is the author of numerous legal publications including in the areas of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, disclosure, and procedure. He is also a frequent participant in continuing education programs.

Mr. Segal is co-chair of Ontario’s Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committee, and he is also on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Mental Health Association of Toronto and on the Board of Trustees of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. In 2013, he was appointed as a member of the Ontario Review Board. In October, 2015 Mr. Segal released a Report to the Province of Nova Scotia on the justice system’s handling of the Rehtaeh Parsons matter. 

Jeannette Arsenault

Jeannette Arsenault is co-owner of Cavendish Figurines Ltd., in Prince Edward Island. The company started in 1989 in the Summerside Business Park and in 1998 they re-located to Gateway Village and built their own building. They employ 18 people in the busy tourist season. Prior to starting this business Ms. Arsenault worked with Statistics Canada for 15 years.

Cavendish Figurines has won many awards over the years, and in 2003 Ms. Arsenault was chosen as “one of the 100 most Powerful Women in Canada” by the Women’s Executive Network. In 2002 she received the “Summerside Good Neighbour Award”.

Ms. Arsenault serves on many committees including the Entrepreneurs’ Forum, both on the local and the Atlantic Committee, University of Prince Edward Island and the RDÉE Prince Edward Island Inc., to name a few. She was also the President of the Summerside Chamber of Commerce in 2001.

Born in Prince Edward Island, Ms. Arsenault grew up in Abram Village. She is bilingual English/French, married, has had two children and now has two grand-daughters. 

Chief Brian Francis

Chief Brian Francis was first elected Chief of the Abegweit First Nation in August 2007. He was re-elected in 2011 and 2015.

Chief Francis was born in Lennox Island, Prince Edward Island. After receiving his early education in Lennox Island and Summerside, he completed four years of apprenticeship training and became a journeyman carpenter. He was the first Aboriginal person in PEI to receive his inter-provincial red seal trade certificate. He also studied at the Maritime School of Social Work.

As Education Coordinator with the Abegweit First Nation, he provided advice and guidance to Aboriginal students before joining the federal public service. He worked in several departments, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, Human Resources Development Canada and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, prior to his election as Chief and Band Administrator for Abegweit First Nation.

Among his proudest accomplishments is the signing of the Canada-PEI-Mi’kmaq Partnership Agreement.

Chief Francis and his wife Georgina have three children, Kateri, Shawn and John Ryan. The couple resides in Rocky Point, Prince Edward Island. 

Sylvie Bernier

A native of Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Sylvie Bernier won gold in 3-metre springboard diving at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. It was Canada’s first—and to date the only—gold medal in that event. She is also the first Canadian diver ever to be inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

Following her athletic career, Ms. Bernier obtained a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and a Master’s in International Health Management. She has been working in radio and television for over 30 years.

She served as Canada’s Assistant Chef de Mission at the 2006 Olympic Games in Turin and 2012 in London. She also served as Chef de Mission at the Beijing 2008 Olympics Games.

A recipient of the Order of Quebec and the Order of Canada, Ms. Bernier has collaborated with numerous companies, including Investors Group, for many years. She works with Québec en forme as a Healthy Lifestyle Ambassador, as well as chairing two Quebec organizations promoting physically active lifestyles and healthy diets (i.e., the Table de concertation intersectorielle permanente spécifique au mode de vie physiquement actif and the Table québécoise sur la saine alimentation).

Ms. Bernier is the mother of three young adults and dreams that, someday, “eating better and moving more” will become the norm in our society. 

Yves Lamontagne

President and CEO of the Collège des médecins du Québec from 1998 to October 2010, Dr. Yves Lamontagne first worked as a professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Montreal and as President of the Association des médecins psychiatres du Québec. He is the founder of the Fernand-Seguin Research Centre of the Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital and founding Chair of the Mental Illness Foundation.

After completing his medical studies, he worked in Africa overseeing the Biafran children’s camps during that tragic war. Following that, he embarked on his psychiatric studies, which he completed at the Institute of Psychiatry in London.

The author of over 200 articles in Canadian, American and European medical journals, Dr. Lamontagne has also published 37 books and contributed 30 chapters to various collections. Over the years, he has had a career simultaneously combining research, teaching, communications and administration.

His work has earned him numerous awards and decorations both within Canada and in the United States, and he is a recipient of both the Order of Canada and the Order of Quebec. He was named Great Montrealer for 2003 in the social sector. Currently, Dr. Lamontagne is called upon as a consultant by various organizations and as a speaker within the health sector and for the general public. 

Annex C: Minister of Democratic Institutions Announces Establishment of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments

Ottawa, Ontario, January 19, 2016 - The Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister of Democratic Institutions, today announced the establishment of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments (Advisory Board).

The Advisory Board will be an independent and non-partisan body whose mandate is to provide the Prime Minister with merit-based recommendations on Senate nominations.

The Board will be chaired by Ms. Huguette Labelle, Emeritus Governor of the University of Ottawa, a Companion of the Order of Canada, and a recipient of the Outstanding Achievement Award of the Public Service of Canada.

The following members are being appointed to the Advisory Board:

  • Dr. Indira Samarasekera as Federal Member – served as the President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Alberta.
  • Professor Daniel Jutras as Federal Member – Dean of Law, Full Professor, Wainwright Chair in Civil Law at the Faculty of Law, McGill University.
  • Mr. Murray Segal as provincial member for Ontario – former Ontario Deputy Attorney General and Ontario Deputy Minister Responsible for Aboriginal Affairs.
  • Dr. Dawn Lavell Harvard as provincial member for Ontario – President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada.
  • Ms. Sylvie Bernier as provincial member for Quebec – Olympic gold medalist, media contributor and Healthy Lifestyle Ambassador.
  • Dr. Yves Lamontagne as provincial member for Quebec – an accomplished psychiatrist and leading figure in the field of medicine.
  • Ms. Susan Lewis as provincial member for Manitoba – worked for over 40 years with the United Way of Winnipeg, including as President from 1985 to 2014.
  • Ms. Heather Bishop as provincial member for Manitoba – an accomplished musician/singer-songwriter, independent recording artist, and entrepreneur.

The establishment of the Advisory Board is the first step in the Government’s comprehensive plan to create a new and non-partisan process to provide the Prime Minister with non-binding recommendations on Senate appointments. The Board will undertake broad consultations within the three provinces with the greatest number of vacancies in the Senate. It is hoped that five vacancies (two in Manitoba, two in Ontario and one in Quebec) will be filled by early 2016.

The permanent process will be established later in 2016 and will include an application process open to all Canadians. The Advisory Board will be guided by public, merit-based criteria, in order to identify Canadians who would make a significant contribution to the work of the Senate – with the end goal of ensuring a high standard of integrity, collaboration, and non-partisanship in the Senate.

Quotes

“The Government is acting rapidly to reform the Senate. I am very pleased to establish this important new Advisory Board, and it is truly inspiring that such eminent Canadians have agreed to serve on it. The new, independent process will help inject a new spirit of non-partisanship into the Senate. I believe that this new process will immediately begin to restore the confidence of Canadians in an institution that plays an essential role in our parliamentary system.”
--Hon. Maryam Monsef, Minister of Democratic Institutions

Quick Facts

  • There are currently 22 vacancies in the Senate. Ontario, Quebec and Manitoba have the largest number of vacancies.
  • Under the Constitution, the Governor General appoints individuals to the Senate. By convention, Senators are appointed on the advice of the Prime Minister.

Related Products

For further information on the Advisory Board and the new process to advise on Senate appointments, please refer to the News Release and Backgrounder (with “Annex: Qualifications and Merit-Based Assessment Criteria”), released on December 3, 2015.

Annex D: Spring 2016 News Release from the Prime Minister

Prime Minister announces intention to recommend the appointment of seven new Senators 

Ottawa, Ontario, March 18, 2016. The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced that he will recommend the appointment of seven new Senators to the Governor General. The new, independent Senators will fill two vacancies in Manitoba, three in Ontario, and two in Quebec.

The following are the individuals who will be recommended for appointment to the Senate:

  • Raymonde Gagné (Manitoba)
  • Justice Murray Sinclair (Manitoba)
  • V. Peter Harder (Ontario)
  • Frances Lankin (Ontario)
  • Ratna Omidvar (Ontario)
  • Chantal Petitclerc (Quebec)
  • André Pratte (Quebec)

Over the last three months, the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments undertook broad consultations in Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec – and provided the Prime Minister with a number of non-binding recommendations. From that pool of candidates, the Prime Minister selected the seven new Senators he will recommend to the Governor General.

The Prime Minister also announced today that he intends to appoint V. Peter Harder as Government Representative in the Senate. Mr. Harder will act as the Government’s Representative in the Senate in order to facilitate the introduction and consideration of Government legislation, and would be sworn in as a Privy Councillor.

The new independent Senators will be expected to make a significant contribution to the work of the Senate, and to contribute to the ultimate goal that ensures a high standard of integrity, collaboration, and non-partisanship.

Quotes

“The Government is today taking further concrete steps to follow through on its commitment to reform the Senate, restore public trust, and bring an end to partisanship in the appointments process.”
– Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

“The Senate appointments I have announced today will help advance the important objective to transform the Senate into a less partisan and more independent institution that can perform its fundamental roles in the legislative process more effectively–including the representation of regional and minority interests–by removing the element of partisanship, and ensuring that the interests of Canadians are placed before political allegiances.”
– Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada 

Quick Facts

  • Taking today’s announcements into account, there are 17 vacancies in the Senate. Up until today’s announcements, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec have had the largest number of vacancies.
  • Under the Constitution, the Governor General appoints individuals to the Senate. By convention, Senators are appointed on the advice of the Prime Minister.
  • The Advisory Board, which recommended these individuals to the Prime Minister, is an independent and non-partisan body whose mandate is to provide the Prime Minister with merit-based recommendations on Senate nominations. The Prime Minister thanked the Advisory Board for all of its extensive and diligent work to consult widely, assess, and recommend these eminent individuals for appointment to the Senate.

Biographical Notes

Manitoba

Raymonde Gagné

Born in Manitoba, Ms. Gagné has worked in the field of education for over 35 years. Notably, she was President of Université Saint-Boniface (USB) from 2003-2014. During this time, she directed the efforts to change the institution’s status from college to university. She also spearheaded an $18 million fundraising campaign -- the largest in the institution’s history – for the construction of a new health sciences building, to expand research capacity and increase the scholarship and bursary program.

Prior to her tenure as President, she served as Director of New Programs, Director of the Community College and of the Continuing Education Division of USB, as well as Professor in Business Administration.

Prior to her arrival at USB, she worked as a high school teacher, a principal, and as a consultant in regional and industrial expansion in New Brunswick. She is a member of the Order of Canada, the Order of Manitoba, and a recipient of the Prix Riel.

She contributes to numerous organizations and boards within Manitoba and across the country. She served as President of the Association des universités de la francophonie canadienne from 2005-2009, was a member of the Advisory Committee on Official Languages for the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages of Canada from 2007-2009, and was a member of the Board of Directors of the Consortium national de formation en santé, which she co-chaired from 2009-2014.

As President of USB, Ms. Gagné was a member of the Council of Presidents of Universities of Manitoba and was elected Chair in 2012. She was also a member of the Senate of the University of Manitoba. 

Justice Murray Sinclair

Justice Sinclair has served the justice system in Manitoba for over 25 years. He was the first Aboriginal Judge appointed in Manitoba, and only the second in Canada.

He has served as Co-Chair of the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry in Manitoba and as Chief Commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). As head of the TRC, he participated in hundreds of hearings across Canada that culminated in the issuance of the TRC’s report in 2015. He also oversaw an active multi-million dollar fundraising program to support various TRC events and activities, and to allow survivors to travel to attend TRC events.

Justice Sinclair has been invited to speak throughout Canada, the United States, and internationally, including the Cambridge Lectures in England (for members of the judiciary of various Commonwealth courts).

He has served as an adjunct professor of law at the University of Manitoba. He is also very active within his profession and his community, and has won numerous awards, including the National Aboriginal Achievement Award, the Manitoba Bar Association’s Equality Award (2001), and its Distinguished Service Award (2016). Justice Sinclair has received Honorary Doctorates from eight Canadian universities.  

Ontario

V. Peter Harder

Mr. Harder spent 29 years in the federal public service, including an impressive 16 years as Deputy Minister, which included heading the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Solicitor General, Public Security, and the Treasury Board Secretariat. As Deputy Minister, he oversaw the legislative process of countless bills and has appeared before standing committees of the House of Commons and the Senate.

From 2003-2007, he served as Personal Representative of the Prime Minister (Sherpa) to three G8 Summits. He is an expert on Canada-China relations and was elected President of the China-Canada Business Council in 2008.

He is active in his community and is a recipient of numerous awards, including the Public Service Outstanding Achievement Award and the United Way Community Builder Award.

He chaired the United Church of Canada Foundation and the Commonwealth Games Foundation. He has provided his time to several organizations and is currently involved with the National Arts Centre, the Glenn Gould Foundation, the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, the Institute for Research on Public Policy, and the Advisory Committee on the Ukrainian Jewish Encounter. He was also the Royal Bank visiting Chair on Women and Work at Carleton University. 

Frances Lankin

Ms. Lankin spent more than 10 years as the CEO of United Way Toronto. She also served as a provincial Minister and Legislator within the Government of Ontario for 11 years (1990-2001).

Furthermore, she has contributed to a number of diverse government bodies and initiatives, including the Security Intelligence Review Committee, the Blue Ribbon Committee on Federal Grants and Contributions, and is Co-Commissioner of the Commission for the Reform of Social Assistance in Ontario.

She is currently Chair of the National NewsMedia Council, Board Director for Hydro One, and Board Director and Chair of the Social Responsibility Committee for the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Commission, and has extensive previous experience as a former volunteer on several boards.

She is a Member of the Order of Canada and has received Honorary Doctorates from Queen’s University, Ryerson University, and Nipissing University. 

Ratna Omidvar

Ms. Omidvar has a long history of service since her arrival in Canada from Iran. She is experienced in issues that surround immigration, multiculturalism, diversity, citizenship, integration, and minority rights.

Currently, she is the founding Executive Director and Adjunct Professor of the Global Diversity and Migration Exchange at the Ted Rogers School of Management, at Ryerson University. She was Executive Director and President of Maytree from 1998 to 2014. During that time, she founded the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council and DiverseCity on Board, both of which have been replicated nationally and internationally to deal with the integration and inclusion of immigrants into the workforce and the community.

Ms. Omidvar is currently Chair of Lifeline Syria. She is also a Director of the Centre for Mental Health and Addiction (CAMH), The Environics Institute, and Samara.

She is a Member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Ontario, and is one of the few Canadians to have received the Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany in recognition of her contribution to the advancement of German-Canadian relations.

She was recognized in 2010 by the Globe and Mail as one of Canada’s top nation-builders of the decade, and has an Honorary Doctorate from York University. She was named to the inaugural Global Diversity List sponsored by The Economist magazine in 2015 as one of the Top 10 Diversity Champions worldwide.

Quebec

Chantal Petitclerc

Ms. Petitclerc is both an internationally famous athlete and a caring woman. At age 13, she lost the use of her legs in an accident. She managed to overcome adversity and numerous obstacles to become an undisputed leader in the sports world.

Her gold medals from the Paralympic, Olympic, and Commonwealth games, the numerous awards and recognition she has received, and her appointment as Chef de Mission for the Canadian team at the Rio Paralympic Games all bear witness to this triumph.

Her many achievements and her personal journey have shaped her into a leading speaker who is recognized nation-wide. She has been Défi sportif AlterGo’s spokesperson for 17 years, and is the Ambassador for the international organization Right to Play.

Through her unflagging message highlighting the contribution of disabled persons to our society, she is playing a definitive role in furthering the development of a more inclusive society. Through her involvement, she is motivating those with limitations to overcome and achieve their full potential.

Through her various experiences, Chantal has also gained a good knowledge of the unique characteristics of the various communities, as well as of decision-making processes at the national level. Moreover, having a functional limitation herself, she has an excellent understanding of the needs of various minorities, and desires to get involved to make their concerns heard.

Ms. Petitclerc is a Companion of the Order of Canada and Knight of the Ordre du Québec. She was awarded the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada’s athlete of the year, and was inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame. She also has four Honorary Doctorates. In addition, Chantal offers a dynamic contribution and unique expertise from her membership on a number of committees and boards. 

André Pratte

Mr. Pratte’s career in journalism has spanned 37 years, 14 of which he spent as editor-in-chief of the daily newspaper La Presse.

Throughout his career, he has been required to demonstrate independence and impartiality. As an editor, he expressed opinions based on facts, principles, and reasoning rather than prejudice, partisanship, or interests. He became very well known in Quebec and the rest of Canada for his strong positions, which clearly conferred on him a role as a leader and public influencer.

He holds a political science degree and has covered Canadian politics for most of his career, including three years on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Having headed the politics desks of La Presse, he has an excellent knowledge of the Canadian Constitution and the legislative process. Further, through his work, he has gained knowledge in a number of fields, including the practice of federalism in Canada and around the world, public finance, energy, the environment, health systems management, Canadian foreign policy, human rights, and the situation of Canada’s cultural and religious minorities.

Annex E: Minister of Democratic Institutions Announces Launch of the Permanent Phase of the Independent Senate Appointments Process

Ottawa, Ontario, July 7, 2016 - The Government of Canada remains committed to reforming the Senate, restoring public trust, and bringing an end to partisanship in the appointments process.

Today, the Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister of Democratic Institutions, launched the permanent phase of the independent Senate appointments process – which features an application process that is open to all Canadians. The four-week period during which applications will be accepted is now open until August 4, 2016.

Minister Monsef also announced the appointment of eight additional provincial members of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments (Advisory Board). Two members have been appointed to represent each of the four provinces that are new to the process – British Columbia, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island – and that will have one or more Senate vacancies filled in the coming months under the permanent phase.

The following members are being appointed to the Advisory Board:

  • Ms. Anne Giardini as provincial member for British Columbia – Chancellor of Simon Fraser University. 

  • Mr. Vikram Vij as provincial member for British Columbia – chef, entrepreneur, author and television personality. 

  • Ms. Roxanne Tarjan as provincial member for New Brunswick – served in prominent positions with a number of nursing profession organizations. 

  • Dr. Donald J. Savoie as provincial member for New Brunswick – leading Canadian expert on public policy, public administration and federalism. 

  • Ms. Jennifer Gillivan as provincial member for Nova Scotia – President and CEO of the IWK Health Centre Foundation. 

  • Dr. Ramona Lumpkin as provincial member for Nova Scotia – President and Vice-Chancellor of Mount Saint Vincent University. 

  • Chief Brian Francis as provincial member for Prince Edward Island – Chief, and former Education Coordinator, of the Abegweit First Nation.  

  • Ms. Jeannette Arsenault as provincial member for Prince Edward Island – entrepreneur and business owner, who was named as one of Canada’s most powerful women by the Women’s Executive Network. 

The Advisory Board has been asked to provide the Prime Minister with non-binding recommendations on appointments to fill 19 current vacancies and one anticipated Senate vacancy.

The Advisory Board will be guided by the same public, merit-based criteria it used during the transitional phase to identify Canadians who would reflect Canada’s diversity, make a significant contribution to the work of Parliament, and ensure a high standard of integrity, collaboration, and non-partisanship in the Senate.

For the seven provinces with Senate vacancies, the application period will be open from today, July 7, 2016, until August 4, 2016, at 23:59 PDT.

Quotes

“Today, our Government is taking another important step toward reforming the Senate. I am very pleased to announce the appointment of the accomplished new provincial members who will be joining the Advisory Board. I am also excited to announce the start of the application process that is open to all Canadians, an important innovation that not only better involves Canadians in our parliamentary democracy, but also enhances transparency.”
– Hon. Maryam Monsef, Minister of Democratic Institutions

“The new independent Senate appointments process is already contributing to the ultimate goal of ensuring a high standard of integrity, collaboration, and non-partisanship in the Senate. These advances are crucial to restoring the confidence of Canadians in the Senate and to reinvigorating an institution that performs vital functions in our parliamentary democracy.” 
– Hon. Maryam Monsef, Minister of Democratic Institutions

Quick Facts

  • There are currently 19 vacancies in the Senate, in seven provinces: British Columbia (1), Manitoba (2), New Brunswick (2), Nova Scotia (2), Ontario (6), Prince Edward Island (1), and Quebec (5). One additional vacancy will arise in August 2016, through the mandatory retirement of a Quebec senator.
  • Under the Constitution, the power to appoint Senators rests with the Governor General and, by constitutional convention, this power is exercised on the advice of the Prime Minister.
  • The Advisory Board, which is chaired by Ms. Huguette Labelle, is an independent and non-partisan body whose mandate is to provide the Prime Minister with merit-based recommendations on Senate nominations for his consideration.
  • Canadians may submit an application for consideration by the Advisory Board at https://www.canada.ca/senate-appointments.

Annex F: Fall 2016 News Releases from the Prime Minister

Prime Minister announces intention to recommend the appointment of nine new Senators

Ottawa, Ontario, October 27, 2016. The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced that he will recommend, to the Governor General, the appointment of nine new, independent Senators to fill vacancies in the Senate for British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.

In doing so, the Government is today taking further concrete steps to follow through on its commitment to improve the appointments process, and to restore public trust in a reformed Senate.

The individuals being recommended today for appointment to the Senate were chosen using the Government of Canada’s new merit-based process – which is designed to help ensure that the Senate is independent, reflective of Canada’s diversity, and best able to tackle the broad range of challenges and opportunities facing the country.

Under the new process, the following people are being recommended for appointment to the Senate:

  • Yuen Pau Woo (British Columbia)
  • Patricia Bovey (Manitoba)
  • Harvey Max Chochinov (Manitoba)
  • Marilou McPhedran (Manitoba)
  • René Cormier (New Brunswick)
  • Nancy Hartling (New Brunswick)
  • Wanda Thomas Bernard (Nova Scotia)
  • Daniel Christmas (Nova Scotia)
  • Diane Griffin (Prince Edward Island)

Announcements about further appointments to the Senate will be made in the near future. Additional information on the first cycle of the permanent process will be made public when the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments completes its report to the Prime Minister later this year.

Quote

“It is a privilege to be putting forward the names of nine new senators to the Governor General who have been selected using a new merit-based and open process. It is part of our ongoing efforts to make the Senate more modern and independent and ensure that its members have the depth of knowledge and experience to best serve Canadians.”
– Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

Quick Facts

  • Under the Canadian Constitution, the Governor General appoints people to the Senate. By convention, Senators are appointed on the advice of the Prime Minister.
  • For the first time ever, the process was opened up to allow Canadians to apply. Following a four-week application period, which generated over 2,700 applications from Canadians across the country, the candidate submissions were reviewed by the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments, which then provided the Prime Minister with non-binding recommendations. From that pool of candidates, the Prime Minister selected the nine people he will recommend to the Governor General for appointment to the Senate.
  • In making their recommendations, the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments was guided by public, transparent, non-partisan and merit-based criteria to identify highly-qualified people.
  • Once appointed by the Governor General and summoned to the Senate, the new Senators will join their peers in examining and revising legislation, investigating national issues, and representing regional, provincial and minority interests – all important functions in a modern democracy.

Biographical Notes

British Columbia

Yuen Pau Woo

Born in Malaysia and raised in Singapore, Yuen Pau Woo came to British Columbia at the age of sixteen on an academic scholarship and later immigrated to Canada. Over the past 28 years, Mr. Woo has worked on public policy issues from coast to coast, with a special emphasis on Canada’s relations with Asia, and has been a spokesperson for British Columbia and Canada in the Asia Pacific. He has been a champion for openness in trade, capital, and people flows, encouraging innovation and risk taking, and fostering public good. Mr. Woo has helped many entities - public and private - understand the importance of Asia for their business and has contributed to policymaking on Canada-Asia relations. As President and CEO of the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada from 2005 to 2014, he led a major expansion of the organization and spearheaded the “National Conversation on Asia”, a three-year cross-Canada campaign to highlight the growing importance of Asia in the world and for Canada. For ten years, he represented Canada on the Standing Committee of the Pacific Economic Cooperation Council. Currently, he serves as President of HQ Vancouver, a public-private partnership established to promote British Columbia as a head office location for global firms. He co-founded a not-for-profit organization that promotes Chinese art and culture in Canada. Mr. Woo has contributed to Canada’s international economic policy and foreign affairs through teaching and scholarly research, consultations with senior officials, business and community leaders, and public advocacy. He is currently a Senior Fellow in Public Policy at the Institute of Asian Research at the University of British Columbia as well as a Senior Resident Fellow at the Beedie School of Business at Simon Fraser University. He has worked effectively with leaders from First Nations and a variety of civil society organizations. Mr. Woo has served as a member of many advisory councils, boards and committees, working on a variety of policy issues such as the standardization system, immigration and multiculturalism, economic policy, and Canada’s place in the world.

Manitoba

Patricia Bovey, FRSA, FCMA

Patricia Bovey is an art historian, guest curator and arts consultant in governance, strategic and business planning and policy development. She clearly articulates the importance of art and culture to social and economic wellbeing, and has increased access to the arts through her leadership and innovative work. She has facilitated the health of community arts organizations through governance stability and audience engagement, and given voice to artists’ work, including Indigenous creators, through research, publications, ground-breaking exhibitions and new public programs. The former director of two major Canadian art galleries, she teaches at the university level, and has lectured and published extensively. Internationally, she has been involved in a number of projects, touring exhibitions and artist exchanges. She has been a member of, or chaired the boards of, several academic institutions, including the University of Manitoba, as well as arts organizations such as the National Gallery of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts. She has participated in federal and provincial cultural policy reviews, international cultural policy discussions, the drafting of ethical guidelines for Canadian museums – including those regarding Nazi looted art – and the development of recommendations for new and amended legislation. Her volunteer commitments have included working in the area of cultural diversity, as well as with youth and intergenerational organizations, presenting workshops for Islamic youth leaders, and serving on St. Boniface Hospital’s Patient Advisory Council. She has received numerous awards and honours recognizing her contributions and, in 2006, was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts in the United Kingdom.

Harvey Max Chochinov

A professor of psychiatry at the University of Manitoba and Director of the Manitoba Palliative Care Research Unit, Dr. Harvey Max Chochinov is recognized internationally as a leading scholar, researcher and proponent of palliative care. Dr. Chochinov also holds a Ph.D. in Community Health Sciences. His publications addressing the psychosocial dimensions of palliation have helped define standards of end-of-life care. His work has transformed his field and improved the care and compassion provided to dying patients, in Canada and around the world. He was recently appointed by the Government to chair the External Panel on Options for a Legislative Response to Carter v. Canada. He previously served seven years as a member of the Governing Council of the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR). Dr. Chochinov has been a guest lecturer in most major academic institutions across the country and in the United States; he has also lectured around the globe. He holds the only Canada Research Chair in Palliative Care and is the only psychiatrist in Canada to be designated as a Soros Faculty Scholar, Project on Death in America. He is the Chair for the Canadian Virtual Hospice, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. From 1987 through 2010, he served as an itinerant, fly-in, psychiatric consultant to The Pas and understands the challenges and opportunities of living in rural northern communities. His contributions and achievements have been recognized with many awards, including the Order of Manitoba and the Order of Canada.  

Professor Marilou McPhedran, C.M., B.A., LL.B., LL.M., LL.D. (honoris causa)

Marilou McPhedran is a lawyer, educator and advocate who has done extensive work to promote human rights through systemic reform in law, medicine, education and governance in Canada and internationally. In 1985, she became the youngest lawyer to be named a Member of the Order of Canada for her co-leadership of the Ad Hoc Committee of Canadian Women on the Constitution, a grassroots movement for strengthening equality rights in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. She has co-founded several non-profit systemic change organizations, including the Women's Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF) and the Metropolitan Action Committee on Violence Against Women and Children (METRAC). Currently a professor at the University of Winnipeg Global College, Ms. McPhedran has previously served on the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, as Chief Commissioner of the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission, and as the Principal (dean) of the College. She has received a long list of awards and honours in recognition of her work to ensure that the voices of marginalized people are heard. She was granted an honorary doctorate of laws degree from the University of Winnipeg in 1992 and completed her Masters in Law (LL.M.) in comparative constitutional law at Osgoode Hall in 2004.      

New Brunswick

René Cormier

René Cormier has a record as a professional in Canada’s arts and culture community, but also as a social actor and a leader within the international Francophonie. He has unparalleled experience and expertise within the arts and culture community in Canada and speaks from his own experience and life as a Francophone New Brunswicker and from his vision of the development of the Acadian people. He has served as President of the Commission internationale du théâtre francophone, Director of the Théâtre populaire d’Acadie, President of the Fédération culturelle canadienne-française, and board member of the Canadian Conference of the Arts, and is currently the Artistic Director of Zones Théâtrales at the National Arts Centre and President of the Société Nationale de l’Acadie, the lead organization for the International Strategy for the Promotion of Acadian Artists. His knowledge of Canada’s legislative process and Constitution is based on his professional experience and his volunteer activities in cultural and linguistic files associated with various legislation, including the Status of the Artist Act, the Broadcasting Act, the Copyright Act, and the Official Languages Act. Mr. Cormier is recognized for his ability to build bridges between often divided cultural groups. He has received awards for his contribution to the cultural sector by various organizations, including the Ordre des francophones d’Amérique. He is also a Knight of Arts and Letters of France. 

Nancy Hartling

Nancy Hartling has played a prominent role in promoting social change and is one of New Brunswick’s most dedicated advocates on issues affecting women. With a career focused on families and social issues, she is well versed in matters of mental health, poverty, violence against women and economic development. As a divorced mother raising two young children, she realized the need to continue her education and learned quickly about the barriers that one faces while trying to earn a living and contribute to society. She completed two university degrees and founded the non-profit organization Support to Single Parents Inc. (SSPI) of which she was the Executive Director for thirty-four years. She has advocated locally, provincially and nationally on socio-economic issues facing single parents and their children, and has spearheaded innovative programs to address the challenges for low-income single mothers.  She also founded St. James Court Inc., an affordable housing complex for single parents. She has contributed to programs for the elderly and has been researching healthy aging and population needs. In her work, Ms. Hartling built and maintained partnerships with all levels of government, community agencies, universities and educational institutions, businesses and media. Her involvement on women’s issues has been extensive, including co-chairing the provincial Minister’s Working Group on Violence against Women, serving on the Board of the Muriel McQueen Fergusson Centre for Family Violence Research, co-chairing for New Brunswick for the Women’s World March 2000, as well as lecturing at the University of New Brunswick. Ms. Hartling’s record of achievement in community service, in organizational leadership and in advocacy has been recognized with several awards, such as the Governor General’s Award in Commemoration of the Persons Case, the Community Spirit Award from the United Way of Greater Moncton and Southeastern New Brunswick, and the Order of New Brunswick.

Nova Scotia

Dr. Wanda Thomas Bernard, PhD, C.M., O.N.S.

Dr. Wanda Thomas Bernard is a highly regarded social worker, educator, researcher, community activist and advocate of social change. She has worked in mental health at the provincial level, in rural community practice at the municipal level, and, since 1990, as a professor at the Dalhousie School of Social Work, where she also served as director for a decade. In 2016, she was appointed Special Advisor on Diversity and Inclusiveness at Dalhousie University and she is the first African Nova Scotian to hold a tenure track position at Dalhousie University and to be promoted to full professor. Dr. Thomas Bernard has worked with provincial organizations to bring diversity to the political processes in Nova Scotia and teach community members about Canada’s legislative process and citizen engagement. She is a founding member of the Association of Black Social Workers (ABSW) which helps address the needs of marginalized citizens, especially those of African descent. As a member of the Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women, and as its current Chair, she has been instrumental in the development of advice to ministers regarding frameworks for gender violence prevention and health equity. At the national level, she has served as a member of the National Coalition of Advisory Councils on the Status of Women. She has served as an expert witness in human rights cases and has presented at many local, national and international forums. Dr. Thomas Bernard has received many honours for her work and community leadership, notably the Order of Nova Scotia and the Order of Canada. 

Daniel Christmas

Daniel Christmas, a lifelong resident of the Mi’kmaw community of Membertou, has been active in a number of international, national, provincial and local organizations in a range of fields including Aboriginal and treaty rights, youth, justice, policing, education, health care, human rights, adult training, business development and the environment. As the Director of Advisory Services for the Union of Nova Scotia Indians, Mr. Christmas coordinated its political and litigation strategy on Aboriginal and treaty rights, led the Mi’kmaw response to the Report of the Royal Commission on the Donald Marshall Jr. Prosecution, and helped ensure the implementation of many of the report’s recommendations. Over the past two decades as Senior Advisor for Membertou, he has played a key role in transforming his home community from a First Nations on the verge of bankruptcy into one of the most successful in Canada. Mr. Christmas is also a consultant with Membertou Quality Management Services, providing services to a number of Mi’kmaw organizations. He has served with or chaired many provincial and national boards, advisory committees, and organizations. For 18 years, he chaired a local charitable organization, Educational Program Innovation Charity, which was recognized as the best run non-profit organization in Canada by the Donner Canadian Foundation in 2010. He has received numerous awards and distinctions for his work, including an honorary Doctor of Law Degree from Dalhousie University. 

Prince Edward Island

Diane Griffin

Diane Griffin is recognized provincially and nationally as a leader in natural area conservation who has contributed to sustainable land management, the protection of ecologically significant lands, and the improvement of her community. She has worked in the environmental non-profit sector, the provincial public service, including as PEI’s Deputy Minister of Environmental Resources, as well as in municipal government.  Over the course of her career, she has advised senior political leaders on environmental issues and policy, and has been involved in drafting and enforcing legislation related to ecological reserves conservation and environmental protection. For the past 13 years, Mrs. Griffin has served on the Stratford Town Council, where she has been a strong voice for balancing environmental sustainability with social and economic sustainability.  Mrs. Griffin is also a tireless community volunteer contributing her time to organizations such as hospitals, universities, heritage groups and health-related charities. For her leadership in natural area conservation, she was awarded the Governor General’s Conservation Award and an honorary degree from the University of Prince Edward Island. She also received the Order of PEI in recognition of her volunteerism and contribution to Island life.

Prime Minister announces intention to recommend the appointment of six new Senators

Ottawa, Ontario, October 31, 2016. The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced that he will recommend, to the Governor General, the appointment of six new, independent Senators to fill vacancies in the Senate for Ontario.

In doing so, the Government is today taking further concrete steps to follow through on its commitment to improve the appointments process, and to restore public trust in a reformed Senate.

The individuals being recommended today for appointment to the Senate were chosen using the Government of Canada’s new merit-based process – which is designed to help ensure that the Senate is independent, reflective of Canada’s diversity, and best able to tackle the broad range of challenges and opportunities facing the country.

Under the new process, the following people are being recommended for appointment to the Senate:

  • Gwen Boniface (Ontario)
  • Tony Dean (Ontario)
  • Sarabjit S. Marwah (Ontario)
  • Lucie Moncion (Ontario)
  • Kim Pate (Ontario)
  • Howard Wetston (Ontario)

An announcement about further appointments to the Senate will be made in the near future. Additional information on the first cycle of the permanent process will be made public when the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments completes its report to the Prime Minister later this year.

Quote

“I am pleased today to put forward six exceptional candidates as new Senators representing Ontario. These men and women were selected using the Government’s new merit-based system, a real example of democracy in action that will contribute to a more modern and independent Upper Chamber. I look forward to working with those summoned to the Senate and seeing them use their remarkable knowledge and experience to benefit our great country.”
– Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

Biographical Notes

Ontario

Gwen Boniface

A police leader, lawyer and educator, Gwen Boniface is globally recognized for bringing justice and equity to a wide range of issues and having a profound impact on women in policing. She became the first woman Inspector in the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP), the first woman appointed as Commissioner of the OPP, and the first female President of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police. She served for three years as the Deputy Chief Inspector of Ireland’s Garda Síochána Inspectorate, tasked with bringing reform to the national police service, then took on the role of Transnational Organized Crime Expert with the United Nations Police Division, where she developed a plan to address organized crime in conflict and post-conflict countries and was a member of the UN Counter Terrorism Integrated Task Force. She served as Commissioner on the Law Commission of Canada for five years, during which time she participated in independent research, study and debate on the modernization of a wide range of issues. She also served on the Board of Governors of the Law Commission of Ontario from 2011 to 2014. Ms. Boniface has worked tirelessly to repair relationships with First Nations communities, initiating many reforms to promote Aboriginal policing. As a consultant on policing and justice issues, both internationally and domestically, she provided services to universities, municipalities, government and non-profit organizations in areas of human rights, policing and justice. She is a long-time member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), where she currently serves as Deputy Executive Director. In addition, she was the founding President of the Canadian Police Chiefs International Service Agency, a non-profit organization created to address sexual exploitation of children. Ms. Boniface was invested into the Order of Ontario in 2001 in recognition of her service for the province and her work with First Nations communities, received the United Nations Peacekeeping Medal, and was awarded an honorary doctorate of letters from Nipissing University in 2006. 

Tony Dean

Tony Dean has been a Professor at the School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Toronto since 2009 and is widely regarded as one of Canada’s top public sector leaders, with extensive experience in public governance, public policy and legislative processes. His expertise is also recognized internationally: he has advised the London-based Commonwealth Secretariat, Commonwealth governments, and the Independent Evaluation Office of the IMF, and worked on governance and capacity-building in a number of countries. After emigrating to Canada from the United Kingdom, he worked for nearly two decades as a public policy professional in the Government of Ontario, becoming Deputy Minister of Labour, Deputy Minister of Policy and Associate Secretary to the Cabinet, and then Secretary of the Cabinet, Head of Ontario Public Service and Clerk of the Executive Council. His ability and willingness to lead change initiatives in complex and change-resistant organizations has resulted in some of his greatest accomplishments as a public servant, notably the development of integrated “Service Ontario” centres and the implementation of a major diversity strategy throughout the Ontario Public Service. Known for his mediating abilities, Mr. Dean was appointed to review Ontario’s workplace health and safety system in 2010 and was tasked with repairing the relationships between the government, teachers’ federations and school boards in the wake of a highly contentious legislative intervention in Ontario in 2012. In 2009, he was inducted as a member of the Order of Ontario for his work in transforming the Ontario Public Service. 

Sarabjit S. Marwah

Sabi Marwah’s career at Scotiabank, which spanned more than 35 years, culminated with his appointment as Vice Chairman and Chief Operating Officer. Until his recent retirement, he was responsible for many of the Bank’s corporate functions, and involved in developing the Bank's strategic plans and priorities, including mergers and acquisitions, while serving as Chairman of several Scotiabank subsidiaries. Originally from India, he has a strong academic background in economics and finance, having earned a Master’s in Economics from the University of Delhi and a Master’s of Business Administration from the University of California, Los Angeles. Through his professional experience and involvement in different organizations, he has acquired insights into diverse sectors of the economy and a broad range of issues. While at Scotiabank, he was a member of numerous industry committees, including the Canadian Bankers Association. Mr. Marwah has served on the boards of leading private organizations in Canada, as well as non-profit organizations such as the C.D. Howe Institute, the Royal Ontario Museum, the United Way Campaign, the Toronto International Film Festival, Humber River Regional Hospital and the Hospital for Sick Children. He is currently a member of the boards of Ryerson Futures Inc. (affiliated with Ryerson University) and Scale Up Ventures, both initiatives focussed on enhancing innovation in Canada and supporting technology based start-ups. He is a founding member of the Sikh Foundation of Canada, and, over the last 15 years, has worked extensively to showcase the rich diversity of Sikh and South Asian art and culture. He received an honorary doctorate from Ryerson University in recognition of his commitment to advancing social inclusion in business, among other achievements.

Lucie Moncion

Lucie Moncion has an extensive background of knowledge and expertise in the co-operative sector paired with vast practical experience. Throughout her career, she has held numerous positions in Ontario's Caisse Populaire network. She is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Alliance des caisses populaires de l'Ontario and has held this position since May 2001, when she became the first woman to hold such a position in a credit union federation in Canada. L’Alliance is a network of 12 credit unions that serves 23 Francophone municipalities in northeastern Ontario and plays a key role in the economic development of Francophone communities. Ms. Moncion has brought important stability to the operations of L'Alliance; asset growth has almost tripled—to $1.4 billion—since she took over as CEO. Ms. Moncion became President and Chair of the Board of Cooperatives and Mutuals Canada in 2016 and also currently serves as President of the Co-operative Board of Ontario. Active within government bodies and in her community, Ms. Moncion has served on various boards of directors, including as Vice-President on the Board of Directors at Nipissing University, Treasurer on the Board of Directors of Direction Ontario, and member of the Board of Directors at Collège Boréal. She holds a Master's Degree in Business Administration and has obtained the Chartered Director designation from both Université Laval and McMaster University. 

Kim Pate

An ardent champion for social justice, equality and criminal justice, Kim Pate is an internationally renowned human rights expert who has contributed to national and international policy discussions on women in the criminal justice system through her research, writings and volunteerism. Trained as a teacher and a lawyer, she has been at the forefront of public education campaigns, research, and legislative and administrative reform at the regional, national and international level. Since 1992, she has worked with and on behalf of women in prison and provided support toward their reintegration into society in her role as the Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies (CAEFS). She has also shed light on the special needs of Aboriginal women, who are overrepresented in Canadian federal prisons, and those with mental health issues. Prior to joining the CAEFS, she worked for several years with the John Howard Societies. A part-time professor in the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law, she has authored many articles in academic journals, and has acted as a mentor to women and law students. She has also served on a host of boards, committees and advisory groups, and is currently on the advisory board of the National Women’s Legal Mentoring Program, Human Rights International’s Canadian Advocacy Committee, and Legal Aid Ontario’s Prison Advisory Committee. Ms. Pate is the recipient of many awards and distinctions, including five honorary degrees, and was appointed to the Order of Canada in 2015. 

Howard Wetston, C.M., Q.C.

Currently counsel with Goodmans LLP and an adjunct professor of law at the University of Toronto, Howard Wetston is a respected public servant, distinguished lawyer, jurist, regulator and executive. He is one of Canada’s most prominent leaders in administrative law and regulation with expertise in securities, energy and other regulated industries. Mr. Wetston has led the Ontario Securities Commission, the Ontario Energy Board and the Competition Bureau. He also served as a Vice Chair of the Board of the International Organization of Securities Commissions, the leading international policy forum for securities regulators and global standard setter for securities regulation. He is a former Federal Court judge, was Crown counsel with the Department of Justice, and has served as General Counsel or Assistant General Counsel with the Canadian Transport Commission, the National Energy Board and the Consumers’ Association of Canada. He holds a law degree from Dalhousie University and has been called to the Bar in Nova Scotia, Ontario and Alberta. Mr. Wetston has served on a number of boards. He has received two honorary degrees and is a member of the Order of Canada.

Prime Minister announces intention to recommend the appointment of six new Senators

Ottawa, Ontario, November 2, 2016. The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced that he will recommend, to the Governor General, the appointment of six new, independent Senators to fill vacancies in the Senate for Quebec.

In doing so, the Government is today taking further concrete steps to follow through on its commitment to improve the appointments process, and to restore public trust in a reformed Senate.

The individuals being recommended today for appointment to the Senate were chosen using the Government of Canada’s new merit-based process – which is designed to help ensure that the Senate is independent, reflective of Canada’s diversity, and best able to tackle the broad range of challenges and opportunities facing the country.

Under the new process, the following people are being recommended for appointment to the Senate:

  • Renée Dupuis (Quebec)
  • Éric Forest (Quebec)
  • Rosa Galvez (Quebec)
  • Marc Gold (Quebec)
  • Marie-Françoise Mégie (Quebec)
  • Raymonde Saint-Germain (Quebec)

Additional information on the first cycle of the permanent process will be made public when the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments completes its report to the Prime Minister later this year.

Quote

“In keeping with our commitment to Canadians, all vacant Senate seats will soon be filled. Once appointed, these six exceptional candidates from Quebec, together with the other recent nominees, will be able to contribute to a Senate which is reflective of our great country. I would like to thank all Canadians who applied to be members of the Senate, as well as extend my gratitude to the members of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments for their excellent work.”
– Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

Biographical Notes

Quebec

Renée Dupuis, C.M., Ad.E.

A lawyer and writer, Renée Dupuis specializes in the fields of administrative law, human rights, and Indigenous law (individuals and communities). She has been a legal advisor and consultant for First Nations and their regional and national organizations in negotiating tripartite comprehensive claims and in constitutional negotiations. She chaired the Indian Specific Claims Commission, a federal commission of inquiry, and the Barreau du Québec's committee on the rights of Aboriginal peoples. In August 2011, she was appointed the vice-president of the Commission on Human Rights and Youth Rights of Quebec. Ms. Dupuis was also a member of the Canadian Human Rights Act Review Panel and served as a commissioner with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. Over the past 30 years, she has participated both as a professional and as a volunteer in training activities for women and women's support organizations. She was a member of the collective that established the Quebec City Women’s Health Centre. Her sustained commitment to women’s community support groups and the advancement of women’s rights was recognized by the Barreau du Québec in 2004 through the Christine-Tourigny Award, and the YWCA Women of Distinction Award in 2002. Her leadership and achievements have been repeatedly recognized by her peers and by society as a whole. In 2012, the Barreau du Québec and Université Laval highlighted her exceptional contribution and her outstanding professional achievements by awarding her respectively the Quebec Bar Medal and an honorary doctorate of law. She also had the honour to be appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in 2005. She has given numerous seminars and conferences in Canada and abroad and authored a number of works and articles. She received the 2001 Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction for her book Justice for Canada's Aboriginal Peoples

Éric Forest

Éric Forest has worked for the development of Eastern Quebec for over 40 years. As the Mayor of Rimouski since 2005, he has engaged the Rimouski community through a strategic plan that guides the development of a respectful, united community. Under his leadership, Rimouski is now recognized as one of the best cities to live in Canada, with a strong cultural vitality and an economic structure geared to the knowledge economy. He entered politics at age 27, as a councillor in Pointe-au-Père – and was elected mayor two years later. After spending some time in the business community, as the co-owner and vice-president of a car dealership, he returned to politics in 1994, as a councillor with the City of Rimouski, before becoming mayor. From 1995 to 2005, he was vice-president and director general of the Océanic hockey club, where he set the goal of making the Océanic an instrument for social cohesion for all of Eastern Quebec. He became the Mayor of Rimouski in 2005, and he chaired the Union of Quebec Municipalities (UMQ) for almost four years, from 2010 to 2014, in the context of a major crisis of confidence by citizens toward their municipal elected officials. His commitment helped to bring together the municipal sector, through two provincial summits that led to the preparation of a white paper on the future of municipalities. While Chair of the UMQ, he also implemented a social and professional integration project that enabled youth from youth centres to have an enriching work experience within their city’s municipal team. In 2014, he received the Jean-Paul L’Allier Award, which honours a Quebec elected official for outstanding vision, leadership and achievements in urban planning and land use planning. Mr. Forest is also very active in numerous social causes and is particularly committed to encouraging young people and women to become involved in politics, within the scope of his responsibilities with the UMQ and the L’Effet A movement. 

Marc Gold

Marc Gold has a recognized record of achievement both professionally and in service to the community. In his early career as a law professor at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, he published extensively, lectured throughout Canada and abroad, and was one of a handful of academics solicited to provide training for federally-appointed judges in the area of constitutional law and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. He left full-time academic life twenty-five years ago, and has since made significant contributions through service to the community. He has held major leadership roles in the Jewish community at the local, national and international levels, including being Chair of Jewish Federations of Canada. He also served for ten years as the Chair of ENSEMBLE pour le respect de la diversité (formerly the Tolerance Foundation), a not-for-profit organization that works with youth to build a more open and inclusive society, which currently reaches more than 25,000 young people annually in schools throughout Quebec and Canada. Mr. Gold served on the Board of Directors and was Chair of the Tenure and Promotions Committee of the Université de Montréal for sixteen years, and upon the end of his mandate in June 2016, was named administrateur émérite in recognition of his service to the university. For 23 years, he was also Vice-President of Maxwell Cummings and Sons, a family-owned private real estate and investment firm based in Montreal. He currently serves as a part-time member of the Parole Board of Canada and is an Adjunct Professor of Law at McGill University. At present, he is a member of the executive committees of the Montreal Symphony Orchestra and Centraide of Greater Montreal. He received an honorary doctorate from Bar Ilan University in 2012 and the Samuel Bronfman Medal from Federation CJA in 2015. 

Marie-Françoise Mégie

Dr. Marie-Françoise Mégie’s professional career comprises over 35 years as a family physician and nearly 30 years as a university professor. She arrived in Quebec in 1976, from Haiti, and rose through the ranks of the medical profession and university teaching, becoming a clinical associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the Université de Montréal. Her university involvement enabled her to participate in the seniors’ care committee and to work on the curriculum review committee of the Department of Family Medicine of the Université de Montréal.  Her medical practice includes providing home health care services for seniors, persons with severe disabilities, and end-of-life patients. She is the medical director of the Maison de soins palliatifs de Laval. Since 2001 she has been a guest speaker at various conferences and symposia at the international, national and provincial levels. She is a member of a number of professional associations, has chaired the Association of Haitian Physicians Abroad, and currently chairs the Association Médecins Francophones du Canada. Since 2006 she has been the editor-in chief of the Newsletter of the Association Médecins Francophones du Canada. Dr. Mégie has received a number of awards for her professional, volunteer and personal contributions. 

Raymonde Saint-Germain

Raymonde Saint-Germain has had a distinguished career with the Government of Quebec and is recognized for her integrity and dedication in fulfilling her duties. As a senior public servant, she has served as the Assistant Deputy Minister of International Relations, Deputy Minister of Government Services, Deputy Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, and Éditrice officielle du Québec. Ms. Saint-Germain was unanimously reappointed as Ombudsperson by the Members of Quebec’s National Assembly in June 2011, for a second consecutive five-year term of office. As Ombudsperson, she has commented on over 125 bills and draft regulations, from the perspective of respect for human rights and freedoms (with regard to mental health, residual rights of incarcerated persons, independent investigations of police incidents resulting in serious injury or death of civilians, end of life care, social protection regimes, administrative justice, and governance). She served as vice-chair (2009-2013) and chair (2013-2015) of the Association des ombudsmans et médiateurs de la francophonie. She has contributed to the professional development of her peers as a trainer with professional associations and universities, in mentoring for executive succession planning, and in volunteering. She was awarded the Prix Orange in 2009 by the Association des groupes d'intervention en santé mentale for her initiative to conduct a systemic investigation of violations of the rights of hospitalized psychiatric patients. 

Rosa Galvez, Ph.D.,  ing. 

Originally from Peru, Dr. Rosa Galvez has spent more than 32 years in Canada and has become a leading expert in the field of environmental pollution and pollution control. Her expertise carries across many environmental problems affecting human health including water pollution, waste and residues, contaminated lands, and the impact of economic activities such as mining or petroleum transport. Her positions have focused on the perspectives of recycling, restoration of ecological services, re-valorization (of waste or lands) and protection of non-renewable natural resources. As an expert she has offered opinions to international government bodies such as the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (supporting the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation), and Canada-US and Quebec-Vermont agreements for protecting the Great Lakes, and the St-Lawrence River. She has participated in multiple UN forums. She holds a PhD in Environmental Engineering from McGill University. She has been a professor at Laval University since 1994 in the Civil and Water Engineering Department and has been head of this department since 2010. Before that, she was Research Associate at the Geotechnical Research Centre at McGill. Her research career has taken her to many parts of the world, including France, Italy, Belgium, Peru, Chili, Brazil, Mexico, Japan and China, where she established partnerships or participated in engineering projects in addition to building collaborative relationships with universities in these countries. She contributes to the Centre d'études nordiques, whose mission is to support the sustainable development of northern regions by way of an improved understanding and prediction of environmental change. Her research achievements include studying Lac Megantic’s major oil spill, and emergency and remediation actions during unconventional oil spills. She has also conducted studies for the Government of the Northwest Territories on mining and lands sustainability and discussed cumulative impacts of a British Columbia hydroelectric project on the Mackenzie watershed. She has won numerous awards both in Quebec and internationally.

Annex G: Assessment Criteria

Constitutional eligibility requirements

An individual must meet the constitutional eligibility requirements at the time of appointment to the Senate.

Age

An individual must be a minimum of 30 years of age and be less than 75 years of age.

Citizenship

An individual must be a citizen of Canada.

Net Worth in Real and Personal Property

An individual must own property with a net value of $4,000 in the province for which he or she is appointed, and have an overall net worth of $4,000 in real and personal property.

In the case of Quebec, a nominee must have his or her real property qualification in the electoral division for which he or she is appointed, or be resident in that electoral division.

Senators from Quebec must represent one of 24 electoral divisions.

Residency

An individual must be a resident of the province for which he or she is appointed.

  • An individual must have his or her place of permanent residence in the province or territory of vacancy at the time of application and appointment. The permanent residence of an individual is where the person is ordinarily present and has made his or her home for a minimum period of two years leading up to the application. The individual must provide documentation of residence in the province or territory.

  • Despite rule 1, an exception to the two-year requirement may be made in a case where An individual is temporarily absent from the province or territory of vacancy for reasons of employment or education but can provide satisfactory proof he or she intends to return to his or her permanent residence in the province or territory of vacancy.

Merit-based criteria established by the Government

Gender, Indigenous and Minority Balance

Individuals will be considered with a view to achieving gender balance in the Senate. Priority consideration will be given to individuals who represent Indigenous peoples and linguistic, minority and ethnic communities, with a view to ensuring representation of those communities in the Senate consistent with the Senate’s role in minority representation.

Non-Partisanship

Individuals will be asked to demonstrate to the Advisory Board that they have the ability to bring a perspective and contribution to the work of the Senate that is independent and non-partisan. They will also have to disclose any political involvement and activities. Past political activities would not disqualify a nominee.

Knowledge Requirement

Individuals must demonstrate a solid knowledge of the legislative process and Canada’s Constitution, including the role of the Senate as an independent and complementary body of sober second thought, regional representation and minority representation.

Personal Qualities

Individuals must demonstrate outstanding personal qualities, including adhering to the principles and standards of public life, ethics, and integrity.

Individuals must demonstrate an ability to make an effective and significant contribution to the work of the Senate, not only in their chosen profession or area of expertise, but the wide range of other issues that come before the Senate.

Qualifications Related to the Role of the Senate

An individual must demonstrate one of the following criteria:

  • a high level of experience, developed over many years, in the legislative process and public service at the federal or provincial/territorial level; and/or,

  • a lengthy and recognized record of service to one’s community, which could include one’s Indigenous, ethnic or linguistic community; and/or,

  • recognized leadership and an outstanding record of achievement in the nominee’s profession or chosen field of expertise.

Asset Qualifications

Bilingualism: fluency in both official languages will be considered an asset. 

Annex H: Statistics on Candidacies

Summary

This represents the total number of applicants. 2757 applicants.

Key facts (based on 2011 Census data5):

  • The percentage of women who applied is below the Canadian workforce population (39.9% vs. 48.2%).

  • The percentage of applicants identifying French as their first official language is higher than the Canadian population representation (31.3 % vs. 23.2%).

  • Indigenous representation is significantly higher than the Canadian workforce population (13.57% vs. 3.5%).

  • Visible minority representation is higher than Canadian workforce population (24.99% vs. 17.8%).

  • Representation of Persons with Disabilities is higher than Canadian workforce population (9.03% vs. 4.9%).

    (Note: Diversity information was optional and provided on a voluntary basis by candidates; all candidates were asked to provide information regarding their first official language and age.)

This bar graph presents data for the distribution of candidacies.
  • Text version:
    Distribution of Candidacies
    Province Number of candidacies Percentage
    British Columbia 308 11.17%
    Manitoba 145 5.26%
    New Brunswick 127 4.60%
    Nova Scotia 174 6.31%
    Ontario 1169 42.39%
    Québec 768 27.85%
    Prince Edward Island 66 2.39%
This pie chart presents data for gender. Male: 1658, 60.1%. Female: 1099, 39.9%.
This pie chart presents data for first official language. First Official Language - English: 1873, 67.9%. French: 863, 31.3%. Unknown: 21, 0.8%.
This bar graph presents data for diversity representation.
  • Text version:
    Diversity Representation
    Diversity Representation (optional self-identification) Number of candidacies Percentage
    LGBTQ 103 3.74%
    Ethnic/Cultural Group* 540 19.59%
    Indigenous 374 13.57%
    Visible Minority 689 24.99%
    Persons with Disabilities 249 9.03%
This bar graph presents data for age distribution.
  • Text version:
    Age Distribution (years)
    Age Number of candidacies
    Under 30 5
    Between 30-40 315
    Between 40-50 535
    Between 50-60 883
    Between 60-70 900
    Between 70-75 114
    Over 75 1
    N/A 4

British Columbia

This represents the total number of applicants in British Columbia. 308 applicants.

Key facts (based on 2011 Census data):

  • Female representation is below the British Columbia workforce population (38.64% vs. 48.5%).

  • The percentage of applicants identifying French as their first official language is higher than the British Columbia population representation (3.25% vs. 1.4%).

  • Indigenous representation is significantly higher than British Columbia’s workforce population (16.88% vs. 4.6%). 

  • Visible minority representation is marginally higher than the British Columbia workforce population (27.92% vs. 25.8%). 

  • Representation of Persons with Disabilities is also marginally higher than the British Columbia workforce population (9.09% vs. 5.8%).

This pie chart presents data for gender distribution in British Columbia. Gender - Male: 189, 61.36%. Female: 119, 38.64%.
This pie chart presents data for first official language distribution in British Columbia. First Official Language - English: 294, 95.45%. French: 10, 3.25%. Unknown: 4, 1.30%.
This bar graph presents data for diversity representation in British Columbia.
  • Text version:
    British Columbia: Diversity
    Diversity Representation Number of candidacies Percentage
    LGBTQ 14 4.54%
    Ethnic/Cultural Group* 72 23.38%
    Indigenous 52 16.88%
    Visible Minority 86 27.92%
    Persons with Disabilities 28 9.09%
This bar graph presents data for age distribution in British Columbia.
  • Text version:
    British Columbia: Age Distribution (years)
    Age Number of candidacies
    Under 30 2
    Between 30-40 34
    Between 40-50 56
    Between 50-60 94
    Between 60-70 110
    Between 70-75 11
    Over 75 0
    N/A 1

Manitoba

This represents the total number of applicants in Manitoba. 145 applicants.

Key facts (based on 2011 Census data):

  • Female representation is below the Manitoba workforce population (39.31% vs. 48%).

  • The percentage of applicants identifying French as their first official language is higher than the Manitoba population representation (9.66% vs. 3.5%).

  • Indigenous representation is significantly higher than Manitoba’s workforce population (23.45% vs. 12.1%). 

  • Visible minority representation is also above that of the Manitoba workforce population (22.07% vs. 13.2%). 

  • Representation of Persons with Disabilities is marginally higher than the Manitoba workforce population (6.90% vs. 5.9%). 

This pie chart presents data for gender distribution in Manitoba. Gender - Male: 88, 60.69%. Female: 57, 39.31%.
This pie chart presents data for first official language distribution in Manitoba. First Official Language - English: 129, 88.97%. French: 14, 9.66%. Unknown: 2, 1.38%.
This bar graph presents data for diversity representation in Manitoba.
  • Text version:
    Manitoba: Diversity
    Diversity Representation Number of candidacies Percentage
    LGBTQ 5 3.45%
    Ethnic/Cultural Group* 26 17.93%
    Indigenous 34 23.45%
    Visible Minority 32 22.07%
    Persons with Disabilities 10 6.90%
This bar graph presents data for age distribution in Manitoba.
  • Text version:
    Manitoba: Age Distribution (years)
    Age Number of candidacies
    Under 30 0
    Between 30-40 19
    Between 40-50 24
    Between 50-60 45
    Between 60-70 51
    Between 70-75 6
    Over 75 0
    N/A 0

New Brunswick

This represents the total number of applicants in New Brunswick. 127 applicants.

Key facts (based on 2011 Census data):

  • Female representation is slightly below the New Brunswick workforce population (43.31% vs. 48.3%).

  • The percentage of applicants identifying French as their first official language is higher than the New Brunswick population representation (39.37% vs. 31.9%).

  • Indigenous representation is considerably higher than the New Brunswick workforce population (16.54% vs. 2.6%). 

  • Visible minority representation is significantly above that of the New Brunswick workforce population (13.39% vs. 2.2%). 

  • Representation of Persons with Disabilities is significantly higher than the New Brunswick workforce population (12.60% vs. 5.3%).

This pie chart presents data for gender distribution in New Brunswick. Gender - Male: 72, 56.69%. Female: 55, 43.31%.
This pie chart presents data for first official language distribution in New Brunswick. . First Official Language - English: 77, 60.63%. French: 50, 39.37%.
This bar graph presents data for diversity representation in New Brunswick.
  • Text version:
    New Brunswick: Diversity
    Diversity Representation Number of candidacies Percentage
    LGBTQ 5 3.94%
    Ethnic/Cultural Group* 23 18.11%
    Indigenous 21 16.54%
    Visible Minority 17 13.39%
    Persons with Disabilities 16 12.60%
This bar graph presents data for age distribution in New Brunswick.
  • Text version:
    New Brunswick: Age Distribution (years)
    Age Number of candidacies
    Under 30 0
    Between 30-40 14
    Between 40-50 21
    Between 50-60 35
    Between 60-70 52
    Between 70-75 5
    Over 75 0
    N/A 0

Nova Scotia

This represents the total number of applicants in Nova Scotia. 174 applicants.

Key facts (based on 2011 Census data):

  • Female representation is below the Nova Scotia workforce population (40.23% vs. 49.2%).

  • The percentage of applicants identifying French as their first official language is slightly higher than the Nova Scotia population representation (4.60% vs. 3.3%).

  • Indigenous representation is significantly higher than the Nova Scotia workforce population (18.39% vs. 3.4%). 

  • Visible minority representation is significantly above that of the Nova Scotia workforce population (17.82% vs. 4.5%). 

  • Representation of Persons with Disabilities is higher than the Nova Scotia workforce population (13.79% vs. 7.2%).

This pie chart presents data for gender distribution in Nova Scotia. Gender - Male: 104, 59.77%. Female: 70, 40.23%.
This pie chart presents data for first official language distribution in Nova Scotia. First Official Language - English: 166, 95.40%. French: 8, 4.60%.
This bar graph presents data for diversity representation in Nova Scotia.
  • Text version:
    Nova Scotia: Diversity
    Diversity Representation Number of candidacies Percentage
    LGBTQ 5 2.87%
    Ethnic/Cultural Group* 32 18.39%
    Indigenous 32 18.39%
    Visible Minority 31 17.82%
    Persons with Disabilities 24 13.79%
This bar graph presents data for age distribution in Nova Scotia.
  • Text version:
    Nova Scotia: Age Distribution (years)
    Age Number of candidacies
    Under 30 0
    Between 30-40 16
    Between 40-50 26
    Between 50-60 56
    Between 60-70 71
    Between 70-75 5
    Over 75 0
    N/A 0

Ontario

This represents the total number of applicants in Ontario. 1169 applicants.

Key facts (based on 2011 Census data):

  • Female representation is below the Ontario workforce population (41.66% vs. 48.7%).

  • The percentage of applicants identifying French as their first official language is higher than the Ontario population representation (11.12% vs. 4.3%).

  • Indigenous representation is significantly higher than Ontario’s workforce population (12.06% vs. 2.1%). 

  • Visible minority representation is slightly above that of the Ontario workforce population (29.68% vs. 24.4%). 

  • Representation of Persons with Disabilities is higher than the Ontario workforce population (9.92% vs. 5.5%).

This pie chart presents data for gender distribution in Ontario. Gender - Male: 682, 58.34%. Female: 487, 41.66%.
This pie chart presents data for first official language distribution in Ontario. First Official Language - English: 1029, 88.02%. French: 130, 11.12%. Unknown: 10, 0.86%.
This bar graph presents data for diversity representation in Ontario.
  • Text version:
    Ontario: Diversity
    Diversity Representation Number of candidacies Percentage
    LGBTQ 47 4.02%
    Ethnic/Cultural Group* 240 20.53%
    Indigenous 141 12.06%
    Visible Minority 347 29.68%
    Persons with Disabilities 116 9.92%
This bar graph presents data for age distribution in Ontario.
  • Text version:
    Ontario: Age Distribution (years)
    Age Number of candidacies
    Under 30 2
    Between 30-40 134
    Between 40-50 235
    Between 50-60 389
    Between 60-70 353
    Between 70-75 55
    Over 75 0
    N/A 1

Prince Edward Island

This represents the total number of applicants in Prince Edward Island. 66 applicants.

Key facts (based on 2011 Census data):

  • Female representation is slightly higher than the Prince Edward Island workforce population (51.52% vs. 49.5%).

  • The percentage of applicants identifying French as their first official language is higher than the Prince Edward Island population representation (7.58% vs. 3.5%).

  • Indigenous representation is higher than Prince Edward Island’s workforce population (6.06% vs. 1.4%). 

  • Visible minority representation is also above that of the Prince Edward Island workforce population (7.58% vs. 2.4%). 

  • Representation of Persons with Disabilities is lower than the Prince Edward Island workforce population (4.55% vs. 5.7%).

This pie chart presents data for gender distribution in Prince Edward Island. Gender - Male: 32, 48.48%. Female: 34, 51.52%.
This pie chart presents data for first official language distribution in Prince Edward Island. First Official Language - English: 61, 92.42%. French: 5, 7.58%.
This bar graph presents data for diversity representation in Prince Edward Island.
  • Text version:
    Prince Edward Island: Diversity
    Diversity Representation Number of candidacies Percentage
    LGBTQ 2 3.03%
    Ethnic/Cultural Group* 8 12.12%
    Indigenous 4 6.06%
    Visible Minority 5 7.58%
    Persons with Disabilities 3 4.55%
This bar graph presents data for age distribution in Prince Edward Island.
  • Text version:
    Prince Edward Island: Age Distribution (years)
    Age Number of candidacies
    Under 30 0
    Between 30-40 3
    Between 40-50 12
    Between 50-60 23
    Between 60-70 25
    Between 70-75 3
    Over 75 0
    N/A 0

Québec

This represents the total number of applicants in Québec. 768 applicants.

Key facts (based on 2011 Census data):

  • Female representation is below the Quebec workforce population (36.07% vs. 47.9%).

  • The percentage of applicants identifying English as their first official language is slightly higher than the Quebec population representation (15.23% vs. 13.5%).

  • Indigenous representation is significantly higher than Quebec’s workforce population (11.72% vs. 1.6%). 

  • Visible minority representation is also considerably above that of the Quebec workforce population (22.27% vs. 9.8%). 

  • Representation of Persons with Disabilities is higher than the Quebec workforce population (6.77% vs. 3%).

This pie chart presents data for gender distribution in Québec. Gender - Male: 491, 63.93%. Female: 277, 36.07%.
This pie chart presents data for first official language distribution in Québec. First Official Language - English: 117, 15.23%. French: 646, 84.11%. Unknown: 5, 0.65%.
This bar graph presents data for diversity representation in Québec.
  • Text version:
    Québec: Diversity
    Diversity Representation Number of candidacies Percentage
    LGBTQ 25 3.26%
    Ethnic/Cultural Group* 139 18.10%
    Indigenous 90 11.72%
    Visible Minority 171 22.27%
    Persons with Disabilities 52 6.77%
This bar graph presents data for age distribution in Québec.
  • Text version:
    Québec: Age Distribution (years)
    Age Number of candidacies
    Under 30 1
    Between 30-40 95
    Between 40-50 161
    Between 50-60 241
    Between 60-70 239
    Between 70-75 29
    Over 75 1
    N/A 1

Annex I: News Release from the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments

Website and open online application process launched to fill 20 Senate seats in 7 provinces

Ottawa, Ontario, July 7, 2016 - The Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments (IABSA) is pleased to announce the launch of its new website, including an online system that allows Canadians to apply for Senate appointments. The new website also provides more detailed information about the IABSA and the Senate appointments process

This follows the Government of Canada’s announcement earlier today launching the permanent phase of the new Senate appointments process. Existing IABSA members welcomed their newly appointed colleagues: Anne Giardini and Vikram Vij representing British Columbia, Roxanne Tarjan and Donald Savoie representing New Brunswick, Jennifer Gillivan and Ramona Lumpkin representing Nova Scotia, and Jeannette Arsenault and Brian Francis representing Prince Edward Island. 

Canadians can now apply online for 20 current and upcoming Senate positions in seven provinces: British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island. Applications for Senate candidates will be accepted online until 23:59 Pacific Daylight Time on August 4, 2016. Detailed information on how to apply is provided on the website. 

The IABSA will review the applications received and provide recommendations on Senate appointments to the Prime Minister. The IABSA members will be guided by public, merit-based criteria, in order to identify Canadians who will make a significant contribution to the work of Parliament – with the end goal of ensuring a high standard of integrity, collaboration, and non-partisanship in the Senate. 

Quick Facts:

  • More information is available on the IABSA website, including the assessment criteria, forms and templates, frequently asked questions, and guidance on how to create a profile and submit an application.

  • Continuing members of the Advisory Board include federal members Huguette Labelle (Chair), Indira Samarasekera, Daniel Jutras, along with provincial members Susan Lewis and Heather Bishop representing Manitoba, Murray Segal and Dawn Lavell Harvard representing Ontario, and Sylvie Bernier and Yves Lamontagne representing Quebec.

Annex J: Outreach: list of organizations

Building on the guidance for the transitional process included in the Terms of Reference, the Advisory Board chose to undertake broad-based outreach efforts to communicate information about the application process for this first round of recommendations for Senate appointments. The list below was developed by the Advisory Board prior to the launch of the process and only includes those organizations that received an official e-mail communication from the Advisory Board (organization names are listed in the language submitted by the Advisory Board members). Additional outreach was undertaken by individual members through both direct and indirect communication approaches, such as e-mail, phone calls and in-person contact.

#

21inc

55+ BC Games (BC Seniors Games Society) 

A

A & O: Support Services for Older Adults

Aboriginal Business Education Partners

Aboriginal Chamber of Commerce

Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of BC

Aboriginal Health and Wellness Centre of Winnipeg Inc.

Aboriginal Social Work Society in Manitoba

Aboriginal Tourism Association of BC

Aboriginal Vision for the North End

Aboriginal Women's Association of PEI

Acadia Divinity College

Acadia First Nation

Acadia University

Action ontarienne contre la violence faite aux femmes (AOcVF)

Adsum for Women and Children

Adult Vocational Training - Dartmouth (DASC)

Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Services Agencies of BC

African Communities of Manitoba Inc. (ACOMI)

Aga Khan Foundation Canada

Alliance Arc-en-ciel Québec

ALS Society of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia

Alzheimer Society Nova Scotia

Amherst and Area Chamber of Commerce

Andrews Street Family Centre

Anglican Church of Canada

Annapolis Valley First Nation

AODA Alliance

Art City

Art Gallery of Nova Scotia

Art Galley of Ontario (AGO)

Arthritis Society (Manitoba Division)

Arts BC

Artscape

Assemblée des Premières Nations du Québec et du Labrador

Assembly of First Nations

Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs

Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi'kmaq Chiefs

Association des conseils scolaires des écoles publiques de l’Ontario (ACEPO)

Association des enseignantes et des enseignants franco-ontariens (AEFO)

Association des Manufacturiers et exportateurs du Québec (AMEQ)

Association des services de garde en milieu scolaire

Association for Co-operative Education (ACE-BC)

Association for Manitoba Archives

Association franco-ontarienne des  conseils scolaires catholiques (AFOCSC)

Association Musées Nouveau Brunswick

Association nationale des éditeurs de livres

Association of Atlantic Universities

Association of Canadian Publishers

Association of Community Colleges of Canada

Association of Management, Administrative and Professional Crown Employees of Ontario

Association of Municipalities of Ontario

Association of Progressive Muslims of Canada

Association of Registered Nurses Of Prince Edward Island

Association Québécoise des Centres de la Petite Enfance (AQCEP)

Association québécoise du loisir municipal

Association québécoise pour le loisir des personnes handicapées

Associations of Colleges and Universities

Ateliers cinq épices

Atlantic Chamber of Commerce

Atlantic Council for International Cooperation

Atlantic Film Festival

Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nationals Chiefs Secretariat

Atlantic Provinces Library Association

Atlantic School of Theology

Aurora Family Therapy Centre

Awaasis Agency of Northern Manitoba

AWO Refugee & Immigrant Services

Az-Zahraa Islamic Centre 

B

B’nai Brith Canada

Banque de Montréal

Banques alimentaires du Québec

Barreau du Québec

BC Agricultural Council

BC Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres

BC Association of Community Response Networks

BC Chamber of Commerce

BC Children's Hospital

BC Federation of Labour (BCFED)

BC Government and Service Employees Union

BC Heritage Fairs

BC Muslim Association

BC Salmon Farmers Association

BC Teachers Federation

BC Wheelchair Sports Association

BC Young Farmers Association

Bear River First Nation

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Halifax

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Winnipeg

Bishop’s University

Black Business Initiative

Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Halifax

Boys & Girls Clubs of Winnipeg

Brandon University

Bridgewater Area Chamber of Commerce

British Columbia Aboriginal Network of Disability Society

British Columbia Arts Council

British Columbia Association of Police Boards

British Columbia Environment Industry Association

British Columbia Historical Federation

British Columbia Institute of Technology

British Columbia Library Association

British Columbia Museums Association

British Columbia Psychological Association (BCPA)

British Columbia Women's Institute

Brock University

Business Council of Canada

Business Council of Manitoba 

C

Caledon Institute of Social Policy

Camosun College

Canada’s Association for the Fifty-Plus (CARP)

Canada's National Artillery Museum

Canadian Academy of Engineering

Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police

Canadian Association of Management Consultants

Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres

Canadian Association of Social Workers

Canadian Association of University Teachers

Canadian Bar Association

Canadian Bar Association - British Columbia

Canadian Bar Association - New Brunswick

Canadian Bar Association - Nova Scotia

Canadian Bar Association - Québec

Canadian Bar Association Prince Edward Island Branch

Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport

Canadian Centre for Gender and Sexual Diversity

Canadian Chamber of Commerce

Canadian Christian Relief and Development Association

Canadian Community Economic Development Network-Manitoba

Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops

Canadian Council of Churches

Canadian Council of Muslim Women - Winnipeg Chapter

Canadian Council of Registered Nurse Regulators

Canadian Council on International Cooperation

Canadian Deaf Sports Association

Canadian Education Association

Canadian Environmental Law Association (CELA)

Canadian Ethnocultural Council

Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Canadian Federation of Students (CFS)

Canadian Film Centre (CFC)

Canadian Foundation for Health Care Improvement

Canadian Labour Congress

Canadian Lawyers for International Human Rights (CLAIHR)

Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives

Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters

Canadian Medical Association

Canadian Mennonite University

Canadian Mental Health Association

Canadian Mental Health Association - British Columbia

Canadian Mental Health Association - New Brunswick

Canadian Mental Health Association - Prince Edward Island

Canadian Mental Health Association - Winnipeg Region

Canadian Mental Health Association Halifax-Dartmouth

Canadian Museum Association

Canadian Muslim Women's Institute

Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB)

Canadian Nurses Association

Canadian Nurses Protective Society

Canadian Opera Company (COC)

Canadian Paralympic Committee

Canadian Paraplegic Association (Manitoba)

Canadian Paraplegic Association (Nova Scotia)

Canadian Psychological Association

Canadian Public Health Association

Canadian Red Cross

Canadian Red Cross Society (Manitoba Region)

Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women

Canadian School Boards Association

Canadian Sport Institute Ontario

Canadian Teacher's Federation

Canadian Union of Public Employees - PEI

Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)

Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers Association (CVMA)

Centre Culturel Franco-Manitobain

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

Centre for Research and Education on Violence against Women and Children

Centre francophone de Toronto

Centre ontarien de prévention des agressions

Certified General Accountants Association of Nova Scotia

Certified Organic Associations of BC

Chambre de commerce acadienne et francophone de l’Î.-P.-É.

Chambre de commerce LGBT du Québec

Chambre des notaires de Québec

Charlottetown Chamber of Commerce

Charlottetown Police Services

Chartered Professional Accountants

Chartered Professional Accountants of British Columbia

Chartered Professional Accountants of Nova Scotia

Chartered Professional Accountants of Ontario

Chef's Table Society of BC

Chiefs of Ontario (COO)

Child and Youth Care Association of New Brunswick

Child Caring Agency

Chinese Professionals Association of Canada

Chinese Society of Nova Scotia

Christian Horizons

Churchill Academy

City of Toronto

Clean Air Partnership

Clean Foundation

Climate Action Network

Club de la médaille d’or

Coalition des Familles LGBT

Coalition québécoise sur la problématique du poids

Collège Acadie Î.-P.-É.

Collège des médecins

College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia

College of New Caledonia

College of Physicians and Surgeons of New Brunswick

College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia

College of Physicians and Surgeons of PEI

College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia

College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia

College of the Rockies

Colleges Ontario

Commissaire à la santé et au bien-être du Québec

Commission d’enquête sur les femmes disparues ou assassinées

Commission de développement des Ressources Humaines des Premières Nations du Québec

Commission de la Santé et des Services Sociaux des Premières Nations

Commission des droits de la personne et de la jeunesse du Québec

Community Education Development Association

Community Financial Counselling Services

Community Living Winnipeg

Community Ownership Solutions Inc.

Community Social Services Employers Association of British Columbia

Community Unemployed Help Centre

Concordia University

Confederacy of Mainland Mi'kmaq

Confédération des syndicats nationaux (CSN)

Congress of Aboriginal Peoples

Congress of Black Women of Manitoba Inc.

Conseil d’entreprises du Nouveau-Brunswick

Conseil de la magistrature du Canada

Conseil de la magistrature du Québec

Conseil des initiatives pour le progrès en alimentation (CIPA)

Conseil du statut de la femme

Conseil économique du Nouveau-Brunswick Inc.

Conseil québécois du loisir

Consulting Engineers or Nova Scotia

COSTI Immigrant Services

Council of Forest Industries

Council of Ontario Universities

Council of Women of Winnipeg

CPA Education Foundation

Craft Council of British Columbia

Croquarium

Culture PEI

Cuso International 

D

Daily Bread Food Bank

Dalhousie University

David Suzuki Foundation

Developmental Disabilities Association

Dialogue New Brunswick

Disability Alliance BC

Doctors Nova Scotia

Doctors of British Columbia

Douglas College

Dragonfly Centre for Autism 

E

Eagle Urban Transition Centre

Ecojustice

École de Technologie supérieure

École des Hautes Études Commerciales de Montréal

École nationale d'administration publique

École Polytechnique de Montréal

Education Quality and Accountability Office

Education Workers’ Alliance of Ontario (EWAO)

Égale Action

Egale Canada Human Rights Trust

Elementary Teachers' Federation of  Ontario (ETFO)

Elizabeth Fry Society of Manitoba

Elmwood Community Resource Centre and Area Association Inc.

Emily Carr University of Art and Design

End Homelessness Winnipeg

Engage Nova Scotia

Engineering Institute of Canada

Engineers & Geoscientists of New Brunswick

Engineers Nova Scotia

Engineers PEI

Engineers without Borders

Environment Probe

Environmental Defence

Environmental Health Association of British Columbia

Equal Voice

Équiterre

Eskasoni First Nation

Extenso

Eyaa-Keen Healing Centre Inc. 

F

Family Dynamics

Farm Folk City Folk

Fédération comité de parents Québec

Fédération commissions scolaires Québec

Fédération de l’Age D’Or du Québec (FADOQ)

Fédération de l'Âge D'Or du Québec - Île de Montréal (FADOQ)

Fédération des Chambres de commerce du Québec (FCCQ)

Fédération des communautés francophones et acadiennes du Canada

Fédération des éducateurs et éducatrices physiques enseignants du Québec

Fédération des femmes du Québec

Fédération des syndicats de l'enseignement (CSQ)

Fédération des travailleurs et travailleuses du Québec (FTQ)

Fédération kinésiologies du Québec

Federation of Canadian Municipalities

Federation of Law Societies

Fédération professionnelle des  journalistes du Québec

Fédération québécoise des municipalités

Fire Fighters Association of Ontario

Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic

Fondation des maladies du cœur et de l’AVC

Fondation du Grand Montréal

Fondation OLO

Fondation père Raymond Bernier

Forest Products Association of Canada

Fort Garry Women's Resource Centre

Fusion Halifax 

G

Gaelic Council of Nova Scotia

Girl Guides – Manitoba

Global Diversity Exchange (GDX)

Glooscap First Nation

Good Neighbours Active Living Centre

Graffiti Art Programming

Greater Halifax Partnership

Greater Moncton Chamber of Commerce

Greater Vancouver Board of Trade

Greater Victoria Chamber of Commerce

Green Table Network

Groupe entreprises en santé

Guid'amies franco-manitobains 

H

Habitat for Humanity

Halifax Chamber of Commerce

Health Association Nova Scotia

Health PEI

Healthy Minds Cooperative

HeartWood Centre for Community Youth Development

Heritage BC

Holland College

Hospice Palliative Care Association of PEI

Hot Docs

Human Development Council

Humanitarian Coalition

Huron University College 

I

IMAGINE Canada

ImagineAbility

Immigrant & Refugee Community Organization of Manitoba (IRCOM)

Immigrant and Multicultural Services Society

Immigrant Centre Manitoba Inc.

Immigrant Women’s Association of Manitoba

Inclusion BC

Independent Electricity System Operator

Independent Living Resource Centre

Indian Brook First Nation

Infirmières et infirmiers sans frontières

Institut Armand Frappier

Institut national de la recherche scientifique

Institute for Ocean Research Enterprise

Institute of Corporate Directors

International Institute for Sustainable Development

International Institute of Women's Rights - Manitoba

International Women's Forum, Atlantic Chapter

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami

Italian Canadian Cultural Association of Nova Scotia 

J

Jamaican Canadian Association

Jewish Child and Family Services

Jewish Federation of Greater Vancouver

Jewish Foundation of Manitoba

Jewish Heritage Centre of Western Canada

John Howard Society of Manitoba

Junior Achievement Nova Scotia

Justice Institute of British Columbia 

K

Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc.

KAIROS

Keewatin Tribal Council

Kelowna Chamber of Commerce

Kildonan Youth Activity Centre

Knowles Centre Inc.

Kwantlen Polytechnic University 

L

L’Association des enseignantes et des enseignants francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick (AEFNB)

La survivance

Lakehead University

Langara College

L'Arche Winnipeg Inc.

L'Assemblée de la francophonie de l'Ontario

Laurentian University

Law Society of Manitoba

Law Society of New Brunswick

Law Society of Prince Edward Island

Law Society of Upper Canada

Le Cercle Molière

Learning Disabilities Association of Manitoba

Learning Disabilities Association of PEI

Lebanese Chamber of Commerce in Nova Scotia

Legal Information Society of Nova Scotia

Les Impatients

LOUD Business

M

Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre

Macdonald Youth Services

Main Street Project

Ma-Mow-We-Tak Friendship Centre

Manitoba 4-H Council Office

Manitoba Archaeological Society

Manitoba Arts Council

Manitoba Association for Rights and Liberties

Manitoba Bar Association

Manitoba Chamber of Commerce

Manitoba Council for International Cooperation

Manitoba Farm Women’s Conference

Manitoba Federation of Labour

Manitoba Film and Music

Manitoba Foundation

Manitoba Genealogical Society

Manitoba Heritage Council

Manitoba Historical Society

Manitoba Immigrant and Refugee Settlement Sector Association (MIRSSA)

Manitoba Interfaith Immigration Council

Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak

Manitoba League for Persons with Disabilities

Manitoba Métis Federation

Manitoba Museum

Manitoba School Improvement Program

Manitoba Women’s Institute

Manitoba Writers' Guild

Maples Youth Activity Centre

Maritime Conservatory of Performing Arts

Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

Marlene Street Resource Centre

Martin Prosperity Institute

Marymound

MATCH International - Manitoba

Maytree Foundation

McGill University

McMaster University

Meals on Wheels of Winnipeg

Medecins sans frontieres

Mediation Services: A Community Resource for Conflict Resolution

Medical Society of PEI

Membertou First Nation

Mental Health Foundation of Nova Scotia

Mental Health Commission of Canada‎

Métis National Council

Metrolinx

Metropolitan Action Committee on Violence Against Women and Children (METRAC)

Mi'kmaq Association for Cultural Studies

Mi'kmaq Confederacy of PEI

Mi'kmaw Economic Benefits Office

Mi'kmaw Kina'matnewey

Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre

Millbrook First Nation

Minwaashin Lodge Aboriginal Women’s Support Centre

Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba

Mount Allison University

Mount Carmel Clinic

Mount Saint Vincent University

Multicultural Council of PEI

Multicultural Nova Scotia

Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada - Winnipeg Chapter

Music Canada

Muslim Association of New Brunswick 

N

Nation Tribal Health

National Association of Friendship Centres

National Ballet School

National Screen Institute

National Trust for Canada

Native Council of Nova Scotia

Native Council of PEI

Native Women's Association of Canada

Native Women's Transition Centre

Nature Canada

Ndinawemaaganag Endaawaad Inc.

Neptune Theatre

New Brunswick Aboriginal Peoples Council

New Brunswick Association of Community Business Development Corporation (CBDCs)

New Brunswick College of Pharmacists

New Brunswick Craft Council

New Brunswick Firefighters Association

New Brunswick for Community Living

New Brunswick Interscholastic Athletic Association

New Brunswick Medical Society

New Brunswick Nurses Union

New Brunswick Public Libraries

New Brunswick Senior Citizens Federation

New Brunswick Teachers’ Association (NBTA)

New Brunswick Teachers’ Federation (NBTF)

New Brunswick Women's Institute

New Directions for Children, Youth, Adults and Families

New Life Ministries

Nicola Valley Institute of Technology

North End Community Renewal Corporation

North End Women's Centre

North Island College

North Point Douglas Women's Centre

Northern Association of Community Councils

Northern Lights College

Northwest Community College

NorWest Co-op Community Health

Nova Scotia Barristers' Society

Nova Scotia Business Inc.

Nova Scotia College of Art and Design

Nova Scotia Community College

Nova Scotia Disabled Persons Commission

Nova Scotia Environmental Network (NSEN)

Nova Scotia Government and General Employees Union (NSGEU)

Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation

Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission

Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History

Nova Scotia Rainbow Action Project (NSRAP)

Nurses Association of New Brunswick 

O

Observatoire de la qualité de l’offre alimentaire

Ocean Wise

Office des professions du Québec

Office of Francophone Affairs

Offshore Energy Research Association

Ogijiita Pimatiswin Kinamatwin

Okanagan College

Ontario Association of Interval and Transition Houses (OAITH)

Ontario Bar Association

Ontario Catholic School Trustees' Association (OCSTA)

Ontario Chamber of Commerce (OCC)

Ontario Coalition of Rape Crisis Centres (OCRCC)

Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI)

Ontario Council of Educational Workers (OCEW)

Ontario Energy Board (OEB)

Ontario English Catholic Teachers Association (OECTA)

Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres (OFIFC)

Ontario Federation of Agriculture

Ontario Federation of Labour

Ontario Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce

Ontario Hospital Association (OHA)

Ontario Judicial Council

Ontario Long Term Care Association

Ontario Medical Association

Ontario Network of Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence Care and Treatment Centres

Ontario Nurses Association (ONA)

Ontario Professional Fire Fighters Association

Ontario Provincial Police Association

Ontario Public School Boards' Association (OPSBA)

Ontario Public Service Employees Union

Ontario Rainbow Association of the Deaf

Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation (OSSTF)

Ontario Teachers’ Federation

Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance (OUSA)

Opaskwayak Cree Nation

Opération enfant soleil  

Opportunities for Employment

Ordre des administrateurs agréés du Québec

Ordre des infirmières et des infirmiers du Québec (OIIQ)

Ordre professionnel diététistes du Québec

Oshki-Giizhig

Ottawa University

Oxfam Canada

Oyate Tipi Cumini Yape Inc. 

P

PacificSport Northern BC

Palliative Manitoba

Paq'tnkek First Nation

PARO Centre for Women’s Enterprise

ParticipACTION

Pas Friendship Centre

PEI Association for Newcomers to Canada

PEI Business Women's Association

PEI Council of People with Disabilities

PEI Counselling Association

PEI Early Childhood Development Association

PEI Home and School Federation

PEI Professional Librarians Association

PEI School Athletic Association

PEI Senior Citizen's Foundation

PEI Teachers' Federation

PEI Union of Public Sector Employees

PEI Women's Institute

PFLAG Canada (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gay)

Philanthropic Foundations of Canada

Pictou Landing First Nation

Plan Canada

Pluri-elles (Manitoba)

Police Association of Ontario (PAO)

Pollution Probe

Powerstream

Pregnancy & Family Support Services

Pride PEI

Prince Edward Island Firefighters Association

Provincial Council of Women of Manitoba, Inc.

Public Accountants Board of Nova Scotia

Public Accountants Council for the Province of Ontario

Public Policy Forum 

Q

qmunity

Quebec Community Groups Network

Queens University 

R

Radio Television Digital News Association Canada (RTDNA)

Rainbow Health Ontario

Rainbow Resource Centre

Reaching E-Quality Employment Services

Red River College

Regroupement des cuisines collectives du Québec

Renaissance Centre

Réseau Accès Participation

Réseau action femmes (French)

Réseau du sport étudiant du Québec (RSEQ)

Réseau québécois de Villes et Villages en santé

Resource Assistance for Youth

Rose & Max Rady Jewish Community Centre

Rossbrook House

Royal Aviation Museum of Western Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre

Royal Roads University

Rural Ontario Municipal Association (ROMA) 

S

Saint John Board of Trade

Salvation Army - Ontario Central East Division

Samara Canada

Save the Children

School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto

Science North

SEED Winnipeg

Senior Citizens Association of BC

Sexuality Education Resource Centre (SERC)

Sierra Club of Canada - Ontario Chapter

Simon Fraser University

Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

Société de l’Acadie du Nouveau Brunswick

Société de soins palliatifs à domicile du Grand Montréal

Société du Patrimoine Asiatique du Nouveau-Brunswick

Société Nationale de l'Acadie

Society for Canadian Women in Science and Technology

Society for Manitobans with Disabilities (SMD)

Soroptimist International of Winnipeg

SOS Children's Villages Canada

Soulpepper

South Winnipeg Family Information

Special Olympics

Spence Neighbourhood Association

Sport British Columbia

Sport Manitoba

Sport Nova Scotia

Sport PEI

Sports Québec

St. Andrews Chamber of Commerce

St. Francis Xavier University

St. Mary's University

St. Thomas University

Stratford Festival

Stroke Recovery Association of Manitoba

Sustainable Forest Initiatve Inc.

Swampy Cree Tribal Council (SCTC)

Sydney and Area Chamber of Commerce

Symphonie Nova Scotia

Syndicat de la fonction publique et parapublique du Québec (SFPQ) 

T

Tablée des chefs

Teen Stop Jeunesse

Télé-Université (TÉLUQ)

The 519 Community Centre

The Laurel Centre

Thompson Rivers University

Toronto Board of Trade

Toronto Environmental Alliance (TEA)

Toronto Hydro

Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF)

Tourism Industry Association of Prince Edward Island

Tourism, Heritage and Culture - New Brunswick

Transportation Association of Canada

Trent University

True North Sports and Entertainment Ltd. 

U

Ukrainian Canadian Congress

Unama'ki Institute of Natural Resources

Unifor National

Union des artistes

Union des municipalités du Québec (UMQ)

Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs

Union of Nova Scotia Indians

United Way Centraide Canada

United Way Toronto & York Region

United Way Winnipeg

Université de Moncton

Université de Montréal

Université du Québec

Université du Québec à Abitibi-Témiscamingue

Université du Québec à Chicoutimi

Université du Québec à Montréal

Université du Québec à Rimouski

Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières

Université du Québec en Outaouais

Université Laval

Université Saint-Boniface

Université Sainte-Anne

Université Sherbrooke

University College of the North

University of British Columbia

University of King's College

University of Manitoba

University of Manitoba Press

University of New Brunswick

University of Prince Edward Island

University of the Fraser Valley

University of Toronto

University of Victoria

University of Winnipeg

University Women’s Club of Winnipeg

Urban Circle Training Centre Inc.

Urban Indigenous Theatre Company Inc. 

V

Vancouver Community College

Vancouver Island University

Vélo Québec

Villa Rosa Inc.

Vivre en ville

Volunteer Manitoba 

W

Wagmatcook First Nation

Waycobah First Nation

Wellesley Institute

West Broadway Youth Outreach

West Central Community Program

West Central Women's Resource Centre

Windsor University

Winnipeg Art Gallery

Winnipeg Central Park Women's Resource Centre

Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce

Winnipeg Foundation

Winnipeg Labour Council

Winnipeg Public Library

Wolseley Family Place

Women in Local Government

Women’s Enterprise Centre of Manitoba (WECM)

Women's Enterprise Center

Women's Equality PEI

Women's Health Clinic

Women's Place Resource Centre

World University Services Canada

World Wildlife Fund – WWF

Winnipeg Labour Council 

Y

YMCA/YWCA of Winnipeg

York University

Youth Agencies Alliance

Youth Project

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