Over 120 Energy Efficiency projects set to move ahead for schools in Manitoba thanks to carbon pollution pricing proceeds 

News release

September 17, 2020 – Ottawa, Ontario
As Canada begins to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, and students head back to school, the Government’s top priority remains the health, safety and well-being of all Canadians. That includes helping the economy safely restart, creating new green jobs, reducing emissions and making life more affordable for Canadians – including students.


Today, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and to the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages (Western Economic Diversification Canada), and Member of Parliament for Winnipeg South, Terry Duguid, on behalf of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, announced that, through the Climate Action Incentive Fund (CAIF), the federal government will provide approximately $5 million dollars to fund 127 projects that will help to make schools in Manitoba more sustainable and climate resilient. Each project will help schools save money, reduce energy costs and enable them to actively take part in Canada’s climate plan.

Through this funding, schools in Manitoba will benefit from better-insulated windows, newer heating and cooling systems and other energy efficiency projects. For example, Daniel McIntyre Collegiate in Winnipeg will receive $300,000 for window replacements; W.C. Miller Collegiate in Brandon will receive $40,224 for LED lighting upgrades; and, La Verendrye School in Portage la Prairie will receive $110,000 for door and insulation upgrades.

This funding comes from the proceeds from the federal carbon pollution pricing system, which invests in projects that reduce carbon pollution, save money, and create good, green jobs. CAIF programming was launched in May 2019 and returns carbon pollution pricing proceeds to the jurisdictions from which they were collected.

Approximately 90% of proceeds are flowing directly back to individuals in Ontario, Manitoba, New Brunswick and Saskatchewan through Climate Action Incentive payments. Most households in those provinces will get more back through Climate Action Incentive payments than the costs they incur due to federal carbon pollution pricing. Through the Climate Action Incentive payment, this year a family of four will receive $486 in Manitoba.

Quotes

“The Government of Canada is fighting climate change while making life more affordable for Canadians. By investing the proceeds from carbon pollution pricing in Manitoba into schools in the province, we are reducing emissions and creating a greener, more prosperous future for our children and grandchildren.”

— Terry Duguid, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and to the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages (Western Economic Diversification Canada), and Member of Parliament for Winnipeg South 

“The average age of school buildings in Manitoba is more than 50 years old. With an injection of money from the Climate Action Incentive Fund, school boards in the province have been able to undertake projects to upgrade this ageing infrastructure, to increase efficiencies, lessen their environmental footprint, and improve the environment for teaching and learning. School boards across Manitoba are grateful for the opportunity to collaborate with the federal government in making these plans a reality.”

— Alan Campbell, President, Manitoba School Boards Association 

Quick facts

  • In Manitoba, funding flows from Environment and Climate Change Canada to the Manitoba School Boards Association (MSBA). MSBA flows funding to schools boards and schools. 

  • Carbon pollution pricing is an important pillar of Canada’s climate plan. All direct proceeds raised from the federal carbon pollution pricing system are being returned to the province where they were collected. Pricing carbon pollution is about putting a price on what we do not want—pollution—so we have more of what we do want: clean air, an efficient economy, innovation and jobs. 

  • The remainder of the proceeds (up to 10%) will be returned via programming that helps support municipalities, Indigenous communities, universities, schools, hospitals, and small and medium-sized businesses reduce energy use, costs, and greenhouse gas emissions.  

  • The Municipalities, Universities, Schools and Hospitals (MUSH) Retrofit stream is a stream under CAIF totaling approximately $60 million, with the first round of funding focusing on energy efficiency projects in school buildings and classrooms. 

Associated links

Contacts

Moira Kelly
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change
819-271-6218
moira.kelly@canada.ca  

Media Relations
Environment and Climate Change Canada
819-938-3338 or 1-844-836-7799 (toll-free)
ec.media.ec@canada.ca

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