Quebecer ordered to pay $60,000 for violating the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994

News release

June 30, 2021 – Saint-Jérôme, Quebec

Strong and effective enforcement of Canada’s wildlife protection laws is one of the tangible ways we respect our commitment to the conservation of wildlife species and their habitat.

On June 21, 2021, in the Saint-Jérôme Courthouse, Frédéric Thibeault was ordered to pay a total fine of $60,000, after pleading guilty to an offence under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. The fine will be directed to the Government of Canada’s Environmental Damages Fund.

In June 2019, Environment and Climate Change Canada’s enforcement officers attended the scene of the incident in Sainte-Sophie, where demolition activities were taking place, to conduct a compliance inspection. During the inspection, the officers noted the presence of nests of cliff swallows, a migratory bird species. An investigation revealed the violations committed by Frédéric Thibeault, who destroyed four cliff swallow nests. Destroying a nest or egg of a migratory bird constitutes an offence, as specified by paragraph 6(a) of the Migratory Birds Regulations, punishable under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. Frédéric Thibeault was ordered to pay $15,000 per nest destroyed, for a total fine of $60,000.

Environment and Climate Change Canada has created a free subscription service to help Canadians stay current with what the Government of Canada is doing to protect our natural environment.

Quick facts

  • Migratory birds are an important component of Canadian biodiversity. Birds contribute to our environment by preying on insects and rodents and dispersing seeds.

  • Under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, Environment and Climate Change Canada is responsible for protecting migratory birds, their nests and their eggs and regulating potentially harmful human activities.

  • Created in 1995, the Environmental Damages Fund is a Government of Canada program administered by Environment and Climate Change Canada. The Fund allows for court-imposed fines to be used to repair environmental harm or generate positive environmental impacts. It redistributes money from fines and court orders; normally, it is reinvested where the harm occurred.

  • Call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 to anonymously report wildlife crime. You could be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,000 from Crime Stoppers.  

Associated links

Contacts

Media Relations
Environment and Climate Change Canada
819-938-3338 or 1-844-836-7799 (toll-free)
ec.media.ec@canada.ca

Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Twitter page

Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Facebook page

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: