Immigrate and live in French in Canada

Canada is enriched every day, all thanks to the talented individuals and families who are building their lives in this country, both in French and in English.

With a large number of communities around the country, there are several routes available to immigrate to these Canadian communities.

Mobilité francophone and Express Entry help facilitate the process of temporarily or permanently relocating to Canada.

This video is also available in HD on YouTube.

Transcript: “Immigrate and live in French in Canada”

Video length: 3:43

Light motivational music plays. On a cream-coloured background, a red banner with white text reads “Immigrate and live in French.” Below the banner, black text reads “in Canada.” A maple leaf floats around the screen and lands under the text.

narrator: Immigrate and live in French in Canada.

The screen fades. Colourful animated landscapes scroll past: a canoe crosses the sea between a house on a hill and a forest bordering white-capped mountains; a Canadian flag waves beside red farm buildings and a white silo on a yellow field; the CN Tower rises over a cluster of tall buildings in downtown Toronto; and a lighthouse on a cliff overlooks boats sailing on the ocean.

narrator: Canada is enriched every day, all thanks to the talented individuals and families who are building their lives in this country both in French and in English. With a large number of communities around the country, there are several routes available to immigrate to these Canadian communities temporarily or permanently.

On a cream-coloured background peppered with white clouds, animations appear: a red woman labelled “eng,” a yellow man labelled “fr,” a yellow woman labelled “fr,” a yellow man labelled “eng” and a family composed of a blue man, a yellow woman, and a red boy labelled “fr”.

The people labelled “eng” slide off-screen and the people labelled “fr” move to the front. Their “fr” tags disappear. Green bars with text reading “temporarily” appear under the man and the woman, and a yellow bar reading “permanently” appears under the family.

narrator: This video presents 2 simple solutions for French speakers who wish to settle in provinces and territories outside of Quebec.

The portraits become colourful dots that fall onto a map of Canada. Quebec disappears as dots continue to fall on the other provinces and territories.

narrator: Mobilité francophone and Express Entry help facilitate the process of temporarily or permanently relocating to Canada.

A purple dot expands to cover the screen. In the centre, a white banner with black text reads “Mobilité francophone” above a red banner with white text that reads “Express Entry”. A white dot circles the banners and disappears.

Black text at the bottom of the screen reads “temporarily or permanently.”

narrator: Every province and territory, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and as far north as the Arctic, is home to francophone communities.

As the map of Canada slides back on-screen, animations pop up: a lighthouse overlooking the ocean to the east, a canoe crossing the sea to the west and a polar bear walking on ice to the north.

narrator: Mobilité francophone gives candidates the opportunity to obtain temporary work certificates. These work permits can also be renewed.

The map and animations slide away. Animated figures of a yellow man wearing a tie and a red woman wearing casual clothes appear. They smile and shake hands in an office.

narrator: To be eligible for Mobilité francophone, 3 basic conditions must be met.

The scene drops away. A white banner with black text that reads “Mobilité francophone” appears above a red square labelled “1,” a yellow square labelled “2,” and a purple square labelled “3.”

narrator: One, candidates must have an offer letter for a management, professional, technical or skilled trade position.

The images slide away. Four certificates scroll past: the first reads “Management position” beside a picture of a laptop, the second reads “Professional position” beside a picture of a stethoscope, the third reads “Technical position” beside a picture of a test tube, and the fourth reads “Skilled trade position” beside a picture of a wrench.

At the bottom of the screen, a red square with “1” at the centre stands beside black text that reads “Candidates must have an offer letter for a management, professional, technical or skilled trade position.”

narrator: Two, candidates must be able to comfortably express themselves in French.

A smiling yellow woman stands facing an empty email window with a green bar at the top reading “julien@gmail.com” and a red button at the bottom reading “Send.” The woman opens her mouth, producing a speech bubble that reads “Bonjour!” while text appears in the email body that reads “Allô. Comment allez-vous?

At the bottom of the screen, a yellow square with “2” at the centre stands beside black text that reads “Candidates must be able to comfortably express themselves in French.”

narrator: Three, candidates must work in a province or territory other than Quebec.

Colourful bars containing the names of the provinces and territories form 2 columns. The green “Quebec” bar slides off-screen.

At the bottom of the screen, a violet square with “3” at the centre stands beside black text that reads “Candidates must work in a province or territory other than Quebec.”

narrator: Mobilité francophone enables admissible candidates to immigrate and gain work experience in Canada, regardless of their age or country of origin. This can be beneficial for those who wish to settle in Canada in the long term.

Animations surround a black bar with white text reading “Canada”: a red woman riding a bicycle, a blue woman working on a computer, steam rising from a coffee mug beside a smart phone, a yellow man driving, a red hand picking up a test tube, and a yellow boy standing with his back to a wall with pencil marks in a living room.

The living room expands to fill the screen. A red woman kneels in front of the boy and marks his height on the wall with a pen. The boy turns to look at the mark, and then back towards the woman. They smile.

narrator: Individuals who would like to apply for permanent residence are encouraged to do so as soon as they are found to be admissible.

A purple square appears behind the woman, framing her upper body, and moves to the side of the screen as the rest of the scene disappears. She smiles as a black cursor navigates a variety of colourful online forms.

Text at the bottom of the screen reads “If you want to immigrate to Canada, you can apply through Express Entry.”

narrator: Express Entry applies to those who wish to immigrate permanently, meaning they have permanent residency status when they arrive, which allows them to live and work in Canada.

As the scene slides away, a white banner with black text that reads “Express Entry” whirls around and disappears. A cloud drifts past the sun above a mountain range. In the foreground, a person rides a bicycle away from a house surrounded by trees.

narrator: The permanent residency application process for skilled workers is expedited through this online system.

A purple office with a computer on a desk slides on-screen. An open window on the screen reads “Application for permanent residence.” A yellow person types on the green keyboard and uses the mouse to move the cursor across the screen.

narrator: To apply for Express Entry, you must follow these 4 simple steps.

The window fills the screen. A white banner with black text that reads “Express Entry” appears above a red square labelled “1,” a yellow square labelled “2,” a purple square labelled “3” and a green square labelled “4.”

narrator: One, determine if you are eligible to immigrate.

Four colourful rectangles that read “age, language, occupation, and studies” surround a yellow animated figure of a man who smiles and nods.

At the bottom of the screen, a red square with “1” at the centre stands beside black text that reads “Determine if you are eligible to immigrate.”

narrator: Two, prepare the required documents.

A sheet of paper passes through a colourful printer.

At the bottom of the screen, a yellow square with “2” at the centre stands beside black text that reads “Prepare the required documents.”

narrator: Three, create a profile.

A blank form reads “First name, Last name, and Nationality.” A cursor clicks on the empty field beside “First name” and “François” is typed in.

At the bottom of the screen, a violet square with “3” at the centre stands beside black text that reads “Create a profile.”

narrator: Once the profile is submitted, it is ranked using a point system based on the candidate’s skills and experience.

The yellow man smiles and nods beside a yellow bar labelled “Skills” and a blue bar labelled “Experience”. A plus symbol flashes at the end of the bars and they grow longer. Below, a red bar labelled “Total points” increases from “6 pts” to “15 pts.”

narrator: If your score is among one of the highest, you will be invited to submit an application for permanent residence.

On the computer screen, an envelope icon with a red circle around the number one appears. A bar extends beside the icon with black text that reads “Invitation – Permanent residence.”

narrator: And fourth, apply for permanent residence.

A red folder labelled “Permanent residence” contains yellow, white, purple and green documents.

At the bottom of the screen, a green square with “4” at the centre stands beside black text that reads “Apply for permanent residence.”

narrator: To increase the chances of being invited to submit a permanent residency application, Express Entry candidates must submit their language proficiency test results. This test must be taken at a centre accredited by the government of Canada.

A yellow woman sits at a desk beside a window. She smiles while writing on a green form. The form flies into the air, turns over and covers the screen. Its red header reads “Test.” Colourful buildings, trees and clouds spring up on both sides of the form.

narrator: Additional points can be obtained if candidates are proficient in French, and even more points are awarded if their English skills are also at a certain level.

The form whirls around and reveals the yellow man smiling beside a yellow building labelled “French” and a green building labelled “English.” Below, a red bar labelled “Total points” reads “6 pts.” The buildings grow taller, dropping white texts reading “+1 pt” onto the “Total points” score, increasing it to “13 pts.”

narrator: In short, every French-speaking person is able to follow an individualized path in order to settle in Canada.

The buildings merge to form a single yellow and green building. Two rectangular windows look onto workspaces. Two green text bubbles reading “eng” pop up over the top window, and two blue text bubbles reading “fr” appear over the bottom window. The text bubbles whirl around as the scene falls away. One of the “fr” bubbles lands beside a computer window framing a smiling yellow woman.

narrator: Spouses, common-law partners, as well as children can also qualify under the same applications as admissible candidates.

The computer window expands and the blue text bubble disappears. A blue man and a red boy appear on either side of the woman. They all smile and the woman puts her arm around the boy.

narrator: Programs such as Mobilité francophone and Express Entry are there to simplify the steps for newcomers who will contribute to the growth, development and prosperity of francophone communities throughout Canada.

The scene slides up and away. A cloud floats in front of the sun over snow-capped mountains, a green hill, and a farmstead on a yellow field. In the foreground, a red hand plants a pole with colourful directional signs behind a bush. A green sign reading “Express Entry” and a grey sign reading “Mobilité francophone” point left.

A red man walks left and joins a yellow woman, a red man in a wheelchair, a blue man, and a yellow man with a red woman holding hands with yellow boy. In the background, the CN tower rises over downtown Toronto. The animated landscapes of Canada’s diverse terrain flash past.

narrator: For more information on all services related to francophone immigration in Canada’s provinces and territories, visit this website: canada.ca/franco-immigration.

The landscapes roll off-screen. On a cream-coloured background, a white banner with black text reads “canada.ca/franco-immigration.” A maple leaf floats around the screen and lands under the text. A black cursor clicks the link.

On a white background, a Canadian flag stands beside black text reading “Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.” At the bottom of the screen, black text reads “Copyright Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, 2020.”

The text fades out and the Canada wordmark appears.

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