Appearance of The President of Shared Services Canada
Report 1, Procuring Complex Information Technology Solutions, of the 2021 Reports of the Auditor General

Table of Contents

Opening Statement

Paul Glover
President
Shared Services Canada

Standing Committee on Public Accounts (PACP)

To Address the
Office of the Auditor General Spring Report on Procurement of Complex IT Solutions, including procurement for the Next Generation HR and Pay Initiative

May 27, 2021


2021 Winter Reports of the Auditor General of Canada: Procuring Complex Information Technology Solutions


Issue

The Auditor General tabled a performance audit report on Procuring Complex Information Technology Solutions on February 25, 2021.

Key Facts

Response

Background

Objective of this audit: This audit focused on whether selected departments planned and carried out agile procurements for complex IT solutions that supported the achievement of business outcomes and demonstrated the government's commitment to fairness, openness, and transparency in the process.

In particular, the audit examined the procurement processes for three major IT initiatives : Next Generation Human Resources and Pay (NextGen); Benefits Delivery Modernization (BDM); and, Workplace Communication Services (WCS). While NextGen and BDM used elements of agile procurement, WCS used a traditional procurement process.

Findings: Overall, the OAG found that the implicated departments made good progress towards adopting agile procurement practices. However, the OAG also found that:

Recommendations : The report makes five recommendations. TBS was implicated in two of the audit's recommendations because of its central agency policy role and its involvement with the NextGen HR and Pay Initiative (TBS was lead between 2018-2020 before responsibility for the project was transferred to Shared Services Canada). SSC was scoped into the audit on four of the audit's recommendations related to the WCS and NextGen.

  1. Recommendation in paragraph 47: To further support the government's modernization of procurement,
    • the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, Public Services and Procurement Canada, and Shared Services Canada should develop more comprehensive guidance and training for employees to improve understanding of agile procurement and how to apply collaborative methods.
    • the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, with input from Public Services and Procurement Canada and Shared Services Canada, should also assess what skills, competencies, and experience procurement officers need to support agile approaches to complex IT procurements.

    TBS's Response:

    Agreed. Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada will continue to work with Public Services and Procurement Canada, Shared Services Canada, and other key stakeholders to develop, deliver and promote formal and informal learning focused on agile procurement as well as develop and promote guidance and tools that support capacity building in the procurement community.

    SSC's Response:

    Agreed. Shared Services Canada is working closely with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and Public Services and Procurement Canada with respect to undertaking transformational IT procurements and is fostering a common understanding of agile procurements. Work on agile procurement has been done in close partnership and  through engagement with other government departments that are Shared Services Canada's procurement clients.

    In December 2019, Shared Services Canada established the Centre of Expertise in Agile and Innovative Procurement, which is dedicated to supporting procurement officers in the implementation of agile and innovative procurements. The department has also undertaken significant efforts to launch and implement the Procurement Refresher and Essentials Program (PREP), which is continuously modernized. Shared Services Canada will continue to ensure that employees involved in transformational IT procurements have a more comprehensive understanding of agile and collaborative procurement methods through refinements to guidance, training, and support being provided to procurement officers.

  1. Recommendation in paragraph 53: TBS, ESDC, and SSC should ensure governance mechanisms are in place to engage senior representatives of concerned departments and agencies for each of the complex IT procurements we audited. This will be particularly important to support agile procurements of complex IT initiatives and their successful achievement of business outcomes.
  2. TBS's Response:

    Agreed. For the NextGen initiative, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat will continue to work with Shared Services Canada and departments and agencies at senior levels as well as users from the HR, pay and manager communities to define business needs and anticipate change management requirements.

    As the initiative moves from discovery to more substantive phases, decision makers will be required to be engaged thoroughly. A review of existing governance to align it with upcoming phases is underway.

    Shared Services Canada's Responses:

    Agreed. Shared Services Canada is pleased to report that processes are already in place.

    For the Workplace Communication Services procurement, Shared Services Canada is committed to engaging all stakeholders at the appropriate junctures in the procurement process, ensuring roles and responsibilities are clearly understood and agreed to, and seeking decision maker commitment to ensure desired business outcomes are achieved.

    Since awarding of the Workplace Communication Services contract in 2017, Shared Services Canada has put in place the Project Management Framework, which guides the effective management and delivery of the department's projects throughout the project life cycle. The framework consists of tools such as a project control framework, integrated plans, risk registers, and the stakeholders' responsibility and accountability matrix, which ensures continued alignment between all stakeholders to support the achievement of the desired business outcomes. The department's Project Governance Framework documents and communicates the role of the various governance committees in providing effective oversight and a challenge function.

    Shared Services Canada also has had a Procurement Governance Framework since July 2019, which was developed, implemented, and communicated, as appropriate, to provide procurement oversight, control, integration, risk management, and decision making for greater transparency and accountability. This framework tailors the required stakeholder oversight levels in relation to the size, scope, complexity, and risks of the procurements.

  1. Recommendation in paragraph 63: PSPC should continue to advance its use of data analytics so that it can identify procurement integrity issues.
  1. Recommendation in paragraph 64: SSC should begin to use data analytics to improve its ability to identify procurement integrity issues.
  2. Shared Services Canada's Response:

    Agreed. Shared Services Canada will augment its data analytics capabilities by developing a departmental analytics strategy and roadmap. Further, the department's Data and Analytics Centre of Excellence will onboard procurement data into the department's Enterprise Data Repository in the upcoming fiscal year and pilot the use of data science, artificial intelligence, and machine learning to improve the department's ability to identify procurement integrity issues.

  1. Recommendation in paragraph 68: PSPC and SSC should improve their information management practices to help contracting authorities better demonstrate that procurement processes are fair. The departments should ensure that procurement records include, at a minimum, file histories, explanations of problems that arise (and how they were resolved) and all relevant decisions and communications with implicated parties.
  2. Shared Services Canada's Response:

    Agreed. Shared Services Canada is pleased to communicate that since the time of the audit, the department has implemented a number of information management tools and procedures to help demonstrate that procurement processes are fair. Shared Services Canada has developed guidelines on procurement file organization and makeup, a procurement file documentation list, and a compliance and quality assurance program, all of which help contribute to sound information management practices. The department will continue to communicate the importance of these practices to ensure that new and existing employees are aware of the tools and processes in place for sound information management.

TBS, PSPC, SSC, and ESDC agree with the recommendations directed at their departments respectively.

Other Background Information

To deliver services efficiently, federal government organizations often need to procure new, complex information (IT) systems to replace aging ones. The government currently has about 21 large IT procurements underway, valued at over $6.6 billion.

In 2017, the Prime Minister directed the Minister of Public Services and Procurement to modernize how the government procures these new systems. Since then, Public Services and Procurement Canada and Shared Services Canada have introduced initiatives to meet this directive. Agile procurement, which they adopted in 2018, is one of them.

While traditional procurement is linear, agile procurement is iterative and typically awards multiple small contracts. Agile procurement aims to achieve business outcomes by establishing close collaborations between procurement experts, end users (those who use the procured systems), and private sector suppliers, through multiple phases. It permits course corrections and helps federal organizations apply lessons learned. It is best used for complex projects in which it may not be clear at the outset what the best potential solution is to address business needs.

The 2018 OAG examination of the implementation of the Phoenix pay system recommended that for all government-wide IT projects, mandatory independent reviews of the project`s key decisions be carried out to determine if they should proceed or not. Furthermore, it recommended that the government ensure effective oversight is maintained and documented, and that it includes the heads of concerned departments and agencies. The Standing Committee on Public Accounts endorsed these recommendations in February 2019.


Overview of the Committee

Standing Committee on Public Accounts (PACP)

Mandate of the Committee

When the Speaker tables a report by the Auditor General in the House of Commons, it is automatically referred to the Public Accounts Committee. The Committee selects the chapters of the report it wants to study and calls the Auditor General and senior public servants from the audited organizations to appear before it to respond to the Office of the Auditor General's findings. The Committee also reviews the federal government's consolidated financial statements – the Public Accounts of Canada – and examines financial and/or accounting shortcomings raised by the Auditor General. At the conclusion of a study, the Committee may present a report to the House of Commons that includes recommendations to the government for improvements in administrative and financial practices and controls of federal departments and agencies.

Government policy, and the extent to which policy objectives are achieved, are generally not examined by the Public Accounts Committee. Instead, the Committee focuses on government administration – the economy and efficiency of program delivery as well as the adherence to government policies, directives and standards. The Committee seeks to hold the government to account for effective public administration and due regard for public funds.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(3) of the House of Commons, the mandate of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts is to review and report on:

  • The Public Accounts of Canada;
  • All reports of the Auditor General of Canada;
  • The Office of the Auditor General's Departmental Plan and Departmental Results Report; and,
  • Any other matter that the House of Commons shall, from time to time, refer to the Committee.
The Committee also reviews:
  • The federal government's consolidated financial statements;
  • The Public Accounts of Canada;
  • Makes recommendations to the government for improvements in spending practices; and
  • The Estimates of the Office of the Auditor General.
Other Responsibilities:
  • The economy, efficiency and effectiveness of government administration;
  • The quality of administrative practices in the delivery of federal programs; and
  • Government's accountability to Parliament with regard to federal spending.
PACP Members
Name Party Riding Membership

Kelly Block

Conservative

Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek

PACP Member & Chair since Oct 2020

Lloyd Longfield

Liberal

Guelph

PACP Member & Vice-Chair since Feb 2020

Maxime Blanchette-Joncas

Bloc Québécois

Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques

PACP Member & Vice-Chair since Feb 2020

Public Accounts Critic

Luc Berthold

Conservative

Mégantic—L'Érable

PACP Member since Oct 2020

TBS Critic

Philip Lawrence

Conservative

Northumberland—Peterborough South

PACP Member since October 2020

National Revenue Critic

Len Webber

Conservative

Calgary Confederation

PACP Member since Oct 2020

Matthew Green

New Democratic Party

Hamilton Centre

PACP Member since Feb 2020

TBS Critic

Kody Blois

Liberal

Kings—Hants

PACP Member since Feb 2020

Greg Fergus

Liberal

Hull—Aylmer

PACP Member since May 2019

Parliamentary Secretary TBS & Digital Government

Francesco Sorbara

Liberal

Vaughan—Woodbridge

PACP Member since Feb 2020

Jean Yip

Liberal

Scarborough—Agincourt

PACP Member since Jan 2018


Kelly Block (Saskatchewan - Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek)

Conservative

Chair

Kelly Block
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament in 2015 for Carlton Trail— Eagle Creek, previously for Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar from 2008-2015.
  • Served as vice-chair on the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities in the 42nd Parliament.
  • Member of the Liaison Standing Committee.
  • Previous member of the Standing Committee of Government Operations and Estimates in the 43rd and 41st Parliament, the Standing Committee of Finance in the 40th
  • Served as the Opposition critic for Public Services and Procurement Canada (appointed by Andrew Scheer).
  • Prior to her election, Mrs. Block served two terms as the first female mayor of Waldheim, Saskatchewan, as chairperson of the Gabriel Springs Health District, and was awarded the Maclean's Parliamentarian of the Year – Rising Star – Award in June 2010.

Lloyd Longfield (Ontario—Guelph)

Liberal

First Vice-Chair

Lloyd Longfield
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament for the riding of Guelph in 2015.
  • Former member of the Public Accounts Committee (PACP) in the 43rd Parliament and is a standing Member of the Environment and Sustainable Development Committee (ENVI).
  • Former Executive Director of the Guelph Chamber of Commerce, and former business executive.

Maxime Blanchette-Joncas (Québec—Rimouski-Neigette – Témiscouata – Les Basques)

Bloc Québécois

Second Vice-Chair

Maxime Blanchette-Joncas
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament for Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques in the 2019 federal election.
  • BQ Critic for Public Accounts.
  • Preceded in his riding by Guy Caron who served as the leader of the NDP from 2017 to 2019.
  • Business Administration graduate from the University of Quebec in Rimouski and former administrative officer at the Business Development Bank of Canada.
  • Was regional president of the Youth Forum of the Bloc Québécois.

Luc Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable)

Conservative

Member

Luc Berthold
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament for Mégantic—L'Érable in 2015.
  • Critic for Treasury Board
  • Previously the Vice-Chair of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, and the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food.
  • Prior to his election, Mr. Berthold was Nathalie Normandeau's  Political Assistant, and communications advisor for the Leader of the Official Opposition in 1999, the Interim Director of communications for Quebec's Liberal Party in 2006, and worked as a speaker, coach and gave leadership training sessions.

Philip Lawrence (Northumberland—Peterborough South)

Conservative

Member

Philip Lawrence
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament for the riding of Northumberland—Peterborough South in the 2019 federal election.
  • Shadow Minister of National Revenue.
  • Former member of Standing Committee of Justice and Human Rights.
  • Prior to his election, Mr. Lawrence received his BA from Brock University in Political Science, he attended Osgoode Hall Law School and the Schulich School of business to obtain his law degree and MBA and volunteered at the Financial Planning Standards Council.

Len Webber (Calgary Confederation)

Conservative

Member

Len Webber
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament for the riding of Calgary Confederation in 2015.
  • Former Vice-Chair of the Standing Committee on Health in the 42nd Parliament.
  • Previously a member on the Standing Committee on Health, the Subcommittee on Sports-Related Concussions in Canada of the Standing Committee on Health and the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Health.
  • Prior to his election, Mr. Webber was a Member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, representing the constituency of Calgary-Foothills from 2004 to 2014, work as an apprentice electrician and managed his own contracting company for 10 years, and served as vice president and director of the Webber Academy, a private, non-profit school in southwest Calgary for children from junior kindergarten to grade 12 founded by his father.

Matthew Green (Ontario—Hamilton Centre)

NDP

Member

Matthew Green
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament foe Hamilton Centre in the 2019 federal election in the riding formerly held by NDP MP David Christopherson.
  • NDP Critic for National Revenue/CRA, Public Services and Procurement.
  • Former Councilor for the City of Hamilton (2014 to 2018).
  • Member of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Accounts (PACP), the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates (OGGO), and the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates.
  • Member of the Canada-Africa Parliamentary Association (CAAF) and the Canadian Section of ParlAmericas (CPAM).

Kody Blois (Kings—Hants)

Liberal

Member

Kody Blois
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament for the riding of Kings—Hants in the 2019 federal election, in the riding formerly held by former TBS President Scott Brison.
  • Current member of the Standing Committee for Agriculture and Agri-Food, and the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food.
  • Former member of the Standing Committee for Agriculture and Agri-Food, and the Standing Committee on Public Accounts.
  • Blois completed degrees in commerce, law, and public administration - which sparked his interest in serving his community.

Greg Fergus (Hull—Aylmer)

Liberal

Member

Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and Minister of Digital Government

Greg Fergus
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament for the riding of Hull—Aylmer in 2015.
  • Member of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics.
  • Former member of the Standing Committee on Finance, and the Standing Committee on Public Accounts.
  • Current and Former Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and Minister of Digital Government. Former Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development.
  • Former National Director of the Liberal Party of Canada and former political staffer in various Ministerial offices.

Francesco Sorbara (Vaughn—Woodbridge)

Liberal

Member

Francesco Sorbara
  • Elected as the Member of Parliament for the riding of Vaughan—Woodbridge in 2015.
  • Member of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics.
  • Former member of the Standing Committee on Finance, as well as the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Finance, and the Standing Committee on Public Accounts.
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue.
  • Sorbara is a chartered financial analyst and worked in the global financial markets for nearly 20 years in both Canada and the United States for Scotiabank, JPMorgan Chase, and global credit rating agency DBRS.

Jean Yip (Scarborough—Agincourt)

Liberal

Member

Jean Yip
  • First elected in a by-election on December 11, 2017 as the Member of Parliament for the riding of Scarborough—Agincourt. Elected in 2019 as the Member of Parliament for the riding of Scarborough—Agincourt.
  • Current member of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations.
  • Former member of the Public Accounts committee, and the Government Operations and Estimates Committee.

Procurement at SSC


Issue

Shared Services Canada (SSC) conducts innovative, open, fair and transparent procurement processes that are supported by a solid governance. Whenever possible, SSC uses competition to get the best value for Canadians.

Key Facts

Response

  1. the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) is the only one that sells the product (and does not have a reseller network); and
  2. SSC can demonstrate that a change of supplier cannot be made for economic or technical reasons and would cause significant duplication of costs.

BuyandSell

Network Solution Supply Chain (NSSC) Vehicles

Background


Metrics

Procurement contracts

All SSC-other government department contracts

Fiscal Year

Competitive

Non-Competitive

TOTAL

2019-20

6,526 (64%)

$1.6B (87%)

3,747 (36%)

$230.6M (13%)

10,273

($1.8B)

2020-21

7,739 (61%)

$2.4 B (62%)

5,012 (39%)

$1.4B (38%)

12,751

($3.8B)

Network Equipment Specific (SSC) Footnote 1

Fiscal Year

Competitive

Non-Competitive

TOTAL

2019-20

217 (49%)

$226.1M (98%)

224 (51%)

$4.8M (2%)

 441 ($230.9M)

2020-21

396 (61%)

$186.1M (95%)

255 (39%)

$8.9M (5%)

 651 ($195.1M)

Greening - Achievements:

Small Medium Enterprises (SSC Funded – fiscal year 2019-20)

Volume

Value

Fiscal year 2018-19 vs Fiscal year 2019-20


Data Analytics at Shared Services Canada


Issue

In order to lead the Government of Canada's Digital Transformation, Shared Services Canada needs to leverage its internal data and analytics capabilities. To do so, the Department will invest ███████████ over the next five years into its Data and Analytics Centre of Excellence, to move toward a modern, accessible, interoperable and digitally-enabled enterprise model.

Key Facts

Response

Background

The Data and Analytics Centre of Excellence (DACoE) at Shared Services Canada (SSC) has established an Enterprise Data Repository (EDR), a training program for data literacy, and its departmental governance bodies are in place to align authoritative data, analytics tools and systems.

To date, SSC's EDR has harmonized the authoritative systems defining SSC's demand and intake requirements from partner and client organizations across the Government of Canada with its financial records, client feedback, and service metrics. This allows SSC analysts and decision-makers to rely on a common “source of truth"to deliver on its departmental mandate.

These data sources currently include:

During the COVID-19 pandemic response, SSC's EDR enabled the organization to quickly mobilize a new business intake prioritization framework in collaboration with its partners and clients and daily operational reporting on service requests and incidents. This resulted in an effective response to the emerging needs of Canadians and the various Government of Canada departments and agencies it serves.

The Department continues to rely on its data and analytics capabilities to respond to the Treasury Board's Policy on Service and Digital, enabling SSC to continue the successful implementation of its Data Strategy established in the fall of 2019.

SSC's corporate functions now include a Chief Data Officer and a Chief Analytics Officer in order to drive its data and analytics programs. This creates seamless alignment between the strategic business focus of the organization, through the Chief Data Officer, and the delivery arm led by the Chief Information Officer / Chief Data Officer.

The ███████████ over the next five years will enable the expansion of SSC's enterprise data repository to critical source systems across multiple functional areas including service, project, human resources, financial, and procurement management. Through critical analysis of its data, SSC will bring tremendous value in its delivery of IT infrastructure services enabling the Government of Canada's Digital Transformation.


Next Generation HR and Pay Initiative


Issue

Update on the Next Generation HR and Pay Initiative

Response

Background

Budget 2018 announced the Government's intention to move away from Phoenix and begin development of a pay system that will be better aligned with the complexity of the federal government's human resources and pay structure.

TBS received $16 million over two years, beginning in 2018-19, to explore replacement options for a next generation human resources and pay solution. 

In summer 2019, the Government announced it had selected Ceridian, SAP, and Workday as the vendors deemed qualified to deliver a next generation human resources and pay solution for the Government of Canada.   

In September 2019, the Government announced that it will invest $117 million to co-design and deliver pilot projects for the NextGen HR and Pay system.

In March 2020, after extensive evaluation, and testing, it was announced that SAP had been selected to work with our team on a pilot for a new Human Resources and Pay solution.

SAP was selected through a rigorous evaluation process which was open and transparent and placed users at the centre. The evaluations involved elements such measuring vendors against Digital, Privacy and Security Standards as well as testing of hundreds of HR and pay scenarios, both simple and complex.

All three vendors remain qualified to work with the government in the future for HR and pay solutions. This means maximum flexibility for the government to access the solutions of multiple, best-in-class vendors which is critical to the NextGen approach.

The NextGen team at SSC engaged SAP on a series of discussions to assess organizational capacity and readiness to work on NextGen under the current COVID-19 circumstances.

Initial focus of work with SAP included establishing governance and oversight, project management tools and protocols and development of a detailed plan to pilot the solution in a core department.

Effective April 1, 2020, leadership for NextGen was transitioned from Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to Shared Services Canada. The Chief Human Resources Officer at Treasury Board Secretariat remains the Business Owner and a key collaborator of the NextGen initiative.

On October 14, 2020, the selection of the Department of Canadian Heritage for the Exploratory Phase of the Next Generation HR and Pay initiative was announced.

The Government is working with the selected vendor (SAP) and the Department of Canadian Heritage to develop an approach to testing that reflects the needs of Canadian Heritage in the context of the core public service.

Canadian Heritage was selected as the Exploratory Phase Department because their organization provides a good representation of the government's human resources complexities, including multiple occupational groups, regional representation, overtime, and other considerations.

Throughout this process, the NextGen team is engaging with public service employees, leaders, HR advisors and technical specialists, as well as working hand in hand with bargaining agents in the development of a user-centric HR and pay solution.

As part of this pilot initiative, NextGen has involved over 890 employees from 20 federal organizations through thirty-eight workshops and 90 working sessions with HR and pay practitioners, end users and technical experts. These activities form the basis for NextGen's Exploratory Phase, and they will inform the next steps in the initiative.

The government will be making a decision this month about moving from the exploratory phase with SAP's Success Factors into the design and experimentation phase, where configuring of the solution will occur.

Any testing undertaken will not affect employees' actual pay. Testing will occur in a controlled environment that is not connected to payment systems. Canadian Heritage employees will continue to be paid through the Phoenix pay system while testing is completed.

The Government continues to work with stakeholders, such as bargaining agents, employees, and HR and pay practitioners, and will continue to engage in an open and transparent manner, so that the new solution can address the needs of a modern public service and its employees as soon as possible.

Over the next three years, NextGen will carry out additional pilots and a feasibility study. The details for the additional pilots and the feasibility study are being finalized and learning from the exploratory phase will inform the planning for these future phases.

Ongoing stabilization of the Phoenix Pay System remains a top priority for the government and is being pursued by Public Services and Procurement Canada.


Workplace Communication Services


Issue

The Workplace Communication Services initiative will replace approximately 107,000 legacy landline systems with modern, cost-effective Voice over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, telephone services.

Key Facts

Response

If pressed on modernization schedule:

Background

The Workplace Communication Services initiative is an important part of Shared Services Canada's efforts to consolidate and modernize the Government's telecommunications infrastructure.

Currently, voice services are delivered via a mix of traditional landline telephones, more modern and reliable technology such as Voice over IP telephony and mobile services  (i.e. cellular and smartphones).

Many of the traditional landline systems are at end-of-life, some of which using technology that was retired by suppliers in 2018. Service outages related to this legacy equipment may have a significant impact on the partner's ability to deliver programs and to work effectively.

The Minister of Digital Government's vision is focused on strengthening and modernizing digital government. Through the Workplace Communication Services Initiative, modernization of essential fixed lines to enterprise VoIP services will ensure that reliable, secure, timely and accessible voice services are maintained, and advance the realization of a digitally-enabled Public Service.

The Workplace Communication Services contract was awarded to TELUS in June 2017. Since then, Shared Services Canada and TELUS have been working towards “service readiness", ensuring the new VoIP service design is robust, tested and ready for implementation (achieved in May 2021). In parallel, over 5,000 traditional landline phones were modernized through the Workplace Communication Services Initiative to existing enterprise VoIP services. 

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