Access to Information Act - Annual Report 2017-2018

(April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018)

This publication is available upon request in alternative formats.
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Canadian Heritage, 2018
Catalogue No. : CH1-1/1E-PDF
ISSN: 1926-3732

Table of contents

List of charts

List of acronyms and abbreviations

List of charts

List of acronyms and abbreviations

ATIP
Access to information and privacy
ATIP/D
Director, Access to Information and Privacy Secretariat
ATIP/DD
Deputy Director, Access to Information and Privacy Secretariat
CS
Corporate Secretary
DM
Deputy Minister
TBS
Treasury Board Secretariat

1. Introduction

The Department of Canadian Heritage is pleased to present to Parliament its annual report on the administration of the Access to Information Actfor fiscal year April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018. Section 72 of the Act requires that the head of every federal government institution submit an annual report to Parliament on the administration of the Act during the fiscal year.

1.1. The Access to Information Act

The purpose of the Access to Information Act is to provide a right of access to information in records under the control of a government institution. It maintains that government information should be available to the public; that necessary exceptions to the right of access should be limited and specific; and that decisions on the disclosure of government information should be reviewed independently of government.

The Department of Canadian Heritage is fully committed to both the spirit and the intent of the Access to Information Actto ensure openness and transparency within the Department. The information contained in this report provides an overview of the activities of the Department in implementing the Act.

1.2. Mandate of Canadian Heritage

The Department of Canadian Heritage and Canada's major national cultural institutions play a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians. We work together to support culture, the arts, heritage, official languages, multiculturalism, citizenship and participation, in addition to Aboriginal, youth, and sport initiatives.

The Department of Canadian Heritage is responsible for programs and policies that help all Canadians participate in their shared cultural and civic life. The Department’s legislative mandate is set out in the Department of Canadian Heritage Act and other statutes for which the Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible and presents a wide-ranging list of responsibilities for the Minister under the heading of “Canadian identity and values, cultural development, and heritage.”

The Department oversees numerous statutes, namely the Broadcasting Act, the Copyright Act and the Investment Canada Act (the latter two acts shared with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada), the Official Languages Act Part VII), the Museums Actthe Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Act, the Cultural Property Export and Import Act, the Status of the Artist Act, the Canadian Multiculturalism Act and the Physical Activity and Sport Act(shared with Health Canada).

The Department of Canadian Heritage is specifically responsible for formulating and implementing cultural policies related to copyright, foreign investment and broadcasting, as well as policies related to arts, culture, heritage, official languages, sport, state ceremonial and protocol, and Canadian symbols. The Department’s programs, delivered through Headquarters, and multiple points of service including five regional offices across the country, fund community and third-party organizations to promote the benefits of culture, identity, and sport for Canadians.

In 2017-2018, the Minister of Canadian Heritage, assisted by the Minister for Sport and Persons with Disabilities, was accountable to Parliament for the Department, five departmental agencies and twelve Crown corporations.

2.   Structure of the Access to Information and Privacy Secretariat

The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Secretariat is responsible for administering the Access to Information Act, within the Department of Canadian Heritage. Its mandate is to act on behalf of the Minister of Canadian Heritage in ensuring compliance with legislation, regulations and government policy and to create departmental directives, including standards, in all matters relating to the Act.

During the reporting period, the ATIP Secretariat consisted of an Operations Unit with 10 positions and a Policy and Governance Unit of two analysts.

The Operations Unit is responsible for processing requests under the Access to Information Act. This includes receiving requests from the public, liaising with program areas within the Department to retrieve the records and recommendations, performing line-by-line review of records and conducting external consultations as required to balance the public’s right of access and the government’s need to safeguard certain information in limited and specific cases. The Operations Unit represents the Department in dealings with the Office of the Information Commissioner regarding the application of the Act.

The Policy and Governance Unit provides policy advice and guidance to the Department on access to information and the protection of personal information. It develops policy instruments, processing products and tools. The unit liaises with employees and prepares and delivers training and awareness sessions throughout the Department. In addition, the unit prepares the Department’s annual reporting requirements and publishes the Department’s Info Source chapter.

In the departmental organizational structure, the ATIP Secretariat reports to the Corporate Secretariat for Canadian Heritage.

3.      Delegation order

The powers, duties and functions of the administration of the Access to Information Act have been fully delegated by the Minister to the Director of the ATIP Secretariat. A copy of the Canadian Heritage’s delegation order is appended to this report as Appendix A.

4.      Administration of requests

The statistical report on the administration of the Access to Information Actis appended to this report as Appendix B.

4.1.      Access requests

The ATIP Secretariat received a total of 799 requests during the reporting period of April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018. This represents an increase of 41% from the previous fiscal year. With the 143 requests carried over from the previous reporting period there was a total of 942 active requests in 2017-2018.

As shown in Chart 1, there has been a steady increase in the number of requests received at Canadian Heritage since 2013-2014, which represents a 237% increase in five years.

Chart 1: number of requests received, 2012-2013 to 2017-2018

Chart 1: number of requests received, 2012-2013 to 2017-2018 – text version

This bar graph shows the number of requests Canadian Heritage received each fiscal year from 2012-2013 to 2017-2018. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • 2012-2013: 237 requests
  • 2013-2014: 241 requests
  • 2014-2015: 297 requests
  • 2015-2016: 358 requests
  • 2016-2017: 566 requests
  • 2017-2018: 799 requests

4.2. Topics

The requests for information received by Canadian Heritage cover a wide range of topics, however, as in previous years, certain subjects were favourites of requesters. For this reporting period, the most frequently requested type of record was briefing notes to the Minister or Deputy Minister.

Topics of the requests related to broadcasting and digital communications, the Copyright Act review, journalism in Canada, Canada 150 and Canada Day, the 2018 Winter Olympics, national monuments and the Creative Canada cultural policy.

4.3. Informal requests

Since 2011, government institutions have been posting lists of completed access to information requests on the web. This Open Government initiative is to enable the public to make informal requests for records that were previously released. Canadian Heritage processed 396 informal requests in 2017-2018 for information relating to 284 previously released requests, a 19% increase since the last reporting period. Processing this steadily increasing amount of informal requests had an impact on the ATIP Secretariat resources already pressured by the important increase of the number of formal requests.

Chart 2: number of requests treated informally, 2014-2015 to 2017-2018

Chart 2: number of requests treated informally, 2014-2015 to 2017-2018 – text version

This bar graph shows the number of requests Canadian Heritage treated informally each fiscal year from 2014-2015 to 2017-2018. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • 2014-2015: 160
  • 2015-2016: 126
  • 2016-2017: 334
  • 2017-2018: 396

4.4.Applicant sources

Of the requests that were received this reporting period, 47% were made by the media while 20% were made by businesses. A total of17% of applicants declined to identify themselves and 12% of all requests were made by the public.

As indicated in Chart 3, the media has consistently been the largest source of requests for Canadian Heritage, this year reaching new heights with a 17% increase since 2016-2017. The business category has continually grown since 2015-2016, with a 10% increase.

Chart 3: applicant sources, 2015-2016 to 2017-2018

Chart 3: applicant sources, 2015-2016 to 2017-2018 – text version

This bar graph shows the sources of requests from fiscal years 2015-2016 to 2017-2018, and indicates the percentage of requests from each source. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

Applicant sources 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Media 31% 30% 47%
Academia 5% 5% 2%
Business 10% 19% 20%
Organization 2% 5% 2%
Public 13% 18% 12%
Decline to identify 39% 22% 17%

4.5. Extensions

Requests can be extended beyond the 30-day statutory time frame in three circumstances; when the request is for a large number of records or necessitates a search through a large number of records, when consultations are necessary, or to give notice to a third party. This reporting period, extensions were taken in 295 cases. In 76 cases, the Department required a 30-day or less time extension. In 218 cases, an extension of over 30 days was required.

Chart 4 illustrates the circumstances for which extensions were taken during the course of the last four years. As in previous years, consultations with other government institutions was the most common reason for extension.

Chart 4: reasons for time extensions, 2014-2015 to 2017-2018

Chart 4: reasons for time extensions, 2014-2015 to 2017-2018 – text version

This bar graph shows the reasons for time extensions in each fiscal year from 2014-2015 to 2017-2018, and the percentages for each reason in each year. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

Reason 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Interference with operations 20% 15% 13% 17%
Consultation - Section 69 23% 13% 4% 16%
Consultation - Other 40% 55% 48% 34%
Third Party Notice 17% 16% 34% 21%

4.6.   Completed requests

Seven hundred and twenty-one requests were completed by the end of March 2018, which is 242 more than the previous year (a 50% increase). Six out of ten requests completed (60%) resulted in partial disclosure. One hundred and forty-five requests were totally disclosed. No records existed in 7% of requests. Information was entirely excluded in 30 requests and exempted entirely in 15 requests. Forty-seven requests were either transferred to other federal institutions or were abandoned by the applicants.

Chart 5: disposition of requests, 2017-2018

Chart 5: disposition of requests, 2017-2018 – text version

This pie chart shows the disposition of requests for the year 2017-2018. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • All disclosed: 20%
  • Disclosed in part: 60%
  • All exempted: 2%
  • All excluded: 4%
  • No records exist: 7%
  • Request transferred: 4%
  • Request abandoned: 3%

The 721 completed requests were processed in the following timeframes:

  • 52% of requests completed within 30 days
  • 20% of requests completed within 31 to 60 days
  • 20% of requests completed within 61 to 120 days
  • 8% of requests completed within 121 or more days

Of the 721 requests completed during this reporting period, 84% were completed within the statutory time frame.

Chart 6 indicates the number of pages that were processed by the Department for the last five fiscal years. The peak in 2013-2014 was due to the hiring of consultants to complete a number of outstanding requests. In 2017-2018, serious efforts were made to process the increased number of requests received, resulting in an increase of the number of pages processed (67,386 pages, a 46% increase in the output of the ATIP Secretariat).

Chart 6: number of relevant pages processed, 2013-2014 to 2017-2018

Chart 6: number of relevant pages processed, 2013-2014 to 2017-2018 – text version

This bar graph shows the number of relevant pages processed each year from fiscal years 2013-2014 to 2017-2018. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • 2013-2014: 93,433 pages
  • 2014-2015: 41,874 pages
  • 2015-2016: 48,034 pages
  • 2016-2017: 46,058 pages
  • 2017-2018: 67,386 pages

To properly process the increased number of requests received during the reporting period, the ATIP Secretariat monitored the processing of requests on a daily basis using the ATIP case management system and with bi-weekly meetings between the advisors and management of the Secretariat. In addition, reports that provide details on the status of requests were shared with program liaisons and departmental senior managers as well as with the Deputy Minister’s office on a weekly basis.

4.7. Exemptions / Exclusions

The Access to Information Act does not apply to certain types of records. The legislation allows this information to be excluded from requests. This reporting period, exclusions were applied in 171 requests. Subsection 69(1) (confidences of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada) was applied in 158 requests and paragraph 68(a) (published material) was applied in 20 requests.

The Access to Information Act sets out specific exceptions to the right of access known as exemptions. Each exemption is intended to protect information relating to a particular public or private interest and together they form the only basis for refusing access to information under the Access to Information Act. Of the 721 requests completed, exemptions to withhold information were invoked in 439 requests. The exemptions most commonly applied by the Department were: paragraph 21(1)(b) (account of consultations and deliberations) invoked in 281 requests; paragraph 21(1)(a) (information relating to the internal decision-making processes of government) applied in 254 requests; subsection 19(1) (records containing personal information) invoked in 177 requests; and paragraph 20(1)(b) (records containing third-party business information), which was applied in 126 requests.

4.8. Consultations

To assist other institutions in processing their access requests, the ATIP Secretariat received their consultations, reviewed and provided recommendations on the disclosure of their records that were of concern to Canadian Heritage. During the reporting period, the ATIP Secretariat received a total of 142 consultation requests from other federal institutions and other levels of governments. This represents a 5% increase from the previous fiscal year, as shown in Chart 7.

In 2017-2018, Canadian Heritage received consultation requests from 35 federal institutions. The top consulting institutions were the Privy Council Office, the Treasury Board Secretariat, Public Services and Procurement Canada, Telefilm Canada and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.

Chart 7: number of consultations received, 2014-2015 to 2017-2018

Chart 7: number of consultations received, 2014-2015 to 2017-2018 – text version

This bar graph shows the total number of consultations received for each fiscal year from 2014-2015 to 2017-2018. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • 2014-2015: 94
  • 2015-2016: 105
  • 2016-2017: 135
  • 2017-2018: 142

4.9. Fees and costs

Under the legislation, fees may be charged during the processing of requests, however, in accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) Interim Directive on the Administration of the Access to Information Act of May 2016, the policy at Canadian Heritage is to waive all fees except the application fee. In 2017-2018 the total amount collected was $2,830.

A total of $880,612 was incurred by the ATIP Secretariat to administer the Access to Information Act, including $839,861 in salary costs, $3,075 for a summer student, and $37,676 in material costs.

5. Complaints, investigations and audits

In the fiscal year, 22 complaints regarding the processing of access to information requests were filed with the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada against Canadian Heritage. The reasons for the complaints included: administrative delay (9); time extension (1); exclusion under section 69 of the Act (1); refusal (exemption)(9); and refusal (incomplete response)(2).

The Office of the Information Commissioner completed their investigation into 21 complaints against Canadian Heritage. Thirteen investigations were discontinued and eight were well founded, resolved. At the end of the fiscal year, 18 complaints were still ongoing.

Canadian Heritage was not involved in Federal Court cases or audits during this reporting period.

6. Education and training activities

To increase the knowledge and understanding of the Access to Information Act across the Department, training and awareness sessions were delivered by the ATIP Secretariat. These sessions provided basic information on the purpose and provisions of the Access to Information Act, as well as the roles and responsibilities of employees and the ATIP Secretariat. The information for these awareness sessions was tailored to meet the specific needs of the branches concerned.

During this reporting period, the ATIP Secretariat delivered 37 access to information and privacy training and awareness sessions to employees in the National Capital Region and regional offices as well as to individuals in the Minister’s Office. In total, 328 individuals participated in these sessions.

The ATIP Secretariat intranet site provides departmental employees with information on the Access to Information Act as well as related departmental policies and procedures. The material on the website is updated as required.

Right to Know Week

Each year, approximately 40 countries and 60 non-governmental organizations celebrate Right to Know Day. This event is intended to raise awareness about people’s right to access government information while promoting freedom of information as an essential feature of both democracy and good governance. In Canada, the Right to Know celebration was a week-long event from September 25 through to October 1, 2017.

In its celebration of Right to Know Week, the ATIP Secretariat published five communiques on the Department’s news service and displayed them on the electronic billboards located throughout its offices. The theme of this awareness campaign was “Be an access to information hero!” Each communique featured a comic book superhero offering tips on how to comply with the Access to Information Act.

7. Policies, guidelines and procedures

During the reporting period, the ATIP Secretariat continued its review of procedures involved in the processing of requests under the Access to Information Act. With the goal of improving efficiencies and providing better service to requesters, the Secretariat researched a secure electronic mail system that facilitates and simplifies the release of records. Rather than sending DVDs or hard copies of records by post, the system would enable the records to be released electronically directly and immediately to the requester.

With respect to proactive disclosure, the ATIP Secretariat actively monitored the progress of Bill C-58, an Act to amend the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act through Parliament. During the reporting period the Secretariat provided advice and guidance on this proposed initiative. The Secretariat was also represented on the Department’s Open Government Committee.


Appendix A – Delegation order

Access to Information Act and Privacy Act

Pursuant to Section 73 of the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act, I, as head of the Department of Canadian Heritage, hereby designate the persons holding the positions set out in the schedule hereto, or persons occupying on an acting basis those positions, to exercise my powers and functions under these Acts specified opposite each position.

This Delegation Order supersedes all previous Access to Information Act and Privacy Act Delegation Orders.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly
Minister of Canadian Heritage
Date: May 31, 2016


Powers and functions delegated pursuant to Section 73 of the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations

Legend:

DM
Deputy Minister
CS
Corporate Secretary
ATIP/D
Director, Access to Information and Privacy Secretariat
ATIP/DD
Deputy Director, Access to Information and Privacy Secretariat

Note: The Xs indicate which position has delegated authority for each section of the Act.

Access to Information Act

Section Description DM CS ATIP/D ATIP/DD
4(2.1) Responsibility of government institutions x x x
7(a) Notice where access requested x x x
7(b) Giving access to record x x x
8(1) Transfer of request to another government institution x x x x
9 Extension of time limits x x x x
11(2), (3), (4), (5), (6) Additional fees x x x x
12(2)(b) Language of access x x x
12(3)(b) Access in an alternative format x x x
13 Exemption - Information obtained in confidence x x x
14 Exemption - Federal-provincial affairs x x x
15 Exemption - International affairs and defence x x x
16 Exemption - Law enforcement and investigation x x x
16.5 Exemption - Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act x x x
17 Exemption - Safety of individuals x x x
18 Exemption - Economic interests of Canada x x x
18.1 Exemption - Economic interests of the Canada Post Corporation, Export Development Canada, the Public Sector Pension Investment Board and VIA Rail Canada Inc. x x x
19 Exemption - Personal information x x x
20 Exemption - Third party information x x x
21 Exemption - Operations of Government x x x
22 Exemption - Testing procedures, tests and audits x x x
22.1 Exemption - Audit working papers and draft audit reports x x x
23 Exemption - Solicitor-client privilege x x x
24 Exemption - Statutory prohibitions x x x
25 Severability x x x
26 Exemption - Information to be published x x x
27(1), (4) Third-party notification x x x x
28(1)(b), (2), (4) Third-party notification x x x x
29(1) Where the Information Commissioner recommends disclosure x x x
33 Advising Information Commissioner of third-party involvement x x x
35(2)(b) Right to make representations x x x
37(4) Access to be given to complainant x x x
43(1) Notice to third-party (application to Federal Court for review) x x x
44(2) Notice to applicant (application to Federal Court by third-party) x x x
52(2)(b), (3) Special rules for hearings x x x
71(1) Facilities for inspection of manuals x x x
72 Annual report to Parliament x x x

Access to Information Regulations

Section Description DM CS ATIP/D ATIP/DD
6(1) Transfer of request x x x x
7(2) Search and preparation fees x x x x
7(3) Production and programming fees x x x x
8 Providing access to record(s) x x x
8.1 Limitations in respect of format x x x

Appendix B – Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act

Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act

Name of institution: Canadian Heritage

Reporting period: 2017-04-01 to 2018-03-31

Part 1: Requests Under the Access to Information Act

1.1 Number of requests

Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 799
Outstanding from previous reporting period 143
Total 942
Closed during reporting period 721
Carried over to next reporting period 221

1.2 Sources of requests

Source Number of Requests
Media 372
Academia 16
Business (private sector) 160
Organization 16
Public 96
Decline to Identify 139
Total 799

1.3 Informal requests

Completion Time
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
131 201 59 5 0 0 0 396

Note: All requests previously recorded as “treated informally” will now be accounted for in this section only.

Part 2: Requests Closed During the Reporting Period

2.1 Disposition and completion time

Disposition of Requests Completion Time
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 14 83 35 11 1 1 0 145
Disclosed in part 27 134 90 121 29 22 8 431
All exempted 3 6 1 5 0 0 0 15
All excluded 1 8 15 5 1 0 0 30
No records exist 24 26 2 0 1 0 0 53
Request transferred 27 0 0 0 0 0 0 27
Request abandoned 12 5 2 1 0 0 0 20
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 108 262 145 143 32 23 8 721

2.2 Exemptions

Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests
13(1)(a) 12 16(2) 9 18(a) 0 20.1 0
13(1)(b) 0 16(2)(a) 0 18(b) 1 20.2 0
13(1)(c) 7 16(2)(b) 0 18(c) 0 20.4 0
13(1)(d) 2 16(2)(c) 32 18(d) 3 21(1)(a) 254
13(1)(e) 0 16(3) 0 18.1(1)(a) 0 21(1)(b) 281
14 0 16.1(1)(a) 0 18.1(1)(b) 0 21(1)(c) 17
14(a) 20 16.1(1)(b) 3 18.1(1)(c) 0 21(1)(d) 2
14(b) 1 16.1(1)(c) 0 18.1(1)(d) 0 22 0
15(1) 0 16.1(1)(d) 0 19(1) 177 22.1(1) 3
15(1) - I.A.* 41 16.2(1) 0 20(1)(a) 1 23 79
15(1) - Def.* 0 16.3 0 20(1)(b) 126 24(1) 31
15(1) - S.A.* 0 16.4(1)(a) 0 20(1)(b.1) 0 26 5
16(1)(a)(i) 0 16.4(1)(b) 0 20(1)(c) 16
16(1)(a)(ii) 0 16.5 0 20(1)(d) 5
16(1)(a)(iii) 0 17 0
16(1)(b) 0
16(1)(c) 2
16(1)(d) 0

* I.A.: International Affairs
Def.: Defence of Canada
S.A.: Subversive Activities

2.3 Exclusions

Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests
68(a) 20 69(1) 0 69(1)(g) re (a) 122
68(b) 0 69(1)(a) 13 69(1)(g) re (b) 0
68(c) 0 69(1)(b) 0 69(1)(g) re (c) 40
68.1 0 69(1)(c) 1 69(1)(g) re (d) 51
68.2(a) 0 69(1)(d) 10 69(1)(g) re (e) 66
68.2(b) 0 69(1)(e) 25 69(1)(g) re (f) 17
69(1)(f) 0 69.1(1) 0

2.4 Format of information released

Disposition Paper Electronic Other Formats
All disclosed 79 66 0
Disclosed in part 187 244 0
Total 266 310 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of Requests Number of Pages Processed Number of Pages Disclosed Number of Requests
All disclosed 18852 19346 145
Disclosed in part 42965 33824 431
All exempted 2935 0 15
All excluded 2239 0 30
Request abandoned 392 76 20
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less Than 100
Pages Processed
101-500
Pages Processed
501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More Than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
All disclosed 135 2234 5 916 1 9 3 3862 1 12325
Disclosed in part 335 9242 75 11576 14 5500 7 7506 0 0
All exempted 10 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 26 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned  19 53 1 23 0 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 525 11529 84 12515 21 5509 10 11368 1 12325
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation Required Assessment of Fees Legal Advice Sought Other Total
All disclosed 43 0 0 5 48
Disclosed in part 246 0 0 79 325
All exempted 4 0 0 4 8
All excluded 14 0 0 1 15
Request abandoned 1 0 0 2 3
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 308 0 0 91 399

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of Requests Closed Past the Statutory Deadline Principal Reason
Workload External Consultation Internal Consultation Other
118 51 15 6 46
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of Days Past Deadline Number of Requests Past Deadline Where No Extension Was Taken Number of Requests Past Deadline Where An Extension Was Taken Total
1 to 15 days 17 21 38
16 to 30 days 6 13 19
31 to 60 days 13 12 25
61 to 120 days 6 4 10
121 to 180 days 4 4 8
181 to 365 days 7 9 16
More than 365 days 1 1 2
Total 54 64 118

2.7 Requests for translation

Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French  0 0 0
French to English  0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3: Extensions

3.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests

Disposition of Requests Where an Extension Was Taken 9(1)(a)
Interference With Operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third-Party Notice
Section 69 Other
All disclosed 2 0 6 3
Disclosed in part 29 65 78 50
All exempted 3 4 0 1
All excluded 2 14 6 0
No records exist 1 0 1 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 1
Total 37 83 91 55

3.2 Length of extensions

Length of Extensions 9(1)(a)
Interference With Operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third-Party Notice
Section 69 Other
30 days or less 11 65 6 0
31 to 60 days 15 16 64 55
61 to 120 days 11 2 21 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 2 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0 0
365 days or more 0 0 0 0
Total 37 83 91 55

Part 4: Fees

Fee Type Fee Collected Fee Waived or Refunded
Number of
Requests
Amount Number of
Requests
Amount
Application 566 $2,830 233 $1,165
Search 0 $0 0 $0
Production  0 $0 0 $0
Programming 0 $0 0 $0
Preparation 0 $0 0 $0
Alternative format 0 $0 0 $0
Reproduction  0 $0 0 $0
Total 566 $2,830 233 $1,165

Part 5: Consultations Received From Other Institutions and Organizations

5.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and organizations

Consultations Other Government of Canada Institutions Number of Pages to Review Other Organizations Number of Pages to Review
Received during reporting period 131 4530 11 970
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 10 358 1 3
Total 141 4888 12 973
Closed during the reporting period 132 4765 12 973
Pending at the end of the reporting period 9 123 0 0

5.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions

Recommendation Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
Disclose entirely 34 33 18 2 0 0 0 87
Disclose in part 1 10 17 3 2 0 0 33
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2
Consult other institution 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2
Other 3 5 0 0 0 0 0 8
Total 39 50 35 6 2 0 0 132

5.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations

Recommendation Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
Disclose entirely 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 7
Disclose in part 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 5
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 3 4 3 2 0 0 0 12

Part 6: Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences

6.1 Requests with Legal Services

Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More Than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 70 511 3 91 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 7 70 1 9 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 4 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 81 590 4 100 0 0 0 0 0 0

6.2 Requests with Privy Council Office

Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More Than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 7: Complaints and Investigations

Section 32 Section 35 Section 37 Total
22 0 21 43

Part 8: Court Action

Section 41 Section 42 Section 44 Total
0 0 0 0

Part 9: Resources Related to the Access to Information Act

9.1 Costs

Expenditures Amount
Salaries $839.861
Overtime $0
Goods and Services $40.751
Professional services contracts $3,075
Other $37,676
Total $880,612

9.2 Human Resources

Resources Person Years Dedicated to Access to Information Activities
Full-time employees 8.96
Part-time and casual employees 1.04
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00
Students 0.25
Total 10.25

Note: Enter values to two decimal places.

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