Resources for teachers and students

There are a number of resources and tips that you can use to keep you and your kids safe when in contact with a potential Unexploded Explosive Ordnance (UXO) site.

Resources for teachers

Our UXO experts are available to go to schools in areas where UXO is known to exist and deliver an information session to elementary and high school students. We use age-appropriate material to inform students how to stay safe. If you are interested in having an information session delivered to your students, please contact us.

UXO safety videos

Transcript

UXO General Safety Video – Final, October 6, 2015

Fade in:

MONTAGE - ARCHIVAL FOOTAGE,

We hear the sounds of an old newsreel as old black and white footage featuring Canadian soldiers in combat fades onto screen. We see images of various conflicts involving Canadian Forces; WWI, WWII, Korea.

NARRATOR

Over the last 100 years, Canada's military has had to fight in a number of conflicts around the world. To prepare, the military used land across Canada for training activities, including firing

weapons.

The montage shifts to show various samples of Canadian soldiers conducting training exercises.

NARRATOR

These weapon ranges and training facilities were vital to providing Canada's Navy, Army and Air Force with the skills they needed to fight overseas.

We see soldiers at shooting ranges, tanks and artillery practicing, Navy and Air Force exercises where bombs are being fired or dropped on target ranges.

NARRATOR

Training at these sites often involved the use of live ammunition, some of which did not explode. These old bombs are called UXO, which stands for unexploded explosive ordnance. UXO is still present at some of these former and current training locations and it continues to be a danger to people.

The montage comes to rest on a black and white image of an old looking bomb partially buried on the ground. Suddenly, the look of the image changes from black and white to colour.

What we are seeing no longer looks like old newsreel footage but a modern image of an old bomb half buried on the ground.

DISSOLVE TO:

MONTAGE - VARIOUS AREAS ACROSS CANADA

We are taken through a series of images of various remote and unpopulated Canadian regions including, mountains, prairies and coastal areas.

NARRATOR

As Canada's population grows, some of these historic military training areas are now being used by the public, making it possible for people to come across UXO.

The montage continues, showing images of partially populated regions, various areas under development, people in parks, fishing boats fishing off the coast etc.

NARRATOR

Mapping, location, and record keeping techniques were often very limited at the time this military training took place — this information was recorded and filed away in a period before computers existed. So sometimes it's difficult to determine where UXO can be found at sites across Canada.

We see UXO personnel looking through old maps, going over old files, and at location sites interacting with local groups

The montage shifts to a progression of images that show EOD teams conducting UXO recovery and inspection exercises in various areas across Canada including coastal areas.

NARRATOR

Even today's technology has its limitations, making it IMPOSSIBLE to say that there is ZERO risk. There have been instances where people have found and touched UXO and were seriously injured.

DISSOLVE TO:

MONTAGE - VARIOUS TYPES OF UXO

We see various images of different types of UXO.

NARRATOR

Examples of UXO can include bombs, rockets, grenades, artillery shells, mortars and even sea mines. And some UXO is not always easy to recognize. When these items get old they can look like ordinary pieces of junk, rusty pipes, scrap metal, or discarded motor parts. UXO can also be tricky to spot as it is often hidden by vegetation, covered by dirt or mud, or lying under water.

As the montage progresses we see samples of UXO partially buried on the ground or covered by foliage. Some of it is deceptively hidden and at a quick glance it looks like ordinary scrap metal or discarded motor parts.

NARRATOR

Sometimes, people find UXO and keep it as a souvenir. As a result, it can be found in people's homes, at garage sales or even antique shops. These items might look old and harmless but the reality is that they CAN still be VERY dangerous.

We see images of UXO kept as souvenirs; adorning mantel pieces or used as decoration around houses.

NARRATOR

If you find something that looks even remotely like UXO the safest thing to do is not touch it. There is a huge misconception that old, partially broken or rusted UXO doesn't work anymore and that it is safe to handle.

The montage comes to an image of an old, rusty looking bomb

GRAPHIC – BLUEPRINT

The image of the bomb morphs into a blueprint schematic of the bomb's internal mechanism.

NARRATOR

Although UXO can lie around for years, decades even, it remains dangerous because of the explosives it contains and the way its mechanisms were designed.

Graphic arrows appear on the blueprint pointing to areas of the bomb where the fuse mechanism and explosives are.

DISSOLVE INTO:

EXT. FOREST – DAY

A couple of cyclists stop to read a UXO warning sign before heading into a cycling trail in the middle of a forested area.

We follow as the couple races along on the trail in perfect control of their bikes.

NARRATOR

So what should you do if you find something that looks like UXO?

Suddenly, the male cyclist notices something on the side of the road. Curious, he brakes to a stop and gets off his bike.

On the ground, resting on the side off the road, is a suspicious looking metallic object, partially hidden by leaves and dirt.

The female cyclist catches up to her partner and dismounts her bike wondering what is going on. The male cyclist points to show her what he found.

At a closer look, the rusted piece of metal on the ground looks like an old artillery shell.

NARRATOR

No matter how harmless it may look, do not touch it!

The couple backs away from the object looking carefully at their surroundings to make sure there aren't any other similar objects around them.

NARRATOR

Remember the area where you found it, and if you can, use something to help responders identify the location.

The female cyclist pulls a small book from her backpack and quickly sketches a rough map of the area they are in, marking the spot where they found the object. She then pulls a rag from her bag and ties it around a nearby branch to mark the spot.

NARRATOR

Turn around and leave the area the same way you came in.

The couple take their bikes and begin to walk up the trail, going back the same way they came in.

NARRATOR

Warn others about what you found.

As the couple heads back on the trail they come across a couple of hikers. They greet them and warn them about what they found ahead on the trail.

CUT TO:

EXT. PARKING LOT BESIDE CYCLING TRAIL – DAY

At the parking lot, the couple is getting ready to go home. The male cyclist pulls his phone out of his pocket and makes a call to 911 to report what they found.

NARRATOR

Call 911 or your local emergency number and report the UXO and where you found it. Military personnel will be contacted to safely remove the item.

CUT TO:

MONTAGE - UXO SOUVENIRS

Once again, we catch some brief samples of UXO kept as souvenirs.

NARRATOR

Similarly, if you come across or have UXO as a souvenir, contact your local authorities to arrange for its safe and proper removal.

CUT TO:

MONTAGE - DND UXO PERSONNEL AT WORK

We see images of DND UXO personnel hard at work. Interacting with local groups, engaged in educational sessions for both kids and adults, placing UXO warning signs, and working with experts at UXO inspection operations.

NARRATOR

The Department of National Defence is working to reduce UXO risks and ensure these areas are safe for Canadians.

As the montage continues, we see DND UXO department personnel sifting through old maps, examining computer graphs and records of old bombs, and searching through old files.

NARRATOR

The Department also uses public information sessions, a school outreach program and signs to raise awareness about UXO safety.

As the montage winds down we see images of EOD personnel searching for UXO on both land and water, and conducting clearing operations.

The montage ends with a final aerial shot of a beautiful, partially populated area of Canada.

DISSOLVE TO:

CLOSING LOGOS

Call to action screen containing, UXO branding logos and contact information.

NARRATOR

Learn more about UXO safety at www.Canada.ca/UXO-Safety

FADE TO BLACK.

Transcript

UXO Safety Video for Kids – Final, October 20, 2015

EXT. HIKING TRAIL IN THE WOODS – DAY

A group of kids is hiking in the woods walking along a hiking trail. EVAN, a 7 year old boy and his friend MAX, also 7, are playing around with sticks as they walk, pretending they are swords and trying to hit one another. JULIA, a 13 year old girl and Max’s 12 year old sister, PATTI, walk behind chatting. The boys rush ahead of the group, chasing each other.

As the girls follow, a UXO warning sign catches their attention. The girls stop to read the sign before continuing down the trail. Having read the sign, Julia turns her attention in the direction the boys are heading.

JULIA

Hey guys wait up!

Julia heads after the boys. Patty lingers for a few seconds reading the sign then follows Julia.

Ahead, Max comes to a sudden stop and stares at something in the ground ahead of him. Evan catches up to him.

MAX

Hey look!

EVAN

What?

Max points at the spot he is looking at.

MAX

That thing, see?

Evan notices.

On the ground, resting amongst some foliage but clearly visible is something that looks like a wide rusted piece of pipe or like a piece of discarded junk from the motor of a car.

EVAN

Wait don’t touch it!

MAX

Why?

EVAN

We had this presentation at school, and they said that if you found old stuff like this not to touch it because it could be a bomb.

MAX

Whoa! Really?

Julia and Patti finally catch up.

JULIA

Guys! Stop running ahead.

EVAN

Max found something. Look!

Evan brings his sister’s attention to what Max found. We get a better glimpse of the object, it looks rather suspicious.

MAX

Is it a bomb?

PATTI

You guys found a bomb?

JULIA

I don’t know, but it looks suspicious, it could be UXO. Guys, don’t touch it, and don’t get close.

Max and Evan back away to a safe distance. Julia takes a quick glimpse at their surroundings making sure there are no other similar objects visible.

MAX

What’s UXO?

JULIA

It means unexploded explosive ordnance. This could be an old bomb that hasn’t exploded yet and it can be dangerous. We have to go back and tell Mom.

Julia takes her back pack off her shoulders, opens it and begins to look for something inside.

PATTI

Is that what that sign we passed said, that you can find UXO here?

JULIA

Yeah kind of, it’s like a warning sign.

FADE TO:

MONTAGE - STOCK FOOTAGE

The scene fades to a brief montage showing old newsreel footage of soldiers practicing during WWI and WWII. The montage also shows old newsreel footage of soldiers posting signs to warn people about UXO.

JULIA(CONT.)

A long time ago, soldiers used to practice in this area and in other areas in Canada before they went to war, like WWI and WWII and stuff. Sometimes, some of the bombs they were using for practice didn’t explode like they were supposed to; those old bombs are UXO.

The montage shifts to give a closer look at the UXO warning sign the kids passed by earlier.

JULIA

You can still find UXO in some places and it can be VERY dangerous. That sign was telling us to be careful in case we find something.

FADE TO:

EXT. HIKING TRAIL IN THE WOODS – DAY

Julia finds what she was looking for in her bag, she pulls a small colorful hair ribbon out and ties it around a branch near her.

PATTI

What’s that for?

JULIA

It’s to remember where we found it and to warn people that maybe there’s a bomb here, so just to be careful.

Julia finishes tying the bow on the branch, she turns to go back and beckons the group to follow.

JULIA

Come on guys let’s go back.

The boys turn around and start to take off running back the same way they originally came in.

JULIA

Hey! Don’t run ahead. Stay together, we are going back the same way we came.

The boys stop on their tracks, they stay close to the girls walking in front of them as they all head back.

PATTI

So how do you know that was UXO?

JULIA

I’m not sure if it is but old bombs look kind of like that, and it’s in an area with warning signs about UXO.

MONTAGE - TYPES OF UXO

We fade to a montage that shows various samples of what UXO can look like. Some UXO looks like pieces of old rusty pipe, rusted cans, or discarded pieces from a car engine.

JULIA(CONT.)

UXO can look like a rusty pipe or an old piece of junk. All UXO is like, really dangerous, so it’s better not to touch anything that looks like it.

EXT. HIKING TRAIL IN THE WOODS – DAY

The group is heading back along the trail.

MAX

So, can you still find UXO now even if it’s old?

JULIA

Yeah, but it’s hard to spot sometimes.

MONTAGE - SAMPLES OF WHERE UXO CAN BE FOUND

We fade to a montage showing various images of the types of places UXO can be found.

JULIA(CONT.)

UXO can be covered with stuff like grass or leaves. Sometimes it’s covered in dirt or underneath snow, it can even be underwater like in a pond or a beside a river.

EVAN

Yeah! You can even find UXO at people’s homes as ornaments like on shelves and stuff.

MAX

Really?

JULIA

Yeah, sometimes people take UXO home as souvenirs because they don’t realize how dangerous it can be.

EXT. HIKING TRAIL IN THE WOODS – DAY

The group continues to head back along the trail.

MAX

How do you know if it’s even working if it’s so old?

JULIA

Ahmm...well, it doesn’t matter how old it is, even if it’s like 20 or 50 or even 100 years old, it can still be VERY dangerous, because of the way it was made and because it has explosives inside.

CUT TO:

MAX

So what are you supposed to do if you find something that looks like UXO?

JULIA

Same thing we just did.

We observe the group from a slight high angle as they continue to head back along the trail. The image suddenly goes into soft focus. As Julia describes the safety steps to take when finding UXO, each step appears written on-screen using graphic text.

JULIA (CONT.)

Don’t touch it, remember where you found it and go back the same way you came, and tell an adult.

EXT. HIKING TRAIL IN THE WOODS – DAY

The group continues to head back along the trail.

EVAN

Yeah, you’re supposed to tell your parents or like an adult so they can call 911 because they know what to do.

CUT TO:

EXT. HIKING TRAIL IN THE WOODS – DAY

As we follow the group, we spot two women heading towards the kids some way in front.

PATTI

Hey there’s Mom!

Julia’s mum and Max and Patti’s mom are walking and chatting leisurely along the trail towards the group.

Max runs towards his mom followed by Evan. The boys start telling their moms what they found rather excitedly. The moms seem a bit confused by what the boys are trying to say. Julia and Patti catch up. Julia’s mom looks inquiringly at Julia. Julia begins to tell her mom what they found pointing in the direction they came. Julia’s mom seems to understand, she beckons everybody to head back, she then pulls her cell phone out of a pocket and dials 911. We see the whole group walking back to where they came from, away from the area where they found the object. The kids chatting happily as they head safely back.

CLOSING LOGOS

Call to action screen containing, UXO branding logos and contact information.

NARRATOR

Learn more about UXO safety at www.Canada.ca/UXO-Safety

FADE TO BLACK

The quiz

True or false?

  • 1. Old bombs are also called UXO.

    This is true! UXO stands for Unexploded Explosive Ordnance, another name for old bombs. 

  • 2. UXO can look just like a rusty old pipe or piece of metal.

    This is true! It is wise not to touch or otherwise disturb old or rusted metal you may come across. 

  • 3. It is OK to brush away the dirt from a piece of metal to see if it is UXO.

    This is false! The slightest touch could cause UXO to explode.

  • 4. If you see something that could be UXO, then you should not touch it, leave the way you came and tell an adult or the police. 

    This is true! That is exactly what you should do.

  • 5. It is OK to poke UXO with a stick or throw rocks at it as long as you are a safe distance away from it.

    This is false! If you are close enough to throw something at it or poke it with a stick then you will be injured or killed if it explodes.

  • 6. The longer UXO has been around the less likely it is going to explode.

    This is false! Old bombs can become more unstable over time and be more likely to explode.

  • 7. Old bombs that are under the water or on the beach can't explode because they are wet.

    This is false! Wet UXO is just as dangerous as dry UXO.

  • 8. If someone you know has an old bomb or other munitions like a grenade on a shelf in their house then it must be safe.

    This is false! It could still be dangerous. "Souvenir" UXO can be very dangerous.

Please contact us to provide feedback about our presentations and resources. 

If you see something that could be UXO:

1. Don't touch it!
Make sure that you don’t get close to it. Tell your friends to leave it alone - and tell them why. Don’t touch it, move it, or throw things at it.

2. Leave the area
Remember where you saw the object and go back the same way you came.

3. Call 9-1-1 or local police.
As soon as possible, tell an adult, call 9-1-1 or contact local police.

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: