Evaluation of the Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering

Executive summary

Objective of the Passport Receiving Agent (RA) Service Offering (PSO):

To offer Canadians living in large urban centres flexibility of access to passport application services and to extend the reach of passport application services into smaller centres and more remote regions of Canada.

Evaluation scope and changes in responsibilities for passport operations

As the first evaluation of Service Canada’s PSO, this evaluation covers the period from its introduction in December 2004 to June 30, 2013. The analyses form the baseline for performance outcomes focusing on data collected from 2010 onwards. Changes resulting from the transfer of responsibility for passport operations to Service Canada, effective July 2, 2013, are beyond the scope of this evaluation.

Key findings

Relevance

  • The PSO significantly increased accessibility to passport services, especially in rural and remote areas, by providing multiple points of services in all 13 provinces and territories, including those without Passport Canada offices. Prior to 2004, one province and three territories did not have access to in-person passport services. At that time there were 29 in-person Passport Canada offices across the country. By 2011 there were an additional 144 Service Canada Centres offering in-person passport services nation-wide.
  • In 2011-2012, 4.8 million passports were issued; 10% of the applications were received by Service Canada.
  • The PSO is well-aligned with federal and departmental priorities regarding service delivery, security and integrity through identity verification and authentication. It supports the federal responsibility to issue secure travel documents, facilitate travel, and contribute to international and domestic security.

Achievement of outcomes

  • Several elements of the PSO partnership and program are identified as effective and worthy of being modelled in future service delivery partnerships, including:
    • Training and support tools.
    • Clarity and precision of Memoranda of Understanding (MoU).
    • Access to services.
    • Rigorous approach to costing.
  • According to survey data, in 2013 over 80% of passport applicants travelled less than 25 kilometres to a Service Canada Centre, including 62% who travelled less than 10 kilometres.
  • The performance management system / quality assurance program has been found to comply with agreements indicated in the Memoranda of Understanding. For example, the overall error rate remained below the targeted 2%.
  • Areas were identified in which the performance management system did not operate optimally:
    • Regional variation in the frequency of communication of error reports.
    • Insufficient description of errors and inadequate frequency of error reports received from Passport Canada.
    • Lack of specificity in some support tools.
  • Data collected in 2013 indicate that the PSO enjoyed high client satisfaction. Over 95% of clients were satisfied or very satisfied with the PSO and 94% responded that they would likely use the PSO again. Key drivers of client satisfaction are: (1) convenience; and (2) access to in-person services. Additionally, 95% of respondents were satisfied with the friendliness and knowledge of Service Canada Receiving Agents.
  • PSO was found to compare well both to other domestic passport service channels, and internationally, in terms of accessibility, timeliness, cost, and client satisfaction.

Demonstration of efficiency and economy

  • Between 2007-2008 and 2012-2013, the financial arrangement between Passport Canada and Service Canada was revised based on additional information gathered from a time and motion study, which resulted in a more accurate reflection of the cost of providing the service.

Recommendations

Based on the evidence presented in this evaluation, it is recommended that Service Canada:

  1. Consider improvements to RA feedback and support mechanisms as required in order to ensure effectiveness of the Quality Assurance Program.
  2. Update the PSO Logic Model to more accurately reflect current activities and outcomes, and support future evaluations of PSO performance.
  3. Explore the feasibility of extending the suite of services provided under PSO, such as the implementation of an integrated electronic file transfer system; the acceptance of complex applications, including applications for name changes with validity periods of more than one year; and the extension of Documentary Evidence of Citizenship services.

Management response

Introduction

The findings of this evaluation highlight the relevance and effectiveness of the Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering (PSO). In particular, the PSO greatly increases accessibility for Canadians to in-person passport services while maintaining both domestic and international standards for clients such as timeliness, cost and knowledge. In addition to 96% of surveyed clients being satisfied with the PSO, its intake volume doubled from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013. The findings of this evaluation also bring to light the achievements of the PSO with regard to interdepartmental partnership development. The PSO was notably successful in establishing a rigorous financial agreement and performance management system, as well as continuously providing adequate training and support material.

Moving forward, Service Canada and CIC (the department responsible for the program) will work closely on the Passport Modernization Initiative including opportunities to expand the number of Service Canada Centres providing the PSO.

Recommendations

Recommendation #1

Consider improvements to RA feedback and support mechanisms as required in order to ensure effectiveness of the Quality Assurance Program.

We are in agreement with the recommendation.

Actions taken: In November 2013, implemented a revised list of performance indicators to address the lack of specificity in the performance feedback. Emphasizing with the regions the importance of regularly disseminating performance feedback to offices to promote continuous improvement.

Next steps: Continued monitoring of PSO performance to ensure quality objectives and service standards are achieved. As the PSO evolves under the modernization plan, the performance management system will be adapted accordingly.

Recommendation #2

Update the PSO Logic Model to more accurately reflect current activities and outcomes, and support future evaluations of PSO performance.

We are in agreement with the recommendations in this evaluation regarding the PSO Logic Model.

Actions taken: CIC is in the process of developing a new Logic Model for the PSO.

Next steps: Continued collaboration with CIC on Passport Modernization and developing a revised Logic Model accordingly.

Recommendation #3

Explore the feasibility of extending the suite of services provided under PSO, such as the implementation of an integrated electronic file transfer system; the acceptance of complex applications, including applications for name changes with validity periods of more than one year; and the extension of Documentary Evidence of Citizenship (DEC) services.

We are in agreement with the recommendation.

Actions taken: Since July 2013, Service Canada and CIC have been working in close collaboration to advance the Passport Modernization Initiative. This initiative will have an impact on the roles and responsibilities of the PSO.

Next steps: As part of the modernization plan, the level of service provided by the PSO will change over the next 3 years. The intention of Passport Modernization is to provide Canadians with on-line passport services for application in-take. Canadians will have the choice of applying from home or through any internet connected service such a Service Canada Centre via a Citizen Access Workstation (CAWS) or any other community provider. For first time applicants, needing to authenticate their identity, Service Canada will provide this service through any of its Service Canada Centres. These changes will provide Canadians with expanded access to passport services and change the role of the PSO.

Overall, the level of service that the PSO will be able to provide will increase by:

  1. Leveraging the complete Service Canada in-person network to enhance access to in-person services.
  2. Deploying a new passport issuance system in SCCs to support the integration of intake and processing activities. It will also improve speed of service, even in remote areas.
  3. Implementing new processes to enable SCCs to accept all application types.

The timing of this evaluation coincides with the Passport Modernization Initiative. With the primary objective of enhancing accessibility and efficiency of passport services for Canadians, the modernization plan already addresses many of the recommendations raised in this evaluation. We will continue to work with CIC to enhance the PSO and maintain a high level of effectiveness as the service offering evolves under the modernization plan.

1. Introduction

This report presents the results of the evaluation of Service Canada’s Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering (PSO) from December 2004 to June 30, 2013. Conducted by the Strategic Evaluation Division, Evaluation Directorate, Employment and Social Development Canada as part of the ESDC Departmental Evaluation Plan (2012-2013 to 2016-2017); the evaluation focuses on the service delivery role of Service Canada in the passport application process. The present evaluation is the first for this service offering and, as such, provides a baseline on the performance of the PSO.

As of July 2, 2013, responsibility for Passport Canada was transferred from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), and Service Canada assumed responsibility for passport operations. Changes in service delivery outcomes that have resulted from these arrangements are beyond the scope of the current evaluation. Similarly, assessment of the passport program and policy, including machinery of government changes as of June 2013, are out-of-scope.

1.1 Evaluative work

In accordance with Treasury Board Secretariat’s Directive on Evaluation, this evaluation focuses on issues of the PSO’s relevance, achievement of outcomes, and efficiency and economy during the period under evaluation.

Multiple lines of evidence, both quantitative and qualitative, were collected and analyzed in support of this evaluation. The evaluation matrix identifying questions and corresponding lines of evidence is attached in Annex A. A total of nine technical reports containing in-depth analyses were produced in support of each line of evidence. A list of these reports is provided in Annex B.

2. Profile

2.1 Background

In the context of increasing demand, Passport Canada developed partnerships to increase points of access. Footnote 1 Service Canada’s Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering (PSO) was one of two Receiving Agent services Footnote 2 introduced in 2004 by Passport Canada with the aim of increasing access to in-person passport services across the country, and providing support in handling steadily rising volumes of passport applications while improving client service. Service Canada’s PSO constitutes one of four domestic channels through which Canadians can access passport services, the others being walk-in service at Passport Canada offices, mail-in directly to Passport Canada, and Canada Post Corporation (CPC) Receiving Agent Service Offering.

Points of service

Prior to the 2004 introduction of Receiving Agent services, there were only 29 Passport Canada offices across the country, with no offices in Prince Edward Island, Yukon, North West Territories or Nunavut. As a result, Canadians in rural and remote locations who needed passport services were required to rely on the mail-in option or undertake travel to access in-person services at a Passport Canada office. In the provincial/territorial examples noted above, out-of-province/territory travel to access a Passport Canada office could require time off work, overnight hotel stays, and extensive travel time.

Volume

Passport Canada had also been experiencing an upward trend in passport volumes with the number of passports issued increasing from approximately 1.4 million in 1997-1998 to over 2.5 million in 2003-2004. Footnote 3 The volume in passport applications increased further in 2007 with the introduction of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI), which required all Canadians travelling to the United States to have a valid passport. Since then, the upward trend has continued with over 4.8 million passports issued in 2011-2012. Footnote 4

Preference for in-person service

Passport Canada Annual Reports from 2005-2006 to 2011-2012 indicate a consistent client preference for in-person service over the mail-in option. Although the number of applications received in-person at Passport Canada offices has decreased from 79% in 2005-2006 to 72% in 2010-2011, the number of applications received in-person through Receiving Agent services has increased over the same period. Footnote 5

2.2 An evolving partnership agreement

In 2005, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC), the Passport Office (PPT) (then an agency of the Department of Foreign Affairs) and Social Development Canada (SDC) entered into an agreement to deliver the Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering (PSO) on a pilot basis. Footnote 6 This agreement permitted HRSDC Receiving Agents (RAs) to provide pre-screening services for regular and renewal passport applications in designated locations across Canada. Following renewal of the agreement and the HRSDC launch of Service Canada in September 2005, the PSO was continued under a 2007 Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between Passport Canada (PPTC) and HRSDC.

The MoU was amended in 2008, and again in 2013, to reflect extensions of service and enhanced precision, as required. Significant amendments to the 2008 MoU updated funding arrangements and permitted the launch of a Documentary Evidence of Citizenship (DEC) validation service pilot in seven existing Receiving Agent sites. Footnote 7 The DEC service permits RAs to photocopy passport applicants’ original identity and citizenship documents and send the copies with completed applications to Passport Canada, thereby eliminating the need for applicants to surrender their original documents. A 2008 Order in Council authorized Service Canada to deliver PSO in up to 200 Service Canada Centres (SCCs), and to provide DEC services in up to 60 SCCs. As of January 2011, almost half of all SCCs (144 out of 324) deliver the PSO, including 14 that also provide the DEC validation service.

In May 2013, the existing MoU between DFAIT and ESDC was extended to March 31, 2016. However, as noted above, this was replaced shortly thereafter by a new MoU between CIC and ESDC, effective July 2, 2013. The current MoU represents significantly revised agreements concerning governance, roles and responsibilities, and costing, which are beyond the scope of this evaluation.

2.3 PSO objectives

During the period of evaluation, the objectives of the Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering were to offer Canadians living in large urban centres flexibility of access to passport application services, and to extend the reach of passport application services into smaller centres and more remote regions of Canada. Footnote 8

The goal of the partnership was to use Service Canada’s expertise in service delivery and its existing network of Service Canada Centres to provide one-stop, seamless and integrated service to Canadians, especially those in rural and remote locations where in-person passport services were previously unavailable. Footnote 9

2.4 Governance of the partnership

This section refers to the governance of the partnership as it existed under the Memoranda of Understanding with DFAIT prior to July 2, 2013. A steering committee co-chaired by the designated representatives of Passport Canada and Service Canada was created to meet periodically and as required, to provide overall direction and leadership. The designated representative for Passport Canada had the authority to recommend amendments to the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). Both organizational representatives acted as signatories to any amendments.

Working groups comprised of representatives of the partner organizations were established by the steering committee. Working groups had wide-ranging responsibilities to explore potential areas for collaboration and ensure efficient and effective service delivery.

Under the 2008 MoU, Passport Canada oversaw the overall direction of the PSO, including accountability for the policy direction of the service offering, responsibility to determine entitlement and issue passports, and responsibility to provide Service Canada with all information, RA training and support tools required to carry out its roles and responsibilities. Service Canada was responsible for specific delivery aspects only, including the provision of pre-screening PSO and DEC services to Canadians; the collection and submission to Passport Canada of any valid or expired passports, accompanying materials and applicable passport fees; and referral of clients with urgent or complex applications to Passport Canada. Footnote 10

3. Key findings - relevance

3.1 Continued need for the program

As noted above, Service Canada’s PSO was introduced to address the need for increased access to in-person passport services by Canadians, and to assist Passport Canada in responding to steadily increasing volumes of passport applications, while improving client service. Evidence from this evaluation indicates that during the period under review, the PSO made significant contributions in both regards, and that there is an ongoing need for this service offering. The PSO supports Canada’s ability to deliver passports to Canadians in a manner comparable to international counterparts with regards to a multiple-option service delivery model (e.g., in-person services through dedicated passport offices, as well as Receiving Agent services, application mail-in, on-line information and forms, etc.). Footnote 11

Points of service

Prior to the introduction of the Receiving Agent options in 2004, there were only 29 Passport Canada offices across the country, Footnote 12 with no offices operating on Prince Edward Island or in Yukon, Northwest Territories, or Nunavut. Figure 1 presents all in-person points of service across the country in 2010-2011, indicating clearly that the 144 SCC sites greatly increase accessibility to in-person passport services for all Canadians.

Figure 1: Points of service
Points of service image: description follows
  • Source: Passport Canada Annual Report 2010-2011, p. 7
Text description for Figure 1: Points of service

Figure 1, entitled “Points of Service”, is a map of Canada indicating every in-person point of service for accessing passport services across the country. Colour-coded dots distinguish between Canada Passport Offices, Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent locations, and Service Canada Centres providing the Passport Receiving Agent (RA) Service Offering. The map does not specify which Service Canada sites offer Documentary Evidence of Citizenship (DEC) services, nor does it provide specific addresses.

The following is an alphabetical list of all in-person points of service, organized first by province, then by organization providing the service, and finally by specific location.

Alberta:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent locations:
    • none
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • Calgary (South)
    • Edmonton
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Brooks
    • Calgary (three locations)
    • Canmore
    • Edmonton (three locations)
    • Edson
    • Fort McMurray
    • Grande Prairie
    • Lethbridge
    • Lloydminster
    • Medicine Hat
    • Red Deer

British Columbia:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • none
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • Kelowna
    • Richmond
    • Surrey
    • Vancouver
    • Victoria
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Abbotsford
    • Burnaby
    • Chilliwack
    • Comox Valley
    • Coquitlam
    • Cranbrook
    • Kamloops
    • Kelowna
    • Langley
    • Nanaimo
    • Nelson
    • New Westminster
    • North Vancouver
    • Penticton
    • Powell River
    • Prince George
    • Ridge Meadows
    • Salmon Arm
    • Terrace
    • Vancouver
    • Victoria

Manitoba:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • none
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • Winnipeg
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Brandon
    • Flin Flon
    • Morden
    • Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes
    • Steinbach
    • The Pas
    • Thompson

New Brunswick:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • none
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • Fredericton
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Campbellton
    • Edmundston
    • Grand Falls (Grand-Sault)
    • Miramichi
    • Moncton
    • Saint John
    • Saint-Quentin
    • Shediac
    • St. Stephen
    • Woodstock

Newfoundland and Labrador:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • none
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • St. John's
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Corner Brook
    • Gander
    • Happy Valley
    • Labrador City
    • Marystown
    • Placentia
    • St. Anthony

Northwest Territories:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • none
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • none
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Fort Simpson
    • Fort Smith
    • Hay River
    • Inuvik
    • Yellowknife

Nova Scotia:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • Sydney
    • Yarmouth
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • Halifax
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Amherst
    • Bedford
    • Bridgewater
    • Glace Bay
    • Kentville
    • New Glasgow

Nunavut:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • none
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • none
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Cambridge Bay
    • Iqaluit
    • Rankin Inlet

Ontario:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • Ancaster
    • Belleville
    • Bracebridge
    • Brantford
    • Cambridge
    • Chatham
    • Guelph
    • Kingston
    • Midland
    • Newmarket
    • North Bay
    • Oakville
    • Orillia
    • Ottawa (2 locations)
    • Owen Sound
    • Pickering
    • Sarnia
    • Sault Ste. Marie
    • Stratford
    • Sudbury (2 locations)
    • Toronto
    • Uxbridge
    • Woodstock
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • Brampton
    • Hamilton
    • Kitchener
    • London
    • Mississauga
    • North York
    • Ottawa
    • Scarborough
    • St. Catharines
    • Thunder Bay
    • Toronto
    • Whitby
    • Windsor
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Ajax
    • Barrie
    • Bracebridge
    • Brockville
    • Collingwood
    • Cornwall
    • Espanola
    • Elliot Lake
    • Fort Frances
    • Georgetown
    • Hawkesbury
    • Kapuskasing
    • Kenora
    • New Liskeard
    • Newmarket
    • North Bay
    • Oakville
    • Orangeville
    • Oshawa
    • Ottawa (2 locations)
    • Owen Sound
    • Parry Sound
    • Pembroke
    • Peterborough
    • Richmond Hill
    • Sault Ste. Marie
    • Timmins
    • Toronto (3 locations)

Prince Edward Island:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • Charlottetown
    • Summerside
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • none
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Charlottetown
    • Montague
    • O'Leary
    • Souris
    • Summerside

Quebec:

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • Anjou
    • Boucherville
    • Brossard
    • Cap Rouge
    • Lévis
    • Québec (2 locations)
    • Rimouski
    • Saint-Bruno
    • Trois-Rivières
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • Chicoutimi
    • Gatineau (Hull sector)
    • Laval
    • Montréal
    • Pointe-Claire
    • Québec
    • Saint-Laurent
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Asbestos
    • Baie Comeau
    • Brossard
    • Chibougamau
    • Coaticook
    • Cowansville
    • Drummondville
    • Gaspé
    • LaSalle
    • La Tuque
    • Lévis
    • Longueuil
    • Magog
    • Pointe-aux-Trembles
    • Repentigny
    • Rouyn-Noranda
    • Saint-Hyacinthe
    • Sept-Îles
    • Sherbrooke
    • Thetford Mines
    • Trois-Rivières
    • Val d'Or
    • Valleyfield
    • Verdun

Saskatchewan

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • none
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • Regina
    • Saskatoon
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Estevan
    • Melfort
    • Moose Jaw
    • North Battleford
    • Prince Albert
    • Regina
    • Weyburn
    • Yorkton

Yukon

  • Canada Post Passport Receiving Agent Locations:
    • none
  • Passport Canada Offices:
    • none
  • Service Canada Centres:
    • Whitehorse

Volume

In 2011-2012, over 4.8 million passports were issued. Of these, 24.2% (1,181,149.5) came via mail-in channels (including the RA services of both Service Canada and Canada Post). Footnote 13 The number of passport applications received by Service Canada Receiving Agents has increased steadily since PSO was first introduced, growing from 67,260 in 2006-2007 to 267,112 in 2007-2008 after the introduction of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative. In 2011-2012 Service Canada received 484,297 passport applications. Footnote 14 This constitutes 41% of the total mail-in (including from Service Canada and Canada Post) volume sent to Passport Canada Footnote 15 or about 10% of all passport applications in that year.

In summary, according to Passport Canada, Canadians have come to rely on the extended access to RA services. Footnote 16 PSO continues to provide an often needed service to Canadians, especially those living in rural and remote areas.

3.2 Alignment with government priorities

The PSO is well aligned with federal government and departmental priorities regarding service delivery, as well as security and integrity. In particular, PSO continues to support the Government of Canada’s priority to improve service to Canadians, and to strengthen the security of entitlement and issuance processes through improved identity verification and entitlement capabilities. Footnote 17 PSO objectives are also aligned with ESDC’s 2014-2015 Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) Strategic Outcome 4: Service Excellence for Canadians.

3.3 Alignment with federal roles and responsibilities

The PSO objectives noted in Section 2.3 are consistent with the Government of Canada’s mission regarding passports, “to issue secure Canadian travel documents through authentication of identity and entitlement, facilitating travel and contributing to international and domestic security”. Footnote 18

The leveraging of Service Canada’s resources and service delivery network across the country for the delivery of PSO contributes to the federal government’s goal regarding issuance of passports, while also providing access to government services and benefits that Canadians need.

4. Key findings - achievement of expected outcomes

This section presents evidence concerning the extent to which PSO achieved expected outcomes as set out in the Memoranda of Understanding and logic model (see Annex C), including: the effectiveness of the service delivery and partnership, access to passport services, awareness of Service Canada services, and client satisfaction. Findings regarding the adequacy of the performance management (quality assurance) system and comparability of PSO with other domestic channels and international delivery models are also presented.

4.1 Effectiveness of service delivery approach

PSO service delivery was found to have been effective. Several elements of the partnership and program were identified by interviewees Footnote 19 as highly effective and worthy of being modelled in future service delivery partnerships. These include: the training and support tools, the rigorous approach to costing, and the Memoranda of Understanding. Both the performance and financial aspects of the MoU were described as very clear and detailed. They were noted to have evolved throughout the partnership, thereby permitting the PSO to be implemented as per planning expectations, and services to be delivered in a manner consistent with the terms of the MoU. It was noted specifically that the PSO provided a good model for costing in situations of variable volume, which may be applicable to future Service Canada service offerings. Footnote 20

Interviewees discussed two aspects of the PSO that may have implications for other Service Canada service offerings. A suggested advantage is that PSO provides an opportunity to increase the “bundling” of services, essentially informing passport applicants of other service offerings provided by Service Canada. Conversely, it was noted that the PSO can be a time-consuming service offering, especially in instances where one individual submits applications on behalf of several people (for example, family members). Given that each passport application takes approximately 15 minutes to complete, such a situation can occupy a single passport Receiving Agent for a considerable amount of time, thus potentially extending wait times for other clients and creating more pressure for employees. This is particularly the case in small offices with few employees, during peak seasons for passport applications, and in urban offices with generally more diverse clientele who may require longer transaction times.

Two additional observations were made by interviewees. First, it was noted that in order to support optimal service delivery, clear and regular inter-departmental communications at both the executive level and the working level are key. Second, while successive MoUs clearly identified the objectives of the PSO, the logic model requires updating to accurately reflect current activities and outcomes, and to support ongoing monitoring and assessment.

4.2 Performance management system

During the period under evaluation, the PSO performance management system Footnote 21 consisted of a detailed list of possible errors, a rigorous and detailed training and support system aimed at preventing errors, and an error feedback system that operated horizontally between partners and vertically within Service Canada.

4.2.1 Error rates

Between 2004 and June 2013, Passport Canada assessed the quality of Service Canada performance by reviewing 100% of the applications forwarded by Service Canada and calculating the error rate on a monthly basis. The error rate was calculated based on the number of applications containing one or more errors and not on total number of errors. Errors were tracked and could be linked to individual Receiving Agents.

According to the MoU, the agreed upon performance goal is 100% of application forms with no errors; however, on October 1, 2009 the targeted error rate was set at less than or equal to 2% of applications containing errors. Footnote 22 Analysis of Passport Canada administrative data for the period of July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 indicates that the average overall error rate was at an acceptable level, at 1.8%. This is a reduction from an error rate of 6.4% in 2008. Footnote 23 Ninety of the 144 SCCs (62.5%) offering the PSO achieved the targeted error rate during this period.

Analysis of the same Passport Canada administrative data also provided evidence that, with very few exceptions, there was an inverse relationship between the volume of passport applications and the error rate. For example, most SCCs with a high error rate handled quite a low annual volume, while most SCCs with a low error rate experienced a high annual volume of applications. Footnote 24 There was also evidence of regional variation in error rates.

4.2.2 Training and support tools

Results from the survey of Receiving Agents Footnote 25 conducted in spring 2013 indicated that virtually all RAs received mandatory training prior to delivering passport application services. Fully 89% of survey respondents reported that the training provided adequate preparation to deliver the PSO. Footnote 26 Interview evidence indicated that additional training to deliver the Documentary Evidence of Citizenship (DEC) portion of the PSO was straightforward and very accessible. This was due, in part, to the fact that Service Canada’s Citizen Service Officers (CSOs) are already familiar with DEC validation for the Social Insurance Number (SIN) service offering. Footnote 27

Results from both the RA survey and the key informant interviews indicated that the Operational Guidelines and Directives (also referred to as the RA Manual), Travel Date Calculator, and Questions and Answers were effective tools that were used frequently. By contrast, both studies indicated a somewhat lower use of the Error Definitions and Error Guide. Specifically, while 97% of RA survey respondents reported that the Operational Guidelines were useful or very useful, only 73% of respondents found the Error Guide useful or very useful. Footnote 28 Interviewees reported that the Error Definitions and Error Guide were overly vague. Footnote 29 For interviewees, the Photo Guide was also lacking in specificity, although this finding was inconsistent with RA survey findings regarding this tool. Footnote 30

4.2.3 Feedback

Evidence from the RA survey indicated that over 90% of Receiving Agents received performance feedback from their managers, with 46% receiving feedback on at least a monthly basis. Footnote 31 A majority (77%) agreed that monthly performance feedback was adequate. Footnote 32

The evidence indicated there was regional variation in the frequency of communication of error reports. Data collected revealed that performance feedback in the Ontario Region was provided every six months compared to other regions where information was provided monthly. Ontario Receiving Agents were also less likely to be satisfied with this rate of feedback – their satisfaction rate was 20% compared to 58%-85% satisfaction rates in other regions. Footnote 33

Key informant interviewees identified a lack of specificity in the description of some errors in the error reports, and an inadequate frequency of receipt of such reports from Passport Canada. Footnote 34

4.3. Client satisfaction

As part of this evaluation a Client Satisfaction Survey Footnote 35 was conducted in spring 2013. The survey instrument was adapted from the National Survey of Client Satisfaction previously commissioned by Passport Canada. Data could only be collected from passport applicants using the Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering (Service Canada clients); for this reason client satisfaction results could not be compared among the domestic channels (Passport Canada offices, Canada Post Receiving Agents, or mail-in).

4.3.1 Satisfaction

Results from the client satisfaction survey indicated that 95% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with the service. Furthermore, 94% of respondents reported they would be likely or very likely to use Service Canada to submit their next passport application. Footnote 36 , Footnote 37

Two primary drivers of preference for Service Canada emerged from the survey. Footnote 38 First, a total of 71% of respondents reported that they chose Service Canada because of convenience, including the handiness of the location relative to the respondents’ homes (37%) and the ease of using the location (34%) due to features such as access to parking, shorter lineups, or improved accessibility for persons with disabilities. Footnote 39 Second, a total of 32% indicated their preference for accessing in-person services at Service Canada because they were able to ask questions (17%), could get assistance to ensure their applications were completed correctly (12%), and were not required to trust the postal system with their original identity and citizenship documents (3%).

4.3.2 Accessibility

As noted in Section 3.1, provision of the PSO in 144 Service Canada Centres across the country has significantly increased accessibility to in-person services for passport applicants, especially those in rural and remote areas, and those in provinces and territories without Passport Canada offices. The number of passport applications received by Service Canada RAs constitutes 41% of the total mail-in volume received by Passport Canada Footnote 40 or approximately 10% of all passport applications in 2011-2012, up from less than two percent in 2006-2007. Footnote 41 While Passport Canada has met its target of 95% of the population being within 100 km of in-person services since 2009-2010, results from the Client Satisfaction Survey indicate that over 80% of respondents reported travelling less than 25 kilometres to a Service Canada Centre, including 62% who travelled less than 10 kilometres. Urban applicants reported shorter distances than rural applicants, with 90.5% of urban applicants travelling less than 25 km compared to 39.9% of rural applicants. Fully 97% of survey respondents who could identify the required distance to travel to the SCC reported the distance was acceptable. Footnote 42

4.3.3 Timeliness

Wait times

Results from the Client Satisfaction Survey indicated that respondents waited an average of approximately 21 minutes to speak to a Service Canada representative with approximately 60% waiting less than 20 minutes, and 8% waiting one hour or longer. Ninety percent of respondents reported they found the wait times acceptable. The proportion of respondents who found their wait times acceptable decreased as the length of wait time increased. Wait time begins to have the most negative impact at 45 minutes or longer, as evidenced by a sharp increase in the proportion of respondents who signalled they found the wait times unacceptable at the interval of 45 to 59 minutes. Footnote 43

Processing delay

Analysis of Passport Canada administrative data indicated that 89% of the applications received by Service Canada were processed within three business days. Footnote 44 For the purpose of this evaluation, “processing” refers to the time elapsed between the time an application is received by a Service Canada RA to the time it is received at Passport Canada for review, validation, and production. During the period under evaluation, if an application had to be returned to the client for revision and subsequent re-submission, the initial date of receipt was retained. Footnote 45 Therefore, unless a revised application was re-submitted on the same day, retaining the initial date of receipt inevitably resulted in longer processing delays. There was also evidence of some regional variation in processing delays. For example, the average processing delay in Newfoundland and Saskatchewan (3 business days) was almost twice as long as in Quebec and Ontario (1.7 business days). In the absence of clear evidence accounting for these differences, it is likely that these regional differences may be attributed to differences in mailing times and practices.

4.3.4 Friendliness and knowledge of Service Canada staff

Results from the Client Satisfaction Survey indicated high levels of client satisfaction with the friendliness and knowledge of the Service Canada Receiving Agents. At least 95% of survey respondents indicated they were satisfied with Service Canada Receiving Agents’ courtesy, understanding of client needs, competence, ability to answer questions, and ability to provide service in client’s choice of official language. Footnote 46

4.4 Domestic and international comparison

As noted earlier, Service Canada’s PSO is one of four domestic channels available to Canadians requiring passport services. Given the focus of this evaluation on elements of service delivery, this section compares Service Canada’s PSO with other domestic and international channels regarding accessibility, timeliness, cost, and client satisfaction.

Domestic channels

Overall, Service Canada’s PSO compares well with other existing domestic passport application channels in terms of accessibility, timeliness, cost, and client satisfaction. Footnote 47 The PSO is offered in 144 SCCs compared to 34 Passport Canada offices, and 56 Canada Post Corporation locations (see Figure 1). PSO provides a turn-around time of 20 business days plus delivery time, which is consistent with all other domestic channels, except Passport Canada, the only channel authorized to provide urgent service. Footnote 48 Service Canada collects passport fees only, and unlike the Canada Post Receiving Agent Service, does not charge a service fee. Further details are included in Annex D.

International

At the international level, Canada is a member of the Five Nations Passport Group along with the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. A technical report Footnote 49 comparing Canada with nation members of this group illustrated that Canadian passport service delivery channels, including Service Canada’s PSO, compare well internationally in terms of accessibility, timeliness, and passport fees. Canada’s geographical realities are reflected in the accessibility targets set by Passport Canada regarding travel distances for Canadians to access a passport point of service (e.g., 95% of Canadians travel less than 100 km, compared to 99% of UK citizens accessing services within 5 km). However, as noted above, evidence from the Client Satisfaction Survey indicated that over 80% of respondents reported travelling less than 25 kilometres to a Service Canada Centre, including 62% who travelled less than 10 kilometres. This compares well with Australia (88% within 7.5 km). Footnote 50 Further details regarding timeliness and passport cost are included in Annex D. Footnote 51

4.5 Emerging issues

Key informant interviewees were asked to provide suggestions for improving the PSO. This section presents a number of unanticipated findings that emerged from the key informant interview study. Footnote 52 Although comprehensive study of these issues was beyond the scope of this evaluation, further consideration may be warranted in light of the current agreement to support the modernization of the passport program while maintaining high-level client service. Footnote 53

4.5.1 Limits of current services provided

Name changes

In the instance where a citizen requires a new passport to reflect a name change, regulations require that a new general application be submitted and the existing passport surrendered. While Service Canada Receiving Agents may accept these documents if the original passport has less than one year validity remaining, passports with more than one year validity remaining must be surrendered along with the general application directly to Passport Canada. Footnote 54 Authorizing Service Canada RAs to accept applications for name change passports when the current passport has longer remaining validity may enhance client service in such situations.

Complex applications

Key informant interviewees suggested the expansion of the current Service Canada PSO to permit RAs to handle a range of other complex applications that, during the period of evaluation, required referral directly to Passport Canada. These include the ability to: accept children’s applications with only one parental signature where the second parent is deceased; return cancelled passports on behalf of deceased persons; certify passports; deal with lost, stolen or damaged passports; help expedite corrections in the event that passports are received with errors; and assist clients in completing their passport applications online.

Outreach services

The key informant study provided evidence of one Official Language Minority Community (OLMC) in a remote area serviced by SCC outreach. It is plausible that there may be several such OLMCs across the country. In the event that the PSO were expanded to outreach sites, it would be important to ensure a complete expansion in order to avoid any potential inequality of service provision to OLMCs.

4.5.2 Issues for further exploration

Increased volume in service locations

Several key informants suggested that the provision of the PSO and/or PSO-DEC may lead to increased volume in centres offering those services relative to nearby centres not offering them. This, in turn, may cause increased pressure for Citizen Service Officers, and potentially increase wait times for clients of other service offerings. It was observed that it is particularly problematic in small centres with few staff working during peak seasons for passport applications, and in urban offices with generally more diverse clientele who may require longer transaction times. Footnote 55

Documentary Evidence of Citizenship (DEC) issues

Although it was beyond the scope of this evaluation to conduct a comprehensive study of the DEC service, several DEC-related issues emerged in the key informant interviews, which may warrant further exploration. As noted above, it was suggested that the provision of DEC services may result in increased volume relative to other SCCs where this extended service is not offered. It was also noted in Section 4.2.2 that because Citizen Service Officers are familiar with the validation of citizenship documents through the Social Insurance Number (SIN) service offering, they were able to easily master the PSO DEC training. Finally, key informant interviewees reported that client feedback indicated a desire for DEC services. Given that these services are currently provided in only 14 Service Canada Centres, expansion of this service may further enhance client service.

5. Key findings - efficiency and economy

While the specific funding agreements have evolved as the PSO has matured, the financial arrangement between Passport Canada and Service Canada accurately reflected the cost to provide the service between 2007 and 2013. Footnote 56

5.1 Costs to process a passport application

Service Canada incurs a range of costs including variable costs per application, fixed costs related to National Headquarters (NHQ) management of the PSO, non-recurring costs related to program expansion and start-up costs, and costs to receive and review applications that are incomplete or otherwise non-compliant and consequently cannot be forwarded to Passport Canada. Footnote 57 Annex E provides details on all variable, fixed and non-recurring costs related to both the PSO and DEC service offerings by fiscal year from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013.

5.1.1 Variable costs

Under the 2007 Memorandum of Understanding, Passport Canada agreed to pay Service Canada $5.00 per application received between the period of April 1, 2007 and September 30, 2007. Based on a Time and Motion study conducted in 2007, the 2008 Memorandum of Understanding amended the funding agreement providing for Passport Canada to reimburse Service Canada a variable cost of $12.39 Footnote 58 per application received by Passport Canada. Footnote 59 As noted in section 4.1, this approach to costing was found to be effective and to provide a good model for costing in situations of variable volume. Following an assessment of the DEC pilot in 2009, the reimbursement for DEC applications was established at an additional $1.75 per application. Footnote 60 These fees per application remained unchanged from the time they were established throughout the period under evaluation.

A second Time and Motion study Footnote 61 was conducted in 2012. Results indicated that Service Canada’s application processing time had decreased by three minutes and 23 seconds since the 2007 Time and Motion study, resulting in a reduction in cost of $2.52 per application. Footnote 62 The study also indicated that it took Service Canada two minutes and 57 seconds longer to provide DEC services than to process an application without DEC services. Footnote 63 , Footnote 64

Finally, Service Canada incurred costs to receive and review applications that were incomplete or otherwise non-compliant and could not be forwarded to Passport Canada. The 2012 Time and Motion study identified the average cost per non-compliant application at $8.38. Further review of an application after it has been deemed non-compliant was estimated to cost approximately $0.85 per minute for a total cost of approximately $750K for 2011-2012. Footnote 65

Given that variable costs are dependent on the volume of applications Service Canada sends to Passport Canada, increasing variable costs from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 reflect the ongoing trend of increasing volumes. Spikes in volumes occurred following the 2007 introduction of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI), and again five years later as those passports required renewal. Footnote 66

6. Conclusion

6.1 Relevance

The PSO significantly increased accessibility to passport services, especially in rural and remote areas, with multiple points of services in all 13 provinces and territories, including those lacking Passport Canada offices. Canadians have come to rely on the extended access to Receiving Agent services. Footnote 67 PSO also supports Canada’s ability to deliver passports to Canadians in a manner comparable to international counterparts with regards to a multiple-option service delivery model. The PSO is well-aligned with federal and departmental priorities and supports the federal responsibility regarding passport issuance.

6.2 Achievement of outcomes

The PSO service delivery was found to be effective. Several elements of the partnership and program have been identified as worthy of being modelled in future service delivery partnerships. Client satisfaction with the PSO and with Service Canada Receiving Agents was reported as high. Although it was not possible to compare client satisfaction among domestic channels, PSO compared well with other international counterparts in terms of accessibility, timeliness, cost, and client satisfaction. Consideration of an extension of the suite of services provided under the PSO may enhance the ability to meet client needs during the transition to a modernized passport program.

Overall, the performance management (quality assurance) system was found to be a reliable system that functioned well and served both partners adequately, as evidenced by the fact that the average error rate remained consistently below the target of less than 2%. Further inquiry into regional variation in the frequency of communication of error reports is suggested. Increasing the frequency of error reports and the specificity of some error descriptions may increase the percentage of Service Canada Centres achieving the targeted error rate. Improvement of tools identified as overly vague could also support more SCCs in achieving the targeted error rate.

In the context of the current initiative to modernize the passport program and Service Canada’s responsibilities for passport operations, updating the PSO Logic Model to accurately reflect current activities and expected outcomes would support partners’ ability to evaluate future achievement of PSO outcomes.

6.3 Efficiency and economy

The largest costs incurred by Service Canada have been the variable costs linked to the volume of passport applications it handles. Between the establishment of precise variable costs per application in 2008 and June 2013, Passport Canada reimbursed Service Canada for variable costs. This approach to costing was found to be highly effective and a good model for costing in situations of variable volume. Between 2007 and 2013, the financial arrangement between Passport Canada and SC accurately reflected the cost to provide the service.

7. Recommendations

Based on the evidence presented in this evaluation, it is recommended that Service Canada:

  1. Consider improvements to RA feedback and support mechanisms as required in order to ensure effectiveness of the Quality Assurance Program.
  2. Update the PSO Logic Model to more accurately reflect current activities and outcomes, and support future evaluation of PSO performance.
  3. Explore the feasibility of extending the suite of services provided under PSO, such as the implementation of an integrated electronic file transfer system; the acceptance of complex applications, including applications for name changes with validity periods of more than one year; and the extension of Documentary Evidence of Citizenship services.

Annex A: Evaluation questions by line of evidence

Table 1: Evaluation matrix for the passport (receiving agent) service offering evaluation
Evaluation questions Lit/ doc review Analysis performance data Client satisfaction survey Online survey Key informant interview
Performance-effectiveness (design and delivery) 1 2 3 4 5
1. Is the service delivery approach effective? X X X
a. Was it implemented as planned? X
b. How well does the Service Canada/Passport Canada partnership function? X
c. What are the lessons learned/scope for service delivery arrangements with other departments? X
2. How adequate is the performance measurement system? X X X
a. Does the current error grid cover all possible issues with applications? X X X
b. Does it provide adequate feedback to the Service Canada centres for quality control purpose? X X X
3. What is the performance of the PSO in terms of accessibility, reliability and client satisfaction? X X X
a. What was the effect on accessibility? X X
b. What was the level of error rates and of client complaints? X X
c. Were applications handled in a secure and timely manner? X X X
d. Did clients consider Service Canada staff as friendly and knowledgeable? X X X
4. What are the implications on other Service offerings if Service Canada extends its Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering (including identity validation via the DEC)? X X
a. Does it make sense to provide this service in all service centres? X
Performance-efficiency and economy 1 2 3 4 5
5. What are the costs involved in the Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering? X
a. How much does it cost Service Canada to process a passport application? X
b. What are the overall costs of the program? X
c. What are the costs to provide the PSO in rural areas? X
6. How does Service Canada delivery of PSO compare in terms of performance and client satisfaction with the other available channels (Passport Canada Office, Mail) and with Canada Post passport receiving agents? X
7. Are there alternative designs to delivery that could improve the service? X X

Annex B: List of technical reports

  1. Employment and Social Development Canada, 2014. Extended Analysis of Passport Client Survey. Technical Report in support of the Evaluation of the Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering. (Based on data collected in spring, 2013).
  2. Employment and Social Development Canada, 2014. Financial Study. Technical Report in support of the Evaluation of the Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering. (Based on data from 2008-2013).
  3. Employment and Social Development Canada, 2014. Technical Report on the Key Informant Study in support of the Evaluation of the Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering. (Based on data collected in fall, 2013).
  4. Employment and Social Development Canada, 2014. Technical Report on a Survey of Service Canada Passport Receiving Agents in support of the Evaluation of the Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering. (Based on data collected in spring, 2013).
  5. Employment and Social Development Canada, 2013. Analysis of Passport Canada Administrative Data, July 2010- June 2011. Technical Report in support of the Evaluation of the Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering.
  6. Employment and Social Development Canada, 2013. Data Quality Study for Passport: The Administrative Data Generated by Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering, July 2010-June2011. Technical Report in support of the Evaluation of the Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering.
  7. Employment and Social Development Canada, 2013. International Comparison among Passport Service Offerings. Technical Report in support of the Evaluation of the Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering.
  8. Employment and Social Development Canada, 2013. Literature / File Review in support of the Evaluation of the Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering.
  9. Employment and Social Development Canada, 2013. Technical Report on the Passport Client Survey in support of the Evaluation of the Service Canada Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering. (Based on data collected in spring, 2013).

Annex C: Logic model

Logic model
Logic model chart
Text description of Annex C: Logic Model

Annex C presents the Passport Delivery Logic Model (LM) for Service Canada’s Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering (PSO). This LM presents a causal chain that begins with three groups of specific activities, which lead to four specific outputs. The outputs then lead to two specific immediate outcomes, which in turn lead to two specific medium-term outcomes. At the last stage, the medium-term outcomes lead to a single long-term outcome. There is decreasing attribution as the causal chain moves from activities to long-term outcome.

Beginning at the level of the three groups of activities, the LM also identifies the organization that is responsible for each group of activities as follows:

Activities:

  • Passport Canada and Service Canada share the responsibility to design and refine the service delivery model and related workflow processes.
  • Passport Canada is responsible to:
    • Provide training to Service Canada Agents with respect to Passport policies and procedures; and to
    • Provide Service Canada with all necessary forms, brochures and other information for distribution to the public.
  • Service Canada is responsible to:
    • Provide basic information on passport applications;
    • Review applications for completeness; and to
    • Provide training on Service Canada administrative and financial procedures to Agents.

Outputs:

The three groups of activities outlined above lead to the following four outputs:

  • Guidelines for Service Canada Delivery Agents;
  • Service Canada Delivery Infrastructure;
  • Applications processed accurately and shipped on time to Passport Canada; and
  • Basic information on passport applications.

Immediate Outcomes:

The four previous outputs lead to the following two immediate outcomes:

  • Increased access to Passport application services for Canadians; and
  • Increased awareness/reach of Service Canada services.

Medium-Term Outcomes:

The previous two immediate outcomes lead to the following two medium-term outcomes:

  • Higher client satisfaction with Service Canada and Government of Canada; and
  • Successful Service Canada partnership with a policy department.

Long-Term Outcome:

The previous two medium-term outcomes lead to the following long-term outcome:

  • Whole-of-government approach to services with departments working in a collaborative and networked environment while offering citizen-centered, integrated service delivery for Canadians.

Annex D: Domestic and international comparisons regarding passport services

Accessibility Timeliness Cost Footnote 68 Client satisfaction Footnote 69
Domestic Channels
In-person at Passport Canada Footnote 70 34 regional sites Footnote 71
  • 10 business days + delivery time
  • Urgent pick-up (24 hours)
  • Express pick-up (2-9 business days)
  • Standard pick-up (10 business days)
Passport fees:
  • Adult 5 year $120
  • Adult 10 year $160
  • Child (up to 15 years) 5 year $57
  • Urgent pick-up: $110 + passport fees
  • Express pick-up: $50 + passport fees
  • Standard pick-up: $20 + passport fees
96% satisfied including

44% very satisfied (2008 data) Footnote 72
Mail-in ubiquitous 20 business days + delivery time Passport fees 41% very satisfied (2008 data) Footnote 73
Service Canada PSO 144 sites including remote, rural, and urban locations Footnote 74 20 business days + delivery time Passport fees 95% satisfied including

67% very satisfied

94% likely to use PSO again (2013 data) Footnote 75
Canada Post Corporation 56 RA sites; Passport applications available in all outlets 20 business days + delivery time $20 service fee + passport fees 44% very satisfied (2008 data) Footnote 76
International Comparison
Five Nations Passport Group Footnote 77
Canada Footnote 78 95% within 100 km
  • 10 business days + delivery time
  • Urgent pick-up (24 hours)
  • Express pick-up (2-9 business days)
  • Standard pick-up (10 business days
  • Adult 5 year $120
  • Adult 10 year $160
  • Child (up to 15 years) 5 year $57
  • Urgent pick-up: $110 + passport fees
  • Express pick-up: $50 + passport fees
  • Standard pick-up: $20 + passport fees
96% satisfied including

44% very satisfied (2008 data) Footnote 79
Australia 88% within 7.5 km
  • 10 working days + delivery
  • Urgent: 48 hours with fee
$205.70 88%
New Zealand n/a
  • 10 days
  • Urgent: 3 days with fee
$129.61 91%
United Kingdom 99% within 5 km
  • In person: 2 weeks
  • Mail-in: 3 weeks
  • Premium: under 4 hours + pick-up
  • Fast Track: within 1 week + delivery
$121.53 88%
United States n/a
  • 4-6 weeks
  • Urgent: within 2 weeks with fee and delivery cost
$141.01 n/a
Other partially comparable countries Footnote 80
France n/a Varies per site $126.48 n/a
Germany n/a n/a $83.85 n/a
Italy n/a n/a $60.40 n/a
Switzerland n/a n/a $161.52 n/a
Japan n/a n/a $170.20 n/a
  • Source: Adapted from Annex B, International Comparison among Passport Service Offerings. Technical Report in support of the Evaluation of Service Canada’s Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering. (Under separate cover).

Annex E: Service Canada PSO yearly costs

Service Canada PSO – RA costs only

Receiving Agents (RA) Variable cost
Year Volume charged Salary EBP (employee benefits plan) Non-salary Total
2008-2009 Footnote 81 , Footnote 82 , Footnote 83 302,281 $2,995,605 $598,516 $151,141 $3,745,262
2009-2010 411,339 $4,076,369 $814,451 $205,670 $5,096,490
2010-2011 394,221 $3,906,730 $780,558 $197,111 $4,884,398
2011-2012 486,322 $4,819,451 $962,918 $243,161 $6,025,530
2012-2013 617,029 $6,114,757 $1,221,717 $308,515 $7,644,989
  Fixed cost
Year Salary EBP Non-salary Total
2008-2009 $398,171 $79,634 $75,000 $552,805
2009-2010 $477,912 $95,582 $75,000 $648,494
2010-2011 $528,885 $105,777 $75,000 $709,662
2011-2012 $530,375 $106,075 $75,000 $711,450
2012-2013 $530,375 $106,075 $75,000 $711,450

Service Canada PSO – DEC costs only

DEC Variable cost
Year Volume charged Salary EBP Non-salary Total
2008-2009          
2009-2010 26,674 $34,676 $7,469 $4,535 $46,680
2010-2011 Footnote 84 26,443 $34,376 $7,404 $4,495 $46,275
2011-2012 33,098 $43,027 $9,267 $5,627 $57,922
2012-2013 31,584 $41,059 $8,844 $5,369 $55,272
  Non recurring cost
Year Salary EBP Non-salary Total
2008-2009 $81,842 $16,369 $94,842 $193,053
2009-2010        
2010-2011 Footnote 85 $3,679 $736 $16,800 $21,215
2011-2012        
2012-2013        

Service Canada PSO – RA and DEC costs combined

  Total yearly cost
Year Salary EBP Non-salary Total
2008-2009 $3,475,618 $694,519 $320,983 $4,491,120
2009-2010 $4,588,958 $917,502 $285,204 $5,791,664
2010-2011 $4,473,670 $894,475 $293,406 $5,661,550
2011-2012 $5,392,853 $1,078,260 $323,788 $6,794,901
2012-2013 $6,686,192 $1,336,636 $388,884 $8,411,711

List of abbreviations

CIC:
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
DEC:
Documentary Evidence of Citizenship
DFAIT:
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
EBP:
Employee benefits plan
ESDC:
Employment and Social Development Canada
HRSDC:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
MoU:
Memorandum of Understanding
PSO:
Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering
RA:
Receiving Agent
SCC:
Service Canada Centre
SIN:
Social Insurance Number
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: