Employment Insurance Monitoring and Assessment Report for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 2016 and ending March 31, 2017
Annex 3: Employment benefits and Support Measures data tables

From: Employment and Social Development Canada

  • Annex 3.1 Overview of the Labour Market Development Agreements
    Allocation ($000s)1
    Province/Territory Signature date Implementation date 2017 to 2018 2016 to 2017 2015 to 2016
    $125M top up $1,95B envelope Total LMDA funding $125M top up $1,95B envelope Total LMDA funding Total LMDA funding
    Newfoundland and Labrador September 4, 2008 November 2, 2009 4,602 125,651 130,253 4,505 126,037 130,542 126,780
    Prince Edward Island September 5, 2008 October 5, 2009 1,123 24,484 25,607 1,179 24,899 26,078 25,292
    Nova Scotia June 13, 2008 July 1, 2009 4,639 77,960 82,599 4,898 78,384 83,282 78,592
    New Brunswick December 13, 1996 April 1, 1997 4,884 89,599 94,483 5,084 89,854 94,938 89,819
    Quebec April 21, 1997 April 1, 1998 33,988 574,763 608,751 35,598 576,865 612,464 577,625
    Ontario November 23, 2005 January 1, 2007 40,092 574,961 615,053 43,416 577,144 620,560 574,760
    Manitoba April 17, 1997 November 27, 1997 3,598 42,806 46,404 3,442 42,804 46,246 43,087
    Saskatchewan February 6, 1998 January 1, 1999 3,226 35,158 38,384 2,593 34,959 37,552 35,229
    Alberta December 6, 1996 November 1, 1997 14,822 116,795 131,617 10,491 110,671 121,162 109,404
    British Columbia February 20, 2008 February 2, 2009 13,576 278,354 291,931 13,374 278,971 292,345 279,959
    Northwest Territories February 27, 1998 October 1, 1998 162 3,000 3,162 170 3,031 3,201 3,082
    Yukon July 8, 2009 February 1, 2010 140 3,708 3,848 130 3,602 3,731 3,560
    Nunavut May 11, 2000 April 1, 2000 147 2,761 2,908 119 2,780 2,899 2,811
    Canada     125,000 1,950,000 2,075,000 125,000 1,950,000 2,075,000 1,950,000
    • 1Funds that are transferred to cover administrative costs are not included in the amounts. Please refer to Annex 3.12 for administrative costs.
  • Annex 3.2 Employment Insurance (EI) Part II― General definitions

    Eligibility for Employment Benefits and Support Measures (EBSMs) or similar programs funded under Part II

    In 2016 to 2017, to be eligible for Employment Benefits, individuals must be unemployed and have a current Employment Insurance (EI) claim as an “active EI client” or a claim that ended in the preceding three years as a “former EI client.” Those who began a maternity or parental claim in the preceding five years, after which they left the labour market to care for their newborn or newly adopted children, also qualify as former EI clients and are eligible for Employment Benefits upon re-entry into the labour market. Unemployed individuals who are neither active nor former EI clients are considered “non-insured” and are eligible to participate in Employment Assistance Services as well as self-services provided by the National Employment Service.

    Labour Market Development Agreements (LMDAs)

    LMDAs provide the frameworks within which EBSM delivery takes place. EBSMs are flexible by design, allowing provincial and territorial jurisdictions (P/Ts) to develop and deliver programs that respond to local and regional labour market needs. With the implementation of the Canada-Yukon LMDA on February 1, 2010, all provinces and territories are now fully responsible for the design and delivery of programs similar to EBSMs established under Part II of the EI Act. In support of these activities, Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) transfers LMDA funding to the provinces and territories and focuses on accountability, evaluation and ongoing policy development. ESDC also delivers Pan-Canadian programming and maintains, in partnership with the provinces and territories, specific projects and activities in the national interest under Part II of the EI Act. Canada retains responsibility for the delivery of insurance benefits under Part I of the EI Act and for the aspects of labour market development reflective of national interests.

    Please visit the LMDA’s website for more information. For more information on LMDAs, please refer to: Labour Market Development Agreements.

    Apprentices

    Apprentices are paid by their employer during periods of practical training. During the classroom portion of their training, apprentices are eligible for regular benefits under Part I of the EI Act. The apprentice requires a referral under the authority of Section 25 of the EI Act to access these benefits. Depending on the regional and local priorities of the province or territory, the apprentice may receive EI Part II support to cover classroom-related expenses.

    Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS)

    ESDC negotiates agreements with indigenous organizations to design and deliver employment programs and services for indigenous people at the community level. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS) is the successor to the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (AHRDS), which expired on March 31, 2010.

    The sunsetting of AHRDS and the modernization of ESDC's Aboriginal labour market programming—through ASETS—coincides with ESDC’s process of modernizing the administration of grants and contributions. The ASETS advances labour market outcomes for First Nations, Métis, and Inuit via demand-driven skills development, strategic partnerships with provinces, territories and the private sector, and via increased accountability. It also supports the development of a skilled Aboriginal workforce, which is one of the Aboriginal Economic Development Framework’s objectives.

    Job Bank

    Job Bank is an Internet service that helps connect employers and workers. It is the largest web-based network of job advertisements across Canada and is available to Canadian employers and job seekers free of charge. See Job Bank.

  • Annex 3.3 EBSM Program descriptions

    Employment benefits

    Targeted Wage Subsidies assist insured participants to obtain on-the-job work experience by providing employers with financial assistance toward the wages of participants. This benefit encourages employers to hire unemployed individuals whom they would not normally hire in the absence of a subsidy.

    Self-Employment provides financial assistance and business planning advice to EI-eligible participants to help them start their own business. This financial assistance is intended to cover personal living expenses and other expenses during the initial stages of the business.

    Job Creation Partnerships projects provide insured participants with opportunities to gain work experience that will lead to ongoing employment. Activities of the project help develop the community and the local economy.

    Skills Development helps insured participants to obtain employment skills by giving them direct financial assistance that enables them to select, arrange for and pay for their own training.

    Targeted Earnings Supplements encourage unemployed persons to accept employment by offering them financial incentives. Quebec offers a similar measure—Return to Work Supplement—to help with expenses related to returning to work (for example, new tools, office materials or clothing).

    Support measures

    Employment Assistance Services provide funding to organizations to enable them to provide employment assistance to unemployed persons. The services provided may include individual counselling, action planning, job search skills, job-finding clubs, job placement services, the provision of labour market information, case management and follow-up.

    Labour Market Partnerships provide funding to help employers, employee and employer associations, and communities to improve their capacity to deal with human resource requirements and to implement labour force adjustments. These partnerships involve developing plans and strategies, and implementing adjustment measures.

    Research and Innovation supports activities that identify better ways of helping people to prepare for or keep employment and to be productive participants in the labour force. Funds are provided to eligible recipients to enable them to carry out demonstration projects and research for this purpose.

  • Annex 3.4 EBSM overview1
    Clients served2
    Gender
    Men 58.9%
    Women 41.1%
    Age3
    15 to 19 5.7%
    20 to 24 14.6%
    25 to 29 14.1%
    30 to 34 12.9%
    35 to 39 11.6%
    40 to 44 9.8%
    45 to 49 9.2%
    50 to 54 9.1%
    55 and older 12.9%
    EI clients served
    Active claimants 78.6%
    Former claimants 21.4%
    Intervention-to-client ratio
    Clients 751,872
    Interventions 1,178,642
    Ratio 1.57
    Participation in interventions as a percentage of total
    Employment benefits
    Targeted Wage Subsidies 1.4%
    Self-Employment 0.5%
    Job Creation Partnerships 0.3%
    Skills Development-Regular 4.5%
    Skills Development-Apprentices 5.8%
    Targeted Earning Supplements 0.0%
    Support measures: Employment Assistance Services
    Employment services 51.0%
    Group services 2.1%
    Individual counselling 31.7%
    Pan-Canadian 2.7%
    Designated group participation in EBSMs
    Women 43.3%
    Indigenous people4 7.6%
    Persons with disabilities4 12.2%
    Visible minorities4 6.2%
    Labour Market
    Employment 18,153,400
    Unemployment rate 6.9%
    • 1 In 2013 to 2014, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system, ended Employment Services contracts with external service providers and re-instituted their network of provincial counsellors. In the context of the transition to this new system, the 2016 to 2017 administrative data counts for the province are still incomplete. Therefore, the 2016 to 2017 data on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report for the province are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. 2016/2017 administrative data results for the Northwest Territories are estimates.
    • 2 Clients with an unknown gender were removed from this distribution.
    • 3 SD-Apprentices and Group Services are excluded from the distribution because client date of birth is not collected.
    • 4 Reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
    • Sources: Client and Participant datasets.
  • Annex 3.5 EBSM clients – Clients served, by client type1, 2
    2016 to 2017
    Provinces and Territories EI clients Non-insured clients served Total clients served
    EI active claimants Former claimants served Total EI clients served
    Target3 Active claimants served
    Newfoundland and Labrador 9,200 9,308 1,812 11,120 1,232 12,352
    Prince Edward Island 2,911 2,798 709 3,507 1,893 5,400
    Nova Scotia 8,800 9,651 2,141 11,792 4,717 16,509
    New Brunswick 8,550 11,386 2,859 14,245 8,347 22,592
    Quebec 136,500 138,682 26,945 165,627 84,716 250,343
    Ontario 75,000 62,339 24,796 87,135 103,402 190,537
    Manitoba 9,000 9,941 3,011 12,952 12,963 25,915
    Saskatchewan 11,362 11,542 2,742 14,284 1,040 15,324
    Alberta 48,000 49,720 14,087 63,807 54,258 118,065
    British Columbia 37,500 35,272 8,733 44,005 31,073 75,078
    Northwest Territories 300 306 156 462 573 1,035
    Yukon 300 201 34 235 85 320
    Nunavut 190 116 95 211 628 839
    National Headquarters
    Total EBSMs 347,613 341,262 88,120 429,382 304,927 734,309
    Indigenous Pan-Canadian 15,738 10,100 7,463 17,563 17,563
    Canada 363,351 351,362 95,583 446,945 304,927 751,872
    • 1 In 2013 to 2014, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system, ended Employment Services contracts with external service providers and re-instituted their network of provincial counsellors. In the context of the transition to this new system, the 2016 to 2017 administrative data counts for the province are still incomplete. Therefore, the 2016 to 2017 data on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report for the province are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. 2016/2017 administrative data results for the Northwest Territories are estimates.
    • 2 This table includes clients served between April 1, 2016, and March 31, 2017, with one count per client served.
    • 3 Each jurisdiction's target refers to the number of EI active clients served, except in Quebec, where it includes both active and former clients served.
    • Source: Client dataset.
  • Annex 3.6 New EBSM interventions 1, 2
    2016 to 2017
      N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont.3 Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yuk. Nun. NHQ Canada
    Employment benefits
    Targeted Wage Subsidies 812 832 827 2,461 6,657 2,652 30 39 2,073 16 5 16,404
    Self-Employment 236 170 568 362 1,774 131 75 226 2,569 21 5 6,137
    Job Creation Partnerships 1,524 68 146 232 103 857 298 25 3,253
    Skills Development–Regular 3,206 1,070 1,432 6,300 26,033 6,337 2,043 358 1,270 4,193 82 23 280 52,627
    Skills Development–Apprentices 2,734 295 1,477 1,994 16,394 4,166 6,344 21,554 13,342 154 137 42 68,633
    Targeted Earning Supplements
    Total employment benefits 8,512 2,435 4,450 11,117 34,464 25,615 6,473 6,777 23,946 22,475 298 165 327 147,054
    Support measures: EAS
    Employment services 8,014 4,897 22,532 10,428 196,739 32,685 6,367 191,515 126,937 219 826 601,159
    Group services 3,906 2,077 18,381 731 184 25,279
    Individual counselling 6,006 1,162 4,009 23,256 68,202 188,071 19,185 6,243 55,751 1,521 373,406
    Total support measures: EAS 17,926 6,059 28,618 33,684 283,322 188,071 51,870 13,341 191,515 182,872 1,521 219 826 999,844
    Total support measures: EAS–Without group services 14,020 6,059 26,541 33,684 264,941 188,071 51,870 12,610 191,515 182,688 1,521 219 826 974,565
    Total benefits and support measures: EAS 26,438 8,494 33,068 44,801 317,786 213,686 58,343 20,118 215,461 205,347 1,819 384 1,153 1,146,898
    Indigenous Pan-Canadian 478 215 472 588 2,296 5,480 4,788 4,492 3,177 9,032 297 210 78 141 31,744
    Grand Total–Benefits and support measures: EAS 26,916 8,709 33,540 45,389 320,082 219,166 63,131 24,610 218,638 214,379 2,116 594 1,231 141 1,178,642
    Grand Total–Without group services 23,010 8,709 31,463 45,389 301,701 219,166 63,131 23,879 218,638 214,195 2,116 594 1,231 141 1,153,363
    • 1 In 2013 to 2014, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system, ended Employment Services contracts with external service providers and re-instituted their network of provincial counsellors. In the context of the transition to this new system, the 2016 to 2017 administrative data counts for the province are still incomplete. Therefore, the 2016 to 2017 data on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report for the province are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. 2016/2017 administrative data results for the Northwest Territories are estimates.
    • 2 Interventions in this table refer to all new starts between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017.
    • 3 Ontario counts one individual counselling intervention per client.
    • Source: Participant dataset.
  • Annex 3.7 EBSM designated members: Women 1, 2
    New starts, by intervention (%)—2016 to 2017
    N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yuk. Nun. NHQ Canada
    Employment benefits
    Targeted Wage Subsidies 62.6 42.1 43.7 51.0 44.6 42.4 33.3 48.7 41.6 38.5 100.0 45.0
    Self-Employment 46.7 39.4 43.5 36.2 43.3 36.6 29.3 43.4 47.9 41.7 80.0 44.2
    Job Creation Partnerships 43.8 72.1 59.6 66.4 19.4 42.7 37.9 45.1
    Skills Development–Regular 41.1 56.1 53.3 49.3 40.3 46.2 52.6 40.8 48.0 54.6 31.0 30.4 50.7 44.4
    Skills Development–Apprentices 8.5 5.4 4.4 3.8 2.7 2.8 5.2 6.2 4.9 8.8 8.0 4.8 4.6
    Targeted Earning Supplements
    Total employment benefits 33.5 44.4 34.2 41.1 41.3 18.1 19.6 7.3 10.1 22.9 17.8 13.9 45.3 25.9
    Support measures: EAS
    Employment services 43.5 48.3 48.4 47.8 44.7 48.6 32.6 45.8 47.1 56.2 47.9 45.5
    Individual counselling 51.4 52.6 49.2 44.7 44.6 49.0 48.6 39.3 46.5 34.3 46.6
    Total support measures: EAS 46.6 49.1 48.5 45.7 44.7 49.0 48.6 35.9 45.8 46.9 34.3 56.2 47.9 46.0
    Total benefits and support measures: EAS 38.2 47.8 46.5 44.5 44.3 45.3 45.4 25.9 41.9 44.3 31.2 38.0 47.2 43.3
    Indigenous Pan-Canadian 39.7 50.7 44.1 49.1 44.9 43.5 42.4 42.7 29.9 41.3 45.1 29.5 52.6 66.7 41.5
    Grand total–Benefits and support measures: EAS 38.2 47.9 46.5 44.6 44.3 45.2 45.2 29.1 41.7 44.2 33.9 35.0 47.5 66.7 43.3
    • 1 In 2013 to 2014, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system, ended Employment Services contracts with external service providers and re-instituted their network of provincial counsellors. In the context of the transition to this new system, the 2016 to 2017 administrative data counts for the province are still incomplete. Therefore, the 2016 to 2017 data on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report for the province are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. 2016/2017 administrative data results for the Northwest Territories are estimates.
    • 2 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in 2016 to 2017).
    • Source: Participant dataset.
  • Annex 3.8 EBSM designated members: Persons with disabilities1, 2
    New starts, by intervention (%)—2016 to 2017
    N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yuk. Nun. NHQ Canada
    Employment benefits
    Targeted Wage Subsidies 2.5 16.2 4.8 35.7 8.0 3.3 28.3 20.0 21.7
    Self-Employment 13.7 1.7 1.8 6.1 2.7 4.4 31.8 15.6
    Job Creation Partnerships 5.9 10.3 4.9 2.7 36.9 4.9
    Skills Development–Regular 4.7 20.3 4.9 4.0 4.5 10.1 1.4 34.7 4.3 1.4 6.3
    Skills Development–Apprentices 0.1 0.3 0.2 1.5 0.5 0.3
    Targeted Earning Supplements
    Total employment benefits 3.2 11.7 4.0 10.0 0.8 1.7 2.0 0.2 13.5 1.2 1.2 5.5
    Support measures: EAS
    Employment services 18.8 27.1 19.2 7.9 8.4 10.3 3.6 37.3 3.7 1.6 13.8
    Individual counselling 9.2 36.2 8.7 5.6 8.3 6.3 9.6 40.4 0.7 12.8
    Total support measures: EAS 16.9 28.5 12.0 7.3 8.3 7.6 9.9 3.6 38.2 0.7 3.7 1.6 13.4
    Total benefits and support measures: EAS 13.0 26.1 10.0 7.6 7.4 7.0 7.1 3.2 35.5 0.7 2.6 1.5 12.4
    Indigenous Pan-Canadian 3.8 5.6 7.0 3.7 0.5 2.5 6.6 5.7 1.8 5.6 0.3 0.5 4.3 4.4
    Grand total–Benefits and support measures: EAS 0.2 12.8 25.8 9.9 7.6 7.2 6.9 6.9 3.2 34.3 0.6 1.9 1.4 4.3 12.2
    • 1 In 2013 to 2014, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system, ended Employment Services contracts with external service providers and re-instituted their network of provincial counsellors. In the context of the transition to this new system, the 2016 to 2017 administrative data counts for the province are still incomplete. Therefore, the 2016 to 2017 data on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report for the province are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. 2016/2017 administrative data results for the Northwest Territories are estimates.
    • 2 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in 2016 to 2017). These reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
    • Source: Participant dataset.
  • Annex 3.9 EBSM designated members: Indigenous people 1, 2
    New starts, by intervention (%)—2016 to 2017
    N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yuk. Nun. NHQ Canada
    Employment benefits
    Targeted Wage Subsidies 0.6 2.5 1.7 13.3 2.6 10.6 61.5 40.0 1.9
    Self-Employment 4.6 0.1 5.3 9.3 1.3 7.4 41.7 3.9
    Job Creation Partnerships 1.4 0.9 15.5 7.1 22.5 4.6
    Skills Development–Regular 1.4 3.6 1.0 10.6 8.7 1.3 12.1 58.6 13.0 82.5 2.2
    Skills Development–Apprentices 0.3 0.1 1.2 1.8 0.1 0.3 23.1 0.4
    Targeted Earning Supplements
    Total employment benefits 0.1 0.8 2.2 0.5 4.5 2.3 0.4 4.5 35.2 3.0 70.6 1.5
    Support measures: EAS
    Employment services 1.2 3.5 0.1 12.2 12.9 7.7 14.2 12.3 89.7 6.6
    Individual counselling 2.1 3.9 0.9 8.1 12.4 15.3 72.9 3.6
    Total support measures: EAS 1.4 3.6 0.1 0.9 10.7 12.7 7.7 14.5 72.9 12.3 89.7 5.5
    Total benefits and support measures: EAS 1.2 3.4 0.1 0.8 10.0 9.0 6.9 13.4 65.7 8.3 84.3 5.0
    Indigenous Pan-Canadian 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
    Grand total–Benefits and support measures: EAS 4.1 3.7 4.8 1.3 0.8 3.3 16.8 26.1 8.3 17.1 72.5 40.7 85.3 100.0 7.6
    • 1 In 2013 to 2014, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system, ended Employment Services contracts with external service providers and re-instituted their network of provincial counsellors. In the context of the transition to this new system, the 2016 to 2017 administrative data counts for the province are still incomplete. Therefore, the 2016 to 2017 data on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report for the province are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. 2016/2017 administrative data results for the Northwest Territories are estimates.
    • 2 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in 2016 to 2017). These reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
    • Source: Participant dataset.
  • Annex 3.10 EBSM designated members: Visible minorities1, 2, 3
    New starts, by intervention (%)—2016 to 2017
    N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yuk. Nun. NHQ Canada
    Employment benefits
    Targeted Wage Subsidies 6.0 1.6 1.4 10.1 10.0 2.6 9.3 7.7 3.5
    Self-Employment 1.2 2.8 1.7 13.0 10.7 1.8 11.6 16.7 5.8
    Job Creation Partnerships 1.5 9.5 8.7 0.7 8.7 2.0
    Skills Development–Regular 6.7 2.9 2.5 15.3 20.3 14.2 2.8 10.1 22.4 4.3 0.4 4.1
    Skills Development–Apprentices 0.1 0.1 0.7 1.0 0.1 0.2 4.1 0.2
    Targeted Earning Supplements 0
    Total employment benefits 5.1 1.6 1.8 5 7.3 1.8 0.3 4.3 9.6 0.6 0.3 2.3
    Support measures: EAS
    Employment services 14.5 4.4 7.0 0 20.1 9.5 1.6 13.5 0.5 1.0 5.0
    Individual counselling 6.5 3.0 4.7 12.7 21.8 9.7 13.2 15.8 10.2
    Total support measures: EAS 13.0 4.2 5.4 12.7 20.7 9.6 1.6 13.4 15.8 0.5 1.0 7.0
    Total benefits and support measures: EAS 10.7 3.9 4.5 11.8 19.3 6.9 1.5 12.4 14.6 0.5 0.8 6.4
    Indigenous Pan-Canadian 0
    Grand total–Benefits and support measures: EAS 10.5 3.8 4.5 11.5 17.8 5.6 1.5 11.9 11.7 0.3 0.7 6.2
    • 1 In 2013 to 2014, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system, ended Employment Services contracts with external service providers and re-instituted their network of provincial counsellors. In the context of the transition to this new system, the 2016 to 2017 administrative data counts for the province are still incomplete. Therefore, the 2016 to 2017 data on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report for the province are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. 2016/2017 administrative data results for the Northwest Territories are estimates.
    • 2 Quebec and NHQ did not report participation levels for members of the visible minority groups. Therefore, these jurisdictions were excluded from the calculation of the national average.
    • 3 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in 2015 to 2016). These reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
    • Source: Participant dataset.
  • Annex 3.11 EBSM and Pan-Canadian activities: Part I – Final expenditures
    In $000s by intervention—2016 to 2017
    N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T. Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
    Self-Employment 1,461 1,165 2,229 3,209 8,088 68 931 590 1,463 3,413 181 22,798
    Job Creation Partnerships1 1,580 113 171 14 44 412 252 40 314 2,940
    Skills Development 22,955 7,282 16,568 41,352 55,904 77,186 26,041 23,804 115,088 51,140 965 697 323 439,305
    Total2 25,996 8,560 18,968 44,575 64,036 77,666 27,224 24,394 116,591 54,867 1,146 697 323 465,043
    • 1 In Quebec, this amount refers only to Pan-Canadian activities.
    • 2 Totals may not add due to rounding.
    • Source: Benefit and Overpayment System.
  • Annex 3.12 EBSM Final expenditures5
    In $000s by intervention—2016 to 2017
      N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont.4 Man. Sask. Alberta B.C. N.W.T. Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
    Employment benefits
    Targeted Wage Subsidies 5,804 4,060 3,999 12,818 81,153 2,654 173 465 9,049 203 38 352 120,768
    Self-Employment 6,186 2,008 5,518 5,153 24,536 39 1,073 263 1,230 13,574 160 10 59,752
    Job Creation Partnerships 9,734 601 1,404 2,422 999   8,599 11,067 34,827
    Skills Development 95,211 14,479 37,409 57,319 237,845 165,709 26,020 31,375 64,758 120,892 1,190 1,513 1,579 855,300
    Targeted Earning Supplements including Supplément de retour au travail
    Total employment benefits 116,936 21,149 48,331 75,290 343,534 170,825 28,264 31,638 75,051 154,582 1,553 1,552 1,941 1,070,647
    Support measures: EAS
    Employment assistance 6,252 3,461 32,070 10,131 156,429 336,002 11,618 4,333 42,737 108,592 1,171 1,599 150 714,544
    Total support measures: EAS 6,252 3,461 32,070 10,131 156,429 336,002 11,618 4,333 42,737 108,592 1,171 1,599 150 714,544
    Sub-total : Employment benefits and support measures: EAS 123,188 24,610 80,400 85,421 499,963 506,828 39,882 35,971 117,788 263,174 2,724 3,150 2,091 1,785,191
    Other support measures
    Labour Market Partnerships 2,924 1,344 1,987 8,685 111,704 18,024 5,247 1,219 3,374 11,034 187 114 43 165,886
    Research and Innovation 298 124 894 832 797 95,708 1,117 362 16,095 119 187 116,533
    Total Other Support Measures 3,221 1,467 2,882 9,517 112,501 113,732 6,364 1,581 3,374 27,129 307 302 43 282,419
    Total EBSM— Part II 126,409 26,078 83,282 94,938 612,464 620,560 46,246 37,552 121,162 290,303 3,031 3,452 2,133 2,067,610
    Overcontribution1 4,133         2,042 170 280 765 7,390
    Pan Canadian (see details in Annex 3.13) 1,850 225 1,596 1,302 9,006 20,449 14,145 11,253 12,798 13,874 2,628 980 2,296 21,660 114,063
    Adjustment2 (7,125)         (1,459)         (151) (106) (296)   (9,138)
    Total including Pan Canadian 125,267 26,302 84,878 96,240 621,470 639,549 60,392 48,805 133,960 306,219 5,678 4,606 4,899 21,660 2,179,925
    Administrative costs related to LMDAs3 8,903 2,695 10,142 8,922 58,920 57,277 6,078 6,021 9,594 20,535 1,450 389 702   191,629
    • 1 Overcontributions will be recovered during 2017 to 2018.
    • 2 This adjustment reflects overpayments established, refunds of previous years' expenditures and other accounting adjustments.
    • 3 Net Administrative costs include $181 million (salary and non-salary) to administer LMDAs and $11 million for rent.
    • 4 Expenditures for Ontario TWS (Job Placement with Incentives) were estimated by Ontario. In Ontario's financial statements, actual expenditures for Ontario's TWS-similar interventions were included in total EAS expenditures, because the province has integrated these services in its employment service model, in order to maximize the flexibility of program delivery by third-party service providers.
    • 5 Totals may not add due to rounding.
    • Source: provincial/territorial audited statements.
  • Annex 3.13 EI Part II Pan-Canadian – Final expenditures1
    In $000s by intervention—2016 to 2017
      N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alberta B.C. N.W.T. Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
    Pan-Canadian - Programming funds
    Aboriginal Skills and     Employment Training Strategy 1,850 225 1,596 1,302 9,006 20,449 14,145 11,253 12,798 13,874 2,628 980 2,296 659 93,062
    Labour Market Partnerships   14,982 14,982
    Research and Innovation 6,019 6,019
    Grand total Pan-Canadian 1,850 225 1,596 1,302 9,006 20,449 14,145 11,253 12,798 13,874 2,628 980 2,296 21,660 114,063
    • 1 Totals may not add due to rounding.
    • Source: SAP
  • Annex 3.14 Returns to employment and unpaid benefits indicators1
    2016 to 2017
    Clients who returned to employment2 Unpaid benefits ($ millions)2  
    Targets3 Results Results vs. Targets (%) Targets3 Results Results vs. Targets (%)
    SD-Apprentices Group Services Other4 Total SD-Apprentices Group Services Other4 Total5
    Newfoundland and Labrador 5,600 1,509 2,187 3,696 66% 24.0 16.5 6.8 23.2 97%
    Prince Edward Island 2,001 186 1,895 2,081 104% 6.9 2.2 5.0 7.1 103%
    Nova Scotia 5,500 1,098 220 3,835 5,153 94% 24.0 13.4 1.7 8.9 24.0 100%
    New Brunswick 7,850 1,001 7,299 8,300 106% 30.2 7.4 22.6 30.0 99%
    Quebec 50,900 5,109 61,359 66,468 131% 240.0 41.2 293.1 334.3 139%
    Ontario 40,000 12,423 24,621 37,044 93% 270.0 139.8 122.9 262.7 97%
    Manitoba 7,000 2,958 3,607 6,565 94% 44.0 31.6 15.0 46.6 106%
    Saskatchewan 5,700 3,619 130 2,967 6,716 118% 50.0 49.2 1.5 24.0 74.7 149%
    Alberta 25,000 16,680 12,991 29,671 119% 225.0 265.1 119.8 384.9 171%
    British Columbia 21,750 8,598 35 12,417 21,050 97% 130.0 103.4 0.3 49.0 152.7 117%
    Northwest Territories 200 95 82 177 89% 2.5 1.0 1.1 2.0 82%
    Yukon 250 100 76 176 70% 2.6 1.1 0.4 1.5 58%
    Nunavut 110 42 33 75 68% 0.8 0.8 0.4 1.2 153%
    Canada 171,861 48,309 5,494 133,369 187,172 109% 1,050.0 631.4 44.6 669.0 1,345.0 128%
    • 1 In 2013 to 2014, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system, ended Employment Services contracts with external service providers and re-instituted their network of provincial counsellors. In the context of the transition to this new system, the 2016 to 2017 administrative data counts for the province are still incomplete. Therefore, the 2016 to 2017 data on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report for the province are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. 2016/2017 administrative data results for the Northwest Territories are estimates.
    • 2 ASETS activity resulted in 7,860 returns to employment and $15.9 million in unpaid benefits. These amounts are not included in the provincial totals.
    • 3 Targets are for EBSM regular clients only.
    • 4 The “Other” category includes all other EBSMs. SD-Apprentices and Group Services are reported separately because a different methodology is used to calculate returns to employment for these two measures.
    • 5 Some unpaid benefit figures have been rounded.
    • Source: Results dataset.
  • Annex 3.15 Returns to employment by EBSM intervention1, 2
    2016 to 2017
    N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que.4 Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C.4 N.W.T4 Yuk. Nun. NHQ Canada
    Employment benefits
    Targeted Wage Subsidies 134 333 335 1,511 1,559 941 18 3 882 5 4 5,725
    Self-Employment 130 119 376 350 1,231 7 70 36 57 848 8 3,232
    Job Creation Partnerships 363 26 60 58 31 0 268 127 933
    Skills Development—Regular 1,278 522 744 2,254 9,725 888 602 378 188 1,764 22 21 10 18,396
    Skills Development—Apprentices3 1,509 186 1,098 1,001 0 12,423 2,958 3,619 16,680 8,598 95 100 42 48,309
    Targeted Earning Supplements
    Total benefits 3,414 1,186 2,613 5,116 12,515 14,317 3,679 4,033 17,196 12,219 130 125 52 76,595
    Support measures: EAS
    Employment services 188 700 2,086 1,012 42,435 1,695 952 12,475 7,523 51 23 69,140
    Group services 220 5,109 130 35 5,494
    Individual counselling 94 195 234 2,172 6,409 22,727 1,191 1,601 1,273 47 35,943
    Total support measures: EAS 282 895 2,540 3,184 53,953 22,727 2,886 2,683 12,475 8,831 47 51 23 110,577
    Total employment benefits and support measures: EAS 3,696 2,081 5,153 8,300 66,468 37,044 6,565 6,716 29,671 21,050 177 176 75 187,172
    Target 5,600 2,001 5,500 7,850 50,900 40,000 7,000 5,700 25,000 21,750 200 250 110 171,861
    Results vs. targets (%) 66% 104% 94% 106% 131% 93% 94% 118% 119% 97% 89% 70% 68% 109%
    • 1 In 2013 to 2014, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system, ended Employment Services contracts with external service providers and re-instituted their network of provincial counsellors. In the context of the transition to this new system, the 2016 to 2017 administrative data counts for the province are still incomplete. Therefore, the 2016 to 2017 data on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report for the province are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. 2016/2017 administrative data results for the Northwest Territories are estimates.
    • 2 Results associated solely with the ASETS are not available.
    • 3 Results for SD-Apprentices do not match those in Annex 3.14. Results presented in this Annex are associated with the last intervention in which a client participated. Employment Benefits participation supersedes participation in Employment Services.
    • 4Due to the methodology difference, these numbers are different from the POB's result.
    • Sources: Results dataset and Common System for Grants and Contributions (CSGC)
  • Annex 3.16 Incremental impacts of EBSMs at the national and provincial levels

    The following presents the results from an analysis of EBSM incremental impacts over three years after participation for active claimants who started participating in 2007 to 2008 or between 2006 and 2008 (that is, post-program impacts over three consecutive years between 2008 and 2012 or 2006 and 2012). The national results from this analysis were presented in the 2013 to 2014 EI MAR. This section of Annex 3 presents the national results as well as those at the provincial levels.

    1. Study objective and methodology

    Incremental impacts of EBSMs represent the direct effect of program participation on participants’ labour market experience (that is, earnings from employment/self-employment, incidence of employment and use of EI) after participation. The role of the incremental impact analysis is to isolate the effects of participation from other factors such as inflation, economic cycles, layoff, etc. In order to achieve this, the incremental impact analysis compares the labour market experience of participants before and after their participation, with that of non-participants before and after the same period (see diagram).

    Example of Incremental Impact Calculation
    description follows
    Text description of Example of Incremental Impact Calculation

    Participants
    Average annual earnings

    • Before participation
      = $30,000
    • After participation
      = $38,000
    • Change in earnings
      = +$8,000

    Comparison group
    Average annual earnings

    • Before participation period
      = $31,000
    • After participation period
      = $36,000
    • Change in earnings
      = +$5,000

    Incremental impact

    • (Change due to program participation)
    • +$3,000
      (i.e., $8,000 - $5,000)

    The analysis covered up to 100% of active and former claimants who started their participation in EBSMs between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2008 or between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2008. This analysis was conducted at the national level with participants from the 13 PTs. It was also conducted at the provincial level for 9 provinces. Results were not produced for Quebec since the Quebec Government is responsible for evaluating its LMDAFootnote 1. As well, it was not possible to produce incremental impacts for the territories because the number of participants was too low to generate reliable results. The 2007 to 2008 reference period was used at the national level as well as in provinces where the number of participants was sufficient to produce results. The period was extended by one year (2006-2008) in other provinces in order to increase the sample size. Despite adding this year, the number of participants for some EBSMs was still too low to generate impacts for those program and services.

    The analysis was conducted using linked administrative data from EI Part I and II and the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The comparison group was composed of active claimants who were eligible to participate in EBSMs but did not start participation in 2007 or 2008 or between 2006 and 2008.

    The impacts of EBSM participation on improving the labour market experience of participants were measured using the following indicators:

    • Average earnings from employment and/or self-employment: An increase in earnings indicates that participants improved their employment situation by either working more hours or by having a better paying job than they did before participation.
    • Incidence of employment (that is incidence of having earnings from employment and/or self-employment): Measures whether participants were more likely to be employed after participation. A gain means that a higher proportion of participants were employed after participation than they would have been if they had not participated or if they had received minimal employment services.
    • Amount of EI benefits received: Measures the average amount of EI benefits collected.
    • Average number of weeks in receipt of EI: Measures the average number of weeks participants spent on EI.

    The same methodology was used at national and at the provincial levels.

    2. National results

    The following presents results at the national level and for the 9 provinces covered by this analysis. The national results are presented along with a text description to help readers understand how to interpret the results. The provincial results are presented in table format only. Since different reference periods were used at the national level and across provinces (that is, 2007 to 2008 or 2006 to 2008) the results are not directly comparable.

    The national analysis covered active claimants in the 2007 to 2008 period. Key results are as follows:

    Skills Development (SD): As shown in Table 1 below, SD participants experienced earnings gains in each of the three years after participation but those increases became larger over time. The incremental gains averaged $2,300 per year. Active claimants also had an average incremental increase of 4.7 percentage points in their incidence of employment in the three years following participation. As well, SD participation resulted in lower use of EI benefits. The incremental decreases averaged $400 per year.

    Targeted Wage Subsidies (TWS): Active claimants had incremental gains in earnings in each of the three years following the end of their TWS participation averaging $1,300 per year. These gains were accompanied by incremental increases in incidence of employment in each year after participation averaging 6.1 percentage points per year. Most impacts on EI benefits collected were not statistically significant at the 95% level. In this context, it is not possible to draw any clear conclusion about TWS effectiveness in reducing the use of EI after participation.

    Self-Employment (SE): Over the three-year period following the end of their participation, active claimants had an average incremental reduction of $10,200 per year in their earnings from employment and/or self-employment and a reduction of 19 percentage points per year in their incidence of employment.

    The earnings results should be interpreted with caution, as they may not fully capture the financial situation of participants. Impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation (for example, unemployed, paid employee or self-employed). According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes.Footnote 2 Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial situation of SE participants after their participation.

    The incremental impact analysis also shows that SE participants collected $1,600 less in EI benefits per year on average. Those results should also be interpreted carefully since the time worked under self-employment does not allow self-employed Canadians to qualify for regular EI benefits.

    Job Creation Partnerships (JCP): Participation in JCP improved active claimants’ earnings by an average of $1,200 per year. They also had incremental increases in the incidence of employment in each of the three years after participation, averaging 4.9 percentage points per year. As well, on average, active claimants collected $300 less in EI benefits annually.

    Employment Assistance Services only (EAS-only): Impacts were measured for the active claimants who only participated in EAS without receiving other programs or services. EAS participation was effective at helping active claimants to return to employment. Incremental impact results show that they improved their incidence of employment, while reducing their use of EI in the three year period after participation. Specifically, they had an average incremental gain of 0.6 percentage points per year in their incidence of employment, as well as average incremental decreases of $390 per year in their use of EI benefits.

    Active claimants had incremental decreases in their earnings averaging $465 per year. However, the result should be interpreted with caution, as EAS is a short term and low intensity measure that is not focused on human capital development. EAS mostly includes services such as counselling, help with job search, development of return-to-work action plans and, in some cases, very short training such as first aid. In this context, it may not be reasonable to expect that participation in EAS-only would result in improving participants’ earnings. However a recent evaluation on the timing of participation in EAS showed that participants who started their EAS within four weeks after initiating an EI claim had earnings gains in both the short- and medium-term after participation and achieved quicker return to employment.

    Overall, results at the national level are similar to those in the provinces, with modest differences.

    Table 1. Incremental impacts at the national level
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=18,025)
    Earnings ($) 292*** 2,745*** 3,904*** 2,314*** 6,943***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    3.1*** 5.2*** 5.8*** 4.7*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -755*** -298*** -191*** -415*** -1,244***
    EI weeks (weeks) -2.3*** -0.9*** -0.5*** -1.2*** -3.7***
    Targeted wage subsidies (n=9,114)
    Earnings ($) 1,270*** 1,112*** 1,580*** 1,338*** 4,014***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    7.7*** 5.3*** 5.6*** 6.1*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -32 -55 -209** -99 -296
    EI weeks (weeks) 0.3 0.2 -0.3 0.1 0.2
    Self-employment (n=10,220)1
    Earnings ($) -11,412*** -9,929*** -9,375*** -10,236*** -30,708***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    -22.7*** -18.3*** -16.1*** -19.0*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -2,038*** -1,473*** -1,172*** -1,561*** -4,682***
    EI weeks (weeks) -5.7*** -4.0*** -3.1*** -4.2*** -12.7***
    Job creation partnerships (n=2,456)
    Earnings ($) 1,427*** 1,286** 850 1,179** 3,537**
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    6.1*** 4.5*** 3.8*** 4.9*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -513*** -404*** -44 -320*** -961***
    EI weeks (weeks) -0.8** -0.8** 0.3 -0.5 -1.4
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=108,230)
    Earnings ($) -1,113*** -368*** 87 -465*** -1,395***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    0.6*** 0.6*** 0.8*** 0.6** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -512*** -371*** -288*** -390*** -$1,171
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.7*** -1.1*** -0.8*** -1.2*** -3.6***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
    • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation (that is, unemployed, paid employee or self-employed). According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes.Footnote 3 Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

    2.2 Newfoundland and Labrador

    Table 2. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Newfoundland and Labrador
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=8,611)
    Earnings ($) $1,820*** $3,836*** $6,477*** $4,046*** $12,139***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    1.0** 2.5*** 2.9*** 2.1*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$800*** -$319*** -$200*** -$440*** -$1,319***
    EI weeks (weeks) -3.4*** -1.8*** -1.4*** -2.2*** -6.6***
    Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=728)
    Earnings ($) $4,229*** $3,331*** $3,234*** $3,598*** $10,795***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    6.5*** 5.3*** 4.9*** 5.6*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$1,677*** -$1,229*** -$1,055*** -$1,320*** -$3,961***
    EI weeks (weeks) -4.4*** -3.1*** -2.5*** -3.3*** -9.9***
    Self-Employment (n=314)1
    Earnings ($) -$8,102*** -$5,771*** -$5,647*** -$6,507*** -$19,520***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    -19.9*** -18.3*** -14.8*** -17.7*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$3,860*** -$2,951*** -$2,268*** -$3,026*** -$9,079***
    EI weeks (weeks) -12.0*** -8.9*** -7.0*** -9.3*** -27.9***
    Job Creation Partnerships (n=1,346)
    Earnings ($) -$300 -$678 -$837* -$605 -$1,815
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    3.2*** 1.6 2.3** 2.4*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$714*** -$445*** -$116 -$425*** -$1,275***
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.0** -0.2 0.9** -0.1 -0.2
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=11,904)
    Earnings ($) $927*** $2,158*** $2,503*** $1,863*** $5,588***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    2.0*** 2.2*** 2.1*** 2.1*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$375*** -$176*** -$128** -$226*** -$679***
    EI weeks (weeks) -0.9*** -0.3** -0.1 -0.4*** -1.3***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
    • 1 See note 1 under table 1.

    2.3 Prince Edward Island

    Table 3. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Prince Edward Island
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=1,516)
    Earnings ($) $2,635*** $4,591*** $5,054*** $4,091*** $12,273***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    1.7** 3.0*** 2.6*** 2.4*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$477*** -$393*** -$168 -$346*** -$1,038***
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.1*** -1.1** -0.7 -1.0*** -2.9***
    Targeted Wage Subsidies
    Not available due to low sample size.
    Self-Employment
    Not available due to low sample size.
    Job Creation Partnerships
    Not available due to low sample size.
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=1,635)
    Earnings ($) $426*** $870 $1,089** $795** $2,386**
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    1.7** 2.0** 1.0 1.6** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$645*** -$330** -$506 -$494*** -$1,481*
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.8*** -0.6 -1.2*** -1.2*** -3.6***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

    2.4 Nova Scotia

    Table 4. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Nova Scotia
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=4,911)
    Earnings ($) $3,427*** $5,996*** $7,728*** $5,714*** $17,142***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    6.3*** 8.3*** 9.7*** 8.1*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$1,051*** -$532*** -$440*** -$675*** -$2,024***
    EI weeks (weeks) -3.2*** -1.7*** -1.3*** -2.1*** -6.2***
    Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=307)
    Earnings ($) $3,889*** $2,642** $3,151** $3,228** $9,683**
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    6.2** 6.4** 7.7** 6.8** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$1,374*** -$834*** -$835** -$1,015*** -$3,044***
    EI weeks (weeks) -4.3*** -2.3** -2.5** -3.0*** -9.1***
    Self-Employment (n=846)1
    Earnings ($) -$10,302*** -$8,752*** -$9,691*** -$9,561*** -$28,683***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    -29.5*** -25.4*** -22.4*** -25.8*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$2,506*** -$2,116*** -$1,814*** -$2,145*** -$6,436***
    EI weeks (weeks) -7.3*** -5.7*** -5.0*** -6.0*** -18.0***
    Job Creation Partnerships (n=350)
    Earnings ($) $571 $543 -$923 $64 $191
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    3.9* -1.1 -1.4 0.5 n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$664** -$426 -$245 -$445* -$1,335*
    EI weeks (weeks) -2.3** -1.3 -0.7 -1.4* -4.3*
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=9,456)
    Earnings ($) $177 $1,346*** $1,653*** $1,059*** $3,176***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    1.2*** 1.9*** 1.4*** 1.5*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$705*** -$579*** -$414*** -$566*** -$1,698***
    EI weeks (weeks) -2.3*** -1.7*** -1.2*** -1.7*** -5.1***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
    • 1 See note 1 under table 1.

    2.5 New Brunswick

    Table 5. Incremental impacts for active claimants in New Brunswick
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=4,528)
    Earnings ($) $1,051 $5,158*** $7,120*** $4,443*** $13,328***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    9.4*** 9.9*** 11.9*** 10.4*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$752*** -$294 $86 -$320* -$960*
    EI weeks (weeks) -0.8 0.5 0.8 0.2 0.5
    Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=388)
    Earnings ($) $1,998** $1,276 $1,777** $1,684** $5,051*
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    7.6*** 6.0*** 7.7*** 7.1*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) $441 $802** $720** $655** $1,964**
    EI weeks (weeks) 2.0** 2.9*** 2.2** 2.4*** 7.2***
    Self-Employment (n=628)1
    Earnings ($) -$9,224*** -$8,154*** -$7,771*** -$8,383*** -$25,149***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    -26.7*** -26.1*** -20.2*** -24.3*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$3,297*** -$2,804*** -$2,512*** -$2,871*** -$8,613***
    EI weeks (weeks) -8.6*** -7.0*** -6.1*** -7.2*** -21.7***
    Job Creation Partnerships
    JCP was not delivered in New Brunswick during the observed period.
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=12,841)
    Earnings ($) $1,636*** $2,528*** $2,668*** $2,277*** $6,832***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    3.1*** 3.7*** 3.8*** 3.5*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$117 $6 $183* $24 $72
    EI weeks (weeks) 0.0 0.5* 1.0*** 0.5** 1.5**
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
    • 1 See note 1 under table 1.

    2.6 Ontario2

    Table 6. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Ontario
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=17,015)
    Earnings ($) -$1,959*** $379 $1,607*** n/a n/a
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    4.2*** 5.4*** 6.0*** 5.2*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$799*** -$233*** -$187*** -$406*** -$1,219***
    EI weeks (weeks) -2.3*** -0.6*** -0.5*** -1.1*** -3.4***
    Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=2,530)
    Earnings ($) $2,176* $2,439* $2,650* $2,479** $7,437**
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    7.3*** 11.3*** 8.6*** 9.1*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) $442* $61 -$104 $133 $399
    EI weeks (weeks) 1.4* 0.2 0.0 0.6 1.7
    Self-Employment (n=3,731)1
    Earnings ($) -$10,930*** -$9,433*** -$8,575*** -$9,646*** -$28,937***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    -23.9*** -18.4*** -14.5*** -18.9*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$1,681*** -$1,099*** -$794*** -$1,191*** -$3,573***
    EI weeks (weeks) -4.7*** -2.9*** -2.0*** -3.2*** -9.6***
    Job Creation Partnerships (n=668)
    Earnings ($) $2,248* $3,513*** $3,290** $3,017** $9,051**
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    7.3*** 7.2*** 5.8*** 6.8*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$518* -$381 $70 -$276 -$829
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.9*** -1.2* -0.3 -1.1** -3.4**
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=35,302)
    Earnings ($) -$654*** $465*** $895*** $235 $706
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    2.8*** 3.1*** 3.3*** 3.1*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$669*** -$280*** -$162*** -$370*** -$1,111***
    EI weeks (weeks) -2.2*** -0.7*** -0.5*** -1.1*** -3.3***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
    • 1 See note 1 under table 1.
    • 2 In Ontario, participation in SD is up to three years in length. In the incremental impact analysis, the participation period is defined as two years. As a result, participants may still be in training during the first year of post-program results. Therefore, it is not unexpected to observe incremental decreases in earnings, as participants are not available for full time work in year 1 and will be transitioning into employment in year 2. To interpret trends for Ontario, the third year is the most relevant period to consider for incremental impacts. As a result, the average annual impact and total impact are not applicable for Ontario.

    2.7 Manitoba

    Table 7. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Manitoba
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=3,750)
    Earnings ($) $3,387*** $5,971** $7,032** $5,461** $16,384**
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    10.6** 10.1** 11.8** 10.8** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$546*** -$458*** -$212** -$405*** -$1,215***
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.8*** -1.3*** -0.6** -1.2*** -3.7***
    Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=339)
    Earnings ($) -$1,345 -$768 -$86 -$722 -$2,166
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    6.9* 2.6 2.7 4.1 n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$407 -$751** -$251 -$470 -$1,409
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.4 -1.8 -0.5 -1.3 -3.8
    Self-Employment (n=517)1
    Earnings ($) -$12,450*** -$9,940*** -$9,231*** -$10,540*** -$31,621***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    -26.6*** -21.3*** -19.1*** -22.3*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$1,364*** -$1,177*** -$999*** -$1,180*** -$3,541***
    EI weeks (weeks) -3.8*** -3.0*** -2.5*** -3.1*** -9.3***
    Job Creation Partnerships (n=286)
    Earnings ($) $4,126*** $4,655*** $5,029*** $4,470*** $13,409***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    8.1*** 7.5*** 9.9*** 8.5*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$549** -$427 -$130 -$369* -$1,106*
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.8** -1.7** -0.6 -1.4** -4.1**
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=15,131)
    Earnings ($) -$320 $266 $407* $118 $353
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    2.8*** 3.5*** 1.7*** 2.7*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$363*** -$235*** -$253*** -$284*** -$851***
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.4*** -0.8*** -0.8*** -1.0*** -3.0***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
    • 1 See note 1 under table 1.

    2.8 Saskatchewan

    Table 8. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Saskatchewan
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=1,375)
    Earnings ($) $2,299*** $5,189*** $6,961*** $4,839*** $14,517***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    5.8*** 6.4*** 6.5*** 6.2*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$401*** -$223** $83 -$180** -$541**
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.0*** -0.7*** 0.1 -0.5** -1.6**
    Targeted Wage Subsidies
    Not available due to low sample size.
    Self-Employment
    Not available due to low sample size.
    Job Creation Partnerships
    JCP was not delivered by Saskatchewan during the observed period.
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=5,269)
    Earnings ($) -$371 $731** $1,381*** $580** $1,741**
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    1.9*** 2.1*** 0.9 1.6*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$442*** -$332*** -$278*** -$351*** -$1,052***
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.3*** -1.0*** -0.8*** -1.0*** -3.1***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

    2.9 Alberta

    Table 9. Incremental Impacts for Active Claimants in Alberta
    (for Active Claimants who Started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=2,356)
    Earnings ($) -$121 $1,044 $2,359** $1,108 $3,324
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    9.3*** 10.0*** 10.6*** 10.0*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$277* $137 $42 -$33 -$98
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.0** 0.2 0.0 -0.3 -0.7
    Targeted Wage Subsidies
    Not available due to low sample size.
    Self-Employment (n=658)1
    Earnings ($) -$13,493*** -$12,430*** -$13,046*** -$12,990*** -$38,970***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    -14.7*** -14.4*** -13.9*** -14.3*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$971*** -$658*** -$308* -$646*** -$1,938***
    EI weeks (weeks) -2.4*** -1.6*** -0.8* -1.6*** -4.9***
    Job Creation Partnerships (n=521)
    Earnings ($) $144 -$950 -$1,144 -$650 -$1,950
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    7.0*** 9.8*** 3.7 6.8*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) $314 $616*** $503** $478*** $1,433***
    EI weeks (weeks) 0.9 1.6*** 1.4** 1.3*** 4.0***
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=20,997)
    Earnings ($) -$969*** -$627** -$602** -$733*** -$2,198***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    1.7*** 1.6*** 0.8* 1.4*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$530*** -$253*** -$164*** -$315*** -$946***
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.5*** -0.6*** -0.4*** -0.8*** -2.5***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
    • 1 See note 1 under table 1.

    2.10 British Columbia

    Table 10. Incremental impacts for active claimants in British Columbia
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)
    Indicators Post-program period Average annual impact Total impact
    1st year 2nd year 3rd year
    Skills Development (n=4,090)
    Earnings ($) $2,560*** $5,559*** $6,395*** $4,824*** $14,471***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    5.8*** 7.2*** 6.9*** 6.6*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$768*** -$448*** -$173** -$463*** -$1,389***
    EI weeks (weeks) -2.3*** -1.3*** -0.5*** -1.4*** -4.1***
    Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=1,491)
    Earnings ($) $3,121*** $3,141*** $3,756*** $3,319*** $9,957***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    7.1*** 5.9*** 6.5*** 6.5*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) $113 -$161 -$111 -$53 -$158
    EI weeks (weeks) 0.5 -0.3 -0.4 -0.1 -0.2
    Self-Employment (n=1,764)1
    Earnings ($) -$10,521*** -$8,450*** -$7,806*** -$8,915*** -$26,746***
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    -17.7*** -13.8*** -13.1*** -14.8*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$1,723*** -$1,155*** -$735*** -$1,204*** -$3,613***
    EI weeks (weeks) -4.7*** -3.1*** -1.8*** -3.2*** -9.5***
    Job Creation Partnerships
    Not available due to low sample size.
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=28,985)
    Earnings ($) -$511*** $299*** $801*** $196 $589
    Incidence of employment
    (percentage points)
    3.6*** 2.6*** 3.0*** 3.0*** n/a
    EI benefits ($) -$507*** -$337*** -$298*** -$381*** -$1,142***
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.7*** -0.9*** -0.8*** -1.1*** -3.4***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
    • 1 See note 1 under table 1.

    2.11 Total impacts by Province

    Table 11. Total impacts for active claimants by Province
    (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)
    Indicators Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia
    Skills Development
    Earnings ($) $12,139*** $12,273*** $17,142*** $13,328*** n/a $16,384** $14,517*** $3,324 $14,471***
    EI benefits ($) -$1,319*** -$1,038*** -$2,024*** -$960* -$1,219*** -$1,215*** -$541** -$98 -$1,389***
    EI weeks (weeks) -6.6*** -2.9*** -6.2*** 0.5 -3.4*** -3.7*** -1.6** -0.7 -4.1***
    Targeted Wage Subsidies
    Earnings ($) $10,795*** Not available due to low sample size. $9,683** $5,051* $7,437** -$2,166 Not available due to low sample size. Not available due to low sample size. $9,957***
    EI benefits ($) -$3,961*** -$3,044*** $1,964** $399 -$1,409 -$158
    EI weeks (weeks) -9.9*** -9.1*** 7.2*** 1.7 -3.8 -0.2
    Self-Employment1
    Earnings ($) -$19,520*** Not available due to low sample size. -$28,683*** -$25,149*** -$28,937*** -$31,621*** Not available due to low sample size. -$38,970*** -$26,746***
    EI benefits ($) -$9,079*** -$6,436*** -$8,613*** -$3,573*** -$3,541*** -$1,938*** -$3,613***
    EI weeks (weeks) -27.9*** -18.0*** -21.7*** -9.6*** -9.3*** -4.9*** -9.5***
    Job Creation Partnerships
    Earnings ($) -$1,815 Not available due to low sample size. $191 JCP was not delivered in New Brunswick during the observed period. $9,051** $13,409*** JCP was not delivered by Saskatchewan during the observed period. -$1,950 Not available due to low sample size.
    EI benefits ($) -$1,275*** -$1,335* -$829 -$1,106* $1,433***
    EI weeks (weeks) -0.2 -4.3* -3.4** -4.1** 4.0***
    Employment Assistance Services (EAS)  
    Earnings ($) $5,588*** $2,386** $3,176*** $6,832*** $706 $353 $1,741** -$2,198*** $589
    EI benefits ($) -$679*** -$1,481* -$1,698*** $72 -$1,111*** -$851*** -$1,052*** -$946*** -$1,142***
    EI weeks (weeks) -1.3*** -3.6*** -5.1*** 1.5** -3.3*** -3.0*** -3.1*** -2.5*** -3.4***
    • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
    • 1See note 1 under table 1.
    • Important: Incremental impacts in any given province cannot be compared to those of another province, due to differences in the macroeconomic context in each of the jurisdictions.
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: