Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) flat rate information

From: Employment and Social Development Canada

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Flat rate description for construction projects

There is now an easier way for you to apply for funding. The change will benefit those applying for 3 of the program's most requested construction activities:  

  • ramps
  • accessible doors
  • accessible washrooms

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) developed a new way to determine the amount of funding you can receive. We apply flat rate costs based on the specifications of your construction. The Application Form guides you through a series of options to help determine the amount of funding you are eligible for. This will replace the need for you to provide ESDC with external quotes or detailed project plans.

Diagrams are available below to guide you, and your contractor, through the standard requirements to make your project truly accessible.

How do flat rate costs work

As you complete the Application Form, the options you select will help determine the amount of funding you could receive.

The flat rate costs take many factors into consideration, such as:

  • the essential items and/or components needed to meet accessibility standards
  • the fair market value for materials and labour
  • the construction materials that are standard commercial grade
  • project location
  • necessary permits and professional fees

The flat rate costs also consider:

  • any accessibility and safety features you wish to add to your project
  • the scope of the construction activities. For example, costs for upgrades to an existing washroom or for an addition to a building to accommodate a new accessible washroom

Estimated costs for renovation projects

The amounts provided below are costs for standard, renovation projects as of June 1, 2020. They include all mandatory accessibility features, requirements and labour. For retrofits (upgrading an existing space), the calculated amount considers items you select and the labour required to install. Amount for retrofits could be lower than indicated below.

When completing the application form, please refer to the:

  • glossary (below) to ensure you choose the right options for your project
  • diagrams (also below) to know the standard requirements to make your project accessible

Ramps

  • Wooden external ramp with a rise of 2 feet: from $22,932
  • Concrete external ramp with a rise of 2 feet: from $58,968
  • Wooden internal ramp with a rise of 2 feet: from $18,018
  • Concrete internal ramp with a rise of 2 feet: from $27,750

Note:

To calculate the ramp rise, measure the top of the landing to the ground. A 2 foot ramp is approximately 3 steps. A local contractor can specify local building code requirements.

Diagram showing what a ramp rise is: description follows

Note:

The material selected for ramps will impact project costs. If you need a concrete ramp, the cost may go over the maximum program funding of $100,000. Your organization is responsible to pay for any costs that exceed $100,000.

Accessible doors

  • External accessible door: from $7,729
  • Interior accessible door: from $6,250
  • One door operator: $4,586

Accessible washrooms

  • Single occupant accessible washroom: from $16,849
  • Accessible stall washroom: from $19,361

Note:

If you need to add new square footage to your building to add a new washroom, the cost may go over $100,000. Your organization is responsible to pay for any costs that exceed $100,000.

How will project location impact funding amounts

The amounts provided are for project locations that are within or close to urban areas. When we review your application, the flat rate will adjust costs based on the project location. This analysis includes how remote the project location is or how difficult it is to access.

Should I put money aside for my project

The flat rate will calculate eligible costs for each project. Yet, unexpected situations and costs are common with construction projects. We recommend that you consult a certified contractor to scope your project. This can help reduce unexpected costs. We also recommend that you have a contingency budget of around 20% of your total project costs to offset unexpected costs.

Diagrams and descriptions

Below are diagrams and descriptions for standard renovations. They display accessibility features that you can add to your project.

Disclaimer

Dimensions and standard requirements outlined in the diagrams are based on the National Building Code 2015 with precedent from the CSA B651-18 Accessible Design for the Built Environment Standard. Contact your Local Authority Having Jurisdiction and local and municipal building codes for local standards. Exact standards and requirements as they relate to acceptable building code solutions vary between provinces, cities and municipalities. Appendix diagrams are shown for reference only. They should only be applied as a suggestion to the acceptable construction methods to meet the intent of the building code.

With the permission of Canadian Standards Association, (operating as "CSA Group"), 178 Rexdale Blvd., Toronto, ON, M9W 1R3, material is reproduced from CSA Group's standard CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. This material is not the complete and official position of CSA Group on the referenced subject. The position is represented solely by the Standard in its entirety. While use of the material is authorized, CSA Group is not responsible:

  • for how we present the data in this document
  • for any representations and interpretations

No further reproduction is permitted. For more information or to purchase standard(s) from CSA Group, please visit the CSA Group online store or call 1-800-463-6727.

Figure 1: Ramps

Figure 1: description follows

Source: Figure 33, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of Figure 1

The ramp starts at a level doorway. It goes down a first slope until it reaches a landing. It then turns 90 degrees to go down a second slope. It ends at a level landing.

Along the ramp, there are safety features such as:

  • curbs
  • guard rails
  • handrails
  • pickets
  • tactile warning strips

These features help people go up and down the ramp safely. For example, tactile warning strips indicate the change in flooring at the entrance of the door and where the ramp curves.

  • The grade of the ramp is no more than 1:15
  • The width is a minimum of 3'7" (1100 mm) wide
  • Guard rails are 3' (915 mm) high
  • Pickets are no more than 4" (100 mm) apart

Include

  • Ramp and landings
    • Ramp: width: 1100 mm or 3'-7", slope: 1/15
    • Landing size: 5'-0" (1500 mm) by 5'-0" (1500 mm)
  • Curbs, guard rails, handrails and pickets
  • Structural framing
  • Tactile warning/colour contrasting strips
  • Shallow foundation (not deeper than 1.8 m (6'))

Additional options may be selected

  • A weather cover for exterior ramps

Figure 2: Accessible doors

Diagram of accessible doors: description follows

Source: Figure 22, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of Figure 2
  • A person using a cane is walking toward a door.
  • The door is at minimum 2' 8" (800 mm) wide. It has a glass window that is no more than 3 feet (900 mm) from the ground. This increases visibility of persons in assistive devices, such as a wheelchair.
  • The door has an automatic door operator and controls powered by electricity.
  • From the outside, guard rails are on each side of the doorway. A small vertical rectangular push button is at the top of the guard rail located on the right. The push button is between 3 to 3’7” (900 to 1100 mm) from the ground.
  • The entrance flooring (threshold) is a no higher than half an inch (13 mm).

Exterior door includes

  • Insulated door complete with insulated glass window
    • Dimensions: 3'-0" width by 7'-0" height (900 mm width by 2100 mm height)
    • Door Construction: Insulated Hollow metal, welded. Uvalde: 2.0 complete with dual pane glass light
  • Insulated frame
    • Frame construction: insulated/thermally broken pressed steel, welded
  • Door hardware set
  • Automatic door operator and push buttons
  • Electrical power
  • Barrier-free threshold
  • Colour contrasting painting

Interior door includes

  • Non-insulated door with non-insulated glass window 3' (900 mm) from the floor to increase visibility
    • Dimensions: 3'0" width by 7'0" height (900 mm width by 2100 mm height)
    • Door Construction: Hollow metal, welded
  • Non-insulated frame
    • Frame construction: pressed steel, welded
  • Door hardware set
  • Automatic door operator and push buttons
  • Electrical power
  • Barrier-free threshold
  • Colour contrasting painting

Additional options may be selected

  • Cane detectable guard rails

Figure 3: Accessible single occupant washroom general floor plan

Figure 3: description follows

Source: Figure 47, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of Figure 3
  • Across from the doorway is an accessible sink, a vanity and an accessible height mirror. There is space underneath the sink for a person with an assistive device such as a wheelchair to fit their knees. The sink's insulated pipes protect the knees from the hot water supply.
  • Beside the sink, there is a clear area for a person to move from their assistive device onto the accessible manual flush toilet. The distance is at least 3' (900 mm).
  • The toilet has a backrest and a grab bar fixed against the back wall. On the left-hand side of the toilet, there is:
    • an emergency call button (optional)
    • a horizontal grab bar
    • a vertical grab bar
    • a toilet paper dispenser
    • a power door actuator button
  • The grab bars are 2'5" to 2'10" (750 to 850 mm) from the floor and at least 2' (600 mm) wide. 

Dimensions: 75 sqft (6.7 sm)

Includes

  • Barrier-free toilet
    • Accessible manual flush valve toilet
  • Barrier-free sink and vanity
    • Vanity complete with knee protection from plumbing lines
  • Two grab bars
  • Accessible angled mirror
  • Washroom accessories
    • Soap dispenser
    • Toilet paper dispenser
    • Paper towel dispenser or hand dryer
    • Napkin disposal
    • Signage
  • Non-slip flooring
  • Colour contrasting painting
  • Braille signage
  • Interior finishes

Additional options may be selected

  • Accessible urinal
  • Emergency call button
  • Power assisted adult change table
  • Barrier-free shower

Figure 4: Washroom accessory heights

Figure 4: description follows

Source: Figure 42, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of Figure 4
  • To the left, a person in a wheelchair is using the hand dryer.
  • All washroom accessories are approximately at their eyesight level.
  • Beside the hand dryer, there is a sink and a mirror above it. The sink's insulated water supply and drainpipes protect persons in wheelchairs from getting injured when their legs are under the sink.
  • Beside the mirror and sink unit is:
    • a soap dispenser
    • a towel dispenser
    • a waste bin unit
    • a dispenser of various items (for example, feminine hygiene product or other possible items)

Figure 5: Multi-stall washroom with accessible stall general floor plan

Figure 5: description follows

Source: Figure 40, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of Figure 5
  • The shape of the multi-stall washroom is like a rectangle. There is a short hallway to enter the washroom leading to an open entrance. The doorway is at the top right corner.
  • When standing in the doorway, there are 3 sinks on the right and four washroom stalls in front of them. Clear areas separate the sinks and the stalls. That gives enough space for a person with an assistive device, such as a wheelchair, to move around.
  • Of the 4 stalls, 3 are standard and 1 is an accessible stall, which is larger than the rest.
  • The standard sized stalls have doors that open inward.
  • The barrier-free stall has:
    • a door that opens outward, which has a coat hook
    • a "D" type door pull on the inside and one on the outside

Dimensions: 90 sqft (8.4 sm)

Includes

  • Barrier-free toilet
    • Accessible manual flush valve toilet
  • Barrier-free sink and vanity
    • Vanity complete with knee protection from plumbing lines
  • Two grab bars
  • Accessible angled mirror
  • Washroom accessories
    • Soap dispenser
    • Toilet paper dispenser
    • Paper towel dispenser or hand dryer
    • Napkin disposal
    • Signage
  • Metal washroom partitions and door
  • Non-slip flooring
  • Colour contrasting painting
  • Braille signage
  • Interior finishes

Additional options may be selected

  • Accessible urinal
  • Emergency call button
  • Power assisted adult change table

Figure 6: Accessible stall general floor plan

Figure 6: description follows

Source: Figure 44, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of Figure 6
  • The accessible stall has a door that opens outward. There is a "D" shape door pull on the outside. On the inside, there is a "D" shape pull, a coat hook and an operable latch to lock the door.
  • The toilet has a backrest and a grab bar fixed against the back wall. When sitting down on the toilet, a person can find on their left-hand side an "L" shape grab bar and a tissue holder.
  • The grab bars are 2'5" to 2'10" (750 to 850 mm) from the floor and at least 2' (600 mm) wide.

Figure 7: Barrier-free shower general floor plan

Figure 7: description follows

Source: Figure 49, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of Figure 7
  • There is a clear area with slip resistant surface before going into the shower area. The clear area is at least 3' to 5' (900 to 1500 mm).
  • A curb no higher than half an inch (13 mm) separates the shower areas and the clear area. 
  • When entering the shower area, there are 2 grab bars for support. The first one is a vertical grab bar attached to the left wall. The second one is a horizontal grab bar attached to the right wall.
  • There is also a folding seat attached to the left wall if a person needs to sit down.
  • On the back wall, there is:
    • a recessed soap holder
    • a vertical grab bar
    • a horizontal grab bar
    • a handheld shower head with flexible hose

Includes

  • Shower kit
    • Held shower head and accessible controls
  • Recessed soap holder
  • Folding seat
  • Four grab bars
  • Non-slip flooring

Glossary

Addition:
Adding new square footage to an existing building.
Accessible door:
Door with a width that ranges from 850 to 1220 mm. The door includes hardware to use with a single fist with limited strength and does not need tight grasping or twisting of the wrist. The door also includes power-assisted operator and push buttons. The door transition is between two spaces. The transition of the finished floor between both areas is less than 13 mm. The finishing includes colour contrasting painting.
Accessible stall washroom:
A larger stall within a washroom with many stalls. It has adequate wheelchair turning radius and adequate transfer space. The accessible toilet, sink, vanity, grab bars, door and washroom accessories are at an accessible height. The finishes include signage, non-slip flooring and colour contrasting painting.
Barrier:
A physical, architectural or technological obstacle. It makes it difficult for persons with disabilities to access or circulate in community spaces and workplaces. It prevents persons with disabilities to access or use public spaces on an equal basis with others.
Braille signage:
A sign including braille. Braille is a system where raised dots represent letters and words. Unified English Braille is the braille standard for Canada.
Cane detectable guard rails:
A rail system that falls within the detection range of a long white cane.
Colour contrast painting:
Walls painted in a different colour than the door frames, floor, adjacent wall or plumbing fixtures. Colour contrast painting helps with depth perception for those with low vision.
Deep foundation:
Building foundations which are deeper than 6'-0". Deep foundations are sometimes necessary in parts of Canada where the ground material is not stable. This includes locations with high clay or silt in the ground. They require specialized construction equipment for installation.
Ramp:
A sloping walkway leading from one level to another, which has a slope not more than 1:15
Ramp curb:
A sloped surface built into a curb.
Ramp Rise:
Height between floor or ground surface and top of access ramp landing.
Retrofit (upgrading an existing space):
Install (new or modified parts or equipment) in something previously constructed.  For example, to make upgrades to your existing washroom to include accessible features.
Renovation:
Create a new space to enhance accessibility, without adding additional square feet. For example, if you make an accessible washroom in what was previously a storage room.
Single occupant accessible washroom:
A single person washroom (for use with or without a caregiver). It includes adequate wheelchair turning radius and adequate transfer space. The accessible toilet, sink, vanity, grab bars, door, washroom accessories are at an accessible height. The finishes include signage, non-slip flooring and colour contrasting painting.
Tactile warning strips or indicator:
Letters or graphics slightly raised above the surface. They can be detectable underfoot or by a long white cane. They assist persons with low vision or blindness navigate the space.
Weather cover:
A cover to an exterior ramp including steel frame and metal roof.
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