Enabling Accessibility Fund: Flat rate information

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List of figures

List of figures

Flat rate description for construction projects

When applying to the Enabling Accessibility Fund, an interactive calculator guides you through a series of options to help determine the amount of eligible funding for:

  • ramps
  • accessible doors
  • accessible washrooms
  • accessible lifts
  • elevators
  • pool lifts
  • multi-sensory environments
  • accessible playgrounds

How do flat rate costs work

The flat rate costs take many factors into consideration, such as:

  • the essential items and/or components needed to meet accessibility standards
  • the fair market value for materials and labour
  • the construction materials that are standard commercial grade
  • project location
  • necessary permits and professional fees

The flat rate costs also consider:

  • accessibility and safety features or accessories you may wish to add to your project
  • the scope of the construction activities
    • for example, costs for upgrades to an existing washroom or for an addition to a building to accommodate a new accessible washroom

How will project location impact funding amounts

Flat rate adjusts costs based on the project location. This analysis includes how remote the project location is or how difficult it is to access.

Project planning and contingency

Flat rate will calculate eligible costs for each project. Yet, unexpected situations and costs are common with construction projects. We recommend that you consult certified professionals to scope your project. We also recommend that you have a contingency budget of approximately 20% of your total project costs to offset unexpected costs.

Please note: The COVID-19 pandemic, supply chain and labour shortages have the potential to impact construction projects beyond normal industry standards. Additional due diligence confirming project timelines, scope and costs with certified professionals is recommended when planning your accessibility project.

Ramps

Figure 1: Ramps

Figure 1 : description follows
Text description of Figure 1
  • The ramp starts at a level doorway and goes down a first slope until it reaches a landing. It has a 90 degree turn to go down a second slope and ends at a level landing
  • Along the ramp, there are safety features to help people go up and down the ramp safely, such as:
    • curbs
    • guard rails
    • handrails
    • pickets
    • tactile warning strips
  • Source: Figure 33, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

A ramp is a slope or incline joining 2 different levels, at the entrance or between floors of a building. Ramps allow wheelchairs and other mobility aids to more easily access a building, or navigate between areas of different height. Along the ramp, there are safety features such as curbs, guard rails, handrails, pickets and tactile warning strips.

These features help people go up and down the ramp safely. For example, tactile warning strips indicate the change in flooring at the entrance of the door and where the ramp curves:

  • the grade of the ramp is no more than 1:15
  • the width is a minimum of 3’7" (1100mm) wide
  • guard rails are 3’ (915mm) high
  • pickets are no more than 4" (100mm) apart

Ramps include:

  • ramp and landings
  • curbs, guard rails, handrails and pickets
  • structural framing
  • tactile warning/colour contrasting strips
  • supportive foundation

Optional accessibility feature:

  • weather cover for exterior ramps

Accessible doors

Figure 2: Accessible doors

Figure 2 : description follows
Text description of Figure 2
  • A person using a cane is walking toward a door
  • The door is at minimum 2’ 8" (800mm) wide and has a glass window that is no more than 3 feet (900mm) from the ground. This increases visibility of persons in assistive devices, such as a wheelchair or scooter
  • The door has an automatic door operator and controls powered by electricity. From the outside, guard rails are on each side of the doorway. A small vertical rectangular push button is at the top of the guard rail located on the right. The push button is between 3 and 3’7" (900 to 1100) from the ground
  • The entrance flooring (threshold) is a no higher than half an inch (13mm)
  • Source: Figure 22, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Accessible doors have windows low enough for persons in assistive devices, such as wheelchairs and scooters, to be seen from the other side. They have an automatic door operator with push button or sensor controls powered by electricity. The controls are located either on a guard rail or wall. Guards or guard rails are on either side of the door, and are an optional accessibility and safety feature for persons with visual or mobility impairments. Painting the door and door frame in contrasting colours helps with depth perception for those with visual impairments.

Exterior doors include:

  • insulated door with insulated glass window
  • insulated steel frame
  • door hardware set
  • automatic door operator and controls
  • electrical power connection
  • colour contrasting painting and finishing

Interior doors include:

  • non-insulated hollow metal door with non insulated glass window
  • non-insulated pressed steel frame
  • door hardware set
  • automatic door operator and controls
  • electrical power connection
  • colour contrasting painting and finishing

Optional accessibility feature:

  • cane detectable guardrails

Accessible washrooms

Figure 3: Accessible single occupant washroom general floor plan

Figure 3: description follows
Text description of Figure 3
  • Across from the doorway is an accessible sink, vanity and an accessible height mirror. There is space underneath the sink for a person with an assistive device to fit their knees. The sink’s insulated pipes protect the knees from the hot water supply
  • Beside the sink, there is a clear area for a person to move from their assistive device onto the accessible manual flush toilet. The distance is at least 3’ (900mm)
  • The toilet has a backrest and a grab bar fixed against the back wall. On the left-hand side of the toilet, there is:
    • an emergency call button (optional)
    • a horizontal grab bar
    • a vertical grab bar
    • a toilet paper dispenser
    • a power door actuator button
  • The grab bars are 2’5"and 2’10" (750 to 850mm) from the floor and at least 2’ (600mm) wide. Dimensions: 75 SQFT (6.7 SM)
  • Source: Figure 47, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

The size of an accessible washroom is approximately 75 sq ft (6.7 sq m). The sink or vanity has space underneath for a person with an assistive device to fit their knees. Insulated pipes protect the knees from the hot water supply. Beside the sink, there is a clear area for a person to move from their assistive device onto the toilet, which has a backrest and is surrounded by grab bars for support. Walls painted in a different colour than the door frames, floor, adjacent wall or plumbing fixtures helps with depth perception for those with visual impairments.

Accessible washrooms include:

  • barrier-free toilet
  • barrier-free sink and vanity with knee protection
  • 2 grab bars
  • accessible angled mirror
  • non-slip flooring
  • washroom accessories:
    • soap dispenser
    • toilet paper dispenser
    • paper towel dispenser or hand dryer
    • napkin disposal
  • colour contrasting painting
  • directional braille signage
  • interior finishes such as minor repairs to floors, walls, and ceilings

Optional accessibility features:

  • accessible urinal
  • emergency call button
  • power assisted adult change table
  • barrier-free shower

Figure 4: Washroom accessory heights

Figure 4 : description follows
Text description of Figure 4
  • Starting from the left, a person in a wheelchair is using the hand dryer
  • All washroom accessories are approximately at their eyesight level
  • Beside the hand dryer, there is a sink and a mirror above it. The sink’s insulated water supply and drain pipes protect persons in wheelchairs from getting injured when their legs are under the sink
  • Beside the mirror and sink unit is:
    • a soap dispenser
    • a towel dispenser
    • waste bin unit
    • a dispenser of various items (for example, feminine hygiene product or other possible items)
  • Source: Figure 42, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

All washroom accessories are approximately at eyesight level for wheelchair users. The sink’s insulated water supply and drain pipes protect persons in wheelchairs from leg injuries.

Accessories could include:

  • a hand dryer
  • a soap dispenser
  • a towel dispenser
  • waste bin
  • a dispenser for various items (for example, feminine hygiene products)

Figure 5: Multi-stall washroom with accessible stall general floor plan

Figure 5: description follows
Text description of Figure 5
  • The shape of the multi-stall washroom is like a rectangle with a short hallway leading to an open entrance. The doorway is at the top right corner
  • When standing in the doorway, there are 3 sinks on the right and 4 washroom stalls in front of them. Clear areas separate the sinks and the stalls. That gives enough space for a person with an assistive device, such as a wheelchair, to move around
  • Of the 4 stalls, 3 are standard and 1 is an accessible stall, which is larger than the rest
  • The standard sized stalls have doors that open inward
  • The barrier-free stall has:
    • a door that opens outward, which has a coat hook
    • a "D" type door pull on the inside and 1 on the outside
  • Source: Figure 40, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

A multi-stall washroom with an accessible stall has clear areas that separate the sinks and the stalls to give enough space for a person with an assistive device, such as a wheelchair, to move around.

The barrier-free stall has:

  • a door that opens outward, which provides space for a person with an assistive device to enter the stall
  • a "D" type door pull on the inside and 1 on the outside

Accessible stalls include:

  • barrier-free toilet
  • barrier-free sink and vanity with knee protection
  • 2 grab bars
  • accessible angled mirror
  • directional braille signage
  • colour contrasting painting to help with depth perception for those with visual
  • impairments
  • washroom accessories:
    • soap dispenser
    • toilet paper dispenser
    • paper towel dispenser or hand dryer
    • napkin disposal
  • metal washroom partitions and door
  • non-slip flooring
  • interior finishes such as minor repairs to floors, walls, and ceilings

Optional accessibility features:

  • accessible urinal
  • emergency call button
  • power assisted adult change table
  • barrier-free shower

Figure 6: Accessible stall general floor plan

Figure 6 : description follows
Text description of Figure 6
  • The accessible stall has a door that opens outward with a "D" shape door pull on the outside. On the inside, there is also a "D" shape pull as well as a coat hook and an operable latch to lock the door
  • The toilet has a back rest and a grab bar fixed against the back wall. When sitting down on the toilet, a person can find on their left-hand side a "L" shape grab bar and a tissue holder
  • The grab bars are 2’5" and 2’10" (750 and 850mm) from the floor and at least 2’ (600mm) wide
  • Source: Figure 44, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

The accessible stall has a door that opens outward with a "D" shape door pull on the outside to accommodate a wide range of users, including persons with assistive devices.

Figure 7: Barrier-free shower general floor plan

Figure 7 : description follows
Text description of Figure 7
  • There is a clear area with slip resistant surface before going into the shower area. The clear area is at least 3’ to 5’ (900 to 1500mm)
  • A curb no higher than half an inch (13mm) separates the shower areas and the clear area
  • When entering the shower area, there are 2 grab bars for support. The first one is a vertical grab bar attached to the left wall. The second one is a horizontal grab bar attached to the right wall
  • There is also a folding seat attached to the left wall if a person needs to sit down
  • On the back wall, there is:
    • a recessed soap holder
    • a vertical grab bar
    • a horizontal grab bar
    • a handheld shower head with flexible hose
  • In front of the shower, there is a clear area with slip resistant surface to ensure safety
  • A curb no higher than half an inch separates the shower areas and the clear area
  • Source: Figure 49, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Accessible showers include:

  • shower kit
    • hand held shower head and accessible controls
  • recessed soap holder
  • folding seat
  • 4 grab bars
  • non-slip flooring

Accessible lifts

Figure 8: How to choose between an accessible lift and an elevator to best suit your access needs

Figure 8 : description follows
Text description of Figure 8

The flowchart asks you yes or no questions.

Question 1: Is your project interior or exterior?

  • If your answer is "Interior", go to question 2
  • If your answer is "Exterior":
    • an accessible lift may accommodate your needs

Question 2: Do you need access for more than 2 levels?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • you are better served by a passenger elevator
  • If your answer is "No", go to question 3

Question 3: Is access required for more than 1 person at a time?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • you are better served by a passenger elevator
  • If your answer is "No":
    • an accessible lift may accommodate your needs

Result:

  • passenger elevators are more inclusive than accessible lifts

Figure 9: How to choose the accessible lift that best suits your accessibility needs

Figure 9 : description follows
Text description of Figure 9

The flowchart asks you yes or no questions.

Question 1: Do you have a 60" x 60" space for a lift?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • you are better served by a vertical platform lift
  • If your answer is "No", go to question 2

Question 2: Do you only have 1 staircase that is needed for an emergency exit?

  • If your answer is "Yes", go to question 3
  • If your answer is "No":
    • you are better served by a vertical platform lift

Question 3: Is access required for more than 1 person at a time?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • you are better served by a vertical platform lift
  • If your answer is "No":
    • an inclined platform lift may accommodate your needs

Result:

  • vertical platform lifts are more inclusive than accessible lifts

Figure 10: Inclined platform lift

Figure 10 : description follows
Text description of Figure 10
  • There is a set of stairs that leads to a landing before pivoting 45 degrees and continuing to the next flight of stairs
  • The platform lift is 2’ to 4" x 3’.7" (724mm x 1,118 mm) and is in the middle of the first set of stairs and is attached my inclined rails. The clearance minimum clearance for the platform to move up the stairs is 5’ (150mm)
  • At the bottom of the stairs is a call station button that is a maximum height of 3’11" (120mm) from the floor
  • At the top of the landing is an audio visual alert to let people know the list if in use
  • At the top of the second flight of stairs is another call button as well as a rectangle that houses the drive system machinery
  • Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18/ CSA B355-19

A platform lift is attached by inclined rails to sets of stairs. At the bottom of the stairs is a call station button for assistance when needed. At the top of the landing is an audio visual alert to let people know the lift is in use. At the top of the second flight of stairs is another call button as well as the drive system machinery.

Interior and exterior platform lifts include:

  • platform lift unit
  • controls
  • inclined rails
  • electrical power connection

Optional accessibility features:

  • fire alarm integration
  • lighting
  • fold-down seat with seatbelt
  • directional braille signage

Figure 11: Vertical platform lift (with enclosure)

Figure 11 : description follows
Text description of Figure 11
  • There is a 2 story vertical lift with a door to enter the lift platform, which is at the lower stop
  • The minimum pit under the lift is 3" (76mm)
  • The maximum lifting height for 1 stop is 23’ (7000mm)
  • The minimum clearance of the upper stop is 7’ to 4" (22 to 35mm). The upper stop has an enclosure door as well as the lift mast machinery
  • Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18/ CSA B355-19

Vertical platform lifts include:

  • platform lift unit
  • controls
  • electrical power connection
  • pit
  • lift mast

For lifts that are over 8ft (2.5m) or exposed to rain and snow, an enclosure will be calculated in the flat rate cost.

Optional accessibility features:

  • fire alarm integration
  • lighting
  • directional braille signage

Elevators

A panel of elevator controls should be located at eyesight level for better accessibility for persons with assistive devices, such as a wheelchair.

Figure 12: How to choose the passenger elevator that best suits your accessibility needs

Figure 12 : description follows
Text description of Figure 12

The flowchart asks you yes or no questions.

Question 1: Is an elevator required by building code?

  • If your answer is "Yes", go to question 4
  • If your answer is "No", go to question 2

Question 2: Do you need access for more than 2 levels?

  • If your answer is "Yes", go to question 4
  • If your answer is "No", go to question 3

Question 3: Will the elevator be for general use (not only those with mobile accessibility needs)?

  • If your answer is "Yes", go to question 4
  • If your answer is "No":
    • a limited use/limited application (LULA) elevator may accommodate your needs

Question 4: Do you need access for more than 4 floor levels?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • you are better served by a traction elevator
  • If your answer is "No":
    • a hydraulic elevator may accommodate your needs

Result:

  • traction elevators are more inclusive than LULA elevators

Figure 13: Limited application, limited use elevator

Figure 13 : description follows
Text description of Figure 13
  • Doors enclose a 2-stop elevator. The elevator cab is at the lower stop
  • The minimum pit under the elevator is 1’-2" (355mm)
  • The maximum lifting height per floor is 25’ (7600mm)
  • The upper stop has elevator doors
  • Source: NBC 2015 / CBA B651 / CSA B44-16

LULA elevators provide direct vertical access between 2 or more levels. The elevator cab can accommodate a limited number of occupants. These elevators require smaller pits and machine rooms, and are suitable for confined spaces.

Limited use, limited application elevators include:

  • doors
  • controls
  • hydraulic cylinder, motor and tank
  • rails
  • electrical power connection
  • pit
  • machine room
  • hoistway (the enclosure of an elevator or shaft)
  • elevator cab where the passengers ride

Optional accessibility features:

  • directional braille signage

Figure 14: Hydraulic elevator

Figure 14 : description follows
Text description of Figure 14
  • Doors enclose a 2-stop elevator that has a lifting mechanism at the bottom. The elevator cab is at the lower stop
  • The minimum pit under the elevator is 5’-10" (1525mm)
  • The upper stop has elevator doors and there is a lifting beam, at the very top of the elevator shaft
  • Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18 / CSA B44-16

Hydraulic elevators provide direct vertical access between 2 or more levels. The elevator cab can be sized to accommodate a range of occupants. These elevators are suitable for low to mid-rise applications (up to approximately 5 stops).

Hydraulic elevators include:

  • doors
  • controls
  • hydraulic cylinder, motor and tank
  • guide rails
  • hoistway
  • electrical service
  • pit, fixed ladder, drain and sump
  • machine room
  • elevator cab with handrail and emergency telephone

Optional accessibility features:

  • directional braille signage
  • hearing loop
  • fold-down seat

Figure 15: Traction elevator

Figure 15 : description follows
Text description of Figure 15
  • Doors enclose a 2-story elevator that has additional space above to house the machinery room and lifting beam. The elevator cab is at the lower stop
  • The minimum pit under the elevator is 5’-8" (1720mm), which has 2 pistons to lift and lower the cab
  • In the second story of the elevator shaft, there is a rectangular counter weight
  • The upper stop has elevator doors
  • Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18 / CSA B44-16

Traction elevators provide direct vertical access between 2 or more levels. The elevator cab can be sized to accommodate a range of occupants. These elevators are suitable for mid to high-rise applications (approximately 5 or more stops).

Traction elevators include:

  • elevator cab with handrail and emergency telephone
  • doors
  • controls
  • motor, counterweight
  • guide rails
  • suspension ropes
  • travelling cable
  • hoistway
  • lifting beam
  • electrical service
  • pit
  • fixed ladder, drain and sump
  • machine room

Optional accessibility features:

  • directional braille signage
  • hearing loop
  • fold-down seat

Pool lifts

Figure 16: How to choose the pool lift that best suits your accessibility needs

Figure 16 : description follows
Text description of Figure 16

Question 1: Is your pool or spa in-ground?

  • If your answer is "Yes", go to question 2
  • If your answer is "No":
    • a chairlift may accommodate your needs

Question 2: Do you need the lift to accommodate assistive devices (i.e. wheelchairs)?

  • If your answer is "Yes", go to question 4
  • If your answer is "No":
    • a chairlift may accommodate your needs

Question 3: Does your pool have room to accommodate a lift in the pool?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • you are better served by a permanent platform lift
  • If your answer is "No":
    • a removable platform lift may accommodate your needs

Result:

  • permanent platform lifts are more inclusive than chair lifts

Figure 17: Above-ground pool chair lift

Figure 17 : description follows
Text description of Figure 17
  • The seat of the chair swivels from the deck to the pool
  • The chair is at least 4’ (1200mm) from a wall to give adequate space for a person to get on the chair lift
  • The chair lowers close to the basin wall to allow a person to disembark
  • Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18

A pool chair lift is a hard seat designed to carry a person in a seated position from the pool deck to the above-ground or in-ground pool. The chair swivels and lowers close to the basin wall to allow the person to exit.

Above-ground and in-ground pool chair lifts include:

  • chair lift unit
  • pool deck anchor

Figure 18: Permanent in-ground pool lift

Figure 18 : description follows
Text description of Figure 18
  • The lift is at the same height of the pool deck
  • There is a lift control panel at the entrance of the platform, which has guardrails
  • A lifting mechanism lowers the platform along the basin wall
  • The lift is anchored to the floor of the pool
  • Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18

Platform pool lifts provide direct access between the pool deck and in-ground pool. The lift platform is designed to carry a person with a mobility device, so they can easily and autonomously get into the water. The lift controls can be operated by the occupant or attendee. The lift mechanism lowers the lift platform into the water along the edge of the basin wall.

Permanent and portable platform pool lifts include:

  • platform lift unit
  • pool deck anchor
  • pool wheelchair

Multi-sensory environments

Where possible, a multi-sensory room is the preferred environment to create a controlled space that is adaptable to the needs of a variety of participants.

Figure 19: How to choose the multi-sensory space that best suits your accessibility needs

Figure 19 : description follows
Text description of Figure 19

The flowchart asks you yes or no questions.

Question 1: Do you have a 160sq ft of available space that can be renovated? Or can you build an addition?

  • If your answer is "Yes", go to question 2
  • If your answer is "No":
    • a multi-sensory mobile station may accommodate your needs

Question 2: Do users have the ability/mobility to come to a dedicated room?

  • If your answer is "Yes", go to question 3
  • If your answer is "No":
    • a multi-sensory mobile station may accommodate your needs

Question 3: Would you like the multi-sensory space to serve more than 1 user at a time?

  • If your answer is "Yes", go to question 4
  • If your answer is "No":
    • a multi-sensory mobile station may accommodate your needs

Question 4: Do you have staff to operate a multi-sensory space?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • you are better served by a multi-sensory room
  • If your answer is "No":
    • a multi-sensory mobile station may accommodate your needs

Result:

  • if you answered yes to the questions, a multi-sensory room may accommodate your accessibility needs. They are the most inclusive option

Figure 20: Multi-sensory room

Figure 20 : description follows
Text description of Figure 20
  • A multi-sensory room includes finishing for approximately 160 sq ft (15m sq) or 10 ft x 16 ft room that includes a clear area to enter and exit the room with a door on the left that opens inward and an equipment storage closet with a door across from it
  • There is also a clear area to give access to the hand wash area
  • The sink has enough space underneath for persons in assistive devices to fit their knees, as well as protection from the hot water supply.
  • The sink has wall protection, soap dispenser, and a paper towel/waste dispenser
  • The room includes:
    • optimized lighting, temperature and ventilation with controls inside the room
    • at least 4 duplex electrical receptacles (outlets). With a placement consideration for sensory equipment
    • an emergency call button
    • room signage
    • sound insulated walls and door

Multi-sensory rooms create a controlled, safe space devoted to stimulating or calming the senses. They can be relaxing spaces to help reduce agitation and anxiety. They can also engage the user to participate in activities, stimulate reactions, and encourage communication. Generally, the room is adaptable to a wide range of participant needs.

It is important to consult professionals, such as architects, mechanical and electrical engineers to optimize the soundproofing, and systems within the space. Professional fees are included in the flat rate cost.

A multi-sensory room includes finishing for approximately a 160 sq ft (15m sq) or 10 ft x 16 ft room that includes a clear area to enter and exit the room. There is also a clear area to give access to the hand wash area. The sink has enough space underneath for persons in assistive devices to fit their knees, as well as protection from the hot water supply.

Multi-sensory rooms include:

  • sound insulated walls
  • sound insulated door
    • insulated steel frame
    • door hardware set
    • automatic operator with controls
    • electrical power connection
    • barrier free transition
    • colour contrasting painting
  • optimized HVAC (beyond code minimums)
    • improved air quality
    • acoustic absorption
    • in room controls
  • optimized lighting
    • anti-glare lighting with dimmer
    • in room controls
  • optimized electrical
    • increased capacity for receptacles and circuits
    • minimum of 4 duplex receptacles in room
  • wall mounted hand wash sink
    • installed with modifications to existing plumbing
    • insulated piping or shroud
    • wall protection
    • soap dispenser
    • paper towel dispenser
    • waste bin
  • storage closet for sensory equipment
    • hollow metal door with steel frame
    • door hardware set
  • room signage with text, graphic and braille
    • one directional wayfinding sign placed elsewhere to direct users

Sensory tools and equipment

The following packages give examples of items you could purchase with the amount of funding included with each package selected. These are examples only. You may purchase similar sensory items of an equivalent value that best suits your users. The packages you select will depend on the needs of the users of the multi-sensory room.

It is important to consult specialists, such as an occupational therapist, physical therapist, speech pathologist among others, when purchasing sensory equipment to customize the space and programming for the intended users.

Auditory package: Items that produce music, tones or other noises.

  • 5 toy musical instruments, 4 games, 1 sound machine

Visual package: Items that produce light or other visual input.

  • 1 light table, 4 games, 2 lamps, 4 light panels, 1 projector package, 1 fibre optic light

Vibration or Vibroacoustic package: Items designed to produce vibration. Vibroacoustic combines vibration and sound.

  • 1 vibroacoustic chair, 1 vibrating cushion, 1 vibrating pillow, 1 vibrating mat, 1 vibrating oral toy, 1 vibrating hand held toy

Muscle sense (Proprioception) package: Items that activate joint and muscle involvement.

  • 1 mini trampoline, 1 bouncy chair, 3 body socks (small, medium, large), 1 squeeze machine, 1 weighted blanket with adjustable weights, 1 weighted vest with adjustable size, 1 weighted toy for lap or over shoulders

Movement (Vestibular) package: Items designed to cause movement.

  • 1 swing, 1 spinner, 1 beam, 1 scooter, 1 wobble cushion, 1 therapy ball, 1 rocker seat, 1 balance board

Sensory Dampening package: Items that allow user to reduce noise, visual input or other stimuli

  • 4 sets of noise cancelling headphones, 4 adjustable size eye masks

Optional accessibility features:

  • acoustic ceiling and acoustic non-slip flooring
  • hygienic wall cladding
  • specialized seating and work surfaces
  • a selection of chairs, mats, wedges
  • tables or decks that are height adjustable
  • emergency call button
  • additional sound insulated emergency exit door

Figure 21: Multi-sensory mobile station

Figure 21 : description follows
Text description of Figure 21
  • The mobile station has 4 lockable heavy duty wheels for easy transport
  • At the top, there is an overhead bar for hanging sensory components as required
  • There is a work surface with adjustable height push handles on the left hand side, and a waste bin
  • The shelf underneath has secured storage compartments with a height adjustable/folding-down work surface for those who are seated
  • At the bottom of the cart, there is an electrical power connection outlet

A mobile station offers a multi-sensory environment where space or mobility of the users may be a consideration. The cart should be height adjustable to engage users while seated or standing.

A multi-sensory cart includes:

  • height adjustable work surface
  • height adjustable push handles
  • heavy duty, locking wheels
  • secure storage compartments
  • overhead bar for hanging sensory components, as required
  • electrical power connection with 4 outlets
  • waste bin

Sensory tools and equipment

The following packages give examples of items you could purchase with the funding included with each package selected. These are examples only. You may purchase similar sensory items of an equivalent value that best suits your users. The packages you select will depend on the needs of the users of the multi-sensory station.

It is important to consult specialists, such as an occupational therapist, physical therapist, speech pathologist, among others, when purchasing sensory equipment to customize the space and programming for the intended users.

Auditory package: Items that produce music, tones or other noises.

  • 5 toy musical instruments, 3 games, 1 sound machine

Visual package: Items that produce light or other visual input.

  • 4 games, 1 lamp, 1 table top light panel or box, 1 projector package, 1 fibre optic light

Vibration or Vibroacoustic package: Items that produce vibration. Vibroacoustic combines vibration and sound.

  • 1 vibrating cushion, 1 vibrating pillow, 1 vibrating mat, 1 vibrating oral toy, 1 vibrating hand held toy

Muscle sense (Proprioception) package: Items that activate joint and muscle involvement.

  • 3 body socks (small, medium, large), 1 weighted blanket with adjustable weights, 1 weighted vest with adjustable size, 1 weighted toy for lap or over shoulders

Movement (Vestibular) package: Items designed to cause movement.

  • 1 wobble cushion, 1 rocker seat, 1 balance board

Sensory Dampening package: Items that allow user to reduce noise, visual input or other stimuli

  • 2 sets of noise cancelling headphones, 2 adjustable size eye masks

Accessible playgrounds

Accessible playgrounds promote engagement and participation for all ages and abilities. They should provide a variety of play components. These components should give opportunities to challenge user’s abilities and play types, such as social, physical and mental experiences. A number of ground-level play components should be included for persons who cannot access elevated areas. It is important to consult with a landscape architect or playground designer when designing, building or renovating your accessible playground.

Figure 22: How to choose the accessible playground that best suits your accessibility needs

Figure 22 : description follows
Text description of Figure 22

The flowchart asks you yes or no questions.

Question 1: Do you have an existing playground?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • go to question 2
  • If your answer is "No":
    • you are better served by a new accessible playground

Question 2: Does your playground have existing components that can be used?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • go to question 3
  • If your answer is "No":
    • you are better served by a new accessible playground

Question 3: Can the components be modified for accessible upgrades?

  • If your answer is "Yes":
    • renovating your playground may accommodate your needs
  • If your answer is "No":
    • you are better served by a new accessible playground

Result:

  • if you answered no to the questions, a new accessible playground may accommodate your accessibility needs

Figure 23: Accessible playground - small

Figure 23 : description follows
Text description of Figure 23
  • The layout of the playground is shown from a bird’s eye perspective as well as a side profile
  • On the left side, there is an existing sidewalk with a new walkway that connects to the playground
  • The walkway leads to accessible safety surfacing so persons with assistive devices can easily and safely access the playground
  • There is a fall zone buffer which outlines the playground area
  • The play structure is in the centre of the picture
  • On the left side of the play structure, there is an elevated accessible bridge that connects the ground level with the elevated area
  • Once on the play structure there are 2 play components, a slide and a play panel
  • On the right side of the play structure, there is a transfer platform
  • A ground level sensory panel is on the far right edge of the playground

A path connects to an existing pedestrian walkway or sidewalk. It must be at least 150mm wide and have a slope of no more than 5%. The accessible safety surface needs to be a certain depth based on fall heights to meet CSA requirements and for drainage. The surfacing has minimum border or "fall zone buffer" area that outlines the playground. Accessible bridges connect elevated areas to ground level components. A transfer platform allows persons to transfer from their assistive mobility devices to elevated play components. A tactile orientation map allows users with visual impairments to navigate the play area.

Accessible playgrounds include:

  • accessible safety surfacing
  • engineered wood fibre
  • pour-in place rubber (most accessible option for assistive devices, such as wheelchairs)
  • elevated play components and/ or ground-level play components such as,
  • elevated
    • climbers
    • slides
    • sensory play panels
  • ground
    • swings
    • spring riders
    • bouncers
    • sensory play panels
  • elevated bridge and/ or transfer platform to give access from the ground-level to elevated play components
  • path connection to pedestrian walkway

Optional accessibility features:

  • tactile orientation map
  • sensory play panels
  • accessible seating

Figure 24: Accessible playground – medium

Figure 24 : description follows
Text description of Figure 24
  • The layout of the playground is shown from a bird’s eye perspective as well as a side profile
  • On the left side, there is an existing sidewalk with a new walkway that connects to the playground
  • The walkway leads to accessible safety surfacing so persons with assistive devices can easily and safely access the playground
  • There is a fall zone buffer which outlines the playground area
  • The play structure is in the centre of the picture
  • On the left side of the play structure, there is an accessible swing
  • To the right of the swing is the play structure. An elevated accessible bridge connects the ground level with the elevated area
  • Once on the play structure, there are 2 play components, a slide and a play panel
  • On the right side of the play structure, there is a transfer platform
  • A ground-level spinner is on the far right edge of the playground

Figure 25: Accessible playground - large

Figure 25 : description follows
Text description of Figure 25
  • The layout of the playground is shown from a bird’s eye perspective as well as a side profile
  • On the left side, there is an existing sidewalk with a new walkway that connects to the playground
  • The walkway leads to accessible safety surfacing so persons with assistive devices can easily and safely access the playground
  • There is a fall zone buffer which outlines the playground area
  • On the top left side of the play structure, there is a ground-level component
  • The play structure is in the centre of the picture
  • There are accessible bridges that connect the ground-level to the play structure, as well as connects 2 elevated areas
  • Once on the play structure, there are 3 elevated play components, such as slides and play panels
  • On the right side of the play structure, there is a transfer platform
  • There are 2 additional ground-level components, such as a spinner or bouncer, on the bottom right and top left of the playground
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