Enabling Accessibility Fund flat rate information

List of figures

List of figures

Flat rate description for construction projects

There is now an easier way to apply for Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) funding. The change will benefit those applying for the following construction activities:

  • ramps
  • accessible doors
  • accessible washrooms
  • accessible lifts
  • elevators
  • pool lifts

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) developed a new way to determine the amount of funding you could receive. We apply flat rate costs based on the specifications of your construction. An interactive calculator, which is part of the application package, guides you through a series of options to help determine the amount of eligible funding. This replaces the need for you to provide ESDC with external quotes or detailed project plans for these activities

Diagrams are available below to guide you, and your contractor, through the standard requirements to make your project accessible.

How do flat rate costs work

As you complete the calculator, the options you select will help determine the amount of funding you could receive.

The flat rate costs take many factors into consideration, such as:

  • the essential items and/or components needed to meet accessibility standards
  • the fair market value for materials and labour
  • the construction materials that are standard commercial grade
  • project location
  • necessary permits and professional fees

The flat rate costs also consider:

  • any accessibility and safety features you wish to add to your project
  • the scope of the construction activities. For example, costs for upgrades to an existing washroom or for an addition to a building to accommodate a new accessible washroom

Estimated costs for renovation projects

The amounts in the calculator are estimated costs for standard renovation projects. They include all mandatory accessibility features, requirements and labour. For retrofits (upgrading an existing space), the calculated amount considers items you select and the labour required to install.

When completing the application form, please refer to the:

  • glossary to ensure you choose the right options for your project
  • diagrams to know the standard requirements to make your project accessible

If costs, features or specifications that are specific to your project are not as described in the flat rate calculator, please provide supplementary information in the additional information section of the form.

How will project location impact funding amounts

Flat rate adjusts costs based on the project location. This analysis includes how remote the project location is or how difficult it is to access.

Contingency

Flat rate will calculate eligible costs for each project. Yet, unexpected situations and costs are common with construction projects. We recommend that you consult a certified contractor to scope your project. This can help reduce unexpected costs. We also recommend that you have a contingency budget of around 20% of your total project costs to offset unexpected costs.

Diagrams and descriptions for standard renovations and accessibility features

Below are diagrams and descriptions for standard renovations. They display or describe accessibility features that you can add to your project.

Disclaimer

Dimensions and standard requirements outlined in the diagrams are based on the National Building Code (NBC) 2015 with precedent from the Canadian Standard Association (CSA) B651-18 Accessible Design for the Built Environment Standard, in combination of CSA B355 for accessible lifts, and CSA B44 for elevators. Contact your Local Authority Having Jurisdiction and local and municipal building codes for local standards. Exact standards and requirements as they relate to acceptable building code solutions vary between provinces, cities and municipalities. Appendix diagrams are shown for reference only. They should only be applied as a suggestion to the acceptable construction methods to meet the intent of the building code.

With the permission of CSA, (operating as “CSA Group”), 178 Rexdale Blvd., Toronto, ON, M9W 1R3, material is reproduced from CSA Group’s standard CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. This material is not the complete or official position of CSA Group on the referenced subject. The position is represented solely by the Standard in its entirety. While use of the material is authorized, CSA Group is not responsible:

  • for how we present the data in this document
  • for any representations and interpretations

No further reproduction of images is permitted. For more information or to purchase standard(s) from CSA Group, please visit CSA Group online store or call 1-800-463-6727.

Ramps

Figure 1: Ramps

A ramp that details the construction requirements for an accessible ramp. Text version below.

Source: Figure 33, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of figure 1
  • The ramp starts at a level doorway. It goes down a first slope until it reaches a landing. It then turns 90-degrees to go down a second slope. It ends at a level landing.
  • Along the ramp, there are safety features such as:
    • curbs
    • guard rails
    • handrails
    • pickets
    • tactile warning strips
  • These features help people go up and down the ramp safely. For example, tactile warning strips indicate the change in flooring at the entrance of the door and where the ramp curves.
    • The grade of the ramp is no more than 1:15
    • The width is a minimum of 3’7” (1100mm) wide
    • Guard rails are 3’ (915mm) high
    • Pickets are no more than 4” (100mm) apart
Ramps include:
  • ramp and landings:
    • (ramp: width: 1100 mm or 3’-7”, slope: 1/15)
    • (landing size: 5’-0” (1500mm)x 5’-0” (1500mm))
  • curbs, guard rails, handrails and pickets
  • structural framing
  • tactile warning/colour contrasting strips
  • shallow foundation (not deeper than 6’/ 1.8m)
Additional accessibility option:
  • A weather cover for exterior ramps

Accessible doors

Figure 2: Accessible doors

A door that details the construction requirements for an accessible door. Text version below.

Source: Figure 22, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of figure 2
  • A person using a cane is walking toward a door
  • The door is at minimum 2’ 8” (800mm) wide and has a glass window is no more than 3 feet (900mm) from the ground. This increases visibility of persons in assistive devices, such as a wheelchair
  • The door has an automatic door operator and controls powered by electricity
  • From the outside, guard rails are on each side of the doorway. A small vertical rectangular push button is at the top of the guard rail located on the right. The push button is between 3 and 3’7” (900 to 1100) from the ground
  • The entrance flooring (threshold) is a no higher than half an inch (13mm)
Exterior doors include:
  • insulated door complete with insulated glass window
    • dimensions: 3’-0” W x 7’-0”H (900mm W by 2100mm H)
    • door construction: Insulated Hollow metal, welded. Uvalde: 2.0 complete with dual pane glass light
  • insulated frame
    • frame construction: insulated/thermally broken pressed steel, welded
  • door hardware set
  • automatic door operator and controls
  • electrical power
  • barrier-free threshold
  • colour contrasting painting
Interior doors include:
  • non-insulated door with non insulated glass window 3’ (900mm) from the floor to increase visibility
    • dimensions: 3’-0” W x 7’-0”H (900mm W by 2100mm H)
    • door construction: Hollow metal, welded
  • non-insulated frame
    • frame construction: pressed steel, welded
  • door hardware set
  • automatic door operator and controls
  • electrical power
  • barrier-free threshold
  • colour contrasting painting
Additional accessibility option:
  • cane detectable guardrails

Accessible washrooms

Figure 3: Accessible single occupant washroom general floor plan

A washroom that details the construction requirements for an accessible washrooms. Text version below.

Source: Figure 47, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of figure 3
  • Across from the doorway is an accessible sink, vanity and an accessible height mirror. There is space underneath the sink for a person with an assistive device to fit their knees. The sink’s insulated pipes protect the knees from the hot water supply
  • Beside the sink, there is a clear area for a person to move from their assistive device onto the accessible manual flush toilet. The distance is at least 3’ (900mm)
  • The toilet has a backrest and a grab bar fixed against the back wall. On the left-hand side of the toilet, there is:
    • an emergency call button (optional)
    • a horizontal grab bar
    • a vertical grab bar
    • a toilet paper dispenser
    • a power door actuator button

The grab bars are 2’5”and 2’10” (750 to 850mm) from the floor and at least 2’ (600mm) wide

Dimensions: 75 SQFT (6.7 SM)

Accessible washrooms include:
  • barrier-free toilet
    • Accessible manual flush valve toilet
  • barrier-free sink and vanity
    • vanity complete with knee protection from plumbing lines
  • 2 grab bars
  • accessible angled mirror
  • washroom accessories
    • soap dispenser
    • toilet paper dispenser
    • paper towel dispenser or hand dryer
    • napkin disposal
  • non-slip flooring
  • colour contrasting painting
  • directional braille signage
  • interior finishes
Additional options may be selected
  • Accessible urinal
  • Emergency call button
  • Power assisted adult change table
  • Barrier-free shower

Figure 4: Washroom accessory heights

An accessible washroom that details the construction requirements for washroom accessories.

Source: Figure 42, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of figure 4
  • Starting from the left, a person in a wheelchair is using the hand dryer
  • All washroom accessories are approximately at their eyesight level
  • Beside the hand dryer, there is a sink and a mirror above it. The sink’s insulated water supply and drain pipes protect persons in wheelchairs from getting injured when their legs are under the sink
  • Beside the mirror and sink unit is:
    • a soap dispenser
    • a towel dispenser
    • waste bin unit
    • a dispenser of various items (for example, feminine hygiene product or other possible items)

Figure 5: Multi-stall washroom with accessible stall general floor plan

An accessible stall washroom that details the construction requirements.

Source: Figure 40, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of figure 5
  • The shape of the multi-stall washroom is like a rectangle with a short hallway leading to an open entrance. The doorway is at the top right corner
  • When standing in the doorway, there are 3 sinks on the right and 4 washroom stalls in front of them. Clear areas separate the sinks and the stalls. That gives enough space for a person with an assistive device, such as a wheelchair, to move around
  • Of the 4 stalls, 3 are standard and 1 is an accessible stall, which is larger than the rest
  • The standard sized stalls have doors that open inward
  • The barrier-free stall has:
  • a door that opens outward, which has a coat hook
  • a “D” type door pull on the inside and one on the outside

Dimensions: 90 SQFT (8.4 SM)

Accessible stalls include:
  • barrier-free toilet
  • accessible manual flush valve toilet
  • barrier-free sink and vanity
  • vanity complete with knee protection from plumbing lines
  • 2 grab bars
  • accessible angled mirror
  • washroom accessories
  • soap dispenser
  • toilet paper dispenser
  • paper towel dispenser or hand dryer
  • napkin disposal
  • metal washroom partitions and door
  • non-slip flooring
  • colour contrasting painting
  • directional braille signage
  • interior finishes
Additional accessibility options
  • Accessible urinal
  • Emergency call button
  • Power assisted adult change table
  • Barrier-free shower

Figure 6: Accessible stall general floor plan

A stall washroom that details the construction requirements. Text below.

Source: Figure 44, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of figure 6
  • The accessible stall has a door that opens outward with a “D” shape door pull on the outside. On the inside, there is also a “D” shape pull as well as a coat hook and an operable latch to lock the door
  • The toilet has a back rest and a grab bar fixed against the back wall. When sitting down on the toilet, a person can find on their left-hand side a “L” shape grab bar and a tissue holder
  • The grab bars are 2’5” and 2’10” (750 and 850mm) from the floor and at least 2’ (600mm) wide

Figure 7: Barrier-free shower general floor plan

A barrier free stall the details the construction requirements.

Source: Figure 49, CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment. © 2018 Canadian Standards Association

Text description of figure 7
  • There is a clear area with slip resistant surface before going into the shower area. The clear area is at least 3’-5’ (900-1500mm)
  • A curb no higher than half an inch (13mm) separates the shower areas and the clear area
  • When entering the shower area, there are 2 grab bars for support. The first one is a vertical grab bar attached to the left wall. The second one is a horizontal grab bar attached to the right wall
  • There is also a folding seat attached to the left wall if a person needs to sit down
  • On the back wall, there is a recessed soap holder; a vertical grab bar; a horizontal grab bar; and a handheld shower head with flexible hose
Accessible showers include:
  • shower kit
  • held shower head and accessible controls
  • recessed soap holder
  • folding seat
  • 4 grab bars
  • non-slip flooring

Accessible lifts

How to choose between an accessible lift and an elevator to suit your accessibility needs

Flow chart on how to choose between an accessible lift and an elevator to suit your accessibility needs
Text version – How to choose between an accessible lift and an elevator to suit your accessibility needs

The flowchart asks you yes or no questions.

Description:
  • the flowchart will help you choose between an accessible lift and a passenger elevator to best suit your access needs
Question 1: Is your project interior or exterior?
  • If your answer is “Interior”, go to question 2
  • If your answer is “Exterior”:
    • An accessible lift may accommodate your needs
Question 2: Do you need access for more than two levels?
  • If your answer is “Yes”:
    • You are better served by a passenger elevator
  • If your answer is “No", go to question 3
Question 3: Is access required for more than one person at a time?
  • If your answer is “Yes”:
    • you are better served by a passenger elevator
  • If your answer is “No”:
    • an accessible lift may accommodate your needs
Result:
  • passenger elevators are more inclusive than accessible lifts

It is recommended that you choose the most inclusive option possible to ensure a variety of users can benefit from your project, such as persons in wheelchairs and scooters and those with visual impairments and/or hearing impairments. See the additional accessibility options available to tailor your project.

How to choose the accessible lift that best suits your accessibility needs

Flowchart on how to choose the accessible lift that best suits your accessibility needs
Text version – How to choose the accessible lift that best suits your accessibility needs

The flowchart asks you yes or no questions.

Description:
  • the flowchart will help you choose the accessible list that best suits your access needs
Question 1: Do you have much space for a lift?
  • If your answer is “Yes”:
    • you are better served by a vertical platform lift
  • If your answer is “No”, go to question 2
Question 2: Do you only have one staircase that is needed for an emergency exit?
  • If your answer is “Yes”, go to question 3
  • If your answer is “No":
    • you are better served by a vertical platform lift
Question 3: Is access required for more than one person at a time?
  • If your answer is “Yes”:
    • you are better served by a vertical platform lift
  • If your answer is “No”:
    • an inclined platform lift may accommodate your needs
Result:
  • vertical platform lifts are more inclusive than accessible lifts

It is recommended that you choose the most inclusive option possible to ensure a variety of users can benefit from your project, such as persons in wheelchairs and scooters and those with visual impairments and/or hearing impairments. See the additional accessibility options available to tailor your project.

Figure 8: Inclined platform lift

A lift that moves along a staircase. Text description follows.

Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18/ CSA B355-19

Text description of figure 8
  • There is a set of stairs that leads to a landing before pivoting 45 degrees and continuing to the next flight of stairs
  • The platform lift is 2’-4” x 3’.7” (724mm x 1,118 mm) and is in the middle of the first set of stairs and is attached my inclined rails. The clearance minimum clearance for the platform to move up the stairs is 5’ (150mm)
  • At the bottom of the stairs is a call station button that is a maximum height of 3’-11” (120mm) from the floor
  • At the top of the landing is an audio visual alert to let people know the list if in use.
  • At the top of the second flight of stairs is another call button as well as a rectangle that houses the drive system machinery
Interior and exterior platform lifts include:
  • platform lift unit 2’-4” x 3’.7” (724mm x 1,118 mm)
  • controls
  • inclined rails
  • electrical service
Additional accessibility options:
  • Fire alarm integration
  • Lighting
  • Fold-down seat with seatbelt
  • Directional braille signage

Figure 9: Vertical platform lift (with enclosure)

A lift that has 2 stops. Text description follows.

Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18 / CSA B355-19

Text description for figure 9
  • There is a 2 story vertical lift with a door to enter the lift platform, which is at the lower stop
  • The minimum pit under the lift is 3” (76mm)
  • The maximum lifting height for one stop is 23’ (7000mm)
  • The minimum clearance of the upper stop is 7’-4” (2235mm). The upper stop has an enclosure door as well as the lift mast machinery
Vertical platform lifts include:
  • platform lift unit 3’.5” -4” x 4’.5” (1067 mm x 1371 mm)
  • controls
  • lift mast
  • electrical service
  • pit (3” /76mm)

For lifts that are over 8ft (2.5m) or exposed to rain and snow, an enclosure will be calculated in the flat rate cost.

Additional accessibility options
  • fire alarm integration
  • lighting
  • directional braille signage

Elevators

How to choose the passenger elevator that best suits your accessibility needs

Flowchart on how to choose the passenger elevator that best suits your accessibility needs
Text version – How to choose the pool lift that best suits your accessibility needs

The flowchart asks you yes or no questions.

Description:
  • the flowchart will help you choose the passenger elevator to best suits your access needs
Question 1: Is an elevator by building code?
  • If your answer is “Yes”, go to question 4
  • If your answer is “No”, go to question 2
Question 2: Do you need access for more than two levels?
  • If your answer is “Yes”, go to question 4
  • If your answer is “No", go to question 3
Question 3: Will the elevator be for general use (not only those with mobile accessibility needs)?
  • If your answer is “Yes”, go to question 4
  • If your answer is “No":
    • a limited use/limited application (LULA) elevator may accommodate your needs
Question 4: Do you need access for more than four floor levels?
  • If your answer is “Yes”:
    • you are better served by a traction elevator
  • If your answer is “No”:
    • a hydraulic elevator may accommodate your needs
Result:
  • traction elevators are more inclusive than LULA elevators

It is recommended that you choose the most inclusive option possible to ensure a variety of users can benefit from your project, such as persons in wheelchairs and scooters and those with visual impairments and/or hearing impairments. See the additional accessibility options available to tailor your project.

Figure 10: Limited application, limited use elevator

An elevator that has 2 stops. Text description follows.

Source: NBC 2015 / CBA B651 / CSA B44-16

Text description of figure 10
  • Doors enclose a 2-stop elevator. The elevator cab is at the lower stop
  • The minimum pit under the elevator is 1’-2” (355mm)
  • The maximum lifting height per floor is 25’ (7600mm)
  • The upper stop has elevator doors
Limited use, limited application elevators include:
  • elevator cab (48” x 54” /1220mm x 1372mm)
  • doors
  • controls
  • hydraulic cylinder, motor and tank
  • rails
  • hoistway
  • electrical service
  • pit (355mm depth including drain and sump)
  • machine room ( 54” x 60” /1220mm x 1525mm)
Additional accessibility option:
  • Directional braille signage

Figure 11: Hydraulic elevator

A barrier free stall the details the construction requirements. Text description follows.

Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18 / CSA B44-16

Text description of figure 11
  • Doors enclose a 2-stop elevator that has a lifting mechanism at the bottom. The elevator cab is at the lower stop
  • The minimum pit under the elevator is 5’-10” (1525mm)
  • The upper stop has elevator doors and there is a lifting beam, at the very top of the elevator shaft
Hydraulic elevators include:
  • elevator cab (1525mm x 1525mm)
  • perimeter handrail and telephone
  • doors
  • controls
  • hydraulic cylinder, motor and tank
  • guide rails
  • hoistway
  • electrical service
  • pit (1750mm depth), fixed ladder, drain and sump
  • machine room (1700mm x 3050mm)
Additional accessibility options:
  • directional braille signage
  • hearing loop
  • fold down seat

Figure 12: Traction elevator

Alt text; A barrier free stall the details the construction requirements. Text description follows.

Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18 / CSA B44-16

Text description of figure 12
  • Doors enclose a 2-story elevator that has additional space above to house the machinery room and lifting beam. The elevator cab is at the lower stop
  • The minimum pit under the elevator is 5’-8” (1720mm), which has 2 pistons to lift and lower the cab
  • In the second story of the elevator shaft, there is a rectangular counter weight
  • The upper stop has elevator doors
Traction elevators include:
  • elevator cab (1525mm x 1525mm)
  • perimeter handrail and telephone
  • doors
  • controls
  • motor, counterweight
  • guide rails
  • suspension ropes
  • travelling cable
  • hoistway
  • lifting beam
  • electrical service
  • pit (1750 mm depth)
  • fixed ladder, drain and sump
  • machine room (1700 x 3050mm)
Additional accessibility options:
  • directional braille signage
  • hearing loop
  • fold down seat

Figure 13: Elevator controls

A person in a wheel chair in front of elevator controls. Text description follows.

Source : NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18 / CSA B44-16

Text description of figure 13
  • A person in a wheelchair is facing a panel of controls. The width of the buttons must be at least ¾” (19mm). The buttons on the panel of controls are for:
    • alarm
    • stop
    • open door
    • close door
    • ground floor
    • first floor to forth floor
  • The minimum height for the panel is 2’-11” (890mm)
  • The maximum height is 4’-0” (1219mm)

Pool lifts

How to choose the pool lift that best suits your accessibility needs

Flowchart on how to choose the pool lift that best suits your accessibility needs
Text version – How to choose the pool lift that best suits your accessibility needs
Description:
  • the flowchart will help you choose the pool lift to best suit your access needs
Question 1: Is your pool or spa in-ground?
  • If your answer is “Yes”, go to question 2
  • If your answer is “No”:
    • a chairlift may suit your access needs
Question 2: Do you need the lift to accommodate assistive devices (i.e. wheelchairs)?
  • If your answer is “Yes”, go to question 4
  • If your answer is “No":
    • a chairlift may accommodate your needs
Question 3: Does your pool have room to accommodate a lift in the pool?
  • If your answer is “Yes”:
    • you are better served by a permanent platform lift
  • If your answer is “No":
    • a removable platform lift may accommodate your needs
Result:
  • permanent platform lifts are more inclusive than chair lifts

It is recommended that you choose the most inclusive option possible to ensure a variety of users can benefit from your project. For example, platform pool lifts include a pool wheelchair that can help persons with developmental disabilities and seniors to be safely lowered into a pool without an attendant.

Figure 14: Above-ground pool chair lift

A chair lift that details the construction requirements. Text description follows.

Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18

Text description of figure 14
  • The seat of the chair swivels from the deck to the pool
  • The chair is at least 4’ (1200mm) from a wall to give adequate space for a person to get on the chair lift
  • The chair lowers close to the basin wall to allow a person to disembark
Above-ground and in-ground pool chair lifts include:
  • chair lift unit
  • pool deck anchorage

Figure 15: Permanent in-ground pool lift

A permanent lift that details the construction requirements. Text description follows.

Source: NBC 2015 / CSA B651-18

Text description of figure 15
  • The lift is at the same height of the pool deck
  • There is a lift control panel at the entrance of the platform, which has guardrails
  • A lifting mechanism lowers the platform along the basin wall
  • The lift is anchored to the floor of the pool
Permanent and portable pool chair lifts include:
  • platform lift unit
  • pool deck anchorage
  • pool wheelchair

Glossary

Addition
Adding new square footage to an existing building.
Accessible door
Door with a width that ranges from 850mm to 1220mm. The door includes hardware to use with a single fist with limited strength and does not need tight grasping or twisting of the wrist. The door also includes power assisted operator and controls. The door transition is between 2 spaces. The transition of the finished floor between both areas is less than 13mm. The finishing includes colour contrasting painting.
Accessible washroom or stall
A single person washroom (or for use with a caregiver) or a larger stall within a washroom with many stalls. It has adequate wheelchair turning radius and adequate transfer space. The accessible toilet, sink, vanity, grab bars, door and washroom accessories are at an accessible height. The finishes include signage, non-slip flooring and colour contrasting painting.
Auxiliary power
An electrical system upgrade to provide power during power outages.
Barrier
A physical, architectural or technological obstacle. It makes it difficult for persons with disabilities to access or circulate in community spaces and workplaces. It prevents persons with disabilities to access or use public spaces on an equal basis with others.
Braille signage
A sign including braille. Braille is a system where raised dots represent letters and words. Unified English Braille is the braille standard for Canada.
Cane detectable guardrails
A rail system that falls within the detection range of a long white cane for those with visual impairments.
Colour contrast painting
Walls painted in a different colour than the door frames, floor, adjacent wall or plumbing fixtures. Colour contrast painting helps with depth perception for those with visual impairments.
Deep foundation
Building foundations which are deeper than 6’-0”. Deep foundations are sometimes necessary in parts of Canada where the ground material is not stable. This includes locations with high clay or silt in the ground. They require specialized construction equipment for installation.
Hoistway
The enclosure of an elevator or lift. Choosing between steel stud/drywall and concrete block for the hoistway enclosure for an elevator depends on the fire resistance rating required for the specific building as well as additional requirements for structural integrity. A professional should be consulted to determine which one is required.
Hydraulic elevator
An elevator operated by a liquid under pressure in a hydraulic jack.
Inclined platform lift
A fixed place device that elevates and lowers persons with disabilities between 2 or more levels by a stage or platform that moves along a staircase or ramp.
Increased ceiling height
Additional costs for ceilings over the standard 9ft. The selection will calculate costs at approximately 12ft. (up to 14ft from floor to floor).
Interior finishes
Includes minor repairs to floors, walls and ceilings.
Landings
The area of a floor near at the top or bottom step of a stair. Allows stairs to change directions, or allows the user a rest or to exit before the staircase continues.
Limited-use / limited-application elevator
A passenger elevator that has restricted use and application because of its size, capacity, speed and rise.
Modular enclosure
Encloses the vertical platform lift to protect from rain or snow. Can be mandatory for lifts over 8ft or for other safety concerns.
Ramp
A sloping walkway leading from one level to another, which has a slope not more than 1:15.
Ramp curb
A sloped surface built into a curb.
Ramp rise
Height between floor or ground surface and top of access ramp landing. To calculate the ramp rise, measure the top of the landing to the ground. For example, a 2-foot ramp is approximately 3 steps. A local contractor can specify the rise of your ramp project as well local building code requirements. Diagram showing what a ramp rise is.
Retrofit (upgrading an existing space)
Install (new or modified parts or equipment) in something previously constructed. For example, to make upgrades to your existing washroom to include accessible features.
Renovation
Creating a new space to enhance accessibility, without adding additional square feet. For example, if you make an accessible washroom in what was previously a storage room.
Sunken entrance
When there are stairs to get to the main floor of a building. Selecting yes in the calculator will adjust costs to include a half floor to the flat rate cost.
Tactile warning strips or indicator
Letters or graphics slightly raised above the surface. They can be detectable underfoot or by a long white cane. They assist persons with visual impairments to navigate the space.
Telescopic cylinder
This is an upgrade when a hydraulic cylinder is not possible, such as when the ground is too hard and/or a drilling rig cannot be used for installation.
Vertical platform lift
A fixed place device with a stage or platform that elevates and lowers persons with physical disabilities between 2 or more levels.
Water supply
A feature required for certain pool lifts that need water for hydraulic lifting.
Weather cover
A cover for a ramp or lift to protect it from inclement weather.
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