Labour Program Forward Regulatory Plan: 2022 to 2024

This Forward Regulatory Plan informs the public of regulatory initiatives the Labour Program aims to propose or finalize in the next 2 years through:

The Forward Regulatory Plan may also include regulatory initiatives the Labour Program plans to bring forward over a longer time frame. Interested parties may comment or make inquiries using the contact information included with each regulatory initiative.

Note: Consequential amendments to the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations may accompany new statutory or regulatory requirements, if required. Schedules I and II of these Regulations designate and classify each obligation under Part II and Part III of the Canada Labour Code and the associated regulations, based on the severity of the violation. The classification determines the base amount of the administrative monetary penalty and, in certain circumstances, public naming.

Regulatory initiatives

  1. Amending 6 Occupational Health and Safety Regulations – Reporting Requirements and Comments from the Standing Joint Committee for the Scrutiny of Regulations (SJCSR)
  2. Amending Occupational Health and Safety Regulations – Provision of Menstrual Products in the Workplace
  3. Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Equal Treatment and Temporary Help Agencies under the Canada Labour Code – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards
  4. Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Long-Term Disability Plans
  5. Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Medical Leave of Absence with Pay and Miscellaneous Amendments
  6. Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Service of Documents and Regular Rate of Wages
  7. Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Termination of Employment under the Canada Labour Code – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards
  8. Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Updating the Minimum Age of Employment – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards
  9. Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations in Support of the Reimbursement of Work-related Expenses and the Statement of Employment Conditions – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards
  10. Amending the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations – Updating Hazardous Substances Provisions
  11. Amending the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations – Updating Part VII – Levels of Sound
  12. Amending the Motor Vehicle Operators Hours of Work Regulations
  13. Amending the Nuclear Exclusion Regulations
  14. Amending the Oil and Gas Occupational Safety and Health Regulations – Updating Provisions and Standards
  15. Consequential Amendments to the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations
  16. Developing Administrative Monetary Penalties and other Regulations under the Pay Equity Act
  17. Developing COVID-19 Vaccination Regulations under the Canada Labour Code
  18. Regulations Amending Certain Regulations Made Under the Canada Labour Code – Respiratory Protective Equipment
  19. Regulations Respecting Exemptions from and/or Modifications to the Hours of Work Provisions under Part III of the Canada Labour Code – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards

Amending 6 Occupational Health and Safety Regulations – Reporting Requirements and Comments from the Standing Joint Committee for the Scrutiny of Regulations (SJCSR)

Enabling act(s)

Description

The main objective of the proposed amendments is to modernize the reporting requirements by replacing the forms currently included in schedules of the OHS regulations. A list of information will replace the forms that employers must provide to the Labour Program.

Electronic forms for the following reports will be made available online to facilitate submission of required information by employers:

  • Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report (HOIR)
  • Employer’s Annual Hazardous Occurrence Report (EAHOR), and
  • Annual Report on Work Place Committee Activities

In addition, other minor amendments will also be made to the OHS regulations to address concerns raised by the Standing Joint Committee for the Scrutiny of Regulations (SJCSR). These changes will help stakeholders better understand the regulations and avoid possible misinterpretation.

Amendments would be made to the following regulations:

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

There may be potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses. The “one-for-one” rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

Regulatory cooperation efforts are not required, as the amendments are administrative.

Consultations

Due to the administrative nature of the amendments, public consultations on the regulatory proposal are not required. The proposed amendments will not change the intent of the regulations nor have any practical impact on businesses.

Publication in Part II of the Canada Gazette is expected for the fall of 2022 with a coming into force anticipated at a later date.

This regulatory initiative will result in consequential amendments to Schedule 1 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

October 1, 2017

Amending Occupational Health and Safety Regulations - Provision of Menstrual Products in the Workplace

Enabling act(s)

Description

The objective of the proposed amendments is to require federally regulated employers to provide menstrual products in the workplace. This will reduce the health risks that may be caused by the lack of access to menstrual products in the workplace. This will be done by amending the sanitation provisions under the various occupational health and safety regulations under Part II of the Code.

An administrative recognition of all-gender toilets (including unisex and gender-neutral toilets) may be included to ensure they count towards the requirements for the number of toilets that must be provided in the workplace per number of employees, as set out in the sanitation provisions of the COHSR.

This approach will be developed in multiple phases including:

  • convening a roundtable of experts on the subject of the provision of menstrual products in the workplace
  • publishing a summary of findings and survey on the Labour Program website outlining the findings of the roundtable of experts and seeking public feedback, and
  • conducting consultations with federally regulated stakeholders, to amend all applicable OHS regulations to require employers to provide menstrual products in their workplace and to address the recognition of all-gender toilets

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

Employers in the federal jurisdiction are expected to be impacted by the proposed regulatory amendments due to the proposed requirement to provide menstrual products to their employees. The “one-for-one” rule and the small business lens may apply.

Canadians working in the federal jurisdiction are expected to benefit from this initiative due to the increased availability of free menstrual products in their workplaces.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

Regulatory cooperation efforts will require the cooperation and support of:

  • Transport Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Indigenous Services Canada, and
  • the Canada Energy Regulator

Consultations

The Labour Program invited feedback on the proposed policy through the publication of a What We Heard Report on its website in December 2020 summarizing the feedback on the Notice of Intent. Forty-two submissions were received.

The Labour Program convened a roundtable of experts on June 8, 2021. A summary of findings and survey on the topic of the provision on menstrual products in federally regulated workplaces was published on August 3, 2021, and closed on September 7, 2021.  Over 734 Canadians completed the survey.

The Labour Program will conduct consultations with federally regulated stakeholders in the spring of 2022. Pre-publication in Part I of the Canada Gazette is anticipated for the summer of 2022.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will be assessed for consequential amendments to Schedule 1 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

May 2019 (removed in 2019) and now included in March 2021

Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Equal Treatment and Temporary Help Agencies under the Canada Labour Code – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards

Enabling act(s)

The authority for this proposed regulatory initiative is provided under:

Description

  • The objective of these regulations is to support amendments to Part III of the Code not yet in force. The regulations intend to ensure equal treatment and compensation for employees, including those in precarious work.

The amendments to the Code include the following equal treatment provisions:

  • prohibiting differences in rates of wages based on the employment status of employees
  • protecting temporary help agency employees from unfair practices, and
  • entitling all employees regardless of their employment status, to be informed of employment or promotion opportunities

The proposed amendments to Part III to the Code also include authorities to make regulations:

  • modifying requirements
  • exempting classes of employees, and
  • defining terms regarding equal treatment and temporary help agency provisions

Code amendments will come into force on a day determined by order of the Governor in Council.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

These regulations may incrementally increase compliance and administrative costs. The "one-for-one" rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

The Labour Program held initial regulatory consultations between June and August of 2019 with federally regulated stakeholders, including employer and employee representatives. To inform the development of the regulations, the Labour Program launched a consultation with stakeholders on December 21, 2021, concluded on February 21, 2022.

The timeframe for pre-publication of the proposed regulations in Part I of the Canada Gazette, has yet to be determined.

Consequential amendments

This initiative will result in consequential amendments to Schedule 2 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Long-Term Disability Plans

Enabling act(s)

The Canada Labour Code (the Code) provides authority for this proposed regulatory initiative.

Description

A long-term disability (LTD) plan is a benefit that insures an employee against the possibility of income loss due to a medical event or disability that prevents the employee from working for an extended period of time.

The objective of the proposed amendments to the Canada Labour Standards Regulations is to define circumstances and conditions. These are limited situations under which certain employers, such as Crown corporations, may provide benefits to its employees under a LTD plan that is not insured. In these cases, the uninsured LTD plan is protected from insolvency to the same extent as a plan insured by a financial institution or licensed insurance provider.

The July 1, 2014, amendments to Part III of the Code require employers to:

  • insure LTD plans, and
  • ensure that eligible employees continue to receive their LTD benefits, should their employer become insolvent

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

The proposed regulations are not expected to have any compliance and administrative costs. The "one-for-one" rule and/or the small business lens will likely not apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

To inform the possibility of proposing additional regulatory changes related to LTD plan, the Labour Program launched a consultation on December 21, 2021, which concluded in the winter of 2022. The proposed regulations are expected to be pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette in 2022.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will be assessed for consequential amendments to Schedule 2 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

April 1, 2021

Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Medical Leave of Absence with Pay and Consequential Amendments to Certain Regulations under the Canada Labour Code

Enabling act(s)

The authority for this proposed regulatory initiative is provided under:

Description

The objective of these regulatory amendments is to support amendments to Part III of the Code, not yet in force, that introduced ten days of medical leave of absence with pay for employees in the federal jurisdiction and expanded bereavement leave following the loss of a child.

Amendments to the Canada Labour Standards Regulations may define terms used in the legislation, modify medical leave provisions for employees in multi-employer situations and amend record keeping requirements.

Code amendments will come into force on a day to be determined by order of the Governor in Council.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

These regulations may have incremental compliance and administrative costs. The "one-for-one" rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

Initial regulatory consultations will be held during winter/spring 2022.

The proposed regulations are expected to be pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette by the summer of 2022.

Consequential Amendments

This initiative will result in consequential amendments to Schedule 2 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

April 1, 2022

Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Service of Documents and Regular Rate of Wages

Enabling act(s)

The Canada Labour Code (the Code) provides authority for this proposed regulatory initiative.

Description

The objective of the proposed amendments to the Canada Labour Standards Regulations (the Regulations) is to modernize certain provisions under Part III of the Code. These provisions relate to the service of documents by allowing for electronic and substitutional service and for more forms of proof of service.

The proposed Regulations will:

  • clarify the calculation of wages in situations where employees are required to participate in hearings of the Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) and are normally compensated in ways other than an hourly rate
  • establish the manner of service of documents to employers, allowing service to be carried out electronically, and
  • allow for a certificate signed by the Minister or Head of Compliance and Enforcement to serve as proof that service has been carried out in cases where the individual or organization cannot be reached

These provisions would include the service of documents such as:

  • internal audit orders
  • compliance orders
  • orders to pay, including notices of unfounded complaints and notices of voluntary compliance
  • reviews of payment orders or notices
  • notices to furnish information

The proposed Regulations will also outline the calculation of employee wages where an employee is normally compensated in a way other than an hourly rate for an appearance before the CIRB. For example, when an employee is paid a commission, haulage, or mileage rate, the Regulations will provide a formula to aid in calculating a rate of wages.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

These regulations may incrementally increase compliance and administrative costs. The "one-for-one" rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

The Labour Program consulted with federally regulated stakeholders, including employer and employee representatives concluded in the winter of 2022. 

The proposed regulations are expected to be pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette for the summer of 2022.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will be assessed for consequential amendments to Schedule 2 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

April 1, 2021

Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Termination of Employment under the Canada Labour Code – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards

Enabling act(s)

The authority for this proposed regulatory initiative is provided under:

Description

The objective of these regulations is to support amendments to Part III of the Code not yet in force. The regulations intend to update termination of employment provisions. This is to ensure that employees receive sufficient notice and/or compensation when their jobs are terminated, to help protect their financial security.

The amendments to the Code include the following termination provisions:

  • updating group termination of employment provisions to allow employers to provide:
    • pay in lieu of the required 16-week group termination notice, or
    • a combination of notice and pay in lieu, and
  • creating a graduated notice of individual termination of employment that will increase based on the employee’s continuous length of service

The proposed amendments to Part III to the Code also include authorities to make regulations:

  • exempting employers from the application of group termination of employment provisions, and
  • establishing the value of transitional support measures in a group termination of employment, and defining other related terms

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

These regulations may incrementally increase compliance and administrative costs. The "one-for-one" rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

The Labour Program held initial regulatory consultations between June and August of 2019 with federally regulated stakeholders, including employer and employee representatives. The individual termination provisions will come into force on a date that is yet to be determined.

Regulations related to group termination of employment are expected to be pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette. The pre-publication date has yet to be determined.

Consequential amendments

This initiative will result in consequential amendments to Schedule 2 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

April 1, 2020

Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations – Updating the Minimum Age of Employment – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards

Enabling act(s)

The authority for this proposed regulatory initiative is provided under:

Description

The objective of the proposed amendments to the Canada Labour Standards Regulations is to support the amendments to Part III of the Code. These Code amendments are not yet in force.

The amendments to the Code include the following changes:

  • raising the minimum age of employment in hazardous occupations from 17 to 18, and
  • expanding the authority to create regulations that specify the occupations in which persons under the age of 18, or any class of persons under that age, may be employed, and fixing the conditions of that employment

The regulatory amendments will come into force on a day to be determined by order of the Governor in Council.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

These regulations may have incremental compliance and administrative costs. The "one-for-one" rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

The Labour Program held initial regulatory consultations with federally regulated stakeholders, between June and August of 2019.

The proposed regulations are expected to be pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette for the summer of 2022.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will be assessed for consequential amendments to Schedule 2 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

January 7, 2021

Amending the Canada Labour Standards Regulations in Support of the Reimbursement of Work-Related Expenses and the Statement of Employment Conditions – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards

Enabling act(s)

The authority for this proposed regulatory initiative is provided under:

Description

The objective of the proposed amendments to the Canada Labour Standards Regulations is to support the amendments to Part III of the Code. These Code amendments are not yet in force and were enacted to:

  • ensure fair treatment and compensation for employees, including those in precarious work, and
  • enhance employer and employee knowledge of Part III rights and obligations

Under the Code amendments, employers must:

  • provide employees with information respecting employer and employee rights and obligations under Part III of the Code, within 30 days of their employment
  • reimburse their employees for reasonable work-related expenses subject to certain exceptions and within time limits set out under a collective agreement or other written agreement
  • provide each of their employees with a written statement containing information relating to their employment, within the first 30 days of their employment
  • ensure the material is readily accessible to employees, and
  • provide an up-to-date version of this material to former employees in the event of their termination

The Code provides authority for the Governor in Council to make regulations:

  • prescribing the information that must be included in a statement of employment conditions, and
  • prescribing factors to consider in determining if an expense is work-related and/or reasonable

The Governor in Council will determine which day the regulatory amendments will come into force.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

These regulations are expected to have incremental compliance and administrative costs. The "one-for-one" rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

The Labour Program held initial regulatory consultations with federally regulated stakeholders between June and August of 2019, including employer and employee representatives.

Stakeholders will have an opportunity to comment on the proposed regulations during pre-publication in Part I of the Canada Gazette, which is anticipated for the summer of 2022.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will result in consequential amendments to Schedule 2 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

January 7, 2021

Amending Occupational Health and Safety Regulations – Updating Hazardous Substances Provisions

Enabling act(s)

The authority for this proposed regulatory initiative is provided under:

Description

The proposed regulatory amendments to the AOHSR, COHSR, MOHSR, OGOSHR, and OTOHSR under Part II of the Code address health and safety requirements for hazardous substances in the workplace.

The objective of the proposed amendments is to improve the health and safety of federally regulated employees by updating the exposure limits and regulatory requirements. These amendments are adding new requirements related to:

  • thermal stress
  • nanoparticles and ultraviolet radiation
  • clarifying ambiguous regulatory text to reflect best practices, and
  • improving consistency with other provisions within the AOHSR, COHSR, MOHSR, OGOSHR, and OTOHSR and Health Canada guidelines.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

These regulations are expected to benefit Canadian workers in the federal jurisdiction by mitigating exposure to hazardous substances in the workplace. Impacts on Canadians and businesses have been identified. The “one-for-one” rule and the small business lens apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

The United States of America (U.S.) has regulations from both state and federal levels, and in general, Canada and the U.S. have similar requirements. The U.S. is finalizing similar requirements for nanoparticles. Both Canada’s regulations and those of the U.S. rules concerning exposure to ultra violet radiation reference the same standard. The proposed amendment to maintain records for 30 years would be aligned with the U.S. regulations.

Consultations

Federally regulated employers and employees were consulted through the Hazardous Substances Working Group. Since February 2009, 18 meetings of the Hazardous Substances Working Group were held. Certain elements of the regulations have been or will be addressed in separate regulatory proposals. Consultations were completed on May 15, 2014. The timing for stakeholder consultations is to be determined, given current circumstances related to COVID-19 and pressures being experienced by stakeholders at this time.

Stakeholders will have the opportunity to comment on the proposed amendments during pre-publication in Part I of the Canada Gazette, expected for the fall of 2022.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will result in consequential amendments to Schedule 1 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

October 1, 2015

Amending the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations – Updating Part VII – Levels of Sound

Enabling act(s)

Description

The following prescribes the health and safety requirements for employers and employees with respect to the exposure to sound:

  • Part VII of the COHSR
  • Part 2 of the AOHSR
  • Part IV of the OTOHSR
  • Part 12 of the MOHSR, and
  • Part VIII of the OGOHSR under Part II of the Code

The proposed amendments aim to facilitate compliance with the regulations by:

  • amending the reference to an outdated standard
  • clarifying ambiguous regulatory text
  • simplifying the language and providing a more basic duration unit
  • reducing the risk of hearing impairment by updating exposure limits and thresholds, and
  • adopting surveillance measures consistent with scientific knowledge

The proposed amendments will reflect current best practices on noise control and hearing loss prevention programming.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

There may be potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses. The “one-for-one” rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

The proposed amendments would harmonize the exposure limits and surveillance measures with those in several provincial jurisdictions.

Consultations

The Labour Program held preliminary consultations with targeted external stakeholders in May 2019, August 2019 and January 2020.

Targeted consultations with external stakeholders representing federally regulated employers and employees were held in the fall of 2020.

Stakeholders will have further opportunity to comment on the proposed regulations when they are pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette, anticipated for the fall of 2022.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will result in consequential amendments to Schedule 1 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

August 30, 2019

Amending the Motor Vehicle Operators Hours of Work Regulations

Enabling act(s)

Part III of the Canada Labour Code (the Code) provides the authority for this proposed regulatory initiative.

Description

The objectives of the proposed amendments are to modernize and improve the clarity of the Motor Vehicle Operators Hours of Work Regulations. They have remained largely unchanged since coming into force in 1973.

Regulatory authorities provided in Part III of the Code enable the Governor in Council to make regulations:

  • modifying provisions in Division I (Hours of Work) if the application of those sections without modification would be unduly prejudicial to the interests of certain classes of employees or seriously detrimental to the operation of the industrial establishment
  • exempting certain classes of employees from any Division I provision if it cannot reasonably be applied to that class of employee, providing for the calculation of hours worked by employees of any class, and
  • calculating and determining wages received by an employee

The scope and timing of any changes to the regulations are currently being reconsidered based on feedback received from stakeholders following consultations in February of 2021.

In addition to the regulatory review, the Labour Program, in collaboration with the Canada School of Public Service, the Department of Justice, and the Community of Federal Regulators, intends to translate the regulations into machine-readable code. This “rules as code” project is part of the Digitalization and Technology-Neutral Regulations Roadmap (the Roadmap), stemming from a Budget 2018 announcement for targeted regulatory reviews of regulatory requirements and practices that are bottlenecks to economic growth and innovation. The Roadmap outlines a suite of actions to advance digitalization in the regulatory space and support regulations that avoid prescribing any particular technology that must be used to comply with regulatory measures. It also identifies opportunities to simplify the regulatory process to reduce burden and to ensure that regulations do not impede the use of new technologies.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

These proposed amendments may have incremental compliance and administrative costs. The "one-for-one" rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

The Labour Program held regulatory consultations with employer and employee representatives in the road transportation sector in February 2021 to guide the development of proposed changes.

The regulations are expected to be pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette within a timeframe mutually determined with stakeholders.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will be assessed for consequential amendments to Schedule 2 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

January 7, 2021

Amending the Nuclear Exclusion Regulations

Enabling act(s)

Description

There are 4 main objectives of the proposed amendments:

  1. ensure that the current definition of “nuclear facility” in the Ontario Exclusion Regulations can apply to all organizations who operate nuclear facilities and power generation facilities in Ontario
  2. apply the provincial Fire Protection and Prevention Act to those that conduct firefighting activities at nuclear facilities, providing greater clarity surrounding their right to refuse dangerous work
  3. combine the current exclusions for Ontario under one exclusion to streamline and clarify language
  4. update the remaining exclusion regulations for clarity

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

There may be potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses. The “one-for-one” rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

Data sharing is taking place with Ontario, New Brunswick and Saskatchewan to best align regulatory amendments with relevant provincial regulations. The proposed amendments are administrative in nature.

Consultations

The Labour Program held consultations with concerned stakeholders in summer 2019. Stakeholders will be re-engaged prior to publication.

Pre-publication in Part I of the Canada Gazette is expected for the fall of 2022.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will be assessed for consequential amendments to Schedule 1 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

August 30, 2019

Amending the Oil and Gas Occupational Safety and Health Regulations – Updating Provisions and Standards

Enabling act(s)

The Oil and Gas Occupational Safety and Health Regulations (OGOSHR) under Part II of the Canada Labour Code (the Code).

Description

The objective of amending the OGOSHR is to update outdated provisions and standards to ensure that the regulations contain the most current ones. These include:

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

There may be potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses. The “one-for-one” rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

Regulatory cooperation efforts are ongoing with National Resources Canada (NRCan) and the Canada Energy Regulator (CER).

Consultations

The Labour Program conducted consultations with federally regulated employers and employees in 2017.

The pre-publication date of the proposed regulations in Part I of the Canada Gazette is planned for 2023.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will be reviewed for consequential amendments to Schedule 1 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

October 1, 2015

Consequential Amendments to the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations

Enabling act(s)

The Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations are made pursuant to Part IV of the Canada Labour Code (the Code).

Description

The objectives of regulatory amendments to the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations (the AMPs Regulations) include:  

  • ensuring new legislative and regulatory requirements are enforceable under Part IV of the Canada Labour Code, and
  • ensuring consistent application of the AMPs Regulations’ designation and classification methodology.

While the authority to impose an AMP is in Part IV of the Code, consequential regulatory adjustments are required to designate new or amended obligations in the AMPs Regulations schedules.

There are no identifiable new costs to Canadian businesses or impacts on trade or investment that could result from the proposed consequential amendments to the AMPs Regulations.

The regulatory amendments will ensure a consistent administrative monetary penalties system is maintained.

These changes will benefit Canadian workers by promoting employer compliance with all obligations in the Code and its associated regulations, and allowing for their enforcement under Part IV of the Code.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

N/A

Consultations

Due to the administrative and consequential nature of the amendments, public consultations on the regulatory proposal may not be required.

The proposed regulations are anticipated to be pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette in 2022.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

April 1, 2022

Developing Administrative Monetary Penalties and Other Regulations under the Pay Equity Act

Enabling act(s)

Pay Equity Act (PEA)

Description

The PEA and enabling regulations came into force August 31, 2021. The PEA requires federally regulated employers with 10 or more employees to proactively examine their compensation practices to determine whether there is a difference in compensation between positions that are mostly held by women and those mostly held by men that are deemed to be of equal value. If differences in compensation exist, employers are required to increase the compensation of affected employees and, then, maintain pay equity.

The objective of the regulations in development is to establish a system of administrative monetary penalties (AMPs) in order to deter non-compliance with the PEA. The AMPs regulations will allow the Pay Equity Commissioner to levy penalties for prescribed violations of the legislation and regulations, as well as orders made by the Commissioner. The regulations would also set requirements for maintaining a pay equity plan when there are no predominantly male job classes in the workplace.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

The proactive pay equity regime introduced by the PEA applies to employers with 10 or more employees in the federally regulated private and public sectors, including:

  • the federal public service and separate agencies
  • Crown Corporations
  • the Prime Minister’s and ministers’ offices, and
  • parliamentary institutions

There may be potential impacts on businesses. The “one-for-one” rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

There are no expected significant impacts on international trade or investment.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

Consultations with federally regulated employers and employees and their representatives, as well as special interest groups are expected in spring of 2022. The proposed regulations are anticipated to be pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette in 2022.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Lori Straznicky
Executive Director, Workplace and Labour Relations Policy Division
Strategic Policy, Analysis and Workplace Information Directorate, Labour Program
613-462-1023

lori.straznicky@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

April 1, 2021

Developing COVID-19 Vaccination Regulations under the Canada Labour Code

Enabling act(s)

The authority for this regulatory initiative is provided under:

Description

COVID-19 remains a hazard that impacts the occupational health and safety of federally regulated employees in the workplace. In December 2021, the Minister of Labour announced that the Government would propose regulations requiring vaccination of federally regulated employees, except under very limited circumstances.

If introduced, the regulations would complement existing occupational health and safety measures, such as masking, handwashing and physical distancing, to provide further protection against the risk of transmission of COVID-19 in the workplace.

The Government continues to follow the science related to COVID-19 and its occupational health and safety impacts. Timing for the regulations has yet to be determined.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

Employers in the federal jurisdiction may be impacted by the establishment of the regulations that require COVID-19 vaccination of their employees.

The “one-for-one” rule and the small business lens may apply.

Canadians working in the federal jurisdiction are likely to benefit from the protection afforded by increased COVID-19 vaccination rates, reduced transmission of COVID-19 in the workplace and, by extension, in their communities.  When transmission does occur, those who are vaccinated are reported to benefit from reduced negative health outcomes.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

Regulatory cooperation efforts will require the cooperation and support of Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Indigenous Services Canada and the Canada Energy Regulator.

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

Consultations with federally regulated stakeholders, including employer and employee representatives, were held in December 2021. Since then, the program has continued to receive feedback on an ongoing basis from stakeholders. The regulations have not been published, and further details on timing have not yet been announced.

Consequential amendments

This initiative may result in consequential amendments to Schedule I of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

December 10, 2021

Regulations Amending Certain Regulations Made Under the Canada Labour Code – Respiratory Protective Equipment

Enabling act(s)

The following regulations provide authority for this proposed regulatory initiative:

Description

The proposed amendments will update the respiratory protection provisions in the above four occupational health and safety regulations to allow CSA Group certified equipment as an alternative to United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certified equipment in federally regulated workplaces. This will give employers the choice to provide either NIOSH or CSA Group certified equipment when required to do so under the regulations, while also promoting Canada’s access to such equipment in the case of future events that compromise the supply of NIOSH certified equipment.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

The proposed amendments are not expected to have any compliance and administrative costs. The small business lens will apply as small businesses will have the choice between providing NIOSH or CSA Group certified equipment. Additionally, the "one-for-one" rule will not apply as there is no incremental change in administrative burden on business and no regulatory titles are repealed or introduced.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

The proposed amendments will support regulatory cooperation and alignment. This will create additional avenues to protect workers across Canadian provinces and territories, while also promoting Canada’s access to such equipment in the case of future events that compromise the supply of NIOSH certified equipment.

An objective of the Regulatory Reconciliation and Cooperation Table (RCT) is to oversee the regulatory reconciliation process and promote regulatory cooperation across Canada. In regards to certified equipment, the RCT will help facilitate the incorporation of Canadian certified equipment into occupational health and safety regulations in all 14 jurisdictions in Canada.

Consultations

An assessment was undertaken with Health Canada, the National Research Council, the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Standards Council of Canada, which identified the need for a Canadian standard and certification process, equivalent to NIOSH, due to the complexities of international cooperation. In November 2020, the CSA Group began work to develop a new performance standard for the manufacturing of equipment in Canada. The Standard was posted for a 60-day public comment period from March 29, 2021 to May 29, 2021, and was published in October 2021 in English and in December 2021 in French.

Partner departments, external stakeholders, and members of the Labour Program’s Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee were consulted throughout the regulatory process. Consultations revealed that stakeholders were supportive of the proposed amendments, which will ultimately provide greater options for employers and improve the supply chain in case of future events, rather than relying solely on NIOSH certified equipment. Publication in Part II of the Canada Gazette is anticipated in Spring 2022, with a coming into force on the day of registration.

Consequential amendments to the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations will be made to reflect the proposed amendments made to the provisions.

Further information

Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

August 4, 2021

Regulations Respecting Exemptions from and/or Modifications to the Hours of Work Provisions under Part III of the Canada Labour Code – Modernizing Federal Labour Standards

Enabling act(s)

The authority for this proposed regulatory initiative is provided under:

Description

Bill C-63 and Bill C-86 introduced new hours of work rules to Division I of the Code. The objective of the proposed regulations is to enable flexibility in their implementation.

Amendments to the hours of work rules in Division I of Part III of the Code came into force on September 1, 2019. These amendments include new requirements for employers to provide:

  • at least 96 hours’ written notice of work schedules
  • at least 24 hours’ written notice of shift changes or additions
  • unpaid break of at least 30 minutes during every period of 5 consecutive hours of work, and
  • rest period of 8 consecutive hours between work periods or shifts

The Governor in Council may make regulations under authorities provided in Part III of the Code:

  • modifying provisions in Division I (Hours of Work) if the application of those sections without modification would be:
    • unduly prejudicial to the interests of certain classes of employees, or
    • seriously detrimental to the operation of the industrial establishment, and
  • exempting certain classes of employees from any Division I provision if it cannot reasonably be applied to that class of employee

Further to feedback from stakeholders in continuous, 24/7 operations, it will be necessary in limited circumstances to either modify or exempt certain classes from the new hours of work rules.

The legislative amendments also introduced a new limited right for employees to refuse overtime work for responsibilities including:

  • the health or care of a family member, or
  • the education of a family member who is under 18 years of age

No exemptions or modifications to this limited right to refuse overtime are being considered at this time.

Potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses

There may be potential impacts on Canadians, including businesses. The "one-for-one" rule and/or the small business lens may apply.

Regulatory cooperation efforts (domestic and international)

This regulatory initiative is not part of a formal bilateral agreement.

Consultations

Between May and August of 2019, regulatory consultations were held with federally regulated stakeholders including employer and employee representatives. Additional consultations were held to inform the development of the regulations in February and March of 2020, with further consultations held in the fall of 2020 and winter of 2021. The regulations have been developed in 2 phases:

  1. road transportation, postal and courier, marine (pilotage, marine transportation, long shoring), and grain (handling/elevators and milling) sectors:
  2. air and rail transportation, banking, and telecommunications and broadcasting sectors:
    • the proposed regulations were pre-published in Part I of the Canada Gazette on December 25, 2021 for a 60-day comment period and publication in the Canada Gazette Part II is expected in fall 2022.

Consequential amendments

This regulatory initiative will result in consequential amendments to Schedule 2 of the Administrative Monetary Penalties (Canada Labour Code) Regulations.

Further information

The What We Heard Report summarizes the views expressed by stakeholders during legislative consultations. Consult Acts and Regulations for further information on acts and regulations administered by the Labour Program, and Hours of Work webpage.

Departmental contact information

Judith Buchanan
Director General
Workplace Directorate, Labour Program
judith.buchanan@labour-travail.gc.ca

Date the regulatory initiative was first included in the Forward Regulatory Plan

April 1, 2020

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