Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service - Review of fiscal year 2017 to 2018

From: Employment and Social Development Canada

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Executive summary

Federal Mediation and Conciliation Services

The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS) was established to provide dispute resolution and relationship development assistance to trade unions and employers under the jurisdiction of the Canada Labour Code (Code). The Code governs federally regulated employees in key sectors of the economy.

The FMCS offers employers and unionized employees:

  • dispute resolution support through the services of conciliation and mediation officers—third parties whose mandate is to assist both parties in reaching a mutual agreement; and
  • relationship development services that are intended to prevent disputes before they occur. This is achieved by training workshops on collective bargaining and joint conflict resolution. The FMCS also provides grievance mediation services. These are all ways of resolving disagreements and improving industrial relations during the term of the collective agreement.

The FMCS also plays an important role in another method of conflict resolution: arbitration. It coordinates the appointment of arbitrators, adjudicators and referees to resolve certain types of disputes governed by the Code, such as grievances, unjust dismissal complaints and wage recovery appeals. The FMCS also coordinates appointments under the Wage Earner Protection Program Act (WEPP Act).

In Canada, the use of neutral third parties (conciliation and mediation officers) appointed by the government to resolve labour relation disputes dates back to the Conciliation Act of 1900. The Conciliation Act created the federal Labour Department with a mandate to assist unions and employers in the prevention and resolution of labour disputes.

Over the years, the FMCS and its forerunners have provided employers and unions with professional skills essential to the resolution of their collective bargaining disputes.

Conciliation and mediation: During fiscal year 2017 to 2018, conciliation and mediation officers from the FMCS dealt with 245 collective bargaining disputes under the Code. Ninety-four percent of the disputes that were settled during the year were resolved without a work stoppage. Just less than 0.02% of all available work time was lost due to work stoppages during the same period. These negotiations involved companies in most of the industrial sectors covered by Part I of the Code and resulted in major agreements in such industrial sectors as road, air, rail and marine transportation, grain handling, port operations, aboriginal public administration, communications and broadcasting.

Maintenance of activities: The Code stipulates that during a strike or lockout, the employer and the employees of the bargaining unit must continue the supply of services, operation of facilities or production of goods to the extent necessary to prevent an immediate and serious danger to the safety or health of the public. The Code sets a process for the negotiation of a “maintenance of activities” agreement and provides a role for the Minister of Labour and the Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) if the parties are unable to reach agreement. In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, the issue of a “maintenance of activities” agreement was not referred by the Minister to the CIRB under subsection 87.4(5).

Legislation: No special legislation was enacted to end a work stoppage.

Dispute Prevention and Relationship Development Services: During fiscal year 2017 to 2018, FMCS continued to deliver dispute prevention and relationship development services to employers and unions, thereby contributing to better communications, more collaborative collective bargaining and overall improvement of their labour relations.  During this period, 173Footnote 1 interventions were delivered, for a total of 325 days, including grievance mediation, diagnostics of parties’ relationship, training workshops as well as facilitation of workplace issues and joint initiatives. Facilitation services represented the highest number of interventions, while workshop delivery and grievance mediation were also significant contributors. FMCS’s flagship workshop, Labour Relations and the Negotiation Cycle, was successfully delivered again (after 5 consecutive years) and a new public workshop entitled Interest Based Negotiations was offered for the first time.

Appointments of neutral third parties – Part I, Part III and the WEPP Act: Arbitrators were appointed in 72 grievance arbitrations in fiscal year 2017 to 2018 under Part I of the Code. Under Part III of the Code, the FMCS also handled the ministerial appointment of 92 wage recovery referees and 380 unjust dismissal adjudicators and 3 appointments under the Wage Earner Protection Program Act during fiscal year 2017 to 2018.

Upcoming collective bargaining: Upcoming negotiations during fiscal year 2018 to 2019 will involve, among others, Bell Canada, British Columbia Maritime Employers Association, Canada Post Corporation, Canadian National Railway Company, Canadian Pacific Railway Company, G4S Secure Solutions (Canada) Ltd., Garda Security Screening Inc., Halifax Employers Association, Jazz Air Limited Partnership, Maritime Employers Association, NAV Canada, Securitas Transport Aviation Security Limited, Swissport Canada Handling Inc. and VIA Rail Canada Inc.

1. Caseload information and activities

1.1 Collective bargaining disputes

In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS) handled 245 collective bargaining disputes. Sixty-two disputes were carried over as ongoing disputes from previous fiscal years, and conciliation appointments were made in 183 disputes during the fiscal year.

Figure 1: Total caseload between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 1: Total caseload between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 1 – Text version Total caseload between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year Total caseload
2008 to 2009 244
2009 to 2010 245
2010 to 2011 302
2011 to 2012 293
2012 to 2013 317
2013 to 2014 212
2014 to 2015 227
2015 to 2016 230
2016 to 2017 180
2017 to 2018 245

1.2 Post-conciliation appointments

Seventy post-conciliation mediation appointments were made in fiscal year 2017 to 2018.

1.3 Settled disputes

In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, of the 245 cases that were handled by the FMCS, 138 disputes were settled. Of these, 47 cases were carried over from previous fiscal years and 91 were new disputes. Ninety-four percent of all settled disputes were settled without a work stoppage. FMCS has recorded settlement rates of 93 to 97% in the past 10 years.

Total caseload and settlement rates for the last 10 years can be found in Appendix A.

Figure 2: Percentage of settled disputes without work stoppage between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 2: Percentage of settled disputes without work stoppage between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 2 – Text version Percentage of settled disputes without work stoppage between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year %
2008 to 2009 94
2009 to 2010 94
2010 to 2011 94
2011 to 2012 93
2012 to 2013 94
2013 to 2014 97
2014 to 2015 95
2015 to 2016 94
2016 to 2017 97
2017 to 2018 94

1.4 Settlement stage

The majority of settlements continue to be reached at the post-conciliation stage of negotiations. During fiscal year 2017 to 2018, of disputes that were settled during conciliation versus post-conciliation stages, 53% were settled at the post-conciliation stage and 47% were settled during conciliation. This trend began after the 1999 revisions to Part I of the Code, which limited the conciliation period to 60 days unless the parties mutually agree to extend it.

See Appendix B for a comparison of settlement stages since fiscal year 2008 to 2009.

Figure 3: Settlement stage (conciliation versus post-conciliation) between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 3: Settlement stage (conciliation versus post-conciliation) between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 3 – Text version Settlement stage (conciliation versus post-conciliation) between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year % Finalized at conciliation % Finalized at post-conciliation
2008 to 2009 31 69
2009 to 2010 40 60
2010 to 2011 36 64
2011 to 2012 33 67
2012 to 2013 36 64
2013 to 2014 36 64
2014 to 2015 29 71
2015 to 2016 36 64
2016 to 2017 46 54
2017 to 2018 47 53

1.5 Disputes by industry

The largest number of disputes occurred in the road transportation sector (60) followed by the air transportation sector (55). When combined, disputes in the 4 transportation sectors (air, road, rail and marine) accounted for 68% of the total number of disputes handled during the fiscal year.

A breakdown of caseload and work stoppage by industrial sector can be found in Appendix C.

Figure 4: Distribution of fiscal year 2017 to 2018 caseload by industrial sector (%)
Figure 4: Distribution of fiscal year 2017 to 2018 caseload by industrial sector (%)
Figure 4 – Text version Distribution of fiscal year 2017 to 2018 caseload by industrial sector (%)
Industrial sector % of total caseload
Aboriginal 4.5
Air transport 22.3
Banks/Financial institutions 0.8
Broadcasting 4.0
Communications 4.5
Education 0.8
Entertainment/Tourism 0.8
Grain handling 5.7
Marine transport 18.6
Mining 0.8
Miscellaneous* 3.2
Municipal public Administration 1.6
Port operations 5.3
Rail transport 2.8
Road transport 24.3

Miscellaneous includes: Other Service Industries (Yukon and Northwest Territories), Fishing, International/Interprovincial Bridges/Tunnels, Agencies-Public Policy and Hotels/Restaurants/Bars.

2. Work stoppage activities

2.1 Ongoing and initiated work stoppages

Eight work stoppages occurred during fiscal year 2017 to 2018. One was ongoing at the start of the fiscal year and seven work stoppages were initiated during the fiscal year. There is one work stoppage ongoing as of April 1, 2018.

Parties Bargaining Unit Legal work stoppage
Began Ended # Days
1. There was one ongoing legal work stoppages carried over into fiscal year 2017 to 2018 Town of Watson Lake and the Public Service Alliance of Canada approximately 15 municipal employees of the Town of Watson Lake March 27, 2017 April 3, 2017 8 (6-hour lockout and 8-day strike)
2. Legal work stoppages initiated in fiscal year 2017 to 2018 Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc., and the Public Service Alliance of Canada, Union of Canadian Transportation Employees Local 50600 130 employees working as (but not limited to) mechanics, industrial mechanics, electricians, tradeshelpers, carpenters and field maintenance employees July 24, 2017 October 4, 2017 73-day strike
Swissport Canada Handling Inc., and the Canada Council of Teamsters Local 419 approximately 600 groomers, ramp/ground handlers, including those engaged in de-icing functions, mechanics, communications centre co-ordinators and weight and balance specialists, working at the Lester B. Pearson International Airport July 27, 2017 October 15, 2017 81-day strike
Algoma Tankers Limited and the Canadian Merchant Service Guild 32 navigation officers October 21, 2017 October 27, 2017 7-day strike
Algoma Tankers Limited and the Canadian Merchant Service Guild 22 engineer officers October 21, 2017 October 27, 2017 7-day strike
Viterra Inc., and the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 5317 51 employees working in the operations of the grain terminal at the Port of Montréal January 30, 2018 Ongoing* 61-day lockout
Les Autobus Transco (1988) Inc., and the Syndicat des Travailleuses et Travailleurs de Transco-CSN 350 drivers January 30, 2018 -February 28, 2018 January 31, 2018 -February 28, 2018 3-day strike
FirstCanada ULC, carrying on business as First Student Canada and Unifor Local 4268 220 drivers at the Bowmanville branch March 21, 2018 March 25, 2018 5-day strike
Maximum number of workers : 1,420
Number of person - days not worked : 45,620

*Work stoppage is ongoing at the start of fiscal year 2018 to 2019.

2.2 Days lost to work stoppages

The 8 work stoppages accounted for 45,620 person days not worked. The number of working days lost due to work stoppages in fiscal year 2017 to 2018 represented 0.02% of the total available work time in the federal private sector.

Appendix D shows work days lost as a percentage of available work time in the federal private sector.

Figure 5: Person days lost between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 5: Person days lost between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 5 – Text version Person days lost between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year Days lost
2008 to 2009 171,350
2009 to 2010 44,805
2010 to 2011 18,690
2011 to 2012 466,135
2012 to 2013 174,370
2013 to 2014 46,140
2014 to 2015 44,220
2015 to 2016 48,550
2016 to 2017 29,940
2017 to 2018 45,620

2.3 Work stoppages by industrial sector

There was one work stoppage in the Grain Handling sector, one work stoppage in the Municipal Public Administration sector and 2 work stoppages in each of the following Transportation sectors: Air, Marine and Road.

Appendix C includes a breakdown of work stoppages by industrial sector.

Figure 6: Distribution of 2017 to 2018 work stoppages by industrial sector (%)
Figure 6: Distribution of 2017 to 2018 work stoppages by industrial sector (%)
Figure 6 – Text version Distribution of 2017 to 2018 work stoppages by industrial sector (%)
Industrial sector % of total disputes
Air transport 25.0
Grain handling 12.5
Marine transport 25.0
Municipal public aministration 12.5
Road transport 25.0

3. Significant settlements in fiscal year 2017 to 2018

A number of key agreements were renewed across all industrial sectors during fiscal year 2017 to 2018.

A listing of significant settlements achieved in fiscal year 2017 to 2018 is attached as Appendix E.

4. Significant current and forthcoming negotiations in 2018 to 2019

4.1 Expired and expiring collective agreements

There is an average of 350 collective agreements that expire during a year.

A listing of significant current and forthcoming bargaining situations is attached as Appendix F.

5. Appointments under part III of the Canada Labour Code and the Wage Earner Protection Program Act

5.1 Appointments: Unjust dismissal, wage recovery and the Wage Earner Protection Program Act

Initial appointments were made under Part III of the Code for 92 wage recovery (WR) appeal cases, 380 unjust dismissal (UD) complaint cases and 3 Wage Earner Protection Program (WEPP) appeal cases. In 2009, the FMCS first handled WEPP appeals after the Wage Earner Protection Program Act provisions came into force in July 2008.

A table showing adjudicator and referee appointment levels since fiscal year 2008 to 2009 is found in Appendix G.

Figure 7: Appointments made under Part III (UD, WR) and under the Wage Earner Protection Program Act between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 7: Appointments made under Part III (UD, WR) and under the Wage Earner Protection Program Act between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 7 – Text version Appointments made under Part III (UD, WR) and under the Wage Earner Protection Program Act between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year Total UD, WR & WEPP
2008 to 2009 458
2009 to 2010 504
2010 to 2011 508
2011 to 2012 476
2012 to 2013 459
2013 to 2014 477
2014 to 2015 435
2015 to 2016 444
2016 to 2017 484
2017 to 2018 475

6. Grievance arbitration appointments under part I of the Canada Labour Code

6.1 Grievance arbitration appointments

Initial appointments were made under Part I of the Code for 72 grievance arbitration cases during fiscal year 2017 to 2018. These appointments are made when employers and unions are unable to agree upon an arbitrator or arbitration board chairperson to deal with grievances that relate to the application, interpretation, administration or alleged contravention of their respective collective agreements.

Grievance arbitration appointment levels since fiscal year 2008 to 2009 are included in Appendix G.

Figure 8: Part I grievance arbitration appointments between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 8: Part I grievance arbitration appointments between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Figure 8 – Text version Part I grievance arbitration appointments between fiscal years 2008 to 2009 and 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year Part I grievance arbitration appointments
2008 to 2009 112
2009 to 2010 105
2010 to 2011 90
2011 to 2012 72
2012 to 2013 92
2013 to 2014 58
2014 to 2015 64
2015 to 2016 63
2016 to 2017 84
2017 to 2018 72

7. Relationship Development Program Services

During fiscal year 2017 to 2018, FMCS mediators continued to promote and deliver an array of dispute prevention and relationship development services to employers and unions across the country. The services currently being offered include:

  • grievance mediation;
  • facilitation of committee meetings;
  • facilitation of direct negotiations;
  • relationship diagnostics;
  • customized training workshops; and
  • public workshops on Labour Relations and the Negotiation Cycle as well as on Interest Based Negotiations.

During this period, 173 dispute prevention and relationship development interventions were delivered, for a total of 325 days, including many joint customized training workshops and grievance mediation sessions, thus contributing to improved labour relations and long-term stability among unions and employers.

Figure 9: Relationship Development Program Services: fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Figure 9: Relationship Development Program Services: fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Figure 9 – Text version Relationship Development Program Services: fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Service Percentage
Facilitation 37%
Training 22%
Diagnostics 5%
Other (for example, meetings, presentations) 17%
Grievance Mediation 19%

Figure 10: Interventions by industry: fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Figure 10: Interventions by industry: fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Figure 10 – Text version Interventions by industry: fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Industry Percentage
Airport Operations / Airlines 18%
Uranium Handling / Processing 15%
Railway Companies 24%
Port Harbour / Ferries 7%
Postal / Courier 10%
Other (for example, agriculture, trucking, health and social assistance) 26%

The largest number of services were provided to clients involved with Railway Companies (24%), followed by Airport Operations/Airlines (18%) and Uranium Handling/Processing (15%). The “Other” category (26%) includes other industries under the federal jurisdiction.

8. Other key activities

8.1 Status of the Artist Act activities

FMCS handled 1 request, which was carried forward from the 3 previous fiscal years, for mediation assistance under Part II – Professional Relations, section 45 of the Status of the Artist Act. The parties involved are Groupe Media TFO and l’Union des Artistes.

8.2 Ministerial referrals to the Canada Industrial Relations Board under subsection 87.4(5) of the Canada Labour Code – Maintenance of activities Agreement

The Code stipulates that during a strike or lockout, the employer and the employees of the bargaining unit must continue the supply of services, operation of facilities or production of goods to the extent necessary to prevent an immediate and serious danger to the safety or health of the public. The Code sets out a process for the negotiation of a “maintenance of activities” agreement and provides a role for the Minister of Labour and the Canada Industrial Relations Board if the parties are unable to reach agreement.

In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, no referral was made out of approximately 32 strike or lockout notices received.

8.3 Back to work Legislation

In some exceptional circumstances, where there has been a high-profile work stoppage ongoing for some time, the Minister may decide to intervene in a dispute by tabling legislation. This step is taken when there is a high level of public pressure on the government to terminate a dispute that is affecting the public interest or the economy. In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, back-to-work legislation was not enacted to end a strike or lockout.

9. The industrial relations advisory service

Industrial Relations Advisory Service (IRAS) carries out a variety of activities intended to ensure the maintenance of an appropriate framework for collective bargaining in the federal jurisdiction. This area has the responsibility for coordinating any legislative initiatives undertaken by the FMCS, including amendments to existing industrial relations legislation, and analyzes labour board and court decisions, government initiatives and representations by client groups to assess their implications for labour relations. Through its research, liaison and advisory activities, IRAS contributes to the overall FMCS mandate for dispute settlement and prevention. Research is conducted into current and emerging industrial relations problems and issues in order to develop strategies and initiatives that will support labour relations in the federal jurisdiction.

9.1 Technical expertise for interdepartmental committees

IRAS provides industrial relations expertise for inter‑departmental committees dealing with policy initiatives having implications for labour-management relations or government labour policies. Specific activities include:

  • presentation of departmental positions;
  • provision of an understanding of the government’s labour relations philosophy;
  • discussion and decisions which take account of legislative requirements, as well as acquired rights of both labour and management; and
  • provision of information and data on specific industrial relations situations.

9.2 Coordinator of legislative initiatives

FMCS Program involvement in the legislative area can be ad hoc (for example emergency back-to-work legislation). IRAS is responsible for providing the Minister with the support and briefing material required for Cabinet deliberations and parliamentary consideration of Bills. Activities include:

  • preparation of a Memorandum to Cabinet;
  • instruction of Department of Justice drafters;
  • preparation of Minister’s speech and briefing material; and
  • implementation of the Act, once proclaimed.

9.3 Specialized research in support of dispute resolution initiatives

Operational research expertise is provided to conciliators and mediators, conciliation commissioners, industrial inquiry commissions, and other dispute resolution specialists on industrial relations and economic issues. This direct support is provided both in relation to specific needs arising out of ongoing dispute resolution or preventive mediation initiatives and, as well, on a continuing basis. Specific activities include:

  • analysis of employer/union positions on key issues in dispute and the prevailing industry practices; and
  • preparation of major industry bargaining histories which detail, over a time period, the bargaining relationship, the extent and nature of third‑party assistance, changes in key issues and terms of settlement and any other significant economic or industrial relations variables.

9.4 Briefings for ministerial use

IRAS prepares, on a regular basis, briefing notes to support the Minister in the management of high profile labour disputes and to support the Minister when meeting with stakeholders.

10. Appendixes

Appendix A. FMCS Dispute Settlement Proceedings since fiscal year 2008 to 2009

Fiscal year Caseload Settled Settlements without work stoppages
Carried forward New s.72 Appts Total caseload Carried over New s.72 Appts Total cases settled Cases %
2008 to 2009 89 155 244 58 101 159 150 94%
2009 to 2010 83 162 245 46 96 142 134 94%
2010 to 2011 87 215 302 60 99 159 150 94%
2011 to 2012 104 189 293 88 101 189 176 93%
2012 to 2013 89 228 317 69 165 234 221 94%
2013 to 2014 77 135 212 62 97 159 155 97%
2014 to 2015 53 174 227 42 87 129 122 95%
2015 to 2016 98 132 230 93 87 180 169 94%
2016 to 2017 50 130 180 43 76 119 116 97%
2017 to 2018 62 183 245 47 91 138 130 94%

Appendix B. Comparison of settlement stages since fiscal year 2008 to 2009

Fiscal year Total cases finalized Total settled at conciliation stage % Finalized at conciliation Total settled at post-conciliation Stage % Finalized at post-conciliation
2008 to 2009 159 50 31% 109 69%
2009 to 2010 142 57 40% 85 60%
2010 to 2011 159 57 36% 102 64%
2011 to 2012 189 63 33% 126 67%
2012 to 2013 234 85 36% 149 64%
2013 to 2014 159 57 36% 102 64%
2014 to 2015 129 37 29% 92 71%
2015 to 2016 180 64 36% 116 64%
2016 to 2017 119 55 46% 64 54%
2017 to 2018 138 65 47% 72 53%

Appendix C. Caseload and work stoppages by industrial sector for fiscal year 2017 to 2018

Industrial sector Total caseload % of total caseload Number of disputes with work stoppages % of total disputes
Aboriginal 11 4.5% 0 0%
Air transport 55 22.3% 2 25%
Banks/Financial institutions 2 0.8% 0 0%
Broadcasting 10 4.0% 0 0%
Communications 11 4.5% 0 0%
Education 2 0.8% 0 0%
Entertainment/Tourism 2 0.8% 0 0%
Grain handling 14 5.7% 1 12.5%
Marine transport 46 18.6% 2 25%
Mining 2 0.8% 0 0%
Miscellaneous 8 3.2% 0 0%
Municipal public administration 4 1.6% 1 12.5%
Port operations 13 5.3% 0 0%
Rail transport 7 2.8% 0 0%
Road transport 60 24.3% 2 25%
Total all sectors 247 100% 8 100%
Total transportation 168 68.0% 6 75%

Appendix D. Person days lost in the federal jurisdiction since fiscal year 2008 to 2009

Fiscal year Number of work stoppages Days lost As a % of all available time in federal jurisdiction
2008 to 2009 8 171,350 0.08%
2009 to 2010 6 44,805 0.02%
2010 to 2011 9 18,690 0.01%
2011 to 2012 13 466,135 0.22%
2012 to 2013 17 174,370 0.08%
2013 to 2014 5 46,140 0.02%
2014 to 2015 11 44,220 0.02%
2015 to 2016 8 48,550 0.02%
2016 to 2017 5 29,940 0.01%
2017 to 2018 8 45,620 0.02%

Appendix E. Significant settlements achieved in fiscal year 2017 to 2018

Employer and union Bargaining Unit
A.S.P. Incorporated, Burlington, Ontario, and Unifor Local 2002 (Lester B. Pearson International Airport and the Toronto City Centre Airport) 280 security personnel
Air Transat A.T. Inc., Saint-Laurent, Quebec, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers 310 operations employees (technical operations) working at the Dorval, Mirabel, Pearson, Calgary and Vancouver airports and all employees working in the Central Baggage department in Saint-Laurent, Quebec
Bell ExpressVu LP, Dorval, Quebec, and Unifor 200 employees working as customer service representatives (including technical support workers), operations support assistants, administrative support workers and programmers
Brink’s Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario, and Unifor Locals 27, 103, 112, 195, 229, 504, 598, 599, 1359, 1106 and 4266 800 money room and alloy recovery program employees working at or out of its branches in Ontario
Canada Steamship Lines, Montréal, Quebec, and the Seafarers’ International Union 400 unlicensed employees aboard vessels operated by Canada Steamship Lines
Canadian National Railway Company, Montréal, Quebec, and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, System Council No. 11 670 switches and crossings coordinators, testmen, technicians, leading maintainers, leading mechanics, maintainers, mechanics, assistants, apprentices and helpers
Canadian National Railway Company, Montréal, Quebec, and the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference 3,300 conductors and assistant conductors, baggage persons, car retarder operators, yard operations employees, switch-tenders, traffic coordinators and assistant traffic coordinators
Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, and the United Steelworkers Local 1568 509 employees classified as (but not limited to) research/development officer and specialist, designer, design specialist, programmer, programmer/analyst
Cancrew Enterprises Limited, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Canadian Merchant Service Guild 70 licensed Canadian employees aboard all shuttle tankers owned, operated, chartered, crewed, or managed by the employer in the Canadian offshore oil production transportation industry
City of Iqaluit, Iqaluit, Nunavut, and the Public Service Alliance of Canada 174 municipal employees
FirstCanada ULC, carrying on business as First Student Canada, Burlington, Ontario, and Unifor Local 4268 (Whitby, Ajax, Owen Sound, Kincardine and Port Elgin branches) 416 bus drivers
Fort McMurray Airport Authority, Fort McMurray, Alberta, and the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 1505-3 22 employees including (but not limited to) office clerks, airport maintenance technicians, maintenance crafts persons, millwright mechanics, security officers, custodians, shuttle drivers and electricians
GardaWorld Cash Services Canada Corporation (Canada) Ltd., Montréal, Quebec, and the Canada Council of Teamsters 155 employees in the provinces of New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island
GardaWorld Cash Services Canada Corporation, Mississauga, Ontario, and Teamsters Locals 419 and 879 670 service solutions coordinators/dispatchers
IMP Aerospace and Defence, an Operating Unit of IMP Group Limited, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Unifor Local 2215 (Halifax Robert L. Stanfield International Airport and Hammonds Plains locations) 460 maintenance employees at the Aerospace Division in the repair and overhaul of aircrafts
Inkas Security Services Ltd., Toronto, Ontario, and Teamsters Local Union No. 419 70 employees working in the cash management solutions division, including armoured car crews (guards, drivers, custodians), vault employees, cash processing employees and control room
Lakehead Terminal Elevators Association (Richardson International Limited, Superior Elevator ULC and Viterra Inc.), Thunder Bay, Ontario, and the United Steelworkers Unit Lodge 650 250 grain workers and maintenance employees
Loomis Express, a division of TFI Transport 22 L.P., Saint-Laurent, Quebec, and Unifor Locals 114, 4050, 755, 4457 and 4005 1,600 hourly employees and owner-operators working in the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island
Marine Atlantic Inc., North Sydney, Nova Scotia, and Unifor 56 shore-based plant maintenance personnel
Marine Atlantic Inc., Sydney, Nova Scotia, and the Canadian Merchant Service Guild 32 employees classified as masters, chief engineers, chief electrical engineers
Marine Atlantic Inc., Sydney, Nova Scotia, and the USWA/ILA Council of Trade Unions 442 clerical and terminal personnel
National Arts Centre Corporation, Ottawa, Ontario, and the Public Service Alliance of Canada 48 ushers, tour guides, and all employees of the Box Office
National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, and the Public Service Alliance of Canada 210 clerical and office employees
Perimeter Aviation LP, Winnipeg, Manitoba, and Unifor Local 2002 14 flight attendants
Purolator Courier Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario, and the Canada Council of Teamsters 9,000 employees working in Canada, including owner operators in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, as well as part time employees in the Quebec Region
Swissport Canada Handling Inc., Richmond, British Columbia, and Unifor Local 2002 (Vancouver International Airport) 400 passenger service agents
Swissport Canada Handling Inc., St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, Transportation District Lodge 140, Local 927 (St. John’s International Airport) 54 employees classified as (but not limited to) aircraft service persons, mechanics and passenger agents
TST Overland Express, Mississauga, Ontario, and Teamsters Local Unions 91, 879 and 938 300 employees in the freight division
Yukon Hospital Corporation, Whitehorse, Yukon, and the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada 230 health care workers

Appendix F. Significant current and forthcoming bargaining situations

Collective agreement expiry date Employer and union Bargaining Unit 
December 10, 2016 Consolidated Aviation Fueling of Toronto Ltd., Toronto, Ontario, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers 270 aircraft refuellers
December 31, 2016 Maritime Employers Association, Toronto, Ontario, and the International Longshoremen’s Association Local 1842 48 longshoremen
January 13, 2017 Jazz Air Limited Partnership, Richmond, British Colombia (and Quebec City based employees), and Unifor Local 2002 980 customer service agents
January 31, 2017 Canadian North Inc., Calgary, Alberta, and the Air Line Pilots Association, International 130 pilots
March 31, 2017 4384865 Canada Inc., operating as Ornge Air, Mississauga, Ontario, and the Office and Professional Employees International Union 83 helicopter pilots in the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Division
March 31, 2017 Great Lakes Pilotage Authority, Cornwall, Ontario, and the Canadian Merchant Service Guild 55 marine pilots
March 31, 2017 Pacific Pilotage Authority, Vancouver, British Columbia, and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 520 25 dispatchers
April 1, 2017 Garda Security Screening Inc., Thunder Bay, Ontario, and the United Food and Commercial Workers Canada Local 175 (Thunder Bay International Airport) 35 security personnel
April 30, 2017 NAV Canada, Cornwall, Ontario, and the Canadian Federal Pilots Association 34 pilots
June 30, 2017 NAV Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, and Unifor Local 1016 260 technical employees
November 30, 2017 Bell Canada, Montréal, Quebec, and Unifor 6,000 office employees
November 30, 2017 Quebec Ports Terminals Inc., Rivière‑du‑Loup, Quebec, and the International Longshoremen’s Association Local 2033 30 longshoremen
December 31, 2017 Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership, and Unifor Atlantic Communication Locals (Unifor ACL) (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island) 2,700 office employees and technicians
December 31, 2017 Canada Post Corporation, Ottawa, Ontario, and the Canadian Union of Postal Workers 8,000 rural and suburban mail carriers
December 31, 2017 Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Calgary, Alberta, and Teamsters Canada Rail Conference 3,200 running trades employees designated as locomotive engineer, conductor, baggageman, brakeman, car retarder operator, yardman, switchtender, yardmaster, assistant yardmaster, locomotive fireman (helper)
December 31, 2017 Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Calgary, Alberta, and the Canadian Signals and Communications System Council No. 11 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 375 employees working in the signals and communications section of the engineering department working as (but not limited to) foreman, technician, maintainer, wireman, helper and labourer
December 31, 2017 Halifax Employers Association Incorporated, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the Council of ILA Locals for the Port of Halifax

81 checkers

355 longshoremen, foremen and walking bosses

69 gear repair and maintenance employees

December 31, 2017 Maritime Employers Association, Hamilton, Ontario, and the International Longshoremen’s Association Local 1654 49 longshoremen
December 31, 2017 NAV Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, and the Public Service Alliance of Canada 270 clerical and office employees
December 31, 2017 Quebec Ports Terminals Inc., La Baie, Quebec, and Unifor Local 2004-Q, unit T.P.Q. (Port of Grande-Anse) 50 longshoremen
December 31, 2017 VIA Rail Canada Inc., Montréal, Quebec, and Teamsters Canada Rail Conference 350 locomotive engineers, conductors and yardmasters
January 31, 2018 Canada Post Corporation, Ottawa, Ontario, and the Canadian Union of Postal Workers 42,000 urban operations employees
Februray 28, 2018 Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway Company Inc., Sept‑Îles, Quebec, and the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (United Steelworkers) Local 9344 310 railway operation employees
March 31, 2018 British Columbia Maritime Employers Association, Vancouver, British Columbia, and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union – Canada 4,500 longshoremen
March 31, 2018 British Columbia Maritime Employers Association, Vancouver, British Columbia, and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union – Canada Local 514 490 ship and dock foremen
March 31, 2018 Canada Post Corporation, Ottawa, Ontario, and the Association of Postal Officials of Canada 3,100 supervisors
March 31, 2018 G4S Security Solutions (Canada) Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, Transportation District 140 (Campbell River, Comox Valley, Cranbrook, Fort St. John, Kelowna International, Nanaimo, Penticton Regional, Prince George, Vancouver International, Victoria International and West Kootenay Regional Airports) 1,200 airport screening officers
March 31, 2018 Garda Security Screening Inc., Calgary, Alberta, and the General Teamsters Local Union No. 362 (Calgary International Airport) 737 employees engaged in the security screening of passengers, non-passengers, and baggage
March 31, 2018 Garda Security Screening Inc., Edmonton, Alberta, and the General Teamsters Local Union No. 362 (Edmonton International Airport) 349 employees engaged in the security screening of passengers, non-passengers, and baggage
March 31, 2018 Garda Security Screening Inc., Ottawa, Ontario, and the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (United Steelworkers) (Ottawa Macdonald‑Cartier International Airport) 274 airport security screening officers
March 31, 2018 Garda Security Screening Inc., Toronto, Ontario, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (Lester B. Pearson International, Buttonville and Toronto City Centre Airports) 2,269 employees providing pre-board security screening services under the CATSA contract
March 31, 2018 Garda Security Screening Inc., Toronto, Ontario, and the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (United Steelworkers) (Sarnia Chris Hadfield, John C. Munro Hamilton International, Kitchener/Region of Waterloo International, Timmins Victor M. Power, Windsor International, Greater Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie and Norman Roger Airports) 151 airport security screening officers
March 31, 2018 Garda Security Screening Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba, and the General Teamsters Local Union 979 (Winnipeg International Airport) 200 airport security screening officers
March 31, 2018 Securitas Transport Aviation Security Limited, Dorval, Quebec, and TC Local 1976 United Steelworkers (La Grande Rivière, Chapais Chibougamau, La Macaza – Mont-Tremblant International, Lourdes-de-Blanc-Sablon, Gaspé, Kuujjuaraapik, Bagotville and Alma, Baie-Comeau, Mont-Joli Regional, Sept-Îles, Val-d’Or Regional, Rouyn-Noranda Regional and Îles-de-la-Madeleine Airports) 180 airport screening officers
March 31, 2018 Securitas Transport Aviation Security Limited, Dorval, Quebec, and the United Steelworkers (Québec City Jean Lesage International and the Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airports) 800 airport screening officers
March 31, 2018 St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation, Cornwall, Ontario, and Unifor Locals 4212, 4320 and 4323 450 operational and maintenance employees
April 1, 2018 Swissport Canada Handling Inc., Montréal, Quebec, and Unifor Local 2002 (Montréal‑Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport) 525 passenger service and lounge agents
April 8, 2018 Airport Terminal Services, Mississauga, Ontario, and Unifor Local 2002 186 ramp personnel and passenger service agents
May 6, 2018 Bell Technical Solutions Inc., Boucherville, Quebec, and Unifor 1,090 technicians in the province of Quebec
May 6, 2018 Bell Technical Solutions Inc., Mississauga, Ontario, and Unifor 1,730 technicians in the province of Ontario
May 20, 2018 Logistec Stevedoring Inc., Montréal, Quebec, and the United Steelworkers Local 2015 80 longshoremen, lead hands, mobile crane operators, fork lift operators, checkers, guard and dockers
May 20, 2018 Northern Quebec Stevedoring Company Inc., Sept-Îles, Quebec, and the United Steelworkers Local 2015 45 longshoremen, team leaders, mobile crane operators, lift truck operators and those engaged in mooring operations
May 20, 2018 Porlier Express Inc., Sept-Îles, Quebec, and the United Steelworkers Local 2015 45 longshoremen, team leaders, mobile crane operators, lift truck drivers and mooring workers
May 31, 2018 Garda Canada Security Corporation, Edmonton, Alberta, and the General Teamsters Local Union No. 362 (Edmonton International Airport) 92 security personnel
May 31, 2018 Swissport Canada Inc., Saint-Laurent, Quebec, and Unifor (Québec City Jean Lesage International Airport) 60 baggage handlers
June 30, 2018 Jazz Air LP, Enfield, Nova Scotia, and the Canadian Air Line Dispatchers Association 70 dispatchers
July 3, 2018 Garda Security Group G.P., Montréal, Quebec, and TC Local 1976 USW (Montréal-Pierre Elliot Trudeau and Mirabel facilities) 116 security guards and supervisors licensed by the Bureau de Ia sécurité privée
July 19, 2018 Swissport Canada Inc., Edmonton, Alberta, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, Transportation District Lodge 140, Local Lodge 1681 (Edmonton International Airport) 180 ramp personnel
August 31, 2018 Swissport Canada Handling Inc., Richmond, British Columbia, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, Transportation District Lodge 140, Local Lodge 16 (Vancouver International Airport) 900 groomers, ground handlers and mechanics
October 31, 2018 Northern Quebec Stevedoring Company Inc., Baie-Comeau, Quebec, and the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 5159 41 longshoremen
October 31, 2018 Swissport Canada Fuel Services Inc., Richmond, British Columbia, and the Public Services Alliance of Canada, Union of Canadian Transportation Employees Local 20221 (Vancouver International Airport) 70 aircraft refuellers
December 31, 2018 Canada Post Corporation, Ottawa, Ontario, and the Canadian Postmasters and Assistants Association 11,000 postmasters and assistants
December 31, 2018 Canadian National Railway Company, Montréal, Quebec, and Teamsters Canada Rail Conference 190 rail traffic controllers
December 31, 2018 Canadian National Railway Company, Montréal, Quebec, and the United Steelworkers Local 2004 3,000 maintenance of way employees
December 31, 2018 Canadian National Railway Company, Montréal, Quebec, and Unifor 10 operator excavators
December 31, 2018 Canadian National Railway Company, Montréal, Quebec, and Unifor Local 100 2,000 tradespersons, apprentices and helpers
December 31, 2018 Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Calgary, Alberta, and Unifor Local 101R 2,200 shopcraft employees
December 31, 2018 Maritime Employers Association, Montréal, Quebec, and the International Longshoremen’s Association Local 1657 120 checkers
December 31, 2018 Maritime Employers Association, Montréal, Quebec, and the Syndicat des débardeurs, Local 375 of the Canadian Union of Public Employees 870 longshoremen
December 31, 2018 Montreal Port Authority, Montréal, Quebec, and the Syndicat des employés de l’Administration portuaire de Montréal, Railway Division, Local 5598 of the Canadian Union of Public Employees 34 railway non-operating employees
December 31, 2018 Ontario Northland Transportation Commission, North Bay, Ontario, and Unifor Local 103 209 shopcraft employees
December 31, 2018 Prince Rupert Grain Ltd., Prince Rupert, British Columbia, and the Grain Workers Union Local 333 ILWU Canada 116 grain handlers
December 31, 2018 Swissport Canada Inc., Ottawa, Ontario, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, Transportation District 140 & Local Lodge 2413 (Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport) 110 ramp personnel
December 31, 2018 The Garda security group G.P., Montréal, Quebec, and the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 484 140 security guards licensed by the Bureau de la sécurité privée, assigned to the Canada Border Services Agency at an Immigration Holding Centre located in Quebec
December 31, 2018 Vancouver Terminal Elevator Association, Vancouver, British Columbia, and the Grain Workers Union Local 333 ILWU Canada 503 operational employees
January 31, 2019 Cargill Limited, Baie-Comeau, Quebec, and the Fédération des employées et employés de services publics inc. (CSN) 30 grain handlers
January 31, 2019 Halifax International Airport Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the Public Service Alliance of Canada 150 clerical and office employees
March 16, 2019 Saskatchewan Telecommunications, Regina, Saskatchewan, and Unifor 3,800 telephone operators, technical employees and office employees
March 31, 2019 Canadian National Railway Company, Montréal, Quebec, and Unifor Council 4000

65 locomotive engineers, conductors and assistant conductors on the former rail lines and territory of Savage Alberta Railway Inc.

1,750 clerical and office employees

March 31, 2019 Canadian National Transportation Limited, Toronto, Ontario, and Unifor National Council 4000 800 owner-operators
March 31, 2019 Garda Security Screening Inc., Grande Prairie, Alberta, and the General Teamsters, Local Union No. 362 (Grande Prairie Airport) 20 security personnel
March 31, 2019 NAV Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, and Unifor 1,830 air traffic controllers
March 31, 2019 Securiguard Services Limited, Vancouver, British Columbia, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, Transportation District 140 Local Lodge 16 (Vancouver International Airport) 180 security personnel
April 30, 2019 1791949 Ontario Ltd., c.o.b. as Toronto Ground Airport Services, Mississauga, Ontario, and International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, Transportation District 140 (Lester B. Pearson International Airport) 220 passenger agents
April 30, 2019 NAV Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, and the Air Traffic Specialists Association of Canada, Unifor Local 2245 650 flight service specialists and flight service instructors
May 16, 2019 Airport Terminal Services Canadian Company, Calgary, Alberta, and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers Local Lodge 2734 (Calgary International Airport) 80 ramp agents and groomers
June 30, 2019 Saskatoon Airport Authority, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and the Public Service Alliance of Canada Local 40404 25 maintenance employees
July 22, 2019 Canadian National Railway Company, Montréal, Quebec, and Teamsters Canada Rail Conference 3,300 conductors and assistant conductors, baggage persons, car retarder operators, yard operations employees, switch-tenders, traffic coordinators and assistant traffic coordinators

Appendix G. Appointments under Part I and III (UD and WR) of the Canada Labour Code and the Wage Earners Protection Program Act appointments since fiscal year 2008 to 2009

Fiscal year Part III UD appointments Part III WR appointments WEPP appointments* Total UD, WR & WEPP Part I grievance arbitration appointments
2008 to 2009 318 140   458 112
2009 to 2010 364 136 4 504 105
2010 to 2011 386 121 1 508 90
2011 to 2012 305 170 1 476 72
2012 to 2013 315 142 2 459 92
2013 to 2014 334 135 8 477 58
2014 to 2015 297 130 8 435 64
2015 to 2016 355 81 8 444 63
2016 to 2017 389 90 5 484 84
2017 to 2018 380 92 3 475 72

* WEPP provisions came into force in July 2008.

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