Archived: Departmental Performance Report supplemental tables 2014-15, Environment Canada, chapter 4


Group on Earth Observations

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is a key international engagement of the Government of Canada that is coordinated through the Federal Committee on Geomatics and Earth Observations (FCGEO).

Name of lead department(s)

Environment Canada is the lead department in International GEO by virtue of the identification of the Assistant Deputy Minister of the Meteorological Service of Canada as the GEO Principal.

Federal partner organization(s)

Domestically, contributing departments and agencies are Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), and Environment Canada (EC).

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

July 2003

End date of the horizontal initiative

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

Funding is provided through the existing resources envelope (A-Base) and in-kind contributions from federal departments. A contribution agreement was signed in 2013 between EC and GEO for a 5-year period, committing Canada to a contribution of $100,000 per year through 2018.

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The GEO seeks to implement the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to allow free and open access to Earth observations for decision- and policy-makers in all countries. In doing so, users such as EC and NRCan will be able to better predict the future state of the Earth and better warn citizens of the onset of hazardous conditions. See the GEO website for more details.

Shared outcome(s)
  • Enhancing access to global earth observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in earth observation networks, both domestic and international
  • Improving evidence-based decision making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable earth observations
Governance structures

Coordination is achieved through the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)-level FCGEO, the Director General-level Shadow Committee and other ad hoc committees.

Performance highlights

Environment Canada and Other Government Departments

In January 2014 at the GEO Plenary and Ministerial Summit in Geneva, the international community reaffirmed member countries’ commitment to the GEOSS by endorsing the extension of GEO’s mandate for another 10 years (2016-25). During 2014-15, Canada served as a co-chair of the Implementation Plan Working Group (IPWG), established by Plenary to draft the 10 Year Strategic Plan for GEO. A preliminary draft of the Strategic Plan 2016-2025: Implementing GEOSS was presented to Plenary members in November 2014.

In 2014, Canada assumed the Vice-Chair position of Group on Earth Observation Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON). In the 2014-15 fiscal year, this position has achieved the following: developed a 3 year strategic plan for GEO BON, hired a new Executive Director and overhauled the GEO BON Governance structure by establishing an international Advisory Board and Implementation Committee; began implementation of a global capacity building project - BON in a Box (Biodiversity Observation Network in a Box) - with a regional Latin American pilot begun in cooperation with Colombia’s Humboldt Institute; developed and implemented a process for further refining the Essential Biodiversity Variables; organized an international funding call for GEO BON projects; co-led the ongoing development of a Sourcebook for Monitoring Tropical Biodiversity Using Remote Sensing; and initiated the development of a framework and process for establishing national Biodiversity Observation Networks in collaboration with the Convention on Biological Diversity Secretariat and UNEP’s World Conservation Monitoring Centre.

Canada (through the Canadian Space Agency and NRCan’s Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation, participates actively in the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), which is the space arm of GEO. CEOS strives to enhance international coordination and data exchange, and to optimize societal benefit. Canada’s in-kind contributions of earth observation data as well as expert and coordination support in areas such as disaster risk mitigation, atmospheric composition, forest, agriculture, information systems and capacity building are provided in support of GEO activities.

Interdepartmental international activities related to Geomatics and Earth Observations and related domains are being coordinated through FCGEO. NRCan supports FCGEO through the GeoConnections program (GeoSecretariat). Co-chaired by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). FCGEO is an ADM-level committee tasked with providing proactive, whole-of-government leadership in establishing priorities related to GEO in support of government priorities, decision-making, and Canada’s competitive advantage; and collectively enhancing the responsiveness, efficiency and sustainability of the federal GEO community

During 2014-15, Canada (NRCan, CSA and AAFC) actively contributed to global efforts in forest carbon tracking. NRCan’s forestry experts continued to actively contribute to global efforts in forest, as well as initiatives related to forest carbon tracking. NRCan’s forestry experts provided support to other nations and research and development contributions in sensor complementarity/interoperability for improved forest monitoring under GEO’s Global Forest Observation Initiative (GFOI) as well as in complementary activities in the area of Global Early Warning Fire Systems. Canada also contributed to forest observation and land cover research supporting the integration of remote sensing and ground-based observations in support of forest monitoring particularly for carbon tracking, using a range of sensors including optical and radar

AAFC and the CSA continued to play lead roles in the GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative (GEO-GLAM), and AAFC led the GEO Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) supported by the CSA. As Canadian lead in the North American Drought Monitor, AAFC is also responsible for a trilateral operational monitoring effort between Canada, the United States and Mexico.

Recognizing the importance of capacity building, Canada (NRCan) is leading the development of a national geomatics plan in Senegal, and will also be the lead in a new geoscience project in Africa that will be heavily influenced by a new spatial data infrastructure (SDI) platform to be housed in the proposed created African Mineral Development Centre.

Canada also contributes to pilot projects and activities that foster the utilization of Earth observation remote sensing data for all phases of Disaster Risk Management.

In support of enhanced polar monitoring, Canada participated in WMO’s Polar Space Task Group, leading the development and implementation of a multi-year strategy for the observation of ice sheets using space-based earth observation platforms. The satellite assets of the Polar Space Task Group member agencies will continue to monitor ice sheets and contribute to the legacy of archived earth observation satellite products of the Arctic and Antarctica.

Canada continued to collaborate with the United States Group on Earth Observations (U.S. GEO) on joint projects, such as the binational group for the Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS), which is working to improve monitoring and data sharing in the Great Lakes basin.

Canada also played a key role in GEO Monitoring and Evaluation activities, with EC taking part as a member of the fifth evaluation team, focused on the Strategic Targets for Weather, Water and Climate. Canada was also appointed a member of the sixth evaluation team.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

Danielle Lacasse
Director General
Policy, Planning and Partnership Directorate
Meteorological Service of Canada
Environment Canada
819-934-4571
danielle.lacasse@ec.gc.ca

Performance Information
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2014-15
Planned spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2014-15
Expected results
2014-15
Targets
Contributing activity/
program results
Environment Canada Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians Meteorological Service of Canada
Canadian Wildlife Service
Not applicable In-kind contributions:
$75,000 in salary
$50,000 in O&M from existing A-Base
Contributions of $100,000
In-kind estimated:
$75,000 in salary
$50,000 in O&M
$100,000 in G&C
See below See below See above
Canadian Space Agency Space Data, Information and Services Earth Observations   In-kind contributions:
$25,000 in salary and
$20,000 in O&M from existing resources (A-Base)
As planned See below See below See below
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Environmental Knowledge, Technology, Information and Measurement. Science and Technology   0.2 FTE
$25,000 O&M form existing a-base
  See below See below See below
Natural Resources Canada Responsible Natural Resource Management a) Canadian Forest Service Fire:
$8,000 in O&M
.05 person-years (PYs)
Land cover:
$2500 in O&M
0.08 PYs
a) 0.2 full-time equivalent (FTE) a) 0.2 PY
- $20,000 in salary
- $3,500 in O&M
See below See below See above and below
Natural Resources Canada Protections for Canadians and Natural Resources b) Earth Sciences Sector/CCMEO   b) 0.1 FTE b) 0.1 FTE      
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture to National /
International Missions
Ecosystems and Oceans Science Sector   0.2 PY (in kind)
$5,000 travel
As planned See below See below See below
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Ocean Forecasting Ecosystems and Oceans Science Sector   0.2 PY (in kind)
$5,000 travel
As planned See below See below See below
Total for all federal organizations           Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Expected Results and Targets by program of federal partners:
Environment Canada:

Coordination of Canadian input and position for 2014 GEO Plenary, and effective leadership of the GEO IPWG.

FCGEO departments are engaged in Earth Observation data issues and policy development.

Co-chairmanship and co-leadership of the Group on Earth Observation Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON).

Canadian Space Agency:

Benefits of space-borne Earth observations are optimized through co-operation of CEOS agencies in mission planning and in the development of compatible data products, formats, services, applications and policies in support of GEO.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada:

Enhancing international sharing of data and science towards the development of national and global agriculture monitoring capacities.

Risks of reduced water availability and agricultural productivity are identified on a continental scale through assessment and monitoring of drought conditions in Canada, the United States and Mexico.

Natural Resources Canada:

Fire:

  • Development of fire extraction algorithm for any TIR satellite sensor
  • Ongoing collaboration on Cal-Val of Sentinel-3 satellite
  • Lead science team for the CSA’s CWFMS microsat
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Editing Blue Planet Proceedings book
  • DFO input into Canada’s position at GEO Plenary
  • DFO input into FCGEO committee
Contributing activity/program results
Canadian Space Agency:

The CSA provided data dissemination, coordination and planning support to GEO activities related to global monitoring via satellites in forestry (Global Forest Observing Initiative), agriculture (GEO-GLAM), oceans (Blue Planet), and disaster risk management projects either directly (RADARSAT data provided to disaster response pilots in the Caribbean and Namibia) or through its membership in CEOS.

The CSA is also co-chairing the CEOS Working Group on Disasters, which contributes directly to supporting kew GEO initiatives in disasters risk management.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada:

AAFC leads the research and development component of the GEO-GLAM initiative and leads the JECAM initiative. Agreements were negotiated with the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) for free and open space data access for JECAM sites. AAFC has developed national crop monitoring operations to address national and global needs.

The United States has considered the North American Drought Monitor (NADM) to be a model of international collaboration and has, through GEO, initiated the development of the Global Drought Information System.

Natural Resources Canada:

Prototype in place

Fire emissivity; fire extraction algorithm ongoing.

Contributions to GFOI methods and guidance document to support international Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) efforts.

Contributions towards EO federation of catalogues and various interoperability initiatives (CWIC - OPENSEARCH).

Maintenance of the Global Fire Early Warning System.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

DFO is contributing to GEO Blue Planet efforts to coordinate the collection and dissemination (with a goal in real-time) of marine observations. During 2013-14, DFO was a lead editor of the report from the inaugural Blue Planet Symposium.

Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) was approved in March 2005 (followed from the 2-year Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP)).

Name of lead department(s)

Environment Canada with support from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).

Federal partner organization(s)

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada Border Services Agency, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Correctional Service Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, Industry Canada, Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated, Marine Atlantic Inc., National Capital Commission, National Defence, National Research Council of Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada Agency, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Transport Canada

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

The 2-year FCSAAP program, with $175 million in funding, commenced April 1, 2003. FCSAP was approved in 2005, and commits funding of $4.3 billion over 15 years.

End date of the horizontal initiative

FCSAP will continue to March 31, 2020.

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

$3.142 billion (excluding PWGSC accommodations charges) from April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2016

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The FCSAP provides a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites presenting the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2014, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $4.796 billion (Public Accounts of Canada, 2014). Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial organizations, the overall FCSAP program is administered by Environment Canada with support from the TBS.

Shared outcome(s)

The primary objectives of FCSAP are to reduce environmental and human health risks from federal contaminated sites and to reduce the associated federal financial liabilities in the Public Accounts of Canada, while giving priority to higher risk sites.

Governance structures

The Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by the Director Generals Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

Performance highlights

Custodians manage their federal contaminated sites according to a 10-step process, as set out in A Federal Approach to Contaminated Sites (Contaminated Sites Management Working Group, 1999). Sites suspected of contamination are identified and historical reviews of the site are conducted in steps 1 and 2; assessment, classification and prioritization of the need for action at sites occurs through steps 3 to 6; the remediation or risk-management strategy is developed at step 7 and implemented at step 8, which is followed by confirmatory sampling at step 9 and long-term monitoring, as required, in step 10. Sites are closed once no further action is required and financial liability has been reduced to zero. Assessment funding is used to support steps 1 through 6 while remediation funding supports steps 7 through 10.

The assessment and remediation of contaminated sites often require multiple years to complete. In 2014-15, custodians undertook environmental site assessments at 322 sites. Assessment activities were completed at 180 sites. The remaining 142 sites require further assessment.

Remediation funds were spent at 368 sites:

  • 39 sites completed remediation activities in 2014-15;
    • 16 of the 39 sites that completed remediation activities were closed in 2014-15 and the remaining 23 sites require confirmatory sampling and long-term monitoring;
  • 313 sites require further remediation; and
  • 16 sites were closed following risk assessment, confirmatory sampling and long-term monitoring.
Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

FCSAP Secretariat
Contaminated Sites Division
17th floor, Place Vincent Massey
351 St. Joseph Blvd
Gatineau, QC, K1A 0H3
FCSAP.PASCF@ec.gc.ca

Performance Information
Federal Organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2014-15
Planned spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2014-15
Expected results
2014-15
Targets
Contributing activity/
program results
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada Responsible Federal Stewardship Contaminated Sites (On Reserve Program) 205,034,094 841,411 13,778,471 See below See below See below
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada Northern Land and Resources and Environmental Management Contaminated Sites (Northern Program) 1,346,053,323 52,438,450 163,283,133 See below See below See below
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Internal Services Contaminated Sites 7,862,647 385,002 492,950 See below See below See below
Canada Border Services Agency Corporate Management and Direction Infrastructure and Environment 3,490,212 0 0 See below See below See below
Canadian Food Inspection Agency N/A N/A 183,783 0 0 See below See below See below
Correctional Service Canada Internal Services Facilities/Asset Management Services 16,116,770 135,360 1,524,316 See below See below See below
Environment Canada Internal Services Asset Remediation and Disposal (Internal Services Program) 65,711,745 998,573 4,713,518 See below See below See below
Environment Canada Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized Contaminated Sites 74,670,658 5,500,385 4,647,725 See below See below See below
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Internal Services Contaminated Sites - FCSAP Projects 102,990,930 1,605,885 5,694,142 See below See below See below
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Fisheries Protection Fisheries Protection Program - FCSAP Expert Support 31,121,861 1,884,396 1,773,114 See below See below See below
Health Canada First Nations and Inuit Health First Nations and Inuit Health Protection 7,445,162 0 0 See below See below See below
Health Canada Environmental Risks to Health Contaminated Sites 62,749,120 3,475,282 3,319,993 See below See below See below
Industry Canada Communications Research Centre Canada Contaminated Site Management Program 162,000 0 0 See below See below See below
Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated Management of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montréal area N/A 27,033,672 46,000 260,877 See below See below See below
Marine Atlantic Inc. Corporate Management FCSAP (Projects) 120,000 0 0 See below See below See below
National Capital Commission Real Asset Management Land and real asset management 34,518,052 120,000 1,787,680 See below See below See below
National Defence 4.3.5 Real Property Environment and Remediation 692,424,229 15,600,000 29,551,334 See below See below See below
National Research Council of Canada Internal Services Environmental Operations 5,257,000 18,000 18,000 See below See below See below
Natural Resources Canada Internal Services Asset Management Services - Real Property 28,858,807 0 0 See below See below See below
Parks Canada Agency Conserve Heritage Resources Active Management and Restoration 58,506,237 3,802,232 3,451,989 See below See below See below
Public Works and Government Services Canada Accommodation and Real Property Services FCSAP (Projects) 119,012,059 15,483,023 4,519,994 See below See below See below
Public Works and Government Services Canada Accommodation and Real Property Services FCSAP (Expert Support) 8,850,000 650,000 645,249 See below See below See below
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Internal Services FCSAP (Projects) 25,605,214 5,000 246,537 See below See below See below
Transport Canada Environmental Stewardship of Transportation Stewardship & Sustainable Transportation Programs - Contaminated Sites 213,306,971 16,776,325 22,578,136 See below See below See below
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Financial Management Assets and Acquired Services 5,385,582 527,900 515,244 See below See below See below
Total for all federal organizationsTable note a     3,142,470,128 120,293,224 262,802,402 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Expected Results and Targets by program of federal partners:
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

The Lands and Economic Developments section will undertake to complete the assessment of 10 and the remediation of five sites.

The Northern Land and Resources section will undertake remediation activities on one site.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Assessment activities will occur at three sites, and one site will undergo remediation.

Canada Border Services Agency

N/A

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

N/A

Correctional Service Canada

Assessment activities will occur at five sites, and two sites will undergo remediation.

Environment Canada

Assessment activities will occur at four sites and four sites will undergo remediation.

Contaminated Sites (FCSAP Secretariat): In cooperation with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, the FCSAP Secretariat supports the Director General and Assistant Deputy Minister steering committees and the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group; oversees the project selection process; coordinates site funding and reporting processes; manages program communications; and evaluates program performance.

In 2014-15, the FCSAP Secretariat will lead the planning for renewal of the program in Phase III (2016 to 2020); coordinate, analyze and report the program performance against established targets, and optimize the FCSAP information management system.

Through its role as an expert support department within FCSAP, Environment Canada will conduct the following activities:

  • provide a central point of expert support services for custodial departments;
  • coordinate regional and headquarters activities of other expert support departments (including implementation of interdepartmental regional working groups, integrated work planning, etc.);
  • coordinate and undertake the review of site classification scores with other expert support departments;
  • lead the resolution of issues related to project implementation or eligibility;
  • ensure that information on program tools and guidance is disseminated, that lessons learned are shared and that custodians’ needs are addressed;
  • provide technical advice and expert information on ecological risks and environmental matters (e.g. compliance promotion with federal environmental statutes, National Classification System for Contaminated Sites and aquatic sites classification scoring, Canadian Council of Ministers for the Environment approaches, waste management, sampling design, emerging chemicals, etc.) at the project level and at the program level via the development of science based tools, best practices, guidance documents, and environmental quality guidelines; and
  • provide training on the assessment and management of ecological risks at FCSAP sites as well as key training on other broader program-related aspects (e.g., site prioritization, site closure tool).
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Assessment activities will occur at seven sites and 30 sites will undergo remediation.

In 2014-15, DFO FCSAP Expert Support will conduct the following activities:

  • provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the management of federal contaminated sites that may be impacting, or have the potential to impact, fish or fish habitat;
  • development of guidance material and provision of training to custodial organizations on the management of FCSAP aquatic sites (e.g., long-term monitoring and site closure of aquatic sites, remediation technologies identified in aquatic site remediation / risk management plans and the Aquatic Sites Framework);
  • review of project submissions to ensure that the potential impacts to fish and fish habitat have been appropriately considered; and
  • review and evaluation of FCSAP projects to ascertain if, and to what level, the risk to fish and fish habitat has been reduced as a result of custodial actions.
Health Canada

In 2014-15, the Healthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch (Health Canada FCSAP Expert Support) will conduct the following activities:

  • provision of guidance, training and advice on human health risk assessment and risk management;
  • risk communication;
  • review of National Classification System (NCS) scoring, human health risk assessments and remediation plans for projects;
  • participation in interdepartmental national and regional working groups; and
  • development of the human health component of Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) soil quality guidelines.
Industry Canada

N/A

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

N/A

Marine Atlantic Inc.

N/A

National Capital Commission

Five sites will undergo remediation.

National Defence

Remediation will be completed at two sites while an additional 10 sites will have ongoing remediation, and 12 sites will undergo long-term monitoring.

National Research Council of Canada

N/A

Natural Resources Canada

N/A

Parks Canada Agency

Assessment activities will occur at four sites and three sites will undergo remediation.

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC)

Assessment activities will occur at one site and 15 sites will undergo remediation.

In 2014-15, PWGSC FCSAP Expert Support will conduct the following activities:

  • develop contaminated site management tools
  • collect and share information about innovative and sustainable/green approaches to contaminated sites management
  • inform the private sector of likely federal demand for services
Royal Canadian Mounted Police

N/A

Transport Canada

Remediation will be completed at 1 site while an additional 23 sites will have ongoing remediation activities, and three sites will undergo long-term monitoring.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TSB)

TBS supports Environment Canada in the management of the FCSAP Program through the provision of strategic advice and policy guidance to ensure that ongoing implementation of FCSAP is undertaken in a manner that is consistent with Treasury Board policies on management of federal real property, including federal contaminated sites. In this role, TBS will advise Environment Canada on monitoring of government-wide progress, administer the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory, and coordinate planning for the biennial Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop to be held in April 2014.

Contributing activity/program results
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s Contaminated Sites (On Reserve Program) spent assessment funds at 23 sites:

  • 14 sites completed assessment activities; and
  • 9 sites require further assessment.

Remediation funds were spent at 64 sites:

  • 13 sites completed remediation activities in 2014-15;
    • 10 of the 13 sites that completed remediation activities in 2014-15 were closed;
  • 50 sites require further remediation; and
  • 1 additional site that completed remediation activities in a previous year was closed following confirmatory sampling and monitoring, indicating that no further action is required.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s Contaminated Sites (Northern Program) spent assessment funds at 11 sites:

  • 4 sites completed assessment activities; and
  • 7 sites require further assessment.

Remediation activities were undertaken at 54 sites:

  • 2 sites completed remediation activities in 2014-15; and
  • 52 sites require further remediation.
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada spent assessment funds at 27 sites:

  • 18 sites completed assessment activities; and
  • 9 sites require further assessment.

Remediation funds were spent at 1 site, which requires further remediation.

Canada Border Services Agency

No assessment or remediation activities were carried out in 2014-15 with FCSAP funding.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

N/A - no funding requested.

Correctional Service Canada

Correctional Service Canada spent assessment funds at 6 sites:

  • 2 sites completed assessment activities; and
  • 4 sites require further assessment.

Remediation activities were undertaken at 5 sites:

  • 3 sites completed remediation activities in 2014-15;
  • 1 site requires further remediation; and
  • 1 site that completed remediation activities in a previous year was closed following long-term monitoring, indicating that no further action is required.
Environment Canada

Environment Canada spent assessment funds at 35 sites:

  • 22 sites completed assessment activities; and
  • 13 sites require further assessment.

Remediation activities were undertaken at 7 sites:

  • 2 sites completed remediation activities in 2014-15; and
  • 5 sites require further remediation.

In its role of managing the FCSAP program, Environment Canada in its capacity as program Secretariat, with support from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, continued to provide overall program oversight, support and administration (including reviewing project submissions for eligibility and tracking program expenditures at mid-year and year-end).

The FCSAP Secretariat also led the development of a successful proposal for the renewal of FCSAP Phase III (2016-17 to 2019-20) which will continue the important work underway since 2005 of reducing risks and financial liability at federal contaminated sites. Development of this proposal involved collaboration with program partners in other federal organizations to ensure that funding continues to be directed to the federal government’s highest priority sites.

The following notable results were also achieved by the FCSAP Secretariat:

  • published the 2011-12 FCSAP annual report on the federal contaminated sites web portal;
  • prepared draft versions of the 2012-13 and 2013-14 annual reports;
  • Continued improvement of the performance measurement tracking system;
  • provided guidance and training to federal custodians on the estimation of contaminated site liabilities, in partnership with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat; and
  • co-ordinated the FCSAP DG and ADM governance committees to seek their approval of the proposal for FCSAP Phase III and ensure program oversight.

In its role as an expert support department for the FCSAP program, Environment Canada also provided technical advice to custodial departments on the management of their contaminated sites so that risks to the environment are reduced or minimized. Some specific accomplishments included the following:

  • Reviewed site classifications to ensure that FCSAP funding was directed to the highest priority federal sites and coordinated the input from other expert support departments;
  • Made publicly available several guidance documents on the FCSAP web portal (e.g., Executive Summary of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) Long-term Monitoring Planning Guidance, Decision Making Framework); and
  • Developed and delivered several training courses on various topics including ecological risk assessment, climate change, site closure, and the decision making framework.
Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Fisheries and Oceans Canada spent assessment funds at 133 sites:

  • 106 sites completed assessment activities; and
  • 27 sites require further assessment.

Remediation funds were spent at 58 sites:

  • 10 sites completed remediation activities in 2014-15;
    • 3 of the 10 sites that completed remediation activities in 2014-15 were closed;
  •  47 sites require further remediation; and
  • 1 site that completed remediation activities in a previous year was closed following confirmatory sampling, indicating that no further action is required.

In its role as an expert support department for the FCSAP program, Fisheries and Oceans Canada achieved the following in 2014-15:

  1. Provided scientific and technical advice to 12 different custodial organizations with respect to the management of approximately 346 federal contaminated sites that may have impacted or had the potential to impact fish and fish habitat;
  2. Developed guidance material and provided training on the management of FCSAP aquatic sites to custodial organizations in the following nine areas: 1) finalized publication of the Long-Term Monitoring (LTM) guidance executive summary on FCSAP Web portal, 2) developed a draft of the Monitored Natural Recovery (MNR) guidance, 3) continued development of a draft Working Harbour Strategy guidance document, 4) finalized 2014 updates to the Aquatic Sites Classification System (ASCS) and User Guide which were uploaded to the Interdepartmental Data Exchange Application (IDEA), 5) updated draft sediment remediation technologies guidance, 6) delivered LTM professional development training session at RPIC 2014, 7) delivered LTM classroom/WebEx training sessions at five regional locations across Canada, 8) delivered classroom training on Site Closure (SCT)/Tool for Risk Assessment Validation (TRAV) in Ottawa, 9) delivered classroom/WebEx training on the Aquatic Sites Management Framework and ASCS in two regional locations;
  3. Reviewed 153 FCSAP site submissions (i.e., technical documents in support of site classification and remediation) to ensure that the potential impacts to fish and fish habitat were appropriately considered; and
  4. Reviewed and evaluated FCSAP projects to determine whether the risk to fish and fish habitat had been reduced as a result of custodial actions (e.g., Dunn’s Nook Fish Habitat Offsetting/Restoration Project for impacts related to Esquimalt Harbour Remediation activities).
Health Canada

In its role as an expert support department for the FCSAP program, Health Canada achieved the following in 2014-15:

  • Health Canada’s Healthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch and Regions and Programs Bureau provided technical reviews of human health risk assessments and related documents for approximately 87 FCSAP sites across Canada and performed National Classification System (NCS) scoring reviews for 49 sites. In addition, Health Canada completed 45 FCSAP site visits across Canada and provided advice for other non-FCSAP sites and environmental assessment projects. Health Canada reviewed 186 technical documents.
  • Health Canada conducted two training sessions for federal custodians: Bioavailability of Chemicals in Soil for Human Health Risk Assessments (HHRA webinar); and Challenges in Investigating Remote Northern Sites to Support Human Health Risk Assessment (webinar).
  • Health Canada continued work on the development of the following guidance documents: (i) bioavailability guidance (ii) indoor dust guidance (iii) supplemental guidance on Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) on air quality, (iv) vapour intrusion guidance and (v) guidance on Part II of the Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs).
  • Health Canada prepared a fact sheet on the risk assessment of contaminated sediments via the direct contact pathway, and completed an advisory bulletin on the HHRA link to estimating cleanup liability.
  • Health Canada participated in Contaminated Sites Management Working Group meetings (quarterly), Inter-Regional Working Group meetings (semi-annually) and FCSAP Expert Support meetings (quarterly).
  • Health Canada completed a Conceptual Site Model tool, continued to develop soil quality guidelines for Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) and Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA), and initiated a number of technical contracts for future guidance and factsheets.
Industry Canada

N/A - no funding requested.

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

Remediation activities were undertaken at 2 sites, which require further remediation.

Note: This crown corporation had no expected targets/results because the reprofile of funding had not yet been approved at the time of the development of the expected targets/results.

Marine Atlantic Inc.

N/A - no funding requested.

National Capital Commission

The National Capital Commission spent assessment funds at 39 sites; all of which will require further assessment. Remediation activities were undertaken at 6 sites; all sites will require further remediation.

National Defence

National Defence spent assessment funds at 9 sites:

  • 3 sites completed assessment activities; and
  • 6 sites require further assessment.

Remediation activities were undertaken at 85 sites:

  • 3 sites completed remediation activities in 2014-15;
    • 1 of 3 sites that completed remediation activities in 2014-2015 was also closed, indicating that no further action is required.
  •  82 sites require further remediation.
National Research Council of Canada

No assessment or remediation activities were carried out in 2014-15 with FCSAP funding. However, $18,000 of funding was available in 2014-15 and was spent on program management.

Natural Resources Canada

N/A - no funding requested.

Parks Canada Agency

Parks Canada Agency spent assessment funds at 25 sites:

  • 6 sites completed assessment activities; and
  • 19 sites require further assessment.

Remediation activities were undertaken at 32 sites:

  • 3 sites completed remediation activities in 2014-15;
  • 28 sites require further remediation; and
  • 1 remediation site was closed following risk assessment indicating that no further action is required.
Public Works and Government Services Canada

Public Works and Government Services Canada spent assessment funds at 3 sites, all of which completed assessment activities.

Remediation funds were spent at 19 sites:

  • 12 sites require further remediation; and
  • 7 remediation sites, of which 5 had completed remediation activities in a previous year, were closed, indicating that no further action is required.

In its role as an expert support department for the FCSAP program, Public Works and Government Services Canada achieved the following in 2014-15:

  • Continued development of contaminated site management tools (e.g., Guidance and Orientation for the Selection of Technologies (GOST), Sustainable Development (SD) Tool, revised Project Management Handbook);
  • Collection and sharing of innovative and sustainable/green approaches (e.g., sharing information at the RPIC Ottawa Workshop and RemTech);
  • Conducted analysis of federal demand for private sector support for contaminated sites management and shared this information with the private sector (e.g., RPIC Ottawa Workshop and RemTech); and
  • Shared information on PWGSC procurement approaches for contaminated sites projects (e.g., professional development session at RPIC Ottawa and webinar sessions).
Royal Canadian Mounted Police

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police spent assessment funds at 6 sites, of which 2 sites completed assessment activities and 4 sites require further assessment.

Remediation activities were undertaken at 9 sites:

  • 2 sites require further remediation;
  • 2 sites completed remediation activities and were closed in 2014-15; and
  • 5 sites that completed remediation activities in a previous year were also closed following confirmatory sampling activities, indicating that no further action is required.

Note: This department had no expected targets/results because the reprofile of funding had not yet been approved at the time of the development of the expected targets/results.

Transport Canada

Transport Canada spent assessment funds at 5 sites, all of which will require further assessment activities. The 5 assessments could not be completed as additional investigative work is required to further delineate subsurface site conditions. Assessment activities for the 5 sites will continue in 2015-16. Remediation activities were undertaken at 26 sites, of which 1 site completed remediation in 2014-15 and 25 sites require further remediation.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

The Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) supported Environment Canada in the management of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) through the provision of policy advice and guidance. In this role, TBS:

  1. Supported Environment Canada in the development and approval of a program renewal strategy for Phase III of FCSAP;
  2. Supported Environment Canada in monitoring government-wide progress on federal contaminated sites by participating in key program activities such as annual reporting, long-term planning, and future funding analysis;
  3. Maintained and enhanced the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory;
  4. Coordinated planning and delivery of the Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop, held in Ottawa, Ontario, April 12-14, 2014.
Comments on variance:

In 2014-15, the FCSAP federal partners spent 73% ($263 million) of the available funding; reprofiled, carried forward, or cash-managed 26% ($92 million) to future years; and lapsed 2% ($6 million). Note that the amount of available funding was $361 million, while the amount of planned spending was $120 million. This difference is due to the fact that additional 2014-15 funding was made available after the planned spending amount was calculated in the 2014-15 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada - Contaminated Sites (On Reserve Program)

$14,173,103 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $5,000,000 was received from National Defence and $30,364 was received from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s Contaminated Sites (Northern Program). $42,318 of funding was transferred to Aboriginal

Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s Contaminated Sites (Northern Program). In 2014-15, $13,778,471 of funding was spent, $391,690 was internally cash managed from 2014-15 to 2015-16 and $2,942 was lapsed. Reasons for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 include the cancellation of a list minute site visit to a remote community. Also, due to weather and delays with First Nations plans, $391,690 was not spent in planned projects, however it was cash managed to 2015-16.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada - Contaminated Sites (Northern Program)

$193,575,761 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $48,788,357 was reprofiled from previous years. $23,000,000 of funding was received from National Defence and $42,318 was received from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s Contaminated Sites (On Reserve Program). $30,364 of funding was transferred to Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s Contaminated Sites (On Reserve Program). In 2014-15, $163,283,133 of funding was spent, $11,000,000 has been reprofiled from 2014-15 to 2015-16and an additional $19,292,628 is pending a late reprofile request.

Reasons for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 include:

  1. Tundra Mine Remediation Project ($9M): In the fall of 2014-15, the contractor requested early termination of their remediation contract. With AANDC and PWGSC concurrence, an early termination settlement was reached with the contractor to end their services. However, it is now necessary to put the Tundra Mine into Care and Maintenance for at least one year, perhaps two, while retendering of the contract takes place. The planned completion of the project has therefore been delayed and a revised project authority was approved by Treasury Board in May 2015.
  2. Giant Mine Remediation Project ($12M): Approximately $9M in design allowance allocated for contracts (e.g. Care & Maintenance, Roaster Deconstruction, Underground Stabilization), was not required in 2014-15 due to maintaining scope, mitigating potential risks and negotiating changes, consultation, design and permitting for certain work packages, such as the C-1 Pit Buttress work ($1.5M) and C-Shaft headframe deconstruction ($1M) took longer than planned in 2014-15 and so the work will carry over into 2015-16 and 2016-17. Approximately $500K in additional forecast expenditures were not realized as a result of final expenditures being less than anticipated for completed work.
  3. Cape Dorset 2/Nottingham Island Remediation Project ($3.5M): Mobilization that was scheduled for the summer 2014 was delayed due to stormy weather as the barge was unable to land at the site. Mobilization will need to be attempted again in 2015-16, causing a year delay in this project.
  4. The Great Slave Lake Project ($4M) - $4M worth of remediation work will need to be delayed until 2015-16. Delays in the award of the contract, due to ongoing information requests and negotiations with the contractor, will mean the successful bidder will likely only be able to mobilize to one of three sites this year. In addition, one of the three sites has been impacted by forest fires and the full extent of any damage cannot yet be determined.
  5. New contaminants ($1.8M): New contamination was discovered at Padloping Island and Fox E-Durban Island that have resulted in a delay in demobilization that was to occur in 2014-15. An assessment of these new contaminants in 2015-16 may cause additional delays in demobilization efforts if significant remediation is required.
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

$698,002 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $350,000 was internally cash-managed from previous years. In 2014-15, $492,950 of funding was spent and $205,052 was internally cash-managed from 2014-15 to 2015-16. One reason for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 was the limited access to the contaminated soil to be remediated at a Community Pasture site. The contaminated soil was partially located under a building. The building is a house for the pasture manager and could not be relocated for the project. The house is now unoccupied and will be demolished so that the remediation will take place in 2015-16.

Canada Border Services Agency

$1,870,000 of funding was available in 2014-15. This funding was reprofiled from 2014-15 to 2015-16.

Correctional Service Canada

$2,087,977 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $363,617 was internally cash-managed from previous years. $600,000 of funding was received from National Defence. In 2014-15, $1,524,316 of funding was spent and $563,661 was carried forward from 2014-15 to 2015-16. Reasons for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 include final costs ending up being less than expected allowing contingency funds to be carried forward for other projects.

Environment Canada - Custodian

$5,932,573 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $600,000 was reprofiled from previous years. In 2014-15, $4,713,518 of funding was spent, $1,200,000 was reprofiled from 2014-15 to 2015-16 and $19,055 was lapsed. Reasons for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 include expenditures at a site being less than expected, and the inability to complete the hiring of a student for a work term.

Environment Canada - FCSAP Expert Support and Secretariat

$5,500,385 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $4,647,725 was spent and $852,660 was lapsed. Some of the funding available in 2014-15 could not be spent due to the need to spend more time on the FCSAP Phase III renewal proposal than was planned at the beginning of the year. This caused the delay or postponement of some other projects.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Custodian

$5,822,956 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $819,900 was carried forward from previous years, and $20,000 was received from Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Expert Support. In 2014-15, $5,694,142 of funding was spent, $115,800 was carried forward from 2014-15 to 2015-16 and $13,014 was lapsed. The department was not able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 because of delays in completing remediation work at one site and an over-estimation of the required level of assessment work at another site.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada - FCSAP Expert Support

$1,884,396 of funding was available in 2014-15. The actual spending is $1,773,114 with a variance of $111,282 which includes $66,119 that was lapsed due to delays in staffing one regional FTE, part-time educational leave for one regional FTE and internal operational issues with regional budget transfers. The variance also includes $45,163 of funds that were spent for FCSAP Expert Support but not coded correctly.

Health Canada - FCSAP Expert Support

$3,475,282 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $3,319,993 was spent and $155,289 was lapsed. Reasons for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 include salary surplus as a result of vacant positions and Operations and Maintenance surplus attributed to less travel (custodians did not require NCR staff on as many site visits as planned).

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

$24,590,000 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $22,948,000 was reprofiled from previous years. In 2014-15, $260,877 of funding was spent, $23,485,000 was reprofiled from 2014-15 to 2015-16 and $844,123 was lapsed. One reason for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 was that the planned FCSAP remediation work was disrupted by external events which resulted in postponing the implementation of the projects.

National Capital Commission

$4,919,992 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $3,456,992 was reprofiled and internally cash managed from previous years. In 2014-15, $1,787,680 of funding was spent and $3,132,312 was internally cash managed from 2014-15 to 2015-16. Reasons for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 include the use of NCC contaminated land as construction staging areas as part of the Light Rail Transit (LRT) project by the City of Ottawa (impacts on LeBreton and Hurdman North remediation projects) and re-evaluation of scope related to costs higher than expected for the Bayview Project.

National Defence

$42,202,942 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $14,500,000 was reprofiled from previous years. $5,000,000 of funding was transferred to Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s Contaminated Sites (On Reserve Program), $23,000,000 of funding was transferred to Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s Contaminated Sites (Northern Program), and $600,000 of funding was transferred to Correctional Service Canada. In 2014-15, $29,551,334 of funding was spent, $10,000,000 was internally cash managed from 2014-15 to 2015-16 and $2,651,608 was lapsed.

Reasons for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 include:

  • Final assessment costs were less than initially expected due to changes in project scope, reductions in proposals by consultants, contract delays due to additional work required, and initially over budgeting project costs;
  • Delay in field work and projects due to technical, time, weather permitting issues and security clearance needed for controllers;
  • Overestimating the original cost, weights and concentration of contaminants at disposal sites and delays in starting field work than originally planned due to demining;
  • Multiple sites returned funds late in the fiscal year because the final invoices were less than expected.
  • Esquimalt Harbour remediation project did not obtain National Defence’s project approval and because of that the project was inhibited in accelerating work on the site.
  • Goose Bay Sites: late start to contracts due to additional work required around pipelines to ensure remedial impact on operational requirements and PCBs reporting requirements. Funds unspent because contract behind schedule on environmental assessment (soil treatment) due to weather, space limitations, lab issues and soil sampling delays.
  • DEW Line Clean Up (DLCU) Sites: overestimating the original cost, weights and concentration of contaminants at disposal sites, movement of work into next fiscal year, delays in negotiating proposals, and unused contract contingency and disbursement costs for field work.
National Research Council of Canada

$18,000 of funding was available in 2014-15. All funding was spent in 2014-15.

Parks Canada Agency

$5,754,861 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $5,073,543 was carried forward from previous years. $3,500,000 of funding was transferred to Public Works and Government Services Canada. In 2014-15, $3,451,989 of funding was spent and $2,302,872 was carried forward from 2014-15 to 2015-16. Reasons for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 include lower assessment project costs (on average 21% less for assessment projects and 25% less for remediation/risk-management projects) and limited operational capacity to carry out additional projects.

Public Works and Government Services Canada - Custodian

$21,128,573 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $17,293,687 was reprofiled from previous years. $3,500,000 of funding was received from Parks Canada Agency. In 2014-15, $4,519,994 of funding was spent, $10,956,687 was reprofiled, $4,938,382 was carried forward from 2014-15 to 2015-16 and $713,510 was lapsed. One reason for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 was that not all of the work at Esquimalt Graving Dock could proceed due to a delay in a related capital project. Another reason was due to the remote northern location of the remaining approved sites and the associated short working season.

Public Works and Government Services Canada - FCSAP Expert Support

$650,000 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $645,249 was spent and $4,751 was lapsed.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Funding in the amount of $425,253 was available in 2014-15. This amount included $420,253 in carry forward funding from previous fiscal years. In 2014-15, $246,537 of funding was spent and $178,716 was lapsed. Funding available in 2014-15 was not fully utilized as a result of projects being completed under budget as well as the decision to not carry forward FCSAP funds into 2015-16. Only a portion of the RCMP's contaminated sites are deemed eligible for FCSAP funding and as such carry forward was deemed unnecessary.

Transport Canada

$25,819,203 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $17,449,557 was reprofiled and carried forward from previous years. In 2014-15, $22,578,136 of funding was spent. Transport Canada will request that $3,241,067 of funding be carried forward from 2014-15 to 2015-16. The reason for not being able to spend all the funding available in 2014-15 was largely attributable to re-phasing of the multi-year Rock Bay Remediation Project due to a change in the construction schedule. In 2014-15, significantly less contaminated sediment was transported and disposed of than originally forecasted due to unknown difficult ground conditions which resulted in challenging and prolonged installation of the sheet pile shoring and a temporary cofferdam. The shoring and cofferdam needed to be installed in order to excavate contaminated sediment in dry conditions. The majority of contaminated sediment removal and disposal will now be occurring in 2015-16.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

$527,900 of funding was available in 2014-15, of which $515,244 was spent and $12,656 was lapsed due to reduced travel and training.

Great Lakes Ecosystem Initiative

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

Great Lakes Ecosystem Initiative (GLEI)

Name of lead department(s)

Environment Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Infrastructure Canada, Transport Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)
  • Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change
  • Ontario Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Rural Affairs
  • Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry
Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2010 - Canada-United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) first signed in 1972 was amended and came into force February 2013

End date of the horizontal initiative

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

Great Lake Action Plan (GLAP): $8 million annually; continuing.

Sediment Remediation in Great Lakes Areas of Concern announcement: $48.9 million over 14 years, from 2007 to 2021

Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative (GLNI) resources: $16 million over 4 years, from 2012 to 2016

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The GLEI is the name given to Environment Canada’s activities in support of the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes. These activities include negotiation and implementation of the GLWQA and the Canada-Ontario Agreement on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health (COA). Activities are supported by the implementation of the GLAP, sediment work in the Great Lakes, the GLNI and activities delivered through existing resources envelope (A-base resources).

The Government of Canada completed negotiations in 2012 with the Government of the United States (U.S.) to amend the GLWQA, which came into force on February 12, 2013. The GLWQA establishes long-term binational goals and objectives for the restoration and protection of Great Lakes water quality and aquatic ecosystem health. A new 2014-19 COA, which will coordinate domestic actions to help deliver Canada’s obligations in the 2012 GLWQA entered into force on December 18, 2014. 

Great Lakes Action Plan

The GLAP was renewed in 2010 with a commitment to ongoing funding. An amount of $8 million per year is allocated to implement remedial actions to complete the clean-up and restoration in Areas of Concern (AOCs). A portion of this amount is allocated to the Great Lakes Sustainability Fund with a focus on: fish and wildlife habitat rehabilitation and stewardship; contaminated sediment assessment and remediation; and innovative approaches to improve municipal stormwater and wastewater effluent quality.

Sediment Remediation in Great Lakes Areas of Concern Under the Great Lakes sediment remediation initiative, $48.9 million was allocated over 14 years through 2021 to undertake contaminated sediment management projects in AOCs. Work has been completed in four AOCs: Detroit River, Bay of Quinte, Niagara River, and Peninsula Harbour. The remaining funding has been allocated to remediate the largest contaminated sediment site in Canada: Randle Reef, the Hamilton Harbour AOC. Clean-up measures include the construction of containment structures around and over submerged contaminated sediments; the removal, treatment and disposal of sediment; and natural recovery with long-term monitoring. The remediation of contaminated sediment is an essential prerequisite to the longer-term objective of fully restoring environmental quality in certain Areas of Concern, a key commitment under the Canada-U.S. GLWQA.

Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative

In 2012, the Government of Canada committed $16 million over 4 years to the GLNI to address toxic and nuisance algae growth and nearshore water quality and aquatic ecosystem health in the Great Lakes.

The GLNI addresses these issues by determining the current nutrient loadings from selected Canadian tributaries; supporting the negotiation of binational lake ecosystem objectives, phosphorus objectives and load reduction targets; developing policy options and strategies to meet those targets; and developing a nearshore assessment and management framework. The GLNI will also support Canada’s binational commitments under the GLWQA.

Shared outcome(s)

The GLWQA establishes broad, long term objectives for Canada and the U.S. in restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. The COA  provides a short-term (five year) plan for achieving Canada's GLWQA commitments. Through the COA, federal and provincial agencies are guided by a shared vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem for present and future generations. The COA also establishes a common purpose and shared goals, targeted results and commitments in fourteen Annexes.

Annex 1: Nutrients - To address the issue of excess nutrients and reduce harmful and nuisance algal blooms

Annex 2: Harmful Pollutants - To guide cooperative and coordinated actions to reduce or eliminate releases of harmful pollutants into the Great Lakes basin

Annex 3: Discharges from Vessels - To ensure that discharges from vessels do not adversely impact the Great Lakes

Annex 4: Areas of Concern - To restore water quality and ecosystem health in Areas of Concern

Annex 5: Lakewide Management - To advance restoration, protection and conservation of the Great Lakes through collaboration among jurisdictions domestically and binationally and with the Great Lakes community on a lake-by-lake basis

Annex 6: Aquatic Invasive Species - To ensure cooperative and coordinated efforts to reduce the threat of aquatic invasive species to Great Lakes water quality and ecosystem health

Annex 7: Habitat and Species - To continue efforts to restore, protect and conserve the resilience of Great Lakes native species and their habitats

Annex 8: Groundwater Quality - To gain a better understanding of how groundwater influences Great Lakes water quality and ecosystem health, and to identify priority areas for future action

Annex 9: Climate Change Impacts - To continue to build understanding of climate change impacts and advance the integration of this knowledge into Great Lakes adaptation strategies and management actions

Annex 10: Science - To enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of Great Lakes science activities through planning, cooperation, coordination and communication

Annex 11: Promoting Innovation - To create long-term, environmentally sustainable economic opportunities that improve water quality and ecological health and contribute to the well-being of the Great Lakes community

Annex 12: Engaging Communities - To provide opportunities for individuals and groups to enjoy and help take care of the Great Lakes

Annex 13: Engaging First Nations - To reflect the interests and important role of First Nations as participants in the restoration, protection and conservation of the Great Lakes

Annex 14: Engaging Métis - To reflect the interests and important role of Métis as participants in the restoration, protection and conservation of the Great Lakes

Governance structures

Federal signatories to the COA include Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Infrastructure Canada, Transport Canada, and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The oversight of COA is entrusted to the COA Executive Committee. The Committee consists of Assistant Deputy Ministers, Regional Directors General or most senior regional representatives from all departments, ministries and agencies of the Parties who are responsible for leading or supporting one or more commitments. The Committee is co-chaired by Environment Canada and the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change.

Performance highlights

Please refer to the 2014-15 Expected Results and Targets section of this table for additional details.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

Jennifer McKay
Manager
Great Lakes Environment Office
Environment Canada
Tel.: 416-739-5712

Performance Information
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2014-15
Planned spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2014-15
Expected results
2014-15
Targets
Contributing activity /program results
Environment Canada Sustainable Ecosystems COA

$8 million/year - GLAPV;

$48.9 million - CWAP-GL Sediment;

$16 million -  GLNI; Departmental A-Base

n/a

$7.3 million - GLAPV

$191.1 thousand - APCW-GL Sediment

$686.4 thousand - GLNI

$2.8 million - A-Base

See below See below All except those listed below.
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems

Great Lakes Action Plan

Fisheries Protection and Science

Sea Lamprey Control Program

$5.5  million - GLAPV

$17.5 million - Departmental A-Base

$48.2 million A-Base - Sea Lamprey Control Program

$9.0 million - Asian Carp Program

GLAP V =  $930 thousand

Fisheries protection and science = $3.0 million

Sea Lamprey Control Program = $8.1 million

Asian Carp Program = $2.9 million

GLAP V =  $930 thousand

Fisheries protection and science = $3.0 million

Sea Lamprey Control Program = $8.1 million

Asian Carp Program = $2.9 million

See below See below Aquatic Invasive Species: 1.1b, 1.1c, 2.1a, 2.1b, 2.2a, 2.2b, 2.2c, 2.3a, 2.3b, 2.3c, 2.4a, 2.4b, 2.4c, 2.5a, 3.1a, 3.1b, 3.1c, 4.1a, 4.2a, 4.2b, 4.2c, 4.2d, 4.2e, 4.3a, 5.1a, 5.1b; Habitat and Species: 1.2b, 1.2h, 1.2j; Climate Change Impacts: 2.1d
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada 1.2.3 Cost-shared Environmental Risk Assessment and Implementation Growing Forward $54.8 million -  Environment and Climate Change Adaptation Designated Program for Ontario from April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018 $18.4 million $9.8 million See below See below Nuttrients; 4.1a, 4.1b, 4.2a
Natural Resources Canada

Natural Resource Sectors

Consumers are Environmentally Responsible

Risks to natural resource sectors, infrastructure and human health are safely managed

Port Hope Long-term Low-level Radioactive Waste Management Project

Canadian Forestry Service (CFS) - Forest harvesting in riparian zones

CFS - Understanding and mitigating risks to aquatic biodiversity

Departmental A-Base and C-Base

Departmental A-Base

$100k Salary

$100k O&M

$65k Salary

$15k O&M

$100k Salary

$100k O&M

$65k Salary

$15k O&M

See below See below Areas of Concern: 2.3f
Parks Canada

Heritage Places Establishment

Heritage Resources Conservation

COA Departmental A-Base No COA allocation No COA allocation See below See below Habitat and Species: 1.2i
Transport Canada

Environmental Protection

Canadian Ballast Water

COA $65.0 thousand - Departmental A-Base $550.0 thousand - Funding from Ballast Water portion of World Class Initiative $662.4 thousand See below See below Discharges from Vessels: 1.1a, 2.1a, 2.1b, 3.1a, 4.1a; Aquatic Invasive Species: 1.1a
Infrastructure Canada Infrastructure funding program

New Building Canada Plan (New Building Canada Fund; Gas Tax Fund)

Building Canada Plan (Building Canada Fund; Provincial-Territorial Base Fund)

Sunsetting programs (Infrastructure Stimulus Fund; Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund;  Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund)

No COA allocation No COA allocation No COA allocation See below See below Nutrients: 3.1b; Harmful Pollutants:4.2b; Areas of Concern: 2.1a
Health Canada Environmental Risks to Health COA Departmental A-Base No COA allocation No COA allocation See below See below Harmful Pollutants: 3.2a(ii), 3.2a(iv), 3.2a(v) 
Total for all federal organizations     $208 million plus contributions from other departments (Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Infrastructure Canada, and Health Canada) through their existing resource envelopes. n/a n/a Not applicable    
2014-15 Results and Targets:
Environment Canada
  • A new five-year COA entered into force in December 2014. EC also led the implementation of the Canada-U.S. GLWQA, 2012.
  • Work continued to achieve progress in the restoration of Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC):
    • Reached formal funding agreement ($138.9 million initiative is funded equally by the federal and Ontario governments and the local community) and implementation of the contaminated sediment remediation of Randle Reef (Hamilton Harbour), the largest contaminated site in the Canadian Great Lakes waters.
    • Contributed $1.5 million to support 27 new projects to restore environmental quality in Canadian AOC. The funds leveraged nearly $4.8 million from non-federal sources for a total investment of $6.3 million for restoration projects in several AOC, such as the Bay of Qunite, Detroit River, and Nipigon Bay. Projects addressed a range of issues, including restoring fish and wildlife habitat and populations, cleaning up contaminated sediment, and controlling pollution from municipal wastewater, urban storm water, and rural run-off.
  • Environment Canada’s efforts to assess and manage the risks posed by commercial chemicals under Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) supported continued work to reduce the release of harmful substances to the Great Lakes:
    • During 2014-15, a range of chemical risk management initiatives were delivered under the CMP that supported the implementation of the Harmful Pollutants Annex Goals under the new COA. These included continuing efforts towards the sound management of chemicals in the Great Lakes through the reduction of releases and the enhancement of knowledge to mitigate risk.
  • Work continued to achieve a better understanding of, and to report on the Great Lakes Ecosystem status and trends:
    • Reviewed and updated the suite of Great Lakes indicators to be used for reporting in 2016.
    • Advanced implementation of Lakewide Action and Management Plans (LAMPs) through Canada-U.S. discussions on governance, Lake Ecosystem Objectives, reporting, and outreach & engagement.
    • Prepared draft groundwater science report.
  • The Department completed activities under GLNI to determine phosphorus targets and take action to reduce levels that contribute to harmful algae in the Great Lakes:
    • Draft phosphorus targets for Lake Erie were developed through Canada-U.S. and Canada-Ontario discussions.
    • Established a Canada-Ontario interagency steering committee to begin analysis of policy options to achieve phosphorus reduction targets.
    • Draft components of a new nearshore framework, including an approach to baseline assessment, were developed through Canada-U.S. and Canada Ontario discussions.
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Support delisting of impaired beneficial uses in Great lakes AOC with monitoring, analyses, and science advice for fish communities, fish habitat, zooplankton and phytoplankton in Great Lakes AOC.
  • Effective delivery of the new Fisheries Protection Program
  • Suppression of sea lamprey populations to target abundances for each Great Lake that protect fish in support of Fish Community Objectives.
  • Provision of tools for the prevention of Asian Carp establishment in the Great Lakes.
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Work continues to improve agricultural management practices within the Great Lakes farming community including:
    • The development and implementation of beneficial management practices (BMPs) under the environment & climate change adaptation envelope of GF2 programming led by the province of Ontario. In 2014-15, projects involving food processors, collaborations/organizations and agricultural producers continued with varying levels of cost-share available to applicants.
    • The Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative (GLASI) supported two cost-share initiatives targeting agricultural producers whose farm business produced agricultural commodities within the Lake Erie, Lake St. Clair or Lake Huron southeast shores watersheds: (i) the Dust Deflector Program and, the (ii) Manure and Biosolids Management Program.
Natural Resources Canada
  • Work continued towards the achievement of the sustainable development of Canada’s energy, forestry and mineral metals resources within the Great Lakes Basin, including the following:
    • Developed bioacoustic methods for monitoring change in amphibian and wetland associate bird communities.
    • Assessed riparian forest condition and influences on water quality across disturbance gradients
    • Determined effects of natural disturbance (fire) on forest streams as targets and benchmarks for management strategies
    • Conducted stable isotope analyses to track food
    • Applied next generation DNA sequencing techniques to characterizing aquatic microbial communities in forest streams as bioindicators of disturbance and recovery
    • Conducted benthic macroinvertebrate sampling in forest streams across disturbance and size gradients to determine hydrologic drivers of biotic communities
Parks Canada
  • Delivers the National Parks and National Marine Conservation Areas programs and works to develop and maintain a viable protected areas network in the Great Lakes Basin that is relevant to Canadians.  Projects included the following:
    • Worked with Ontario towards the formal establishment of the Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area, including development on interim management plan and zoning.
    • Operated the Fathom Five Marine Park (Lake Huron), including protection and monitoring of coastal heritage resources and delivery of Great Lake focused interpretation and outreach programs.
    • Operated five coastal national parks in Ontario on three Great Lakes and in the St. Lawrence River. This included the monitoring of heritage resources; the active management of invasive species and restoration of habitats through an Action on the Ground project on the Lake Erie Sand Spit Savannah in Point Pelee National Park; and the delivery of interpretation, outreach, stewardship and visitor experience programs
Transport Canada
  • Work continued to ensure compliance with Canada Shipping Act regulations related to the ecosystem health of the Great Lakes. Transport Canada undertook a wide variety of inspection, monitoring programs with respect to discharge from ships as required under Annex 5 of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, including continued support to the Joint Ballast Water Enforcement Program in the Seaway. As well, the following projects were undertaken in 2014-15:
    • Updated/input Information Technology renewal as well as salaries to input data into the Port State Control/Canadian National Ballast Water Database.
    • In conjunction with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, carried out shipboard testing of exchange plus treatment to decrease the risk of discharge of alien invasive species  into the Great Lakes under the Ballast Water Management Program; conducted Phase 4 of Freshwater Ballast Water Treatment Technologies Testing; conducted Phase 8 of Ballast Water Management Assessment - Compliance and Enforcement Tools;
    • Undertook two studies to understand the feasibility and logistic of the application of ballast water treatment technology to Great Lakes Domestic ships.
Infrastructure Canada
  • Work continued toward providing funding to eligible infrastructure projects in support of federal objectives such as a cleaner environment, which includes improved wastewater treatment.
  • Since 2006, the Government of Canada has committed over $2.18 billion in direct federal funding under several infrastructure funding programs for wastewater infrastructure projects across Canada, including more than $628 million for wastewater infrastructure in the Great Lakes watershed. Going forward, the Government of Canada will continue to provide funding for important improvements to wastewater infrastructure through a permanent and indexed Gas Tax Fund, and the 10-year New Building Canada Fund.
  • In 2014-15, Infrastructure Canada continued to support the implementation of wastewater infrastructure projects, including projects to improve the quality of municipal wastewater effluent in the St. Lawrence River, Hamilton Harbour, and the Nipigon Bay AOC.
Health Canada
  • Health Canada supports COA through its work under the joint Environment Canada/Health Canada Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) horizontal initiative. CMP activities are recognized as being potentially beneficial for the environmental integrity of the Great Lakes and the health of Canadians living in the Great Lakes region.
  • Specifically, Health Canada’s efforts, with those of Environment Canada, to assess and manage the risks posed by chemicals under Canada’s CMP supported continued work to reduce the release of harmful substances to the Great Lakes:
    • Since it was launched in 2006, CMP has made significant progress. Of the 4,300 substances identified as priorities for assessment by 2020, approximately 2,700 have been addressed and risk management actions initiated (when necessary) through such initiatives as the Challenge to Industry, the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach and the rapid screening of substances of low concern.
    • Of the 2,700 substances assessed to date under the CMP1 and CMP2, 97 substances, or groups of substances, have been found to be harmful to human health and/or the environment. Risk management instruments have been finalized for 64 of these substances, with proposed instruments published for an additional 2 substances.
    • In addition, approximately 1,600 additional substances are on track to be addressed by 2020.
  • More detailed examples of Health Canada’s work in support of COA are available under the contributing activity section of the Health Canada CMP horizontal results supplementary table.
Contributing activity/program results

See table.

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