Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations: general information

Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations

The Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations (ODSHAR) are the means by which Canada meets its obligations under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol). Environment and Climate Change Canada administers the Regulations on behalf of the Government of Canada. Read more about the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations.

The ODSHAR are modernized Regulations that repealed and replaced Canada’s Ozone-depleting Substances Regulations, 1998 on December 29, 2016.

The ODSHAR add new regulatory requirements to allow Canada to continue to meet its international commitments under the Montreal Protocol, and they consolidate all previous amendments to the former regulations. 

The ODSHAR are made pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Frequently asked questions (FAQs) are available here. The FAQs provide Canadians and businesses with basic information about the ODSHAR.

Permit Application Forms and Reporting Forms

Under the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations (ODSHAR), there are a number of activities involving ozone-depleting substances and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) that require a permit issued by Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Permit application or reporting forms are available upon request by contacting the Ozone Layer Protection and Export Controls Section by email (ec.gestionhalocarbures-halocarbonsmanagement.ec@canada.ca) or by telephone (819-938-4228).

The service standards and performance targets for permits issued under the ODSHAR can be found here.

Fact Sheets *New*

What’s new in the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations

The following Factsheets summarize the key changes found in the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations (ODSHAR).

1- Phase-out of hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) manufacturing

Phase-out of hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) manufacturing (PDF; 591 KB)

To fully meet Canada’s obligations under the Montreal Protocol, the ODSHAR now include a manufacturing allowance system to phase out the manufacture of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) in Canada. This revision impacts companies manufacturing HCFCs and companies using HCFCs manufactured in Canada.

2- Import, manufacture, use and sale of hydrochlorofluorocarbures (HCFCs) as a fire-extinguishing agent 

Import, manufacture, use and sale of hydrochlorofluorocarbures (HCFCs) as a fire-extinguishing agent (PDF; 605 KB)

The ODSHAR extend the prohibition date for the import and manufacture of HCFCs to be used as fire-extinguishing agents to January 1, 2020, to allow this use to continue.   

3- Controls on refillable containers 

Controls on refillable containers (PDF; 604 KB)

Refillable containers are less likely to leak and are therefore more suitable for storing and transporting ozone-depleting substances and their halocarbon alternatives. To minimize risks of releases to the environment, the ODSHAR require that any HCFC and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant manufactured and imported be stored in refillable containers.

4- Permitting and reporting system for hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) 

Permitting and reporting system for hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) (PDF; 685 KB)

The ODSHAR introduce a permitting and reporting system to monitor their import, manufacture and export. The permitting and reporting system applies only to bulk HFCs manufactured in, imported into or exported from Canada.  The ODSHAR does not limit the quantities of HFCs that can be imported, manufactured or exported. 

The permitting and reporting system does not apply to manufactured products that contain HFCs such as domestic appliances or refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment, nor does it establish restrictions on these activities.

5- Methyl bromide transfers

Methyl bromide transfers (PDF; 798 KB)

To provide more flexibility in movement of methyl bromide to where it is needed within Canada, the ODSHAR allow transfers of methyl bromide for certain exempted uses.

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