Goal 12: Reduce waste and transition to zero-emission vehicles.

Why this goal is important

This Goal's focus on reducing waste and transitioning to zero-emission vehicles directly supports SDG Global Indicator Framework targets.

Read more on why this goal is important

This Goal's focus on reducing waste and transitioning to zero-emission vehicles directly supports SDG Global Indicator Framework targets:

  • 12.3: By 2030, halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses
  • 12.4: By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment
  • 12.5: By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.
  • 12.7: Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

By transitioning to a cleaner and more circular economy that prioritizes reducing consumption and waste generation, reusing the resources already extracted, and finding processes and technologies that take a holistic systems-based approach to minimizing waste throughout the economy, we can help reduce negative impacts on the environment. Doing this also improves resilience to resource shortages, rising or volatile prices, and supply chain interruptions.

The circular economy is founded on 3 principles: design pollution and waste out of the economy, keep products and materials in use (through sharing, reuse, repair, refurbishment, remanufacturing, repurposing and recycling), and work with nature to regenerate and enhance ecosystems. Using these principles, we can sustainably manage our economy for the benefit of current and future generations.

Developing the circular economy provides opportunities for innovation in the way that material resources are able to be reclaimed and reused throughout supply chains as well as changing the norm of throwing out old or broken products. As Canada aims to reduce the amount of waste produced, it will be important to look at circularity sector by sector to overcome unique barriers and take advantage of existing and emerging opportunities. In a 2021 study published by the Council of Canadian Academies, Canada's circularity rate, a measure of the contribution of recycled content towards the overall use of materials, was estimated at 6.1% in 2020. When compared to the average circularity rate of 12.8% reported by Eurostat for the European Union countries in 2020, Canada has room to improve how efficiently it utilizes resources.

Right to Repair

Bill C-244, An Act to amend the Copyright Act (diagnosis, maintenance and repair), was re-introduced in the House of Commons in February 2022. This Bill would amend the Copyright Act to allow people to work around a technological protection measure in a computer program for the purpose of diagnosis, maintenance or repair of a product in which the program is used. It also allows people and businesses to manufacture, import, distribute, sell, rent, and provide services to that effect.

This is a first step towards a broader respect for the Right to Repair - the use of legislative and regulatory means to require manufacturers to make devices easier for users to service and to make replacement parts, tools and repair manuals available and affordable. These efforts support a transition to a circular economy by including reuse capability, reparability, and service economy as well as reducing waste, specifically e-waste, and lowering costs for consumers.

Many efforts by the public and private sectors as well as individual Canadians have focused on addressing plastic waste and pollution. Globally, roughly 8 million tonnes of plastic enter oceans each year from land and sea-based activities, causing an estimated USD $13 billion in damages annually to marine ecosystems. By improving the processes involved in plastic production, Canada has the opportunity to limit a large contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. Finding solutions to plastic pollution and waste has emerged as a global priority, increasing momentum for a circular plastics economy.

The Waste Management Hierarchy

The waste management hierarchy outlines the set of preferred actions for preventing and managing waste. It is a means for all Canadians, from civil society to governments, to make purchase and use decisions that will contribute to a circular plastics economy, by reducing, repairing, reusing and recycling plastic items.

Working with its provincial and territorial colleagues, the Government of Canada supports the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment in taking this approach nationally, as described in the Canada-wide Strategy on Zero Plastic Waste.

Food loss and waste is also a global problem of enormous economic, environmental, and societal significance. A 2020 study estimates that food waste made up about 23% of the waste landfilled in Canada in 2016. Food waste disposed of in landfills produces methane, a short-lived but powerful greenhouse gas many times more potent than carbon dioxide. Emissions from Canadian municipal solid waste landfills account for 24% of national methane emissions. Canada's landfills present an opportunity to turn these emissions into a source of biogas, or refined further into renewable natural gas that can be blended into natural gas pipelines, decarbonizing Canada's natural gas consumption.

Critical minerals are the building blocks for the clean and digitized economy. They are essential for renewable energy and clean technology applications (batteries, permanent magnets, solar panels and wind turbines); they are also required inputs for advanced manufacturing supply chains, including defence and security technologies, consumer electronics, agriculture, medical applications and critical infrastructure. Canada is already a top global producer of many critical minerals and has the capacity to produce much more.

Transportation accounts for a quarter of Canada's greenhouse gas emissions, of which the majority comes from the on-road sector, including light-duty vehicles and medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. One way to reduce transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions is to replace vehicles powered by fossil fuels (internal combustion engines, or ICEs), with zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs). In doing so, it will be important to ensure that the life-cycle carbon footprint associated with producing, powering and recycling zero-emission vehicles (and their component parts, such as lithium-ion batteries) is lower than that of ICE vehicles.

Reducing the number of cars needed to support living across Canada by investing in public transportation, walkable communities, and car-sharing can also reduce emissions and support sustainable cities and communities. Efforts will also be required in other transportation modes, including air, rail, marine, and off-road engines, all of which have opportunities for efficiency improvements and electrification or other zero or low carbon alternative fuels.

How the Government of Canada contributes

The Government of Canada has committed to reduce plastic pollution and waste, with an approach that works at each stage of the plastics life cycle, and follows the waste management hierarchy. 

Read more on how the government of Canada contributes

It is promoting a circular economy that fosters sustainable design of plastic products and materials so that they can be reused, remanufactured or recycled and therefore retained in the economy for as long as possible.

Canada continues to be recognized as an international leader in combatting plastic pollution, stemming from both its 2018 Group of 7 (G7) Presidency and its ongoing championing of the Ocean Plastics Charter. The charter, now endorsed by 28 governments and 75 Canadian, global and regional businesses and organizations, takes a comprehensive lifecycle approach to tackling plastic pollution. It lays the groundwork to ensure that plastics are designed for longer product life and increased recovery, such as through reuse and recycling.

Domestically, the government is working with provinces and territories through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) to implement the Canada-wide Strategy and Action Plans on Zero Plastic Waste. The CCME is currently implementing phase 2 of the Action Plan. As part of the commitments under the Ocean Protection Plan, new regulations banning 6 single-use plastics were published in June 2022, and includes items such as checkout bags, cutlery, and foodservice ware made from or containing problematic plastics. The new Regulations will eliminate more than 125,000 tonnes of hard-to-recycle plastic products in the first year of implementation and 1.3 million tonnes over the next ten years. It is contributing to the appropriate management of single-use items that are harmful in the environment, developing recycled content regulations so more plastic remains in the economy, and proposing labelling requirements to help Canadians better recycle and compost.

Meanwhile, the Chemicals Management Plan aims to reduce risks posed by chemicals, polymers, and organisms. These substances are assessed for potential effects on human health and the environment. Risk management actions are developed and implemented to mitigate these impacts if substances are found to be harmful to human health or the environment.

Canada is party to legally binding international agreements that prevent waste and litter, control the transboundary movements of hazardous wastes and other wastes, and ensure such wastes are disposed of in an environmentally sound way, including the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal.

Canada's 2030 Emissions Reduction Plan outlines Canada's commitment to develop a light duty vehicles zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) sales mandate that will set annually increasing requirements towards achieving 100% of their sales by 2035. The Emissions Reduction Plan also signaled the Government's plan to launch an integrated strategy to reduce emissions from medium-and heavy-duty vehicles with the aim of reaching 35% of their total sales being ZEVs by 2030. The government has committed to develop a medium-and heavy-duty vehicles ZEV regulation to require 100% medium-and heavy-duty vehicles sales to be ZEVs by 2040 for a subset of vehicle types based on feasibility, with interim 2030 regulated sales requirements that would vary for different vehicle categories based on feasibility, and explore interim targets for the mid-2020s. To support the uptake of these vehicles, the Government of Canada has launched both the Incentives for Zero-Emission Vehicles and Incentives for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicles Programs.

The federal government is committed to boosting the supply of critical minerals. A Critical Minerals Center of Excellence and targeted research and development will be supported for upstream critical minerals processing and battery precursors and related materials engineering. The Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy aims to speed up development of Canada's critical mineral resources and expertise, by adding value to each stage of the development process, further solidifying Canada's global leadership. In addition, the Canadian Minerals and Metals Plan envisions a circular economy where mine waste is reprocessed to improve sustainability and derive additional economic value.

Stakeholder perspective: Circular Opportunity Innovation Launchpad

Operating across southern Ontario, Circular Opportunity Innovation Launchpad (COIL) is a circular business and innovation accelerator aimed at developing and scaling transformative solutions that will move Canada toward a more resilient, climate-smart economic model.  A collaborative project of the City of Guelph, County of Wellington, Innovation Guelph and 10C Shared Space, COIL contains a suite of programs and resources to embed and accelerate circularity across businesses, supply chains and material streams. COIL programming includes:  accelerators, incubator, innovation challenges, learning and training curriculums, material flow analyses—just to name a few.

Since launch in 2021, more than 65 organizations have participated in COIL programming; more than 230 new circular collaborations have been supported; more than $750,000 in organization funding and mentorship has been provided to support circular transition; 17 new pieces of Intellectual Property (IP) have been nurtured; and hundreds of tonnes of organic byproducts have been upcycled to new high-value goods.  This project is funded by the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.

Source: Circular Opportunity Innovation Launchpad

Additional context and updates regarding this goal

Targets, indicators, milestones and contextual indicators

Targets, indicators, milestones and contextual indicators

Theme:  Management of waste, resources and chemicals

Target: Single-use plastics (1)

By 2030, the amount of single-use plastics that is entering the environment as pollution will be reduced by 5% and that is sent to landfill by 3% (Minister of Environment and Climate Change)

Indicator (i)

Compliance with the Single-Use Plastic Prohibition Regulations

This indicator tracks whether or not industry is compliant with the Single-Use Plastic Prohibition Regulations, meaning single-use plastic checkout bags, cutlery, foodservice ware made from or containing problematic plastics, ring carriers, stir sticks and straws are not manufactured, imported, or sold in Canada by 2025, and are no longer manufactured in Canada for export to another country by 2026. It is expected that increasing the rate of compliance with these regulations will directly result in less single-use plastic entering the environment as pollution and being sent to landfills. Reporting will begin in March 2026.

Target: Waste Reduction (1)

Reduce the amount of waste Canadians send to disposal from a baseline of 699 kilograms per person in 2014 to 490 kilograms per person by 2030 (a 30% reduction); and to 350 kilograms per person by 2040 (a 50% reduction) (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, as federal lead in the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment)

Indicator (i)

Solid waste diversion and disposal

This indicator tracks the total quantity and the quantity per person of non-hazardous solid waste disposed by municipal governments and businesses in the waste management industry. Total solid waste disposal per person decreased from 768 to 694 kilograms between 2002 and 2018. Note that data is updated every 2 years, and may result in a change in the baseline.

Short-term milestone: Finalize the Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy (1)

By the end of 2022, finalize the Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy. In the following years, launch and start implementing associated initiatives to ensure that Canada's natural resources are developed sustainably, competitively and inclusively.

Update

On December 9th, 2022, Natural Resources Canada published the Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy which seeks to increase the supply of responsibly sourced critical minerals and support the development of domestic and global value chains for the green and digital economy.

Status: Achieved

Source: Natural Resources Canada, 2022

Short-term milestone: Implement the Chemicals Management Plan (1)

Between 2022 and 2024, assess and manage risks posed by substances to the environment and human health:

  • Each year, from 2022 to 2024, 100% of new substances (chemicals, polymers, and animate products of biotechnology) are assessed within prescribed timelines
  • Each year, from 2022 to 2024, 100% of actions are taken in a timely manner to protect Canada's environment and the health of Canadians from substances found to be a risk to the environment and/or human health
  • By 2024, 100% of the 4,363 existing chemicals that were prioritized under the Chemicals Management Plan have been addressed
Short-term milestone: Reduce food loss and waste (1)

By fall 2023, announce the grand prize winners of the Food Waste Reduction Challenge, a $20-million initiative to spark new ideas and challenge innovators to deliver game-changing solutions that prevent, divert or transform food waste into new foods or other value-added products. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will also be creating a No-Waste Food Fund to help all players along the food supply chain to commercialize and adopt ways to eliminate, reduce or repurpose food waste

Update

As part of implementing the Food Policy for Canada, the Government of Canada launched the Food Waste Reduction Challenge in November 2020. As the Challenge draws to a close, grand prize winners will be announced in 2024.

Building on lessons learned from the Food Waste Reduction Challenge, the Government of Canada is also leading efforts towards developing a Food Loss and Waste Reduction Action Plan and a No-Waste Food Fund to further efforts to reduce food loss and waste. 

Status: In Progress

Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 2023

Short-term milestone: Regulate plastics in the economy (1)

In 2023, the Government of Canada will publish proposed regulations, and set a target, that will build upon existing regulations to support zero plastic waste goals. Proposed regulations will:

  • prohibit the use of the chasing-arrows symbol ♲ unless 80% of Canada's recycling facilities accept and have reliable end markets for those products; and
  • set minimum recycled content requirements for certain plastic manufactured items to strengthen the market demand for recycled plastics, reduce the amount of plastic waste that ends up in landfills, incinerators, and that enters the environment as pollution, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions associated with plastic production.
Short-term milestone: Use mining waste to produce critical minerals (1)

By March 2024, develop 5 technologies to recuperate critical minerals from mining waste

Short-term milestone: Build Indigenous community capacity to participate in critical minerals and metals projects (1)

Engage and partner with Indigenous communities to ensure they benefit from investments in critical minerals and natural resource development:

  • By the end of 2024, create a National Benefits-Sharing Framework
  • By the end of 2025, expand the Indigenous Partnerships Office and the Indigenous Natural Resource Partnerships program
Short-term milestone: Address contaminated sites (1)

By March 31, 2025, 60% of Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan eligible sites are closed or in long-term monitoring

Theme: Zero-emission vehicles

Target: Light-duty zero-emission vehicle sales (2)

For the 2030 model year, at least 60% of new light-duty vehicle sales are zero-emission vehicles, and 100% of vehicle sales will be zero-emission vehicles for the 2035 model year* (Minister of Transport; Minister of Environment and Climate Change)

Indicator (i)

Proportion of new light-duty vehicle registrations that are zero-emission vehicles

This indicator tracks the number of new zero-emission light-duty vehicles that are registered in Canada annually and will be used as a proxy for the number of vehicles of a given model year that are offered for sale. In 2021, there were 86,032 new zero-emission light-duty vehicles registered in Canada, up (+31,679) from 2020. Zero-emission vehicle market share increased to 5.6% in 2021 from 3.8% in 2020 and 3% in 2019. *Note that the regulatory structure may allow for variations in vehicle numbers from one model year to the next.

Target: Medium- and heavy-duty zero-emission vehicle sales (2)

Aim is to have 35% of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles sales being zero- emission by 2030 and 100% by 2040 for a subset of vehicle types based on feasibility (Minister of Transport; Minister of Environment and Climate Change)

Indicator (i)

Proportion of new medium- and heavy-duty vehicle sales that are zero-emission vehicles

This indicator tracks the number of new zero-emission medium- and heavy-duty vehicles that are registered in Canada annually. Baseline data to come.

Short-term milestone: Make progress toward the light-duty zero-emission vehicle sales target (2)

For the 2026 model year, at least 20% of the new light-duty vehicles that are offered for sale will be zero-emission vehicles.

Short-term milestone: Decarbonize on-road freight (2)

By the end of 2022 to 2023, develop a strategy to decarbonize on-road freight.

Update

The Government of Canada released Canada’s Action Plan for Clean On-Road Transportation, which includes actions for decarbonizing on-road freight. The plan covers initiatives announced and implemented since 2016 to help Canadians and Canadian businesses make the switch to zero-emission vehicles and outlines the Government’s plan to reduce emissions from on-road transportation in support of achieving net-zero emissions by 2050.

Status: Achieved

Source: Transport Canada, 2022

Short-term milestone: Establish interim zero-emission vehicle sales targets (2)

Develop a regulation to require 100% of new medium- and heavy- duty vehicles offered for sale be zero-emission vehicles by 2040 for a subset of vehicle types based on feasibility, with interim 2030 regulated requirements that would vary for different vehicle categories based on feasibility, and explore interim targets for the mid-2020s.

Theme:  Federal leadership on responsible consumption

Target: Non-hazardous operational waste diversion (3)

By 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 75% by weight of non-hazardous operational waste (All Ministers)

Indicator (i)

Percentage of non-hazardous operational waste diversion from landfill by weight

This indicator tracks the annual diversion of waste from landfill of non-hazardous operational waste from internal federal operations.

Target: Construction and demolition waste diversion (3)

By 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 90% by weight of all construction and demolition waste (All Ministers)

Indicator (i)

Percentage of construction and demolition waste diversion from landfill by weight

This indicator tracks the annual diversion of waste from landfill for construction and demolition waste from internal federal operations.

Target: Net-zero procurement (3)

The Government of Canada's procurement of goods and services will be net-zero emissions by 2050, to aid the transition to a net-zero, circular economy (All Ministers)

The Greening Government Strategy outlines specific measures to ensure responsible consumption for internal operations. Federal organizations are responsible for implementing the Greening Government Strategy, and may report progress as appropriate in their departmental sustainable development strategy. Consideration of environmental impacts will be incorporated into the procurement of goods and services, prioritizing high impact categories including light-duty on-road vehicles, low carbon fuels, construction materials and electricity.

Indicator(i)

Percentage of standing offers and supply arrangements available to federal departments for the purchase of goods and services that include criteria that address environmental considerations such as greenhouse gas emissions reduction, plastics waste reduction and/or broader environmental benefits.

This indicator shows the extent to which the procurement instruments of central procurement organizations target sustainably produced goods and services.

Indicator(i)

Percentage of light-duty on-road fleet that comprises zero-emissions vehicles, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

This indicator shows the extent to which zero-emissions vehicles are being purchased annually for the conventional light-duty on-road fleet to achieve a 100% zero-emission vehicle fleet by 2030. The conventional fleet does not include national safety and security vehicles.

Indicator (i)

Percentage electricity consumption from clean electricity generation.

This indicator shows the extent to which clean electricity is being purchased for internal operations.

Short-term milestone: Purchase zero-emission vehicles (3)

Each year, at least 75% of purchases of new light-duty, on-road fleet vehicles for the conventional fleet will be zero-emission vehicles or hybrids, where suitable options are available and meet operational feasibility. Priority is to be given to purchasing zero emission vehicles.

Short-term milestone: Purchase low-carbon intensity fuels for air and marine fleets (3)

Between fiscal year 2023 to 2024 and fiscal year 2030 to 2031, a cumulative total of at least 300 million litres of low-carbon intensity fuels will be purchased for federal air and marine operations.

Short-term milestone: Achieve total clean electricity use in federal real property (3)

By 2025, use 100% clean electricity in federal real property including producing or purchasing renewable electricity.

Short-term milestone: Characterize the waste stream (3)
  • Complete waste audits for a representative sample of most major facilities, to enable quantification and characterization of operational waste.
  • Complete planning and tracking for applicable projects to enable quantification of construction and demolition waste.
Contextual indicator: Human exposure to harmful substances (i)

The federal government monitors concentrations of many substances, including mercury, lead, cadmium and bisphenol A in the Canadian population through the Canadian Health Measures Survey. For the 5 survey cycles from 2007 to 2017:

  • the average concentrations of mercury remained stable
  • the average concentrations of lead showed a declining trend, with a decrease of 28% between Cycle 1 and Cycle 5
  • the average concentrations of cadmium showed a declining trend in the total population, with a decrease of 18% between Cycle 1 and Cycle 5
  • the average concentrations of bisphenol A showed a declining trend, with a decrease of 33% between Cycle 1 and Cycle 5
Contextual indicator: Plastic packaging (i)

This indicator will track the average percentage of resins commonly used in packaging that are recycled (Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), Low-density polyethylene (LDPE), High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and Polypropylene (PP)), beginning the year after the regulation comes into force. The percentage rates will be determined through regulatory development, which is currently underway. This indicator will provide additional context to the plastic pollution target.

Contextual indicator: Total waste diversion (i)

This indicator covers only companies and local waste management organizations that reported non-hazardous recyclable material preparation activities, refers only to that material entering the waste stream and does not cover any waste that may be managed on-site by a company or household. In 2018, the total from all sources of all diverted materials was 9,817,607 tonnes in all of Canada.

Implementation strategies and departmental actions

Implementation strategies and departmental actions

Theme:  Management of waste, resources and chemicals

Implementation strategy: Implement the Single-Use Plastics Prohibition Regulations (1)

Implement regulations that aim to prevent plastic pollution by prohibiting the manufacture, import and sale of 6 categories of single-use plastics that pose a threat to the environment: checkout bags, cutlery, certain foodservice ware, ring carriers, stir sticks and straws.

Implementation strategy: Work with provinces and territories through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) to implement the Canada-wide Strategy on Zero Plastic Waste (1)

Continue to implement, and accelerate implementation where possible, the CCME's Phase 1 and 2 Action Plans on Zero Plastic Waste, for completion by 2025.

Implementation strategy: Advance the circular economy in Canada (1)

Work with industry, other governments and stakeholders to advance a more circular economy in Canada to reduce emissions and waste, and promote more sustainable consumption and production.

Implementation strategy: Assess and manage risks from chemicals and harmful substances (1)

Assess new substances and address existing substance priorities to determine risks to Canadians and the environment, develop and implement regulatory and non-regulatory instruments to manage those risks, and communicate relevant information in a timely and clear way to Canadians, the private sector and governments.

Implementation strategy: Deliver efficient food systems (1)

Reduce food loss and waste at all stages of the food supply chain, helping to make our diverse food systems more efficient and more environmentally, socially and economically sustainable.

Implementation strategy: Boost the supply of critical minerals for the green and digital economy (1)

Through the Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy, work with provinces and territories, Indigenous organizations, key industry stakeholders and international partners to advance the development of critical mineral resources and value chains to power the green and digital economy in Canada and around the world.

Implementation strategy: Continue review of pesticides (1)

Re-evaluate pesticides currently on the Canadian market by applying modern, evidence-based scientific approaches to assess whether they are still acceptable, and when alerted to potential issues, conduct a special review to determine continued acceptability. Implement regulatory decisions to protect the health of Canadians and the environment from risks associated with the use of pesticides.

Implementation strategy: Reduce methane emissions from municipal solid waste landfills (1)

Through the development of new federal regulations, increase the number of landfills across Canada that collect and treat methane.

Implementation strategy: Remediate high-priority contaminated sites (1)

Reduce environmental and human health risks from known federal contaminated sites and associated federal financial liabilities, focusing on the highest priority sites.

Implementation strategy: Research innovative solutions for plastics (1)

Undertake innovative approaches, including conducting new research and fostering domestic capacity to reduce and better manage plastic waste. Conduct studies to identify gaps, challenges and best practices related to circular economy for plastics to inform decision making that will result in implementing regulatory measures around the circularity of plastics in Canada.

Theme:  Zero-emission vehicles

Implementation strategy: Develop regulations and programs that support light-duty zero-emission vehicles (2)

Develop regulations and programs to support the deployment of new zero-emission light-duty vehicles in Canada. Continue to deliver the Incentives for Zero-Emission Vehicles Program and the 100% tax write-off for business investments in eligible zero-emission vehicles. These measures will help make these technologies more affordable and more accessible to Canadians and Canadian businesses.

Implementation strategy: Accelerate regulatory readiness through the Zero Emission Trucking Program (2)

Undertake safety testing and support provinces and territories to develop, modernize, and align codes, standards and regulations for zero emission trucking. Evaluate emerging technologies in Canadian conditions to inform regulatory development and invest in facility upgrades at the Motor Vehicle Test Centre to increase MHZEV testing capabilities.

Implementation strategy: Develop regulations that support medium- and heavy-duty zero-emission vehicles (2)

Develop regulations to support the deployment of new medium- and heavy-duty zero-emission vehicles in Canada.

Implementation strategy: Make zero-emission vehicles more affordable and improve supply (2)

Accelerate the adoption of medium- and heavy-duty zero-emission vehicles by implementing a new purchase incentive program. These measures will help make these technologies more affordable and more accessible to Canadians and Canadian businesses.

Implementation strategy: Work with partners in the transportation sector (2)

Work with partners, including industry, non-governmental organizations and other levels of government on issues related to the transportation sector, such as zero-emission vehicles and the battery value chain.

Theme:  Federal leadership on responsible consumption

Implementation strategy: Disclose embodied carbon in construction (3)

Starting in 2022, beginning with concrete, disclose the amount of embodied carbon in the structural materials of major construction projects.

Implementation strategy: Incentivize supplier disclosure (3)

Starting in 2023, incentivize major suppliers to adopt a science-based target in line with the Paris Agreement, and to disclose their greenhouse gas emissions and environmental performance information.

Implementation strategy: Transform the federal light-duty fleet (3)

Fleet management and renewal will be optimized with the objective that the conventional light-duty on-road fleet comprises 100% zero-emission vehicles by 2030, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

Implementation strategy: Strengthen green procurement criteria (3)

Develop criteria that address greenhouse gas emissions reduction for goods and services that have a high environmental impact; ensure the criteria are included in procurements; and support green procurement, including guidance, tools and training for public service employees.

 

Responsibilities and contributions of federal organizations

Responsibilities and contributions of federal organizations

1Target theme: Management of waste, resources and chemicals
FSDS component Title Supports Goal and/or Target Responsible organization(s)
Target By 2030, the amount of single-use plastics that is entering the environment as pollution will be reduced by 5% and that is sent to landfill by 3% Supports the goal Minister of Environment and Climate Change
Target Reduce the amount of waste Canadians send to disposal from a baseline of 699 kilograms per person in 2014 to 490 kilograms per person by 2030 (a 30% reduction); and to 350 kilograms per person by 2040 (a 50% reduction) Supports the goal Minister of Environment and Climate Change, as federal lead in the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment
Milestone Finalize the Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy Supports the goal Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Implement the Chemicals Management Plan Supports the goal

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Health Canada

Milestone Reduce food loss and waste Supports the goal Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
Milestone Regulate plastics in the economy Supports the goal Environment and Climate Change Canada
Milestone Use mining waste to produce critical minerals Supports the goal Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Build Indigenous community capacity to participate in critical minerals and metals projects Supports the goal Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Address contaminated sites Supports the goal Environment and Climate Change Canada
Implementation Strategy Implement the Single-Use Plastics Prohibition Regulations Supports the goal and the Single-Use Plastics Target Environment and Climate Change Canada
Implementation Strategy Work with provinces and territories through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) to implement the Canada-wide Strategy on Zero Plastic Waste Supports Goal and the Waste Reduction Target Environment and Climate Change Canada
Implementation Strategy Advance the circular economy in Canada Supports the goal Environment and Climate Change Canada
Implementation Strategy Assess and manage risks from chemicals and harmful substances Supports the goal

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Health Canada

Implementation Strategy Deliver efficient food systems Supports the goal

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Implementation Strategy Boost the supply of critical minerals for the green and digital economy Supports the goal Natural Resources Canada
Implementation Strategy Continue review of pesticides Supports the goal Health Canada
Implementation Strategy Reduce methane emissions from municipal solid waste landfills Supports the goal Environment and Climate Change Canada
Implementation Strategy Remediate high-priority contaminated sites Supports the goal

Canada Border Services Agency

Correctional Service Canada

Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Health Canada

Indigenous Services Canada

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc.

National Capital Commission

National Defence

National Research Council of Canada

Parks Canada

Public Service and Procurement Canada

Transport Canada

Implementation Strategy Research innovative solutions for plastics Supports the goal

Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

National Research Council of Canada

Statistics Canada

Transport Canada

2Target theme: Zero-emission vehicles
FSDS component Title Supports Goal and/or Target Responsible organization(s)
Target For the 2030 model year, at least 60% of new light-duty vehicle sales are zero-emission vehicles, and 100% of vehicle sales will be zero-emission vehicles for the 2035 model year Supports the goal

Minister of Transport

Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Target Aim is to have 35% of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles sales being zero-emission by 2030 and 100% by 2040 for a subset of vehicle types based on feasibility Supports the goal

Minister of Transport

Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Milestone Make progress toward the light-duty zero-emission vehicle sales target Supports the goal and the Light-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicle Sales Target

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Transport Canada

Milestone Decarbonize on-road freight Supports the goal and the Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicle Sales Target Transport Canada
Milestone Establish interim zero-emission vehicle sales targets Supports the goal and the Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicle Sales Target

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Transport Canada

Implementation Strategy Develop regulations and programs that support light-duty zero-emission vehicles Supports the goal and the Light-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicle Sales Target

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Transport Canada

Implementation Strategy Accelerate regulatory readiness through the Zero Emission Trucking Program Supports the goal and the Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicle Sales Target Transport Canada
Implementation Strategy Develop regulations that support medium- and heavy-duty zero-emission vehicles Supports the goal and the Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicle Sales Target Environment and Climate Change Canada
Implementation Strategy Make zero-emission vehicles more affordable and improve supply Supports the goal and the Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicle Sales Target

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Transport Canada

Implementation Strategy Work with partners in the transportation sector Supports the goal

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

Transport Canada

3Target theme: Federal leadership on responsible consumption
FSDS component Title Supports Goal and/or Target Responsible organization(s)
Target By 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 75% by weight of non-hazardous operational waste Supports the goal All Ministers
Target By 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 90% by weight of all construction and demolition waste Supports the goal All Ministers
Target The Government of Canada’s procurement of goods and services will be net-zero emissions by 2050, to aid the transition to a net-zero, circular economy Supports the goal All Ministers
Milestone Purchase zero-emission vehicles Supports the goal and the Net-Zero Procurement Target All federal organizations owning conventional fleets, as reported to Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Milestone Purchase low-carbon intensity fuels for air and marine fleets Supports the goal and the Net-Zero Procurement Target

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

National Defence

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Milestone Achieve total clean electricity use in federal real property Supports the goal and the Net-Zero Procurement Target All federal organizations owning real property, as reported to Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Milestone Characterize the waste stream Supports the goal and both Waste Diversion Targets All federal organizations owning real property, as reported to Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Implementation strategy Disclose embodied carbon in construction Supports the goal and the Net-Zero Procurement Target

National Defence

Public Services and Procurement Canada

Implementation strategy Incentivize supplier disclosure Supports the goal and the Net-Zero Procurement Target

National Defence

Public Services and Procurement Canada

Implementation strategy Transform the federal light-duty fleet Supports the goal and the Net-Zero Procurement Target All federal organizations owning conventional fleets
Implementation strategy Strengthen green procurement criteria Supports the goal and the Net-Zero Procurement Target All federal organizations
Implementation strategy Maximize diversion of waste from landfills Supports the goal and both Waste Diversion Targets All federal organizations owning real property

Performance measurement

iIndicators supporting the goal and contextual indicators
Indicator type Target Indicator Source Update cycle
Target By 2030, the amount of single-use plastics that are entering the environment as pollution will be reduced by 5% and that are sent to landfill by 3% Compliance with the Single-Use Plastic Prohibition Regulations Environment and Climate Change Canada Indicator under development
Target Reduce the amount of waste Canadians send to disposal from a baseline of 699 kilograms per person in 2014 to 490 kilograms per person by 2030 (a 30% reduction); and to 350 kilograms per person by 2040 (a 50% reduction) Solid waste diversion and disposal CESI Every 2 years
Target For the 2030 model year, at least 60% of new light-duty vehicle sales are zero-emission vehicles, and 100% of vehicle sales will be zero-emission vehicles for the 2035 model year* Proportion of new light-duty vehicle registrations that are zero-emission vehicles * Transport Canada Annual
Target Aim is to have 35% of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles sales being zero-emission by 2030 and 100% by 2040 for a subset of vehicle types based on feasibility Proportion of new medium- and heavy-duty vehicle registrations that are zero-emission vehicles Transport Canada Indicator under development
Target By 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 75% by weight of non-hazardous operational waste Percentage of non-hazardous operational waste diversion from landfill by weight Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Annual
Target By 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 90% by weight of all construction and demolition waste Percentage of construction and demolition waste diversion from landfill by weight Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Annual
Target The Government of Canada’s procurement of goods and services will be net-zero emissions by 2050, to aid the transition to a net-zero, circular economy Percentage of standing offers and supply arrangements available to federal departments for the purchase of goods and services that include criteria that address environmental considerations such as greenhouse gas emissions reduction, plastics waste reduction and/or broader environmental benefits Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat with data from Public Service and Procurement Canada Annual
Percentage of light-duty on-road fleet that comprises zero-emissions vehicles, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Annual
Percentage electricity consumption from clean electricity generation Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Annual
Contextual Human exposure to harmful substances CESI Every 3 years
Plastic packaging Environment and Climate Change Canada Indicator under development
Total waste diversion Statistics Canada Every 2 years

*Indicators that have also been included in the Canadian Indicator Framework.

For more detailed information see Strengthening transparency and accountability.

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