Woodland Caribou (Boreal population) with Cold Lake First Nations: conservation agreement

Agreement for the conservation of the Woodland Caribou, Boreal population with Cold Lake First Nations

This Agreement for the conservation of Boreal Caribou is made in duplicate as of December 13, 2019, pursuant to Section 11 of the Species at Risk Act, S.C. 2002, c. 29.
between
Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada,
as represented by the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change responsible for the Department of the Environment
(“Canada” or “Environment and Climate Change Canada” “ECCC”)
and
Cold Lake First Nations,
as represented by its Chief and Council (“CLFN”)
(individually, a "Party", collectively, the "Parties")

Preamble

Whereas the Woodland Caribou, Boreal population (“Boreal Caribou”) is a species that has been listed as threatened under the federal Species at Risk Act (“SARA”), SC 2002, c 29;

Whereas the Parties wish to cooperate in identifying and taking Conservation Measures to support recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou;

Whereas the Parties agree that the geographic area covered by the Agreement includes the Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range and those portions of the Range that overlap with the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range (“CLAWR”);

Whereas Canada has legislative responsibility for wildlife species listed on Schedule 1 of SARA, including with regards to the recovery and protection of individuals, residences and critical habitat of listed wildlife species;

Whereas Alberta has legislative responsibility for, among other things, environmental protection and the administration of provincial lands, the conservation and development of natural resources, and for wildlife within the province of Alberta;

Whereas the Parties acknowledge the recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou habitat is essential to the conservation of the species;

Whereas the Parties acknowledge the essential role of Indigenous Peoples in the conservation of wildlife;

Whereas the people of CLFN (the Denesoun'lini) traditionally lived in and derived their livelihood from lands in Alberta and Saskatchewan, some of which are now included in the CLAWR, and are described by CLFN in Appendix A;

Whereas the people of CLFN wish to continue to use such lands for harvesting and other purposes in the future;

Whereas after the CLAWR was established in 1952 the Denesoun'lini were removed from and prevented from living in or having access to the CLAWR and lost the support and sustenance of their traditional use lands;

Whereas an Access Agreement was subsequently entered into by CLFN, Canada and Alberta, providing for access by CLFN for traditional use activities in the CLAWR;

Whereas the Parties recognize that Indigenous perspectives and participation should inform all aspects of this Agreement and the measures set out herein;

Whereas Boreal Caribou is recognized as being of cultural significance to CLFN;

Whereas the decline of Boreal Caribou in the Cold Lake Range has impaired the important relationship existing between CLFN and Boreal Caribou;

Whereas section 11 of SARA provides that conservation agreements may be used to benefit a species at risk or enhance its survival in the wild, and provides the competent ministers with the authority to enter into conservation agreements with any other government, organization or person to benefit a species at risk or enhance its survival in the wild;

Whereas Canada and Alberta intend to execute a separate agreement to provide a province-wide framework for government cooperation on Boreal Caribou recovery and protection in the province of Alberta;

Whereas the Parties intend this Agreement to provide a framework for Nation-to-Nation cooperation on the recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou;

Whereas other organizations and persons may collaborate with the Parties in the recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou. Without limiting the foregoing, such potential collaborators include other Indigenous Peoples, natural resource companies, municipalities, non-governmental organizations, recreational hunters, and other stakeholders;

Whereas the Defence Controlled Access Regulations (SOR/86-957, as amended), under the National Defence Act, regulate access to, exclusion from and safety and conduct of persons in, on or about any defence establishment, work for defence or materiel, which includes the CLAWR; and

Whereas interested parties requesting access to the CLAWR must abide by the conditions set out in the 1986 Memorandum of Agreement (“MOA”) between the Government of Alberta and Canada and administered by the Department of National Defence (“DND”); DND will consider access requests in support of Conservation Measures for the recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou under this Agreement subject to the MOA and the National Defence Act.

Now therefore, the Parties commit to the following:

1. Definitions

 “Agreement” means this Agreement as it may have been, or may from time to time be amended, supplemented, restated, novated or replaced and includes all appendices to it.

Alberta” means Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Alberta, as represented by the Minister of Environment and Parks.

CLAWR” means the Alberta portion of the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range having the boundaries shown in Appendix B.

Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range” or “Cold Lake Range” refers to the Cold Lake (AB10) Boreal Caribou Range as outlined in the 2012 federal Recovery Strategy.

Conservation Measures” means the coordinated activities to be undertaken by the Parties for the benefit of Boreal Caribou as set out in the Tables to Appendix C to this Agreement.

Critical Habitat” means the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a species and for the purpose of this Agreement represents the critical habitat as designated in the 2012 federal Recovery Strategy and includes any amendments or updates to the federal Recovery Strategy.

Effective Date” means the date this Agreement takes effect as per the date of the last signature affixed to this Agreement.

Indigenous Peoples” has the meaning assigned by the definition of Aboriginal Peoples of Canada in subsection 35(2) of The Constitution Act, 1982.

Indigenous Rights” means the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights, recognized and affirmed by section 35 of The Constitution Act, 1982.

Range Plans” refers to a document that demonstrates how the habitat condition within a given range will be managed over time and space to ensure that critical habitat for Boreal Caribou is protected from destruction and therein, that each local population will either continue to be self-sustaining or become self-sustaining over time.

Recovery Strategy” means the federal “Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), Boreal population, in Canada” published in 2012 under the Species at Risk Act, and includes any amendments or updates to the Recovery Strategy.  

2. Goals and purpose

2.1 The goal of this Agreement is to provide a framework for the collaboration of the Parties, and to set out and confirm the actions that the Parties have agreed to take in order to support the achievement of a self-sustaining population in the Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range, consistent with the population and distribution objectives in the Recovery Strategy, that will support traditional Indigenous harvesting activities, consistent with existing Indigenous Rights (hereinafter referred to as the “Shared Recovery Objective”).

2.2 The purposes of this Agreement are to:

  1. Develop and implement Conservation Measures that will be taken by the Parties within the lifespan of this Agreement, to support achievement of the Shared Recovery Objective; and
  2. Provide a mechanism for the Parties to implement the Conservation Measures and collaborate to address key knowledge gaps and technical, governance or administrative issues with respect to Boreal Caribou recovery and protection, including with potential collaborators appointment to the Committee outlined in section 6 of this Agreement, that have a direct interest in the recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou within the CLAWR.

3. Principles

3.1 Collaboration: The Parties will work together to achieve a common understanding of Conservation Measures needed for Boreal Caribou recovery and protection and will cooperate in the development and implementation of these Conservation Measures in a manner that integrates socio-economic considerations, minimizes duplication, maximizes efficiency, respects jurisdictional roles and responsibilities, and respects operational considerations, including national defence considerations, in the CLAWR.

3.2 Reconciliation: The Parties agree that the implementation of this Agreement shall be guided by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and informed by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call for Action.

3.3 Use of best available information: The Parties shall obtain, exchange, and use the best available scientific information and Indigenous knowledge to develop and perform the Conservation Measures set out in Appendix C, including information derived from Indigenous knowledge, provincial Range Plans, and the federal Recovery Strategy.

3.4 Adaptive management: As recovery of threatened species is an emerging discipline, the Parties acknowledge the necessity of comparative tests and monitoring the effects of Conservation Measures, adjusting approaches as necessary to improve recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou. The Parties shall make best efforts to amend the Conservation Measures in accordance with this Agreement where warranted, including by adaptive management or further and better scientific information and Indigenous knowledge.

3.5 Transparency: The Parties will share information related to the Conservation Measures, including their performance, with each other. Before granting public access to such information in accordance with applicable law, any Party will strive to obtain consent from the other Party. The Parties agree that the CLFN’s Indigenous knowledge is culturally sensitive, confidential to the CLFN, and shall not be publicly disclosed without consent of the CLFN, except as required by law. The Parties agree that information and knowledge related to activities of national security are confidential to DND, and shall not be shared or disclosed, publicly or otherwise, without consent of DND.

3.6 Indigenous-led: CLFN have a long-term, meaningful leadership role in the performance of the Conservation Measures to recover and protect Boreal Caribou.  

3.7 Engagement: The Parties shall seek opportunities to engage with partners and stakeholders as collaborators in Boreal Caribou recovery and protection, including implementation of Conservation Measures.

3.8 Intergenerational: The Parties acknowledge and value the need to ensure knowledge, values and capacity are transferred and supported over time and across generations.

3.9 Capacity Building: The Parties acknowledge that the key to long-term success is the building of capacity within CLFN. ECCC will seek all available opportunities to build CLFN’s capacity to carry out Conservation Measures for Boreal Caribou.

3.10 Jurisdiction: The Parties acknowledge that the implementation of Conservation Measures considered under this Agreement may be within the jurisdiction, and/or subject to the approval of the Government of Alberta.

3.11 Access: Where access to property under the administration and control of third parties is necessary to carry out Conservation Measures, the Parties recognize the need for access to be obtained through agreements with, or approvals from the owners, occupiers or custodians of those properties. However, the Parties acknowledge that despite their efforts to obtain access from third parties for the purposes of carrying out Conservation Measures, obtaining access from third parties may not be possible and delivery of Conservation Measures may be delayed or prevented.

4. Interpretation

4.1 The Preamble hereof and any Appendices hereto form an integral part of this Agreement.

4.2 This Agreement does not create or alter any new legal powers or duties on the part of the Parties nor does it alter the powers and duties established by SARA, the National Defence Act or any other federal or provincial legislation.

4.3 The Parties do not relinquish or acquire any jurisdiction, right, power, privilege, prerogative, immunity, or Access by virtue of this Agreement.

4.4 For greater certainty, nothing in this Agreement should be interpreted as limiting the right of any person to engage in activities referred to in section 83 of SARA, subject to any applicable conditions prescribed in that section.

4.5 Nothing in this Agreement is intended or will be construed to reduce or limit any obligation the Government of Canada may have to accommodate, mitigate or compensate for any infringement of any of the Indigenous Rights of CLFN or any other Indigenous Peoples.

4.6 Nothing in this Agreement is intended to limit, alter, supersede, or put the Parties into non-compliance with any obligations that any Party may have with any other person under any other agreement, protocol, or memorandum of understanding, including any agreements between the Government of Alberta and the Government of Canada.

4.7 Each of the Parties represent and warrant that the undersigned have the authority to enter into this Agreement on behalf of their respective Party.

5. Recovery measures for Boreal Caribou

5.1 The Parties acknowledge that:

  1. recovery will require a landscape-level approach over many years, and adaptive management will be required to ensure that Conservation Measures performed in accordance with this Agreement, are monitored and as necessary, improved and adapted to incorporate new information or changed circumstances;
  2. determining appropriate Conservation Measures is a multifaceted and complex undertaking that requires the Parties’ separate and collective analysis of biological, jurisdictional, social, economic, natural resource related tenures, and the rights and interests of the CLFN;
  3. Boreal Caribou recovery and protection requires both short- and long-term actions to protect and restore habitat, increase recruitment, and manage mortality;
  4. some factors directly influencing Boreal Caribou recovery and protection are outside the control of the Parties, which may include the effects of climate change, fire, or other naturally occurring events;
  5. recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou may be addressed in part through changes in decision-making, but may also require legislative or regulatory change, which is subject to legislative and regulatory processes and timeframes (including engagement and the Crown duty to consult and accommodate); and
  6. recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou in the CLAWR will be best served through alignment of the Conservation Measures with Government of Alberta statutes, regulations, policies, Range Plans, and other provincial recovery initiatives, where relevant.

5.2 The Parties agree to pursue the Shared Recovery Objective, consistent with the objectives for Boreal Caribou set out in the federal Recovery Strategy.

5.3 The Parties shall forthwith, or within the timelines provided by this Agreement and Appendix C, perform, within their power or authority, the activities outlined in Appendix C.

5.4 The Parties recognize that, for the Shared Recovery Objective to be achieved, activities must extend beyond the life of this Agreement, and must be aligned with other relevant conservation measures being taken.

5.5 The Parties shall assess the results of Conservation Measures performed, and use the information obtained to develop and propose revisions or add to the Conservation Measures, with reasonable efforts to amend this Agreement, accordingly.

6. Governance

6.1 The Parties’ officials referred to in section 13 shall administer and implement this Agreement.

6.2 The Parties shall establish a Committee for Boreal Caribou Conservation (“Committee”) to administer and implement this Agreement upon the Effective Date, with a representative from each Party as co-chairs of the Committee. The Parties will seek recommendations for appointments to the Committee from each Party as well as ensure the participation from other potential collaborators in Committee meetings (for example, DND, Natural Resources Canada, Government of Alberta, industry), as relevant.

6.3 The Committee will be responsible for:        

  1. developing terms of reference for the Committee, including the process for appointments to the Committee, consistent with the terms of this Agreement;
  2. providing advice with respect to the implementation of this Agreement, including with regards to monitoring and reporting on the commitments in this Agreement; and
  3. under the direction of the Parties, facilitating communication, coordination and, where relevant, implementation of Conservation Measures, consistent with the Shared Recovery Objective of this Agreement, including with collaborators that are not Parties to this Agreement.

7. Information sharing

7.1 Each Party shall, subject to any applicable data sharing arrangements and legislative provisions, provide the other Party access at no charge to all available data and information relevant to this Agreement and its performance, including, without limitation, information on the status, conservation, and recovery of Boreal Caribou, including habitat protection, restoration and other Conservation Measures.

7.2 The Parties acknowledge that some information may relate to national security activities and may be confidential to DND, and may therefore be withheld by DND.

7.3 The Parties acknowledge that some information may be third party oil and gas industry operator information and may be confidential to, and withheld from disclosure by such third parties.

7.4 Some data and information may be confidential. Where a Party identifies information as being confidential, the other Party shall hold and treat that information as confidential.

8. Financial arrangements and support

8.1 Acknowledging the significant financial expense required to support Boreal Caribou recovery and protection, the Parties shall identify financial needs, priorities and funding opportunities to implement Conservation Measures identified in this Agreement.

8.2 The Parties recognize that implementation of this Agreement is subject to their respective appropriations, priorities, legal jurisdictions and budgetary constraints.

8.3 The Parties acknowledge that CLFN requires capacity funding to perform duties and actions described in this Agreement.

8.4 The terms and conditions by which funding may be provided by Canada for this Agreement will be set out in a separate funding agreement. For greater certainty, Canada shall be guided by its applicable policies when developing and negotiating any funding agreements, including those that may arise in the event of successful applications for funding from the Canada Nature Fund.

8.5 This Agreement does not create a requirement for any collaborator to provide financial contributions. It is understood that if any collaborator is in a position to provide financial contributions to support implementation of Conservation Measures in Appendix C, this will be provided for outside of this Agreement and will be subject to appropriations, priorities, and budgetary constraints of the collaborators.

9. Monitoring and reporting

9.1 The Parties agree to convene annually to review and document progress on the implementation of Conservation Measures.

9.2 The Parties shall prepare annual reports, on a fiscal year basis, regarding the status of Conservation Measures prescribed by Appendix C.

9.3 Annual reports will be used to inform reporting requirements under sections 46, 63, and paragraph 126(c) of SARA. The Parties, and potential collaborators, may be requested to provide further details regarding activities, to support Canada in meeting these reporting requirements under SARA.

9.4 The annual reports will address, among other things:

  1. progress toward the Parties’ commitments under this Agreement;
  2. progress toward achieving jointly agreed milestones in relation to Conservation Measures;
  3. the effectiveness of Conservation Measures with respect to achieving the Shared Recovery Objective;
  4. research findings related to the implementation of this Agreement; and
  5. unforeseen circumstances or stochastic events (for example, fire, wildlife disease, forest health issues) that might impact the implementation of Conservation Measures or the achievement of the Shared Recovery Objective.

9.5 Based on the review outlined in section 9.1, the Parties will evaluate the actions and propose any additional commitments or modifications, which may be required to increase the likelihood of achieving the Shared Recovery Objective described in this Agreement or otherwise expedite the recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou.

9.6 Annual reports shall be used to inform discussions on renewal of this Agreement.

10. Term, termination and renewal

10.1 The Agreement shall come in force on the Effective Date and terminate on March 31, 2023, unless otherwise terminated in accordance with this Agreement.

10.2 Either Party may terminate this Agreement by giving ninety (90) days written notice of termination to the other Party provided the dispute resolution process identified in section 12 of this Agreement is unsuccessful in resolving disputes.

10.3 The Parties acknowledge that a failure to perform this Agreement may be grounds for any Party to terminate in accordance with this section. Without limiting the foregoing, the Parties acknowledge that any failure to perform the Conservation Measures constitutes a failure permitting termination in accordance with this section. Any Party electing to terminate in accordance with this section shall first attempt to consult with the other Party to resolve any dispute and to attempt to ensure performance of this Agreement in accordance with the dispute resolution process identified in section 12 of this Agreement.

10.4 On written consent by all Parties, before or after termination, this Agreement or any part of it may be renewed, or its term extended, until the Shared Recovery Objective is achieved.

11. Amendment

11.1 This Agreement and any part of it may be amended from time to time by written consent of the Parties.

12. Dispute resolution

12.1 Subject to the terms of this Agreement, if a disagreement arises concerning the interpretation or implementation of this Agreement (any such disagreement being a “Dispute”), the Parties will make good faith efforts to attempt to resolve the Dispute, including by participating in the following dispute resolution processes:

  1. the Party raising the Dispute will deliver to the other Party a written summary of the issues in the Dispute along with proposed measures to resolve the Dispute;
  2. within 30 days of receipt of notice of the Dispute, senior decision-makers of the Parties will meet (in person or by telephone) and seek to resolve the Dispute;
  3. if the Dispute remains unresolved after the meeting of senior decision-makers, the Parties may, under terms mutually agreeable, utilize non-binding dispute resolution processes, including facilitation, mediation, or obtaining independent technical or legal advice; and
  4. if the Dispute remains unresolved after ninety (90) days from the conclusion of the non-binding resolution processes, at the request of either Party, the Agreement termination process outlined in section 10 may be entered.

13. Designation for implementation of this agreement

13.1 For the purposes of this Agreement, the Representatives from each Party are:

  1. CLFN - the Chief and Council of CLFN; and
  2. Canada - the Associate Assistant Deputy Minister of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment and Climate Change Canada.

13.2 The day-to-day administration and implementation of this Agreement will be carried out on behalf of Canada by officials of the Canadian Wildlife Service, ECCC. Officials of the Canadian Wildlife Service, ECCC, will invite officials of DND to participate in the day-to-day administration and implementation of the Agreement as it pertains to access considerations to the CLAWR.

13.3 The day-to-day administration and implementation of this Agreement will be carried out on behalf of CLFN by officials of CLFN.

14. Counterparts

14.1 This Agreement may be signed in several counterparts and each counterpart shall constitute an original document; these counterparts taken together shall constitute one and the same Agreement. The Parties agree that executed counterparts may be transmitted electronically and that such counterparts shall be treated as originally executed instruments. Each Party undertakes to provide the other with a copy of the original Agreement bearing actual original signatures within a reasonable period of time following the execution of this Agreement.

15. Signatures

In witness whereof, the Parties have executed this Agreement.

On behalf of Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by Associate Assistant Deputy Minister of the Canadian Wildlife Service.


__________________________________
Niall O’Dea
Associate Assistant Deputy Minister
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment and Climate Change Canada
Signed this ___________ day of _____________, 2019.

 

On behalf of Cold Lake First Nations, as represented by Chief Roger Marten of Cold Lake First Nations.


__________________________________
Roger Marten
Chief
Cold Lake First Nations
Signed this ___________ day of _____________, 2019.

 

_________________________________
Councillor
Cold Lake First Nations
Signed this ___________ day of _____________, 2019.

 

__________________________________
Councillor
Cold Lake First Nations
Signed this ___________ day of _____________, 2019.

 

__________________________________
Councillor
Cold Lake First Nations
Signed this ___________ day of _____________, 2019.

 

__________________________________
Councillor
Cold Lake First Nations
Signed this ___________ day of _____________, 2019.

Appendix A: Dene Ni Nenne map

Map of Denne Ni Nenne area
Dene Ni Nenne map
Long description

Map showing Dene Ni Nenne, the traditional land use of the Cold Lake First Nations in Canada that spans across the border of central Alberta and central Saskatchewan. The traditional land use of the Cold Lake First Nations boundary is not fixed and is evolving as the community continues to collect land use data from their Elders. The map overlays the boundary of the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range on top of the traditional land use boundary of the Cold Lake First Nations.

Appendix B: The Cold Lake Boreal Caribou range map

Map of Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range
The Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range map

Note: Elements of the agreement apply to the Cold Lake Caribou Range and those portions of the range that overlap with the Cold Lake area weapons range.

Long description

Map showing the overlap of the Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range in Alberta with the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range. The Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range is located in central Alberta, adjacent to the Saskatchewan border. The Cold Lake Air Weapons Range spans across the Alberta and Saskatchewan provincial border.

Appendix C: Conservation measures for Boreal Caribou

Table A: Landscape-level Planning and Habitat Management

Measure 1: Development and Implementation of a Landscape Restoration Plan for Boreal Caribou
Activities Target Timeline Parties to the Agreement Potential Collaboratorsa
  • Continue involvement in and support ongoing landscape restoration planning underway at the Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range multi-partner group.
  • Seek opportunities for involvement in implementation of restoration activities.
  • Year 1: Continued involvement and support of ongoing landscape restoration planning
  • Year 2 - 4: Implementation of activities pursuant to annual work plan(s)

CLFN: Participation and collaboration, as appropriate

ECCC: Funding and other support, as relevant

NRCan: Participation in development of the plan through modeling support, for example.

DND: Participation. Contribute to planning by defining military constraints to land availability and CLAWR access considerations. Contribute to implementation by considering access to the CLAWR without unduly risking safety or military security

Alberta: Provide information to enable alignment with provincial restoration work, and implementation, as required. Lead for the Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range multi-partner group.

Measure 2: Monitoring Restoration Effectiveness
Activities Target Timeline Parties to the Agreement Potential Collaboratorsa
  • Establish a process for tracking restoration activities outlined in measure 1 and determining reforestation success.
  • Create recommendations for certification standards applicable in the Cold Lake Boreal Caribou Range, based on restoration activities in CLAWR.
  • Year 1 - Year 2: Establish process and identification of relevant restoration work
  • Year 3 - Year 4: Track and evaluate restoration work

CLFN: Lead

ECCC: Funding and other support, as relevant

NRCan: Provide techniques for restoration monitoring, share knowledge of best practices, and options on scaling up monitoring of restoration.

DND: Support, as required.

Alberta: Provide information to enable alignment with provincial restoration framework, as required.

Measure 3: Boreal Caribou Habitat Recovery and Protection
Activities Target Timeline Parties to the Agreement Potential Collaboratorsa
  • Explore opportunities and provide recommendations on options for recovery and protection of Boreal Caribou habitat zones.
  • Year 1 - Year 2: Exploration and feasibility study
  • Year 3: Develop and implement recommendations, as appropriate

CLFN: Lead and provide recommendations

ECCC: Support, as relevant

NRCan: Planning and information sharing, as relevant.

DND: Contribute to planning by defining military constraints to land availability and CLAWR access considerations. Contribute to implementation by considering access to the CLAWR without unduly risking safety or military security.

Alberta: Receive recommendations.

Table B: Community capacity development, knowledge braiding and governance

Measure 4: Develop and Implement Dene Law/Principles for Hunting and Conservation
Activities Target Timeline Parties to the Agreement Potential Collaboratorsa
  • Conduct community-based study on Dene Law principles for hunting and conservation that includes elements such as: community harvest, conservation area planning, spiritual elements of harvest and conservation.
  • Year 1: Conduct Study
  • Year 2 - Year 4: Annual Review and Outreach

CLFN: Lead development and continued outreach with communities and stakeholders

ECCC: Funding and other support, as relevant

NRCan: Observe; participation as relevant.

DND: Observe; participation as relevant.

Alberta: Observe; participation as relevant.

Measure 5: Develop and Implement Indigenous Guardians Pilot Program
Activities Target Timelines Parties to the Agreement Potential Collaboratorsa
  • Develop a proposal to and implement an Indigenous Guardians Pilot Program that includes caribou conservation capacity development, development of commercial servicing, youth engagement, training, etc. 
  • Year 1: Develop proposal
  • Year 2 - Year 4: Implement Pilot Program

CLFN: Lead on Indigenous Guardians Pilot Program

ECCC: Funding and other support, as relevant

NRCan: Observe; participation as relevant.

DND: Contribute to planning by defining military constraints to land availability and CLAWR access considerations. Contribute to implementation by considering access to the CLAWR without unduly risking safety or military security.

Alberta: Observe; participation as relevant.

Measure 6: Knowledge, Science and Research
Activities Target Timelines Parties to the Agreement Potential Collaboratorsa
  • Conduct and/or participate in research programs and knowledge gathering for boreal caribou conservation (for example, climate change, habitat restoration, multi-species), and as relevant, linking to Measure 4.
  • Year 1 - Year 4: Conduct research programs

CLFN: pursue collaborative research with NRCan, ECCC, and Alberta

ECCC: Support, as relevant

NRCan: possible co-lead.

DND: Contribute to planning by defining military constraints to land availability and CLAWR access considerations. Contribute to implementation by considering access to the CLAWR without unduly risking safety or military security.

Alberta: Provide information to enable alignment with provincial research.

Table C. Population management

Measure 7: Predator and Alternate Prey Management
Activities Target Timeline Parties to the Agreement Potential Collaboratorsa
  • Explore opportunities and provide recommendations to contribute/enhance predator and alternate prey management, including by building on results from Measure 4, and monitoring of population responses to management actions.
  • Year 1 - Year 2: Explore predator and alternate prey management opportunities
  • Year 3 - Year 4: Implement recommendations, as appropriate

CLFN: Engage Alberta to explore opportunities, including for increased hunting and trapping pressure for predators and alternative prey species, if required and monitoring of population responses, provide recommendations

ECCC: Funding and other support, as relevant

DND: Contribute to planning by defining military constraints to land availability and CLAWR access considerations. Contribute to implementation by considering access to the CLAWR without unduly risking safety or military security.

Alberta: Ongoing delivery of provincial predator management programming in Cold Lake Range; participate in discussions with CLFN on opportunities.

Table D. Population monitoring

Measure 8: Monitoring of Boreal Caribou Population Metrics (for example, population size, population trend, calf recruitment)
Activities Target Timeline Parties to the Agreement Potential Collaboratorsa
  • Explore opportunities and provide recommendations for CLFN participation in population monitoring, including by building on results from Measure 4.
  • Year 1 - Year 2: Identify opportunities for CLFN participation
  • Year 3 - Year 4: Implement recommendations, as appropriate

CLFN: Engage Alberta to explore opportunities for participation and support, provide recommendations

ECCC: Support as required

DND: Contribute to planning by defining military constraints to land availability and CLAWR access considerations. Contribute to implementation by considering access to the CLAWR without unduly risking safety or military security.

Alberta: Ongoing delivery of provincial caribou population monitoring programming, including population size estimates, population trend estimates (for example, DNA analysis, using fecal pellets), and annual calf recruitment surveys.

Measure 9: Boreal Caribou Mortality Surveys
Activities Target Timeline Parties to the Agreement Potential Collaboratorsa
  • Investigate opportunities and provide recommendations for monitoring of mortality in Boreal Caribou (including disease-related, and information on Chronic Wasting Disease) as appropriate/necessary.
  • Year 1: Identify opportunities for CLFN participation
  • Year 2 - 4: Implement recommendations, as appropriate

CLFN: Explore opportunities with Alberta for participation and support, provide recommendations

ECCC: Funding and other support, as relevant

DND: Contribute to planning by defining military constraints to land availability and CLAWR access considerations. Contribute to implementation by considering access to the CLAWR without unduly risking safety or military security.

Alberta: Ongoing provincial delivery of caribou mortality surveys; participate in discussions with CLFN and support monitoring.

a Potential Collaborators may be key partners in the implementation of Conservation Measures for Boreal Caribou, but they are not signatories of this Agreement, therefore they are under no obligation to carry out the roles outlined in this Appendix.

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